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Community sustainability and tourism  the race continuous | Upload General

Sustainability And Tourism: The Race Continuous

by: Sharai Hoekema
sustainability and tourism  the race continuous | Upload

Although I was pretty convinced that my previous article on Zandvoort and her (lack of a) sustainability plan would be a stand-alone title, recent headlines forced me to revisit this assumption and get started on 'Part 2'. After all, the saga surrounding the Dutch beach town, her precious National Park, and the seemingly inconsistent Formula 1 race coming up next May continues to entertain and annoy in equal parts.

Sustainability And Tourism: Permission To Drive On Protected Beaches

When was the first race at Zandvoort?
There were plans for races at Zandvoort before World War II: the first street race was held on 3 June 1939. However, a permanent race track was not constructed until after the war, using communications roads built by the occupying German army.

Earlier this week, intense protests from local environmental groups could not prevent the passing of a rather dubious bill. The Formula 1 teams of Redbull and Alpha Tauri formally requested ‘special permission’ to drive on the protected beach. This area usually does not allow motorized vehicles of any kind, as to not disturb the nature and the wildlife. Yet it came as no surprise that the town agreed to permit the racing superstars to drive from their hotels in nearby Noordwijk to the Zandvoort racing track via the beach.

Recommended: Zandvoort: A Dutch Town Caught Between Sustainability And Tourism (Part 1)

sea-lion, beach
Photo by: 'Natuurmonumenten'

Yes, there is some fine print. This includes the stipulation that teams can only and only make use of this ‘emergency route’ if they find themselves unable to get to and from the racing track by road or through the air. Additionally, the convoy will be limited to ten cars, all of which have to be either hybrid or electric.

Recommended: UN Shows Human Devastating Impact On Nature: Worldwide

Sustainable Indecisiveness: In Zandvoort The Race Continuous 


                                                           F1 Circuit Zandvoort February 13th 2020

This example of an environmentally-conscious-yet-commercially-appealing strategy that the town has plenty of, once again underlines how Zandvoort has well and indeed found itself between a rock and a hard place. Yes, we will allow an ostentatious parade of F1 superstars driving through a piece of treasured and protected nature - yet we will make ourselves feel better by underlining how this can only be done in a semi-green vehicle. And not too many of them, please.

Who designed the race track in Zandvoort?
Contrary to popular belief John Hugenholtz cannot be credited with the design of the Zandvoort track, although he was involved as the chairman of the Nederlandse Automobiel Ren Club (Dutch Auto Racing Club) before becoming the first track director in 1949. Instead, it was 1927 Le Mans winner, S. C. H. ‘Sammy’ Davis who was brought in as a track design advisor in July 1946 although the layout was partly dictated by the existing roads.

Race-car, beach, chairs
Photo by: Red Bull. Sustainability And Tourism: In Zandvoort The Race Continuous

It is yet another controversy surrounding the race track that just finished a half-year long renovation, to get it ready for its comeback on the world’s premier racing stage. An effort that generated equal amounts of criticism for its lack of nature awareness, with - ironically enough - various environmental groups still tied up in court with the government to prevent something that has already been done. Bureaucracy has been Zandvoort’s best friend.

Recommended: China Will Lead Electric Car Revolution: FIA E-Grand Prix

Sustainability And Tourism: Actions By Environmental Groups Only Diminish The Goal

Whether these protests were about the deer, the sand lizards, or the noise that was sure to bother those living around it, all and any negative angles have been highlighted - to the point that the media at large generally lost their interest in the nay-sayers and grouped them all as ‘whiners.’ A shame, as it unfairly throws all environmental concerns on one colossal pile and largely dismisses it as irrelevant. Some environmental groups, however, really do have a point. These now find their credibility blocked by voices standing up for something that is just as ridiculous as it is unnecessary.

When did the first race took place?
The first race on the circuit, the Prijs van Zandvoort, took place on 7 August 1948. The race was renamed the Grote Prijs van Zandvoort (Zandvoort Grand Prix) in 1949, then the Grote Prijs van Nederland (Dutch Grand Prix) in 1950. 

People protesting
Photo by: Toussaint Kluiters

No wonder that the city has decided to push through its agenda. And while this schedule is claimed to be reasonably green and sustainable, as I highlighted in my previous article on the policy drama’s in this small coastal town, it is undoubtedly a conflicted whole. The paradox of ‘green’ cars being allowed to drive through protected beach areas is just the tip of the iceberg. And unfortunately, most of the other problems are hidden from sight as well.

When was confirmed by Zandvoort tto host the Dutch Grand Prix in 2020?
In November 2018 media brought the news that the Formula One racing organisation has invited the owners of the Zandvoort race track to make a concrete proposal to stage a Grand Prix race in 2020. On 14 May 2019 it was confirmed that Zandvoort would host the Dutch Grand Prix for 2020 and beyond for a duration of at least three years, with the option to host another two in the future. 

Going Green Is Not A Propaganda Tool Or Feel-Good Strategy

The race track’s commitment to becoming the ‘greenest Formula 1 race’ is still largely shrouded in secrecy. Merely shouting that your city - or for that matter, your race track - is going to be all sustainable, and green is not going to do the job for you. 

Recommended: Electric Cars Are Low On CO2: Gas Is The Best. Forget SUVs

Going green is not something that can be used as a propaganda tool or ploy to make people feel better about their decidedly harmful or polluting actions. There should be a real effort to back it up with initiatives that will offset carbon footprint - as well as a continued effort to protect valuable ecosystems and wildlife.

Race Circuit, Nature
Photo by: ANP

And no, problems like these - ‘pretty on the outside, ugly on the inside’ - are not exclusive to Zandvoort. However, it has recently generated enough headlines to serve as a great personification of this problem as it relates to other cities, companies, and organizations as well. Sustainability should never be confused with marketing or PR, but should always be about doing the right thing - instead of doing ‘things right.’ It is not a list of boxes that can be ticked, as much as the person at Zandvoort’s city hall drafting up those fancy looking sustainability plans would like it to be. It is a real, valid effort to find more ways of being kind to the environment.

How much will Zandvoort pay for the upgrade
The Municipality of Zandvoort will pay four million Euros which will be used so the circuit itself can undergo various changes, such as slight alterations to the track, to bring it up to date with F1 standards, this is set to include banking the final corner and Hugenholtzbocht. The infrastructure around the circuit is set to be improved as well, most of the money will be used to improve the accessibility to the track. 

And if the best thing you can come up with is stipulating that the cars driving on the protected beaches should at least be hybrid, you better think again.

Before you go!

Recommended: Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope?

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Sustainability And Tourism: The Race Continuous

Although I was pretty convinced that my previous article on Zandvoort and her (lack of a) sustainability plan would be a stand-alone title, recent headlines forced me to revisit this assumption and get started on 'Part 2'. After all, the saga surrounding the Dutch beach town, her precious National Park, and the seemingly inconsistent Formula 1 race coming up next May continues to entertain and annoy in equal parts. Sustainability And Tourism: Permission To Drive On Protected Beaches When was the first race at Zandvoort? There were plans for races at Zandvoort before World War II: the first street race was held on 3 June 1939. However, a permanent race track was not constructed until after the war, using communications roads built by the occupying German army. Earlier this week, intense protests from local environmental groups could not prevent the passing of a rather dubious bill. The Formula 1 teams of Redbull and Alpha Tauri formally requested ‘special permission’ to drive on the protected beach. This area usually does not allow motorized vehicles of any kind, as to not disturb the nature and the wildlife. Yet it came as no surprise that the town agreed to permit the racing superstars to drive from their hotels in nearby Noordwijk to the Zandvoort racing track via the beach. Recommended:  Zandvoort: A Dutch Town Caught Between Sustainability And Tourism  (Part 1) Photo by: 'Natuurmonumenten' Yes, there is some fine print. This includes the stipulation that teams can only and only make use of this ‘emergency route’ if they find themselves unable to get to and from the racing track by road or through the air. Additionally, the convoy will be limited to ten cars, all of which have to be either hybrid or electric. Recommended:  UN Shows Human Devastating Impact On Nature: Worldwide Sustainable Indecisiveness: In Zandvoort The Race Continuous  {youtube}                                                            F1 Circuit Zandvoort February 13th 2020 This example of an environmentally-conscious-yet-commercially-appealing strategy that the town has plenty of, once again underlines how Zandvoort has well and indeed found itself between a rock and a hard place. Yes, we will allow an ostentatious parade of F1 superstars driving through a piece of treasured and protected nature - yet we will make ourselves feel better by underlining how this can only be done in a semi-green vehicle. And not too many of them, please. Who designed the race track in Zandvoort? Contrary to popular belief John Hugenholtz cannot be credited with the design of the Zandvoort track, although he was involved as the chairman of the Nederlandse Automobiel Ren Club (Dutch Auto Racing Club) before becoming the first track director in 1949. Instead, it was 1927 Le Mans winner, S. C. H. ‘Sammy’ Davis who was brought in as a track design advisor in July 1946 although the layout was partly dictated by the existing roads. Photo by: Red Bull. Sustainability And Tourism: In Zandvoort The Race Continuous It is yet another controversy surrounding the race track that just finished a half-year long renovation, to get it ready for its comeback on the world’s premier racing stage. An effort that generated equal amounts of criticism for its lack of nature awareness, with - ironically enough - various environmental groups still tied up in court with the government to prevent something that has already been done. Bureaucracy has been Zandvoort’s best friend. Recommended:  China Will Lead Electric Car Revolution: FIA E-Grand Prix Sustainability And Tourism: Actions By Environmental Groups Only Diminish The Goal Whether these protests were about the deer, the sand lizards, or the noise that was sure to bother those living around it, all and any negative angles have been highlighted - to the point that the media at large generally lost their interest in the nay-sayers and grouped them all as ‘whiners.’ A shame, as it unfairly throws all environmental concerns on one colossal pile and largely dismisses it as irrelevant. Some environmental groups, however, really do have a point. These now find their credibility blocked by voices standing up for something that is just as ridiculous as it is unnecessary. When did the first race took place? The first race on the circuit, the Prijs van Zandvoort, took place on 7 August 1948. The race was renamed the Grote Prijs van Zandvoort (Zandvoort Grand Prix) in 1949, then the Grote Prijs van Nederland (Dutch Grand Prix) in 1950.  Photo by: Toussaint Kluiters No wonder that the city has decided to push through its agenda. And while this schedule is claimed to be reasonably green and sustainable, as I highlighted in my previous article on the policy drama’s in this small coastal town, it is undoubtedly a conflicted whole. The paradox of ‘green’ cars being allowed to drive through protected beach areas is just the tip of the iceberg. And unfortunately, most of the other problems are hidden from sight as well. When was confirmed by Zandvoort tto host the Dutch Grand Prix in 2020? In November 2018 media brought the news that the Formula One racing organisation has invited the owners of the Zandvoort race track to make a concrete proposal to stage a Grand Prix race in 2020. On 14 May 2019 it was confirmed that Zandvoort would host the Dutch Grand Prix for 2020 and beyond for a duration of at least three years, with the option to host another two in the future.  Going Green Is Not A Propaganda Tool Or Feel-Good Strategy The race track’s commitment to becoming the ‘greenest Formula 1 race’ is still largely shrouded in secrecy. Merely shouting that your city - or for that matter, your race track - is going to be all sustainable, and green is not going to do the job for you.   Recommended:  Electric Cars Are Low On CO2: Gas Is The Best. Forget SUVs Going green is not something that can be used as a propaganda tool or ploy to make people feel better about their decidedly harmful or polluting actions. There should be a real effort to back it up with initiatives that will offset carbon footprint - as well as a continued effort to protect valuable ecosystems and wildlife. Photo by: ANP And no, problems like these - ‘pretty on the outside, ugly on the inside’ - are not exclusive to Zandvoort. However, it has recently generated enough headlines to serve as a great personification of this problem as it relates to other cities, companies, and organizations as well. Sustainability should never be confused with marketing or PR, but should always be about doing the right thing - instead of doing ‘things right.’ It is not a list of boxes that can be ticked, as much as the person at Zandvoort’s city hall drafting up those fancy looking sustainability plans would like it to be. It is a real, valid effort to find more ways of being kind to the environment. How much will Zandvoort pay for the upgrade The Municipality of Zandvoort will pay four million Euros which will be used so the circuit itself can undergo various changes, such as slight alterations to the track, to bring it up to date with F1 standards, this is set to include banking the final corner and Hugenholtzbocht. The infrastructure around the circuit is set to be improved as well, most of the money will be used to improve the accessibility to the track.  And if the best thing you can come up with is stipulating that the cars driving on the protected beaches should at least be hybrid, you better think again. Before you go! Recommended:  Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about the environment in your area? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations