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Community the best explanation ever about the coronavirus | Upload Society

The Best Explanation Ever About The Coronavirus

by: Joris Zuid
the best explanation ever about the coronavirus | Upload

Viruses are just like burglars. It would help if you warded them off at the front door. Doctor, epidemiologist, and professor emeritus Menno Jan Bouma dedicated his life to researching the ecology and spread of viruses and other pathogens. In our current times, where the Coronavirus runs rampant, he was all too eager to share his knowledge to make us understand the Coronavirus just a little bit better. We share some of his most useful insights. Read the best explanation ever about the coronavirus.

The Coronavirus Without A Host Is Nothing!

A virus is not a ‘living’ being like you and me. A virus is not ‘alive’ in any sense of the word. A virus is made up of genetic material (a DNA or RNA genome), surrounded by a protective, virus-coded protein coat (its membrane). Without a ‘host’ or ‘hostess,’ a virus is nothing. It is about as dead as a piece of plastic. It does not exhibit any signs of life.

But as soon as a virus has the luck of entering the cells of a host's body, it will start to behave like a bear that has been rudely awoken from hibernation.

The virus uses the building blocks of its host to reproduce itself. This is about the only thing that a virus can do that a piece of plastic can’t. So, the one thing that a virus can actively do by itself: reproduce. Although, ‘by itself,’ ‘actively’… the virus still requires a host to do so.

virus, host cell graph
Viruses rely on numerous interactions with the host cell machinery to replicate and transmit. Virus–host interactions occur at every stage of the viral life cycle, including attachment, uncoating, genomic replication, protein expression, viral assembly, and egress. While many factors involved are still unknown, some well-described examples are indicated. ER, endoplasmic reticulum; miRNA, microRNA.

Recommended: Everything you want to know About The Coronavirus

What Happens To The Virus After Reproduction?

After reproduction, the new, young viruses will start looking for a new host.

The next step for those young viruses is to travel to this host and find a way of invading it. This is pretty difficult for the virus, as it is incapable of doing anything on its own, except for reproducing. It has to travel passively or find a way of hitching a ride, and then find a way of entering somewhere. As soon as it succeeds, the virus fest of reproduction can start over once again. This means that the virus cycles are simple: traveling, entering, reproducing, traveling, entering, reproducing, et cetera. A virus is unable and unwilling to do anything else. Because a virus is not ‘alive.’

Dead Viruses Can Only Reproduce, Not Travel?

A virus does not have wings, paws, or webbed toes to make its way from one host to another. And indeed, a virus is incapable of merely entering through the skin. Your skin is quite literally an impenetrable barrier for a virus.

text, viruses, green background

Throughout evolution, viruses have come up with various best-practice strategies for traveling to a host and invading it. The way a virus travels is directly related though the virus will - after its trip - start to penetrate the host's body. Therefore, you are looking at a virus that has a correlated way of traveling and a way of invading. Each type of virus is specialized in at least one of those strategies. Following through, you can divide all viruses into three main groups.

Recommended: Climate Change And Viruses: Do Threats Converge?

These Three Main Groups With Their Nickname And Their Strategy:

– ‘Opportunists’: they invade the body through some injury, like a wound or a blood transfusion (like the AIDS virus);

– ‘Survivors’: they take the same road as your food (like the diarrhea-causing viruses);

– ‘Aviators’: they hitch a ride with the air that is breathed in (think influenza viruses and corona).

Let’s look At Those Viruses In A Bit More Detail.

An Opportunist sits back and waits until it finds some opening in the new host's skin, such as a wound. Next, it remains until its old host comes in direct contact with this wound, for instance, through his blood or sperm. Only then is it able to enter the body of the new host through that wound. Opportunists are also capable of entering the body through an insect bite (sting).

A Survivor can withstand overly acidic gastric juices and the bowels' extreme conditions and could survive there. It reproduces in the bowels. If the old host does not wash his hands after pooping, a tiny piece of defecation can end up on the hands of the former host, which can then end up on, for instance, a table, a button, or another surface. Then, when the new host touches that surface, or if the old host shakes his hand, the Survivor ends up on the new host's hands. If the original host consequently licks his fingers or does not wash his hands before eating, the Survivor can make its way to the host's e stomach and bowest.

An Aviator likes to fly and does so by hitching a ride on small droplets coming out of the old host's mouth. If the old host breathes out, talks, sings, or coughs, there will be a wealth of tiny droplets coming out of his mouth. If an Aviator gets lucky, it leaves the old host's body in one of those small droplets. Next, it travels through the air to the new host and will enter that new body through the air breathed in. Once it arrived, it will attempt to - still safely wrapped in that tiny droplet - to continue its trip to the alveoli, deep in the lungs. This deep down in the lungs, the lung walls are fragile: only one layer of cells thick, to be exact. This means that our immune system is weak here: only a handful of virus particles are needed to make you very ill.

Recommended: Coronavirus Was Always Here. Deal With It!

So, How Small Exactly Are We Talking?

The droplets that we talk, sing, breath, cough, sneeze out are all tiny. But some of them are many times smaller than other droplets. The smallest droplets are what we call ‘aerosols,’ and they can fly.

The larger droplets, on the other hand, cannot stay in the air for very long. As a result of gravity, they fall to the ground in a matter of seconds. They can cross distances of roughly half a meter for normal breathing up to a couple of meters for powerful coughs. The Aviators will have to be at about the height of the host’s nose or mouth to reach the new host. This is harder for the larger droplets, that will quickly be forced down to earth. We got gravity to thank for that. The aerosols, on the other hand, can stay afloat for a very long time. If areas are not adequately ventilated, they can circulate in the air for hours and hours on end, traveling immense distances during this period.

That Is The Story Of The Viruses.

Time to look at the flip side of this coin. What are our natural defenses?

Since the origin of man, we have been dealing with viruses. Our distant ancestors in the animal kingdom and we have, so to speak, evolved together with the viruses. Many kinds of innate and acquired defenses emerged over time. Antibodies are only one of those. For each of the different strategies that viruses use to survive (Opportunists, Survivors, and Aviators), our bodies and evolution came up with suitable defense mechanisms.

Perhaps the oldest defense was thrown up to defend ourselves against Opportunists. It is called the skin. Our skin keeps virtually anything harmful that intends to penetrate our body out. If we have a wound, our body can be perfectly capable of sealing up this imperfection quickly.

And it was the Survivors that led to us developing an incredibly acidic stomach. Our gastric juices damage virtually all viruses to such an extent that they can no longer reproduce. Most of the Survivors cannot withstand its acidity - only a handful do, and they might still have an opportunity to produce.

lungs infected
Scans of lungs infected with coronavirus showing areas of pneumonia

Now, the most relevant one in Corona times, the Aviators. To penetrate deep in our lungs, Aviator first has to make its way through the mouth or nose. All of us have multiple defense mechanisms in our nose, mouth, and pharynx, including immune cells. An entire army with a fighting vanguard, a rearguard, and many layers of commanding officers is ready to keep the Aviators out.

Most of the intruders get stuck in the labyrinth of mucous membranes and tiny cilia in your nose and are defused right there. The mouth and pharynx are also taking part in the defense against the Aviators. If these nasty critters already end up in the stomach, they do not stand a chance.

When inhaling the Aviator, the droplet's size that it is hitching a ride on does matter. If an Aviator rides on a small droplet (an aerosol), its chances of breaking right through the defense perimeter are much greater than they are for a larger droplet. Like smaller fish, they have a greater chance of slipping through a net's meshes than the larger fish. While riding on breathed in the air, the Aviator can - if it is lucky - make its way deep into the lungs. After all, the droplet is so small that it can quickly get into the lungs. And ta-dah, the Aviator reached its destination.

If it had chosen to ride on a larger droplet, on the other hand, chances are it would have had a much harder time upon entering the new host. The odds of it being stopped at the gate’ (in the nose, mouth, or pharynx) are very much against it.

So, why is the nose such an essential part of this process? Well, everything in our nose is designed to prevent viruses, bacteria, and other pathogens from entering our body. It is not just the nose. Our mouth and pharynx are equally well-versed in this. Our defense is up, ready to hold back invaders (like viruses and bacteria) in the nose and defuse them. And while they are held back, the body gets an opportunity to ‘get to know’ this intruder. This is equally important, as it means that the next time the same intruder knocks on our front door, we know who he is. Encanto deals with him much more efficiently. Compare it with a frisk search as we find an intruder on our front step: our body gets to know the previously unknown virus and can start throwing up natural defenses and antibodies.

Some people - including a certain President of the United States - claimed that infectious diseases like Corona are seasonal. Fact-checking this, it only seems partially right. For Instance, for Aviators, there appears to be a definite effect of temperature and humidity on viruses spread. Most Aviators, including influenza viruses and corona, enjoy cold, dry air, while Survivors generally become dehydrated and die in dry air. A small caveat is not entirely sure if humidity is bad for the virus itself or for the aerosol's lifespan it has been traveling on. We know that in humid air, aerosols are quicker to fall back to the earth. In dry air, on the other hand, they can circulate for an extended period. A surprising indicator was that we saw many new Corona cases within the meat industry during the summer: an industry in which the air is artificially kept cool and dry and cut costs, not often ventilated using the outside air. This is the metaphorical Walhalla for Aviators (or the aerosols they are traveling on, take your pick).

white heating radiator, 2 evaporer units
We know that in humid air, aerosols are quicker to fall back to the earth. Putting a cup of water on each radiator already goes a long way.

Now, going into the winter, we heat our homes and spend more time indoors. The air gets drier, and we spend more time together in a smaller area. This means that you can get a more massive dose of the virus in your lungs, your most vulnerable spot. This makes influenza and corona real ‘winter viruses.’ Popular ways of saving money on heating (including isolation and intelligent systems that only allow for fresh air ventilation when needed) should be frowned upon. It generally means that we have limited access to newer and moist outdoor air. Something to watch out for! With winter nearly upon us, we ought to guarantee proper humidity in our homes. This does not have to be a complicated process. Merely putting a cup of water on each radiator already goes a long way.

It also means that it is wise to meet up with other people outside. Compare the aerosols to the behavior of cigarette smoke. If you smoke a cigarette outside, the smoke quickly dissipates, and others are generally not as bothered by it, except when you blow it right in their face, of course. The same applies to aerosols. If you are a Coronavirus carrier and meet up with people outside, they will generally not be harmed by your aerosols unless you blow or cough them right in the face.

Ventilation has a similar purpose. If you smoke a cigarette in my living room and I do not ventilate well, you can still smell those cigarettes days later. But if I open up some windows right away, the smell will be gone before you know it. So, if you ventilate well and frequently open your windows, aerosols will be gone before you know it. Especially in the winter, when the virus runs rampant, fresh air is so important.

Recommended: Everything you want to know About The Coronavirus

Other Ways Of Calling A Halt To Aviators Like The Coronavirus

The most crucial thing in combatting infectious diseases is simple: keep your natural immune system healthy. Think healthy food, regular exercise, and sufficient sleep. You can add to your immune system by taking an extra daily dose of vitamin C and D.

Often overlooked, but you also ought to take care of your mental wellbeing. The so-called ‘vitamin F’ or ‘vitamin fun.’ Do things that make you happy. Dance. Sing. Draw. Talk to friends. Whatever makes you happy. Just make sure to avoid super spread events.

Super spread Events

Super spread events are best prevented as they are the literal ground zero for a mass infection. Think events that get many people together for hours in an improperly ventilated room. The popular après-ski bars, for instance, proved to be the breeding ground for the first Coronavirus wave in Europe earlier this year. Only one infected person in that entire room is enough, as he or she will blow numerous aerosols in the air. All others present will spend hours inhaling those very same aerosols. The virus can now invade many people, knocking on their front doors for hours until our defense cracks.

It is not the handwashing, social distancing, or absence of hugs and shaking hands that will help us right now. Such measures are great for preventing the spread of the Survivor type, as the diarrhea viruses. These Survivors travel from host to host through hand contact, surfaces, or touches. When combatting those viruses, it is indeed a good idea to regularly disinfect and keep your distance.

For Corona, it will not do much. Research has unequivocally pointed out that this virus is an aviator with an entirely different strategy for traveling from host to host. Compare it to cigarette smoke, once again. It barely, if anything, spreads through hands or surfaces. If you blow cigarette smoke on your hand and then shake hands with someone else, chances of that smoke entering the lungs of that other person are minimal, to say the least. Aviators are different; they need a ride on the aerosols to make it to the lungs. This renders common measures like washing hands, disinfecting, social distances, not shaking hands, and refraining from hugs insignificant in combatting viruses like influenza and corona.

It may appear to be contrary to what most government leaders are saying. But it really does not matter; it is the basic idea of using your common sense and avoiding large crowds that counts. Keeping distance while ‘on the go’ is generally a good idea as well, as you may avoid aerosols spreading from people going about their business around you.

Positive Tests Not Necessarily Negative

The number of people testing positive is rising. This is not all bad news, though. We are testing using the PCR test, which basically checks for the Coronavirus's presence in your nose, the mouth, or pharynx. So, it basically checks whether the virus is knocking on our front door. It does not say much about the eventual progression, as a normal, healthy body will recognize it as harmful and send its army after it. Perhaps it can even be neutralized before a person even notices its presence.

A positive test merely says that your body is getting acquainted with the virus to be recognized and dealt with more efficiently the next time.

This also means that the more people that have been infected, the greater the ‘protection’ for the group as a whole will be. People who had the virus and managed to hold it back act like some ‘shield’ for those who are more vulnerable: group immunity, another of those often thrown-around words. The hard part is that it takes time for this group's immunity to build up. Generally, younger and healthy people are barely affected by Corona. But once enough of them have been infected, the virus will have a much smaller chance of getting around as fast as it is doing right now: there are far more hosts that are unfriendly to the virus. Therefore, it will have a much harder time finding a suitable host of any kind.

That should be the goal. Not to hide in our homes until it goes away, but to let it gradually infect the population so that more and more of us are becoming ‘immune,’ which means that our immune system already knows and recognizes this virus. That is the only long-term plan that we should be relying on.

Before you go!

Recommended: Coronavirus Gets A Rival: The Chapare Virus

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The Best Explanation Ever About The Coronavirus

Viruses are just like burglars. It would help if you warded them off at the front door.   Doctor, epidemiologist, and professor emeritus Menno Jan Bouma dedicated his life to researching the ecology and spread of viruses and other pathogens. In our current times, where the Coronavirus runs rampant, he was all too eager to share his knowledge to make us understand the Coronavirus just a little bit better. We share some of his most useful insights. Read the best explanation ever about the coronavirus. The Coronavirus Without A Host Is Nothing! A virus is not a ‘living’ being like you and me. A virus is not ‘alive’ in any sense of the word. A virus is made up of genetic material (a DNA or RNA genome), surrounded by a protective, virus-coded protein coat (its membrane). Without a ‘host’ or ‘hostess,’ a virus is nothing. It is about as dead as a piece of plastic. It does not exhibit any signs of life. But as soon as a virus has the luck of entering the cells of a host's body, it will start to behave like a bear that has been rudely awoken from hibernation. The virus uses the building blocks of its host to reproduce itself. This is about the only thing that a virus can do that a piece of plastic can’t. So, the one thing that a virus can actively do by itself: reproduce. Although, ‘by itself,’ ‘actively’… the virus still requires a host to do so. Viruses rely on numerous interactions with the host cell machinery to replicate and transmit. Virus–host interactions occur at every stage of the viral life cycle, including attachment, uncoating, genomic replication, protein expression, viral assembly, and egress. While many factors involved are still unknown, some well-described examples are indicated. ER, endoplasmic reticulum; miRNA, microRNA. Recommended:  Everything you want to know About The Coronavirus What Happens To The Virus After Reproduction? After reproduction, the new, young viruses will start looking for a new host. The next step for those young viruses is to travel to this host and find a way of invading it. This is pretty difficult for the virus, as it is incapable of doing anything on its own, except for reproducing. It has to travel passively or find a way of hitching a ride, and then find a way of entering somewhere. As soon as it succeeds, the virus fest of reproduction can start over once again. This means that the virus cycles are simple: traveling, entering, reproducing, traveling, entering, reproducing, et cetera. A virus is unable and unwilling to do anything else. Because a virus is not ‘alive.’ Dead Viruses Can Only Reproduce, Not Travel? A virus does not have wings, paws, or webbed toes to make its way from one host to another. And indeed, a virus is incapable of merely entering through the skin. Your skin is quite literally an impenetrable barrier for a virus. Throughout evolution, viruses have come up with various best-practice strategies for traveling to a host and invading it. The way a virus travels is directly related though the virus will - after its trip - start to penetrate the host's body. Therefore, you are looking at a virus that has a correlated way of traveling and a way of invading. Each type of virus is specialized in at least one of those strategies. Following through, you can divide all viruses into three main groups. Recommended:  Climate Change And Viruses: Do Threats Converge? These Three Main Groups With Their Nickname And Their Strategy: – ‘ Opportunist s ’: they invade the body through some injury, like a wound or a blood transfusion (like the AIDS virus); – ‘ Survivors ’: they take the same road as your food (like the diarrhea-causing viruses); – ‘ Aviators ’: they hitch a ride with the air that is breathed in (think influenza viruses and corona). Let’s look At Those Viruses In A Bit More Detail. An Opportunist sits back and waits until it finds some opening in the new host's skin, such as a wound. Next, it remains until its old host comes in direct contact with this wound, for instance, through his blood or sperm. Only then is it able to enter the body of the new host through that wound. Opportunists are also capable of entering the body through an insect bite (sting). A Survivor can withstand overly acidic gastric juices and the bowels' extreme conditions and could survive there. It reproduces in the bowels. If the old host does not wash his hands after pooping, a tiny piece of defecation can end up on the hands of the former host, which can then end up on, for instance, a table, a button, or another surface. Then, when the new host touches that surface, or if the old host shakes his hand, the Survivor ends up on the new host's hands. If the original host consequently licks his fingers or does not wash his hands before eating, the Survivor can make its way to the host's e stomach and bowest. An Aviator likes to fly and does so by hitching a ride on small droplets coming out of the old host's mouth. If the old host breathes out, talks, sings, or coughs, there will be a wealth of tiny droplets coming out of his mouth. If an Aviator gets lucky, it leaves the old host's body in one of those small droplets. Next, it travels through the air to the new host and will enter that new body through the air breathed in. Once it arrived, it will attempt to - still safely wrapped in that tiny droplet - to continue its trip to the alveoli, deep in the lungs. This deep down in the lungs, the lung walls are fragile: only one layer of cells thick, to be exact. This means that our immune system is weak here: only a handful of virus particles are needed to make you very ill. Recommended:  Coronavirus Was Always Here. Deal With It! So, How Small Exactly Are We Talking? The droplets that we talk, sing, breath, cough, sneeze out are all tiny. But some of them are many times smaller than other droplets. The smallest droplets are what we call ‘aerosols,’ and they can fly. The larger droplets, on the other hand, cannot stay in the air for very long. As a result of gravity, they fall to the ground in a matter of seconds. They can cross distances of roughly half a meter for normal breathing up to a couple of meters for powerful coughs. The Aviators will have to be at about the height of the host’s nose or mouth to reach the new host. This is harder for the larger droplets, that will quickly be forced down to earth. We got gravity to thank for that. The aerosols, on the other hand, can stay afloat for a very long time. If areas are not adequately ventilated, they can circulate in the air for hours and hours on end, traveling immense distances during this period. That Is The Story Of The Viruses. Time to look at the flip side of this coin. What are our natural defenses? Since the origin of man, we have been dealing with viruses. Our distant ancestors in the animal kingdom and we have, so to speak, evolved together with the viruses. Many kinds of innate and acquired defenses emerged over time. Antibodies are only one of those. For each of the different strategies that viruses use to survive (Opportunists, Survivors, and Aviators), our bodies and evolution came up with suitable defense mechanisms. Perhaps the oldest defense was thrown up to defend ourselves against Opportunists. It is called the skin. Our skin keeps virtually anything harmful that intends to penetrate our body out. If we have a wound, our body can be perfectly capable of sealing up this imperfection quickly. And it was the Survivors that led to us developing an incredibly acidic stomach. Our gastric juices damage virtually all viruses to such an extent that they can no longer reproduce. Most of the Survivors cannot withstand its acidity - only a handful do, and they might still have an opportunity to produce. Scans of lungs infected with coronavirus showing areas of pneumonia Now, the most relevant one in Corona times, the Aviators. To penetrate deep in our lungs, Aviator first has to make its way through the mouth or nose. All of us have multiple defense mechanisms in our nose, mouth, and pharynx, including immune cells. An entire army with a fighting vanguard, a rearguard, and many layers of commanding officers is ready to keep the Aviators out. Most of the intruders get stuck in the labyrinth of mucous membranes and tiny cilia in your nose and are defused right there. The mouth and pharynx are also taking part in the defense against the Aviators. If these nasty critters already end up in the stomach, they do not stand a chance. When inhaling the Aviator, the droplet's size that it is hitching a ride on does matter. If an Aviator rides on a small droplet (an aerosol), its chances of breaking right through the defense perimeter are much greater than they are for a larger droplet. Like smaller fish, they have a greater chance of slipping through a net's meshes than the larger fish. While riding on breathed in the air, the Aviator can - if it is lucky - make its way deep into the lungs. After all, the droplet is so small that it can quickly get into the lungs. And ta-dah, the Aviator reached its destination. If it had chosen to ride on a larger droplet, on the other hand, chances are it would have had a much harder time upon entering the new host. The odds of it being stopped at the gate’ (in the nose, mouth, or pharynx) are very much against it. So, why is the nose such an essential part of this process? Well, everything in our nose is designed to prevent viruses, bacteria, and other pathogens from entering our body. It is not just the nose. Our mouth and pharynx are equally well-versed in this. Our defense is up, ready to hold back invaders (like viruses and bacteria) in the nose and defuse them. And while they are held back, the body gets an opportunity to ‘get to know’ this intruder. This is equally important, as it means that the next time the same intruder knocks on our front door, we know who he is. Encanto deals with him much more efficiently. Compare it with a frisk search as we find an intruder on our front step: our body gets to know the previously unknown virus and can start throwing up natural defenses and antibodies. Some people - including a certain President of the United States - claimed that infectious diseases like Corona are seasonal. Fact-checking this, it only seems partially right. For Instance, for Aviators, there appears to be a definite effect of temperature and humidity on viruses spread. Most Aviators, including influenza viruses and corona, enjoy cold, dry air, while Survivors generally become dehydrated and die in dry air. A small caveat is not entirely sure if humidity is bad for the virus itself or for the aerosol's lifespan it has been traveling on. We know that in humid air, aerosols are quicker to fall back to the earth. In dry air, on the other hand, they can circulate for an extended period. A surprising indicator was that we saw many new Corona cases within the meat industry during the summer: an industry in which the air is artificially kept cool and dry and cut costs, not often ventilated using the outside air. This is the metaphorical Walhalla for Aviators (or the aerosols they are traveling on, take your pick). We know that in humid air, aerosols are quicker to fall back to the earth. Putting a cup of water on each radiator already goes a long way. Now, going into the winter, we heat our homes and spend more time indoors. The air gets drier, and we spend more time together in a smaller area. This means that you can get a more massive dose of the virus in your lungs, your most vulnerable spot. This makes influenza and corona real ‘winter viruses.’ Popular ways of saving money on heating (including isolation and intelligent systems that only allow for fresh air ventilation when needed) should be frowned upon. It generally means that we have limited access to newer and moist outdoor air. Something to watch out for! With winter nearly upon us, we ought to guarantee proper humidity in our homes. This does not have to be a complicated process. Merely putting a cup of water on each radiator already goes a long way. It also means that it is wise to meet up with other people outside. Compare the aerosols to the behavior of cigarette smoke. If you smoke a cigarette outside, the smoke quickly dissipates, and others are generally not as bothered by it, except when you blow it right in their face, of course. The same applies to aerosols. If you are a Coronavirus carrier and meet up with people outside, they will generally not be harmed by your aerosols unless you blow or cough them right in the face. Ventilation has a similar purpose. If you smoke a cigarette in my living room and I do not ventilate well, you can still smell those cigarettes days later. But if I open up some windows right away, the smell will be gone before you know it. So, if you ventilate well and frequently open your windows, aerosols will be gone before you know it. Especially in the winter, when the virus runs rampant, fresh air is so important. Recommended:  Everything you want to know About The Coronavirus Other Ways Of Calling A Halt To Aviators Like The Coronavirus The most crucial thing in combatting infectious diseases is simple: keep your natural immune system healthy. Think healthy food, regular exercise, and sufficient sleep. You can add to your immune system by taking an extra daily dose of vitamin C and D. Often overlooked, but you also ought to take care of your mental wellbeing. The so-called ‘vitamin F’ or ‘vitamin fun.’ Do things that make you happy. Dance. Sing. Draw. Talk to friends. Whatever makes you happy. Just make sure to avoid super spread events. Super spread Events Super spread events are best prevented as they are the literal ground zero for a mass infection. Think events that get many people together for hours in an improperly ventilated room. The popular après-ski bars, for instance, proved to be the breeding ground for the first Coronavirus wave in Europe earlier this year. Only one infected person in that entire room is enough, as he or she will blow numerous aerosols in the air. All others present will spend hours inhaling those very same aerosols. The virus can now invade many people, knocking on their front doors for hours until our defense cracks. It is not the handwashing, social distancing, or absence of hugs and shaking hands that will help us right now. Such measures are great for preventing the spread of the Survivor type, as the diarrhea viruses. These Survivors travel from host to host through hand contact, surfaces, or touches. When combatting those viruses, it is indeed a good idea to regularly disinfect and keep your distance. For Corona, it will not do much. Research has unequivocally pointed out that this virus is an aviator with an entirely different strategy for traveling from host to host. Compare it to cigarette smoke, once again. It barely, if anything, spreads through hands or surfaces. If you blow cigarette smoke on your hand and then shake hands with someone else, chances of that smoke entering the lungs of that other person are minimal, to say the least. Aviators are different; they need a ride on the aerosols to make it to the lungs. This renders common measures like washing hands, disinfecting, social distances, not shaking hands, and refraining from hugs insignificant in combatting viruses like influenza and corona. It may appear to be contrary to what most government leaders are saying. But it really does not matter; it is the basic idea of using your common sense and avoiding large crowds that counts. Keeping distance while ‘on the go’ is generally a good idea as well, as you may avoid aerosols spreading from people going about their business around you. Positive Tests Not Necessarily Negative The number of people testing positive is rising. This is not all bad news, though. We are testing using the PCR test, which basically checks for the Coronavirus's presence in your nose, the mouth, or pharynx. So, it basically checks whether the virus is knocking on our front door. It does not say much about the eventual progression, as a normal, healthy body will recognize it as harmful and send its army after it. Perhaps it can even be neutralized before a person even notices its presence. A positive test merely says that your body is getting acquainted with the virus to be recognized and dealt with more efficiently the next time. This also means that the more people that have been infected, the greater the ‘protection’ for the group as a whole will be. People who had the virus and managed to hold it back act like some ‘shield’ for those who are more vulnerable: group immunity, another of those often thrown-around words. The hard part is that it takes time for this group's immunity to build up. Generally, younger and healthy people are barely affected by Corona. But once enough of them have been infected, the virus will have a much smaller chance of getting around as fast as it is doing right now: there are far more hosts that are unfriendly to the virus. Therefore, it will have a much harder time finding a suitable host of any kind. That should be the goal. Not to hide in our homes until it goes away, but to let it gradually infect the population so that more and more of us are becoming ‘immune,’ which means that our immune system already knows and recognizes this virus. That is the only long-term plan that we should be relying on. Before you go! Recommended:  Coronavirus Gets A Rival: The Chapare Virus Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about the coronavirus? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
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