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Energy wireless energy transmission  nikola would smile | Upload General

Wireless Energy Transmission: Nikola Would Smile

by: Sharai Hoekema
wireless energy transmission  nikola would smile | Upload

New Zealand is home to many incredible things. Rugby. Haka, Kiwifruit. Lord of the Rings. And EMROD. This start-up has risen to fame with a first in the world, a long-range, high-power, wireless power transmission - meant to replace existing copper line technology. 

Electromagnetic Waves Transmitting Energy

Founded by tech entrepreneur Greg Kushnir, it is the brainchild of a man who envisioned a technology that would reduce power distribution costs, avoid outages, and be capable of supporting renewable energy.

The technology they designed is based on electromagnetic waves, which wirelessly transmit energy. This can be done over great distances and is both safe and highly efficient. The Kiwi government was so impressed with the concept that they funded its development, which was done in a warehouse in Auckland, as a shared effort with Callaghan Innovation.

Truck, Wireless Energy Transmission
Photo by EMROD. EMROD Truck for wireless power transmission.

Since its launch, critical reception has been nothing short of phenomenal. The EMROD technology was nominated for the Royal Society Award and was presented a contract by the country’s second largest electricity distribution company, Powerco. This company intents to be the first one to test the technology. 

Recommended: Exclusive: World’s Biggest Battery Is A CO2 Killer

Green Appeal: Renewable Energy Transmission

The green appeal of the company is one of its main advantages. Kushnir says: “We have an abundance of clean hydro, solar, and wind energy available around the world but there are costly challenges that come with delivering that energy using traditional methods, for example, offshore wind farms or the Cook Strait here in New Zealand requiring underwater cables which are expensive to install and maintain. 

He seized the opportunity he saw and came up with a solution for moving clean energy from where it was available abundantly to where it was needed most. “Energy generation and storage methods have progressed tremendously over the last century, but energy transmission has remained virtually unchanged since Edison, Siemens, and Westinghouse first introduced electric networks based on copper wires 150 years ago. Everyone seems to be fixated on the notion that energy comes to consumers as electricity over copper wires, and I knew there had to be a better way.”

Recommended: Solar Floating Energy: A Smart Blue Innovation

Delivering Energy To Remote Places

He teamed up with the famous scientist Dr. Ray Simpkin of Callaghan Innovation to test his concept. Together, the two companies managed to find a way of transmitting energy wirelessly over great distances at a low cost. This would be ideal for, for instance, remote villages - that the ‘traditional’ energy transmission companies have deemed unfeasible for connection as the costs for wiring are too high. This would especially apply to areas in Africa and the Pacific Islands. Villages could be connected to receive cheap and sustainable energy for their schools, hospitals, governments, and businesses. 

Pole, men, road
Photo by EMROD. Pole with an EMROD power transmission plate.

Electricity distributors have expressed their interest, with the Powerco mentioned above now about to invest in a proof of concept. According to their Network Transformation Manager Nicolas Vessiot, “We're interested to see whether Emrod's technology can complement the conventional ways we deliver power. We envisage using this to deliver electricity in remote places, or across areas with challenging terrain. There's also potential to use it to keep the lights on for our customers when we're doing maintenance on our existing infrastructure.”

Recommended: Blue Floating Energy: Wind, Solar, Hydrogen, Waves

Prototyping In Progress

This prototype is expected by October. After October, two to three months will be spent on training Powerco personnel and extensive testing. This means that by early 2021, the project will begin its field trials. For this prototype, safety was the keyword. They are using a non-ionizing Industrial, Scientific and Medical frequency (ISM) band to transmit the energy. "We have chosen this widely used and well-regulated frequency because there's a long history of using it safely around humans and its scientifically proven safety guidelines, which are accepted internationally,” according to Kushnir. 

While this trial is only capable of transmitting a few kilowatts of energy, there is plenty of room to scale up if proven successful. It could be the long-awaited dream for those eager to connect their remote village’s infrastructure.

Before you go!

Recommended: How Inexhaustible Is Earth’s Geothermal Energy

Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below.
We try to respond the same day.

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Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected], and we will write an interesting article based on your input.

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Wireless Energy Transmission: Nikola Would Smile

New Zealand is home to many incredible things. Rugby. Haka, Kiwifruit. Lord of the Rings. And EMROD. This start-up has risen to fame with a first in the world, a long-range, high-power, wireless power transmission - meant to replace existing copper line technology.  Electromagnetic Waves Transmitting Energy Founded by tech entrepreneur Greg Kushnir, it is the brainchild of a man who envisioned a technology that would reduce power distribution costs, avoid outages, and be capable of supporting renewable energy. The technology they designed is based on electromagnetic waves, which wirelessly transmit energy. This can be done over great distances and is both safe and highly efficient. The Kiwi government was so impressed with the concept that they funded its development, which was done in a warehouse in Auckland, as a shared effort with Callaghan Innovation. Photo by EMROD. EMROD Truck for wireless power transmission. Since its launch, critical reception has been nothing short of phenomenal. The EMROD technology was nominated for the Royal Society Award and was presented a contract by the country’s second largest electricity distribution company, Powerco. This company intents to be the first one to test the technology.   Recommended:  Exclusive: World’s Biggest Battery Is A CO2 Killer Green Appeal: Renewable Energy Transmission The green appeal of the company is one of its main advantages. Kushnir says: “ We have an abundance of clean hydro, solar, and wind energy available around the world but there are costly challenges that come with delivering that energy using traditional methods, for example, offshore wind farms or the Cook Strait here in New Zealand requiring underwater cables which are expensive to install and maintain. ”   He seized the opportunity he saw and came up with a solution for moving clean energy from where it was available abundantly to where it was needed most. “ Energy generation and storage methods have progressed tremendously over the last century, but energy transmission has remained virtually unchanged since Edison, Siemens, and Westinghouse first introduced electric networks based on copper wires 150 years ago. Everyone seems to be fixated on the notion that energy comes to consumers as electricity over copper wires, and I knew there had to be a better way .” Recommended:  Solar Floating Energy: A Smart Blue Innovation Delivering Energy To Remote Places He teamed up with the famous scientist Dr. Ray Simpkin of Callaghan Innovation to test his concept. Together, the two companies managed to find a way of transmitting energy wirelessly over great distances at a low cost. This would be ideal for, for instance, remote villages - that the ‘traditional’ energy transmission companies have deemed unfeasible for connection as the costs for wiring are too high. This would especially apply to areas in Africa and the Pacific Islands. Villages could be connected to receive cheap and sustainable energy for their schools, hospitals, governments, and businesses.   Photo by EMROD. Pole with an EMROD power transmission plate. Electricity distributors have expressed their interest, with the Powerco mentioned above now about to invest in a proof of concept. According to their Network Transformation Manager Nicolas Vessiot, “ We're interested to see whether Emrod's technology can complement the conventional ways we deliver power. We envisage using this to deliver electricity in remote places, or across areas with challenging terrain. There's also potential to use it to keep the lights on for our customers when we're doing maintenance on our existing infrastructure .” Recommended:  Blue Floating Energy: Wind, Solar, Hydrogen, Waves Prototyping In Progress This prototype is expected by October. After October, two to three months will be spent on training Powerco personnel and extensive testing. This means that by early 2021, the project will begin its field trials. For this prototype, safety was the keyword. They are using a non-ionizing Industrial, Scientific and Medical frequency (ISM) band to transmit the energy. " We have chosen this widely used and well-regulated frequency because there's a long history of using it safely around humans and its scientifically proven safety guidelines, which are accepted internationally ,” according to Kushnir.   While this trial is only capable of transmitting a few kilowatts of energy, there is plenty of room to scale up if proven successful. It could be the long-awaited dream for those eager to connect their remote village’s infrastructure. Before you go! Recommended:  How Inexhaustible Is Earth’s Geothermal Energy Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about energy transmission? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
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