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Carbon-negative fuel set: burning the world to a better place
A new fuel, made entirely out of elephant grass, recently made headlines after announcing to have developed a potentially major breakthrough solution in combatting climate change. The company is NextFuel, and their home base is Austria - and their fabrication process includes dried elephant grass that is fed into a sealed rotary drum.   It was officially presented at the COP24 climate summit in Poland, aiming to help countries in their   attempt to decarbonise their heavily polluting industries, including the transportation and heat sectors. How is NextFuel made? NextFuel, as the product is called as well, is made by dried elephant grass that is put in a sealed rotary drum. At this stage, all oxygen is removed and the material will be divided into fuel and waste. This only takes some thirty minutes. All waste (mainly gasses) is re-used in the manufacturing plant for the generation of heat of power locally. After that, the fuel part is densified and pressed into briquettes. Next, they will be moved to a cooler. At that stage they are ready to be sold and used in the production of heat or electricity. NextFuel says that these briquettes are perfectly suitable for use in a coal plant, even without having to significantly alter the processes or machines used.   What are the benefits of NextFuel? The main difference? This form of fuel is nowhere near as polluting as the ones that are typically used in coal plants. Or as NextFuel’s chief executive, mr Stefano Romano, proudly claimed: “ For the first time in the history of mankind, we have the ability to produce a cheap and clean copy of fossil fuel.” In an interesting example, NextFuel has calculated that if a cement factory runs on coal-fired power and heat, having this replaced by their alternative fuel will lead to a massive reduction in their annual carbon footprint of 105%. And no, this is not a typo and we do know how percentages work - it will actually render the process carbon negative. Romano explained the workings of this: “ Elephant grass needs a lot of CO2 to grow, and also stores some of this in its roots below ground. In that way, it captures so much carbon from the atmosphere that it can make our entire process carbon-negative in a matter of months. ” The importance of cleaner fuels Stern warnings that we will not hit the targets as set in the  Paris climate agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals have already been given. A large portion of this shortfall can be attributed to the lack of progress made in these highly pollution transportation and heat sectors. This requires quick action on the side of companies active in these industries.   Thankfully, quite a few of them have taken up the challenge. Take British Airways, proponent of the widely polluting aviation industry. They came up with the Future of Fuels challenge, that offers a £25,000 prize to those who come up with an innovative, low-carbon jet fuel; that is capable of powering a long-haul commercial flight for up to 300 customers, while generating no or negative emissions. BA is also working together with the renewable fuel startup Velocys, with the ultimate goal of finding a jet fuel that can be made from household waste , killing two birds with one stone: recycling effectively and cutting back on emissions. Their competitor Virgin Atlantic is working on similar initiatives, including one that fuels jets with recycled industrial waste gases. It is a low-carbon alternative, co-developed by the innovative firm LanzaTech, that has the capacity to partially power a commercial flight from London to Orlando, Florida. In doing so, it cuts back 70% of its emissions when compared to regular jet fuel. Where will it lead? The signs are promising, with various large polluters clearly taking their responsibility and doing their part in creating a fuel that will reduce, if not completely remove, their carbon footprint. As for NextFuel, they are facing a bright - and clean - future as well: production of their innovative clean fuel has been scaled up, following funds received from the European Union.   After that, NextFuel is hoping to power its first two large-scale projects at the end of next year - a cement plant in Africa, and a manufacturing facility in South America. If those implementations are successful, expectations are that a large number of facilities and producers will move to these kind of fuels. Not only will it help them meet the stringent targets set, it will also clean up their production in a significant manner. Reason enough to give the elephant grass a try. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
A new fuel, made entirely out of elephant grass, recently made headlines after announcing to have developed a potentially major breakthrough solution in combatting climate change. The company is NextFuel, and their home base is Austria - and their fabrication process includes dried elephant grass that is fed into a sealed rotary drum.   It was officially presented at the COP24 climate summit in Poland, aiming to help countries in their   attempt to decarbonise their heavily polluting industries, including the transportation and heat sectors. How is NextFuel made? NextFuel, as the product is called as well, is made by dried elephant grass that is put in a sealed rotary drum. At this stage, all oxygen is removed and the material will be divided into fuel and waste. This only takes some thirty minutes. All waste (mainly gasses) is re-used in the manufacturing plant for the generation of heat of power locally. After that, the fuel part is densified and pressed into briquettes. Next, they will be moved to a cooler. At that stage they are ready to be sold and used in the production of heat or electricity. NextFuel says that these briquettes are perfectly suitable for use in a coal plant, even without having to significantly alter the processes or machines used.   What are the benefits of NextFuel? The main difference? This form of fuel is nowhere near as polluting as the ones that are typically used in coal plants. Or as NextFuel’s chief executive, mr Stefano Romano, proudly claimed: “ For the first time in the history of mankind, we have the ability to produce a cheap and clean copy of fossil fuel.” In an interesting example, NextFuel has calculated that if a cement factory runs on coal-fired power and heat, having this replaced by their alternative fuel will lead to a massive reduction in their annual carbon footprint of 105%. And no, this is not a typo and we do know how percentages work - it will actually render the process carbon negative. Romano explained the workings of this: “ Elephant grass needs a lot of CO2 to grow, and also stores some of this in its roots below ground. In that way, it captures so much carbon from the atmosphere that it can make our entire process carbon-negative in a matter of months. ” The importance of cleaner fuels Stern warnings that we will not hit the targets as set in the  Paris climate agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals have already been given. A large portion of this shortfall can be attributed to the lack of progress made in these highly pollution transportation and heat sectors. This requires quick action on the side of companies active in these industries.   Thankfully, quite a few of them have taken up the challenge. Take British Airways, proponent of the widely polluting aviation industry. They came up with the Future of Fuels challenge, that offers a £25,000 prize to those who come up with an innovative, low-carbon jet fuel; that is capable of powering a long-haul commercial flight for up to 300 customers, while generating no or negative emissions. BA is also working together with the renewable fuel startup Velocys, with the ultimate goal of finding a jet fuel that can be made from household waste , killing two birds with one stone: recycling effectively and cutting back on emissions. Their competitor Virgin Atlantic is working on similar initiatives, including one that fuels jets with recycled industrial waste gases. It is a low-carbon alternative, co-developed by the innovative firm LanzaTech, that has the capacity to partially power a commercial flight from London to Orlando, Florida. In doing so, it cuts back 70% of its emissions when compared to regular jet fuel. Where will it lead? The signs are promising, with various large polluters clearly taking their responsibility and doing their part in creating a fuel that will reduce, if not completely remove, their carbon footprint. As for NextFuel, they are facing a bright - and clean - future as well: production of their innovative clean fuel has been scaled up, following funds received from the European Union.   After that, NextFuel is hoping to power its first two large-scale projects at the end of next year - a cement plant in Africa, and a manufacturing facility in South America. If those implementations are successful, expectations are that a large number of facilities and producers will move to these kind of fuels. Not only will it help them meet the stringent targets set, it will also clean up their production in a significant manner. Reason enough to give the elephant grass a try. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
Carbon-negative fuel set: burning the world to a better place
Carbon-negative fuel set: burning the world to a better place
Go with the wind: patent pending for small spherical wind turbine
Recently, I came across an article that discussed a new patent that is pending for the so-called O-Wind concept. This is explained by its developers as being a omnidirectional wind turbine. Say what? Yes, that is right - a wind turbine that can catch winds coming in from all directions and will no longer depend on the good graces of Mother Nature or expensive and time-consuming ways of letting the turbine face the right direction.   The O-Wind turbine was developed as part of the challenge set by the organisation behind the James Dyson Award. This annual award, bringing along a monetary prize of € 35,000, seeks to encourage young inventors and developers to come up with solutions that might make the world a better place.   The futuristic O-Wind turbine captures wind from all directions This year, British entrepreneurs Nicolas Orellana and Yaseen Noorani saw themselves victorious on the award night with their concept for a spherical, small  wind turbine that is able to capture wind, no matter what direction it is coming from. It is futuristic, slick, unconventional and only measures a incredible 25 cm in diameter. Through geometric ports, it takes in wind; that it subsequently converts to energy that can directly be used in the surrounding area. Photo by:  James Dyson Award The applications for this invention seem endless and very promising: it is small and functional enough to serve crowded, urban areas, while it makes optimal use of the often unpredictable wind in those large cities. When attached to someone’s balcony, it might just serve to deliver at least a significant portion of that household’s needs - or feed the energy needs of the larger community. As explained by inventor Orellana: “We hope that O-Wind Turbine will improve the usability and affordability of turbines for people across the world. Cities are windy places but we are currently not harnessing this resource. Our belief is that making it easier to generate green energy, people will be encouraged to play a bigger own role in conserving our planet.” Combining science and great engineering The basic idea of the O-Wind is pretty nifty. For its mechanical motion, it effectively employs Bernoulli’s principle, where the sphere-shaped turbine relies on differences in air pressure to generate its momentum. It has a large number of vents that the wind could run through, using three dimensions. These vents are placed all across the sphere, allowing it to function no matter what direction the wind is coming from.   And once the wind reaches the turbine, it will enter through larger entrances and use smaller exits. When it is windy, the pressure difference between those two terminals will lead to movement in the form of rotation. The movement, in turn, will be used to feed a generator. This produces electricity that can be used locally or fed back to the regional or national grid, to be used at a time of shortage. For this, the owners of the turbines will receive a financial reward - another incentive for installing such a nifty turbine, while increasing the share of sustainable energy. Its functionality makes it particularly suitable for, for instance, apartment buildings in urban areas, where winds can be erratic due to tall architectural buildings throwing it in chaos. The small size, probably best compared to a balloon or Chinese lantern, requires very little maintenance, while very little space is required for its installation. Another plus for urban use. It could quite literally be perched on top of anyone’s roof or the side of a building. Next steps in  wind energy Innovations such as the O-Wind can bring urban energy harvesting to the next level. While Orellana and Noorani are currently developing and prototyping their spherical turbine and lining up investors, there are multiple other start-ups working hard to bring new, feasible alternatives to the market as well. A fascinating initiative would be that of Maya Power, a fellow British company, that uses the wind in the tunnels of the London Underground to generate energy, using a flexible fabric. Or the smart wind turbine of Italian-based start-up Enessere, that learns from the wind patterns to optimise the power generated. Wind energy is something that most people will find themselves drawn to, yet not many will applaud the idea of having a huge turbine in their backyard. This is why these smaller initiatives should be encouraged and cheered on: they are looking into ways of making wind energy accessible for all, whether it is from the use of tiny wind turbines, the O-Wind’s spherical turbines or other creative ways of harnessing the power of the wind. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
Recently, I came across an article that discussed a new patent that is pending for the so-called O-Wind concept. This is explained by its developers as being a omnidirectional wind turbine. Say what? Yes, that is right - a wind turbine that can catch winds coming in from all directions and will no longer depend on the good graces of Mother Nature or expensive and time-consuming ways of letting the turbine face the right direction.   The O-Wind turbine was developed as part of the challenge set by the organisation behind the James Dyson Award. This annual award, bringing along a monetary prize of € 35,000, seeks to encourage young inventors and developers to come up with solutions that might make the world a better place.   The futuristic O-Wind turbine captures wind from all directions This year, British entrepreneurs Nicolas Orellana and Yaseen Noorani saw themselves victorious on the award night with their concept for a spherical, small  wind turbine that is able to capture wind, no matter what direction it is coming from. It is futuristic, slick, unconventional and only measures a incredible 25 cm in diameter. Through geometric ports, it takes in wind; that it subsequently converts to energy that can directly be used in the surrounding area. Photo by:  James Dyson Award The applications for this invention seem endless and very promising: it is small and functional enough to serve crowded, urban areas, while it makes optimal use of the often unpredictable wind in those large cities. When attached to someone’s balcony, it might just serve to deliver at least a significant portion of that household’s needs - or feed the energy needs of the larger community. As explained by inventor Orellana: “We hope that O-Wind Turbine will improve the usability and affordability of turbines for people across the world. Cities are windy places but we are currently not harnessing this resource. Our belief is that making it easier to generate green energy, people will be encouraged to play a bigger own role in conserving our planet.” Combining science and great engineering The basic idea of the O-Wind is pretty nifty. For its mechanical motion, it effectively employs Bernoulli’s principle, where the sphere-shaped turbine relies on differences in air pressure to generate its momentum. It has a large number of vents that the wind could run through, using three dimensions. These vents are placed all across the sphere, allowing it to function no matter what direction the wind is coming from.   And once the wind reaches the turbine, it will enter through larger entrances and use smaller exits. When it is windy, the pressure difference between those two terminals will lead to movement in the form of rotation. The movement, in turn, will be used to feed a generator. This produces electricity that can be used locally or fed back to the regional or national grid, to be used at a time of shortage. For this, the owners of the turbines will receive a financial reward - another incentive for installing such a nifty turbine, while increasing the share of sustainable energy. Its functionality makes it particularly suitable for, for instance, apartment buildings in urban areas, where winds can be erratic due to tall architectural buildings throwing it in chaos. The small size, probably best compared to a balloon or Chinese lantern, requires very little maintenance, while very little space is required for its installation. Another plus for urban use. It could quite literally be perched on top of anyone’s roof or the side of a building. Next steps in  wind energy Innovations such as the O-Wind can bring urban energy harvesting to the next level. While Orellana and Noorani are currently developing and prototyping their spherical turbine and lining up investors, there are multiple other start-ups working hard to bring new, feasible alternatives to the market as well. A fascinating initiative would be that of Maya Power, a fellow British company, that uses the wind in the tunnels of the London Underground to generate energy, using a flexible fabric. Or the smart wind turbine of Italian-based start-up Enessere, that learns from the wind patterns to optimise the power generated. Wind energy is something that most people will find themselves drawn to, yet not many will applaud the idea of having a huge turbine in their backyard. This is why these smaller initiatives should be encouraged and cheered on: they are looking into ways of making wind energy accessible for all, whether it is from the use of tiny wind turbines, the O-Wind’s spherical turbines or other creative ways of harnessing the power of the wind. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
Go with the wind: patent pending for small spherical wind turbine
Go with the wind: patent pending for small spherical wind turbine
Nuclear power: will it destroy or save the world?
The cold hard facts One billion people go to sleep every night without access to electricity. Two and a half billion people do not have access to clean cooking fuels or heating fuels to take care of their families. These statistics, highlighted in a TED-talk by energy scholar Joe Lassiter, are absolutely staggering. It is shocking to realise for us, in the western world, that there are many in developing countries living without things that we would consider a basic need. Just imagine telling your teenage son that there will be no more television at night. Or your 14-year-old daughter that there’ll be no more internet at home. Yet the issue of expanding the power grids and guaranteeing access to electricity or fuels is a double-edged sword that cuts much deeper than the simple logistics of increasing coverage. As it stands, the world is already pushing the envelope of what we can actually generate. The exploitation of fossil fuels and scarce resources have brought us to the edge of a deadly cliff. We are waging a war with Mother Nature that we are bound to lose - if the increasing volume and severity of natural disasters is anything to go by. Building  nuclear reactors There are solutions. One of the most frequently mentioned - and definitely most debated - being the construction of new nuclear reactors. Wait, hold on. The same nuclear reactors that we are working so hard to get rid of? That we, ever since disasters in Chernobyl and Fukushima, have vowed to replace by safer and greener alternatives? Yes. Those. In order to understand this movement, some key elements have to be understood. First of all, modern reactors are much safer than their notorious counterparts. At the same time, they are cleaner than most of the alternatives involving coal or other fossil fuels while generating much more energy at a lower cost. Their major downside is its negative image, fuelled by fears for nuclear mishaps leaving large areas uninhabitable. Nuclear reactors around the world Some of the world’s largest nations still heavily depend on nuclear power for their electricity needs, including the United States, France, Russia and Spain. Growth economies are in the process of constructing a large number of new plants, including in the Middle East, India, China and Pakistan. The sheer number of people living in those countries that require energy, plus the promises made in the Paris treaty towards fighting global warming and drastically reducing harmful emissions, have swayed their political leaders to be in favour of those nuclear giants. But who can blame them? They are doing what is best for their people. As the billions of people that previously lived in poverty move towards a more prosperous life, this inevitably includes access to gas, to electricity, to resources. We are struggling to live up to the demand as it is today, let alone what would happen if all 7,7 billion of us would want to turn on the light at the same time. Break the nuclear taboo Just as we are unwilling to let go of our newfound luxuries that run on  electricity or other scarce resources, so will those billions who are just now being introduced to it. Demand will double, triple, you name it - while we are fussing about sustainable ways of meeting it. And the best part? We will only start using more energy as we get access to more. Increased supply will drive up demand. It is a cycle that we cannot break free from. Nor will it be realistic to assume that it can fully be met through renewable sources like solar, wind and water energy. Coming back to the issue of nuclear power. It is understandable that many, especially those who lived through the disasters in the past, are hesitant to embrace the idea of more nuclear power plants. Experts largely agree that they have become safer and more reliable, yet do not rule out the potential for disaster at this time. Not to mention the costs and time associated with their construction and maintenance and the headache of decommissioning. But it might just be time to put our heads together and break through the nuclear taboo. Coming together and finding ways of tackling those issues, working towards a safe and clean implementation of nuclear energy, might be our best shot at preserving our world while getting all of us the resources we need in this day and age. https://www.whatsorb.com/waste/finlands-solution-to-nuclear-waste-storage-may-set-an-example-for-the-world
The cold hard facts One billion people go to sleep every night without access to electricity. Two and a half billion people do not have access to clean cooking fuels or heating fuels to take care of their families. These statistics, highlighted in a TED-talk by energy scholar Joe Lassiter, are absolutely staggering. It is shocking to realise for us, in the western world, that there are many in developing countries living without things that we would consider a basic need. Just imagine telling your teenage son that there will be no more television at night. Or your 14-year-old daughter that there’ll be no more internet at home. Yet the issue of expanding the power grids and guaranteeing access to electricity or fuels is a double-edged sword that cuts much deeper than the simple logistics of increasing coverage. As it stands, the world is already pushing the envelope of what we can actually generate. The exploitation of fossil fuels and scarce resources have brought us to the edge of a deadly cliff. We are waging a war with Mother Nature that we are bound to lose - if the increasing volume and severity of natural disasters is anything to go by. Building  nuclear reactors There are solutions. One of the most frequently mentioned - and definitely most debated - being the construction of new nuclear reactors. Wait, hold on. The same nuclear reactors that we are working so hard to get rid of? That we, ever since disasters in Chernobyl and Fukushima, have vowed to replace by safer and greener alternatives? Yes. Those. In order to understand this movement, some key elements have to be understood. First of all, modern reactors are much safer than their notorious counterparts. At the same time, they are cleaner than most of the alternatives involving coal or other fossil fuels while generating much more energy at a lower cost. Their major downside is its negative image, fuelled by fears for nuclear mishaps leaving large areas uninhabitable. Nuclear reactors around the world Some of the world’s largest nations still heavily depend on nuclear power for their electricity needs, including the United States, France, Russia and Spain. Growth economies are in the process of constructing a large number of new plants, including in the Middle East, India, China and Pakistan. The sheer number of people living in those countries that require energy, plus the promises made in the Paris treaty towards fighting global warming and drastically reducing harmful emissions, have swayed their political leaders to be in favour of those nuclear giants. But who can blame them? They are doing what is best for their people. As the billions of people that previously lived in poverty move towards a more prosperous life, this inevitably includes access to gas, to electricity, to resources. We are struggling to live up to the demand as it is today, let alone what would happen if all 7,7 billion of us would want to turn on the light at the same time. Break the nuclear taboo Just as we are unwilling to let go of our newfound luxuries that run on  electricity or other scarce resources, so will those billions who are just now being introduced to it. Demand will double, triple, you name it - while we are fussing about sustainable ways of meeting it. And the best part? We will only start using more energy as we get access to more. Increased supply will drive up demand. It is a cycle that we cannot break free from. Nor will it be realistic to assume that it can fully be met through renewable sources like solar, wind and water energy. Coming back to the issue of nuclear power. It is understandable that many, especially those who lived through the disasters in the past, are hesitant to embrace the idea of more nuclear power plants. Experts largely agree that they have become safer and more reliable, yet do not rule out the potential for disaster at this time. Not to mention the costs and time associated with their construction and maintenance and the headache of decommissioning. But it might just be time to put our heads together and break through the nuclear taboo. Coming together and finding ways of tackling those issues, working towards a safe and clean implementation of nuclear energy, might be our best shot at preserving our world while getting all of us the resources we need in this day and age. https://www.whatsorb.com/waste/finlands-solution-to-nuclear-waste-storage-may-set-an-example-for-the-world
Nuclear power: will it destroy or save the world?
WOODEN WIND TURBINES: BROUGHT TO YOU BY EAZ-WIND
A ‘wooden mill’ will undoubtedly bring up associations of the age-old, traditional mills of the Dutch type. Fierce, imposing wooden structures towering over the surrounding landscapes. Quite often, the wind turbines that are so common today pale in comparison. They stand out, with their unnatural materials and shapes. That is, until EAZ developed their unique wooden wind turbines. This Netherlands-based company, originating from the rural area of Groningen, wanted to develop a wind turbine that could easily be set up in densely populated areas. Normally, some of these areas cannot afford an actual wind turbine. Not only are they too expensive, due to the expensive materials and the complicated process of installing and servicing it, they are also facing heavy resistance from the community.   Effectively, this makes it hard to make wind energy solutions available in areas that do not have the required funds or social support. The only options left are solar panels or water power, which are usually not sufficient for providing in the electricity needs of the immediate area either.   EAZ WIND TURBINES As the need for renewable energy grows, so does the need for solutions that actually fit in to the area. And while ‘traditional’ wind turbines often do not fit in, the unique versions created by EAZ manage to blend in seamlessly. The design for their wind turbines have been made simpler, and much more cost-effective. Production is all performed in-house, using local labour and materials. As such, it will not nearly be as expensive to get the wind turbines produced. These materials, sourced locally, include a number of sustainable components from natural sources - including the blades, which are made of larch wood and finished with fibreglass. The stabiliser is also made of wood, with an internal frame of steel for reinforcement.   MAINTENANCE AND INSTALLATION Not only are the materials largely sustainable, they are also chosen as they are relatively maintenance-free. For example, it also has a permanent magnet, a ring generator without gearbox, which means that there is no friction. The steel mast comes with a double coating, making it more durable. The installation is performed quickly and with a minimal impact for the environment. For the generation of energy, the wind turbine will be connected to the fuse box right behind the electricity meter, resulting in further savings on the purchase price of electricity as well as energy tax. SUPPORT OF LOCAL COMMUNITY In another clever move, EAZ wind turbines decided to take the development process to the local authorities and communities. With this, they guaranteed their support and made sure that the eventual design would fit in the landscape.   As the home turf of EAZ - the Dutch province of Groningen - is rapidly growing and expanding, as reflected by the improving economy, the region is becoming increasingly self-sustaining. More and more jobs are being created, putting pressure on local entrepreneurs to find ways of generating more energy in an efficient and sustainable manner. PLACEMENT OF WIND TURBINE One of their options is the purchase of one of these wind turbines, made easier because of the reduced cost price and lower impact on the environment. This way, it can be installed on a farm to provide in the energy needs. Secondly, people could opt for joining an initiative where they invest in a common wind turbine for the entire village. In this case, everyone in the area can directly benefit from the locally generated wind energy. Although these wind turbines might be better looking, it is still an infringement on the landscape. Therefore, EAZ has pledged to take great care in fitting it into the landscape. The already existing elements and lines are being taken into consideration, while the limited height ensures that it is less conspicuous. WHY DOES ANY OF IT MATTER? All well and good, but why would it matter what a wind turbine looks like? What does EAZ offer in an already crowded market that makes them stand out? Their continued success is a testament to the importance of keeping aesthetics and user demands in mind, so that wind turbines become more of a community product. The lower installation and maintenance costs, its adaptability to the landscape, and the decent yield: it adds up to a great proposition that is ready to scale up. After all, the truth of the matter is that the general opinion of wind turbines is still far from favourable. Perhaps unjustly so, but that does not make it any more urgent. EAZ should be commanded for their attempts to sway the public opinion through making wind turbines more accessible and friendly. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/energy/wind
A ‘wooden mill’ will undoubtedly bring up associations of the age-old, traditional mills of the Dutch type. Fierce, imposing wooden structures towering over the surrounding landscapes. Quite often, the wind turbines that are so common today pale in comparison. They stand out, with their unnatural materials and shapes. That is, until EAZ developed their unique wooden wind turbines. This Netherlands-based company, originating from the rural area of Groningen, wanted to develop a wind turbine that could easily be set up in densely populated areas. Normally, some of these areas cannot afford an actual wind turbine. Not only are they too expensive, due to the expensive materials and the complicated process of installing and servicing it, they are also facing heavy resistance from the community.   Effectively, this makes it hard to make wind energy solutions available in areas that do not have the required funds or social support. The only options left are solar panels or water power, which are usually not sufficient for providing in the electricity needs of the immediate area either.   EAZ WIND TURBINES As the need for renewable energy grows, so does the need for solutions that actually fit in to the area. And while ‘traditional’ wind turbines often do not fit in, the unique versions created by EAZ manage to blend in seamlessly. The design for their wind turbines have been made simpler, and much more cost-effective. Production is all performed in-house, using local labour and materials. As such, it will not nearly be as expensive to get the wind turbines produced. These materials, sourced locally, include a number of sustainable components from natural sources - including the blades, which are made of larch wood and finished with fibreglass. The stabiliser is also made of wood, with an internal frame of steel for reinforcement.   MAINTENANCE AND INSTALLATION Not only are the materials largely sustainable, they are also chosen as they are relatively maintenance-free. For example, it also has a permanent magnet, a ring generator without gearbox, which means that there is no friction. The steel mast comes with a double coating, making it more durable. The installation is performed quickly and with a minimal impact for the environment. For the generation of energy, the wind turbine will be connected to the fuse box right behind the electricity meter, resulting in further savings on the purchase price of electricity as well as energy tax. SUPPORT OF LOCAL COMMUNITY In another clever move, EAZ wind turbines decided to take the development process to the local authorities and communities. With this, they guaranteed their support and made sure that the eventual design would fit in the landscape.   As the home turf of EAZ - the Dutch province of Groningen - is rapidly growing and expanding, as reflected by the improving economy, the region is becoming increasingly self-sustaining. More and more jobs are being created, putting pressure on local entrepreneurs to find ways of generating more energy in an efficient and sustainable manner. PLACEMENT OF WIND TURBINE One of their options is the purchase of one of these wind turbines, made easier because of the reduced cost price and lower impact on the environment. This way, it can be installed on a farm to provide in the energy needs. Secondly, people could opt for joining an initiative where they invest in a common wind turbine for the entire village. In this case, everyone in the area can directly benefit from the locally generated wind energy. Although these wind turbines might be better looking, it is still an infringement on the landscape. Therefore, EAZ has pledged to take great care in fitting it into the landscape. The already existing elements and lines are being taken into consideration, while the limited height ensures that it is less conspicuous. WHY DOES ANY OF IT MATTER? All well and good, but why would it matter what a wind turbine looks like? What does EAZ offer in an already crowded market that makes them stand out? Their continued success is a testament to the importance of keeping aesthetics and user demands in mind, so that wind turbines become more of a community product. The lower installation and maintenance costs, its adaptability to the landscape, and the decent yield: it adds up to a great proposition that is ready to scale up. After all, the truth of the matter is that the general opinion of wind turbines is still far from favourable. Perhaps unjustly so, but that does not make it any more urgent. EAZ should be commanded for their attempts to sway the public opinion through making wind turbines more accessible and friendly. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/energy/wind
WOODEN WIND TURBINES: BROUGHT TO YOU BY EAZ-WIND
WOODEN WIND TURBINES: BROUGHT TO YOU BY EAZ-WIND
Solar and battery-based generator delivers electricity wherever you want
If you are looking to generate energy in a mobile or off-grid place, this most likely requires a petrol generator. These polluting generators are used pretty much on a daily basis by building companies, farmers, and festivals. And while it certainly does not help the environment, it is the only option, for now. Needless to say, they are far from environmentally friendly. It is mostly based on the decade-old car technology. Back then, there were no strict regulations regarding emissions. This allowed car manufacturers and other users of petrol generators to pollute freely. While they are decidedly not ‘green’, there is an added downside, as they are generally very noisy and user-unfriendly as well. This is not to mention the huge amount of fuel that it consumes. Now, Volta Energy has created an alternative! The Volta Naos is a solar and battery-based system that can power the same devices or machinery as used by builders, farmers, and festival organizers alike - all while not using any fuel. This makes the system more sustainable. On top of that, it is silent and more user-friendly. Oh, did we mention that it is also a lot cheaper to operate? The Volta Naos is a modular system. This means that it can be extended or reduced through clicking on an extra battery and solar module . The latter uses a sun tracking system to maximize yield, which is a great way of using renewable energy sources effectively. And no, this system is not massive and top-heavy either. Even better, it can be transported using a van or a trailer. Additionally, the system as a whole can be lifted by a person (in line with relevant ARBO legislation). All of this makes it the ideal successor of the old-fashioned generators. Volta Energy has just successfully finished its prototyping phase and is scaling up its production of Naos systems. The first customer, that effectively launched it, was a city in the direct vicinity of the company’s base. This summer, several systems were rented out to users who had previously only used petrol generators, which led to great and valuable feedback. For the next year, Volta Energy is looking to ‘green up’ as many festivals as possible. They aim to do so by matching the price of the system with the price of a petrol generator. As such, cost can no longer be the reason for not opting for the more sustainable solution. Currently, the rental website is under construction to fit it to this purpose, while more rental systems are set up and a renting corporation is put in place. All to be ready for what is to come! Interested in the company? Or are you interesting in renting the Volta Naos for the weekend? Find out more at www.volta-energy.com .  https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
If you are looking to generate energy in a mobile or off-grid place, this most likely requires a petrol generator. These polluting generators are used pretty much on a daily basis by building companies, farmers, and festivals. And while it certainly does not help the environment, it is the only option, for now. Needless to say, they are far from environmentally friendly. It is mostly based on the decade-old car technology. Back then, there were no strict regulations regarding emissions. This allowed car manufacturers and other users of petrol generators to pollute freely. While they are decidedly not ‘green’, there is an added downside, as they are generally very noisy and user-unfriendly as well. This is not to mention the huge amount of fuel that it consumes. Now, Volta Energy has created an alternative! The Volta Naos is a solar and battery-based system that can power the same devices or machinery as used by builders, farmers, and festival organizers alike - all while not using any fuel. This makes the system more sustainable. On top of that, it is silent and more user-friendly. Oh, did we mention that it is also a lot cheaper to operate? The Volta Naos is a modular system. This means that it can be extended or reduced through clicking on an extra battery and solar module . The latter uses a sun tracking system to maximize yield, which is a great way of using renewable energy sources effectively. And no, this system is not massive and top-heavy either. Even better, it can be transported using a van or a trailer. Additionally, the system as a whole can be lifted by a person (in line with relevant ARBO legislation). All of this makes it the ideal successor of the old-fashioned generators. Volta Energy has just successfully finished its prototyping phase and is scaling up its production of Naos systems. The first customer, that effectively launched it, was a city in the direct vicinity of the company’s base. This summer, several systems were rented out to users who had previously only used petrol generators, which led to great and valuable feedback. For the next year, Volta Energy is looking to ‘green up’ as many festivals as possible. They aim to do so by matching the price of the system with the price of a petrol generator. As such, cost can no longer be the reason for not opting for the more sustainable solution. Currently, the rental website is under construction to fit it to this purpose, while more rental systems are set up and a renting corporation is put in place. All to be ready for what is to come! Interested in the company? Or are you interesting in renting the Volta Naos for the weekend? Find out more at www.volta-energy.com .  https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
Solar and battery-based generator delivers electricity wherever you want
Solar and battery-based generator delivers electricity wherever you want
Energy

The demand for energy is great and will only grow further in the coming years. We have already learned how to harvest the power of sunlight, wind and tides, but there are many forms of sustainable energy yet to be explored. We will bring you up-to-date on the latest progress in the search of renewable energy and other sustainable energy sources.

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