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Energy co2 storage  everything you need to know | Upload General

CO2 Storage: Everything You Need To Know

by: Joris Zuid
co2 storage  everything you need to know | Upload

Oil nation Norway plans to help fight climate change by capturing and storing Europe’s carbon emissions. CO2 storage: everything you need to know, is a great story about the pros and cons of  CO2 storage in a 'industrial' and natural way.

CO2 Storage By The Northern Lights Project

Graph see bed layers, CO2 Storage: Everything You Need To Know

Schematic of the subsurface going from south to north through the 31/5-7 (Eos) CO2 confirmation well. The CO2 plume extent after 37.5 Mt injection is illustrated in magenta.

The ‘Northern Lights’ project will store captured CO2 emissions in the North Sea. But this procedure is not without risks. The world is facing a climate catastrophe, and despite rapid growth in renewable energy production, some industries continue to emit vast amounts of CO2 during production processes.


                                                     Norway and CO2 emissions | DW Documentary

CO2 Producing Industries

Two of these industries are cement and steel, both crucial for the economy. A solution is needed, and Norway believes part of the answer for Europe is carbon capture and storage (CCS). The country has called its CCS project ‘Northern Lights.’ The plan is to capture CO2 emitted from industrial sites, liquefy it, and then transport the liquefied gas via pipelines to be stored in the North Sea, approximately 3000 meters below sea level.

Project director Sverre Overå, graph CO2 storage
Project director Sverre Overå

Climate Change And CO2

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has said that the only way to limit the global rise in temperature to a maximum of two degrees is to capture and store many billions of tonnes of greenhouse gases. But in Germany people have protested against the use of carbon capture and storage. The technology has been fraught with problems in the past. And there are other, more natural alternatives.

Peat, trees, plants

Peatland use. Peat from Middle European mires was used since the Bronze Age as fuel. Due to scarcity of wood, the intense use of peat started in the 18th century in Germany. Especially in the north of Germany peat was won, also for agricultural use for soil improvement and as litter. In the end of the 19th century complex ditch systems were established to drain the land. As a result more agricultural area was available.

After the Second World War every piece of land was used, which included grassland and field use on peatlands. The most extensive drainage measures and thus most complex degradation of peatlands were carried out in the 1960s (Hydromelioration), whereby huge amounts of nutrients and climate effective gases were set free.

CO2 Storage The Natural Way

One option could be to restore moorlands and bogs. When wet, these store carbon that has been sucked from the air by plants. But many bogs have been drained for farming, and as drained moorlands dry, CO2 is produced, meaning they have become a source of pollution rather than carbon storage. Reversing this and returning them to their carbon storing potential could be relatively inexpensive, as well as being a more natural way of reducing greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. 

Credits:

DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.

Before you go!

Recommended: Algae Canopy Miracle Works Better Than A Forrest: How?

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I'm especially interested in new Hydrogen techniques. I'm convinced that - in the near future - Hydrogen will surpass the development of solar or wind as alternative energy source. Safety concerns will find a solution and Hydrogen will be applied massively in all forms of transportation. 

I'm especially interested in new Hydrogen techniques. I'm convinced that - in the near future - Hydrogen will surpass the development of solar or wind as alternative energy source. Safety concerns will find a solution and Hydrogen will be applied massively in all forms of transportation. 

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CO2 Storage: Everything You Need To Know

Oil nation Norway plans to help fight climate change by capturing and storing Europe’s carbon emissions. CO2 storage: everything you need to know, is a great story about the pros and cons of  CO2 storage in a 'industrial' and natural way. CO2 Storage By The Northern Lights Project Schematic of the subsurface going from south to north through the 31/5-7 (Eos) CO2 confirmation well. The CO2 plume extent after 37.5 Mt injection is illustrated in magenta. The ‘Northern Lights’ project will store captured CO2 emissions in the North Sea. But this procedure is not without risks. The world is facing a climate catastrophe, and despite rapid growth in renewable energy production, some industries continue to emit vast amounts of CO2 during production processes. {youtube}                                                      Norway and CO2 emissions | DW Documentary CO2 Producing Industries Two of these industries are cement and steel, both crucial for the economy. A solution is needed, and Norway believes part of the answer for Europe is carbon capture and storage (CCS). The country has called its CCS project ‘Northern Lights.’ The plan is to capture CO2 emitted from industrial sites, liquefy it, and then transport the liquefied gas via pipelines to be stored in the North Sea, approximately 3000 meters below sea level. Project director Sverre Overå Climate Change And CO2 The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has said that the only way to limit the global rise in temperature to a maximum of two degrees is to capture and store many billions of tonnes of greenhouse gases. But in Germany people have protested against the use of carbon capture and storage. The technology has been fraught with problems in the past. And there are other, more natural alternatives. Peatland use. Peat from Middle European mires was used since the Bronze Age as fuel. Due to scarcity of wood, the intense use of peat started in the 18 th  century in Germany. Especially in the north of Germany peat was won, also for agricultural use for soil improvement and as litter. In the end of the 19 th  century complex ditch systems were established to drain the land. As a result more agricultural area was available. After the Second World War every piece of land was used, which included grassland and field use on peatlands. The most extensive drainage measures and thus most complex degradation of peatlands were carried out in the 1960s (Hydromelioration), whereby huge amounts of nutrients and climate effective gases were set free. CO2 Storage The Natural Way One option could be to restore moorlands and bogs. When wet, these store carbon that has been sucked from the air by plants. But many bogs have been drained for farming, and as drained moorlands dry, CO2 is produced, meaning they have become a source of pollution rather than carbon storage. Reversing this and returning them to their carbon storing potential could be relatively inexpensive, as well as being a more natural way of reducing greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.  Credits: DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Before you go! Recommended:  Algae Canopy Miracle Works Better Than A Forrest: How? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about roof gardens? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
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