Close Welcome writers, influencers and dreamers, make the world a greener place
Register here
Forgot password
Forgot password
or
or

Close
Close Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
Close Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
Close Reset password
your profile is 33% complete:
33%
Update profile Close
Close WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-Change

For writers, influencers and dreamers who want to make the world a greener place.

WhatsOrb reaches monthly about 28.000 thousand visitors who want - like you - to make the world a greener place. Share your expertise and all can benefit.

Become an influencer and write and share sustainable news and innovations globally
Are you a writer or do you have ideas about sustainability which you want to share? Register and share your green knowledge and news. WhatsOrb offers you global exposure for your article.

If your article meets certain standards, you receive promotional gains like Facebook promotions and Google Ads advertising.

Community try the food snack from spider woman tarantula | Upload Lifestyle

Try The Food Snack From Spider-Woman Tarantula

by: Sharai Hoekema
try the food snack from spider woman tarantula | Upload

One of the most common fears in humankind? Arachnophobia, or an intense and somewhat unreasonable fear of spiders and spider-like creatures. We get it, these eight-legged creatures are not as cuddly as a run-of-the-mill rabbit or baby goat, with their itch-inciting appearance and fast and unpredictable way of moving around.

Food Snack: Tarantula

But the amount of tension that some people experience when faced with this member of the Araneae family is excessive. Recent research has found that some of those who have arachnophobia would even prefer diving with great white sharks or jumping out of an airplane to being locked up in a room with one of those critters for ten whole minutes.

Tarantula: Cultural Fears

Speaking on an evolutionary level, there is absolutely no way in which we can rationalize this fear, or attribute it to our survival instincts. Instead, evidence points to it being a so-called institutionalized fear, a phobia that develops by exposure to the extreme reaction of others suffering from it. 

This makes it a fear that is mostly cultural, rather than genetic. Those of us living in the western world are more prone to it, despite us not having any real poisonous types living in our area that we should legitimately be afraid of. Other cultures, living together with much more dangerous and sizeable members of the spider family, observe them with mild trepidation at best. And different cultures simply eat them. 

Food Snack: Spiders As A Delicacy

In countries like Papua New Guinea and Cambodia, spiders are a real delicacy. (Coincidentally, these are also countries that rank very low on the global arachnophobia index - yes, this is a thing.) Tourists that visit Asian hotspot-on-the-rise Phnom Penh, capital of the Kingdom of Cambodia, are often amazed at the sight of street vendors selling fried tarantula and similar snacks. 


                                             Spider-Woman: Tarantula Staple Food Gets A Snack: Cambodia


Cooking shows all around the world have already zeroed in on the phenomenon, with world-famous chefs like Gordon Ramsay having sampled it. And although reactions are mixed, most would agree that it is a unique part of Cambodian culture that should be treasured. A portion of their national heritage, if you wish.

Recommended: Insects As Food The New Agriculture Is Good For Our Climate

Deep-fried spiders are surely not for everyone, but for those who have grown up with the phenomenon, it is hard to consider the crawly creatures to be anything but absolutely delicious. Scary? Not in their minds. Tasty, that’s more like it. Especially the female tarantulas are treasured, for the tasty, caviar-like eggs that their bellies contain. 

Tarantulas As A Daily Source Of Protein

To preserve this unique flavor, spiders are not gutted or cut up. Instead, after getting a quick wash in water, they are thrown in the pot and fried with some delicious spices. Alternative preparation methods include grilling them and serving them with a variety of dip sauces. Its taste is best described as crab, although the consistency is strikingly different. 

A-Ping, as the locals call it, has been eaten as just your regular source of protein for generations and generations. The dish originates from the farmland that Cambodia is well-known for, with farmers taking home any tarantulas that they find on their land for dinner. Especially during the reign of the Khmer Rouge, the communist party of Cambodia, food was tight - and therefore, all possible food sources more than welcome.

Even after the communist regime, people still enjoyed their tarantula snack, some also attributing health benefits to it: from aiding lung and heart diseases up to enhance sexual desire. The wealthiest of this small Asian country enjoy its uniqueness and rarity, while the people on the street just enjoy its flavor - making it a sought-after delicacy. 

Food Snack Tarantula: Over-Hunting And Deforestation

Unfortunately, it is one that is becoming increasingly harder to find. The rising demand has led to over-hunting, while the deforestation of the Cambodian land is drastically reducing the tarantula’s territory. In the last two decades alone, Cambodia has lost more than 2 million hectares of forest - an alarming 23 percent decline. This land has been re-allocated for agricultural purposes, giving way to enormous cashew and rubber plantations. 

Recommended: Deforestation: No! Celebrate National Tree Day With WhatsOrb

As the tarantulas enjoy the woods, they are finding themselves struggling to stay in their preferred ecosystem. Furthermore, their declining number makes them much harder to find, which means that fewer people are still attempting to. It will be much more profitable to get a job on one of the plantations, instead of hunting for the tarantulas. 

Tarantulas: Steep Decline In Population

This leaves the job of hunting spiders to the poorest of the poor, who are often ruthless in their methods: over-hunting is commonplace, as is the use of dangerous chemicals, with no regulations whatsoever in place to protect the treasured species in her survival. 

All of this has led to a steep decline in the tarantula population, which may soon find itself at risk of extinction. It may mean the end of not just another animal species, but also the end of a treasured piece of local cuisine - as well as threaten the livelihood of those who have turned it into a business. As long as the government remains hesitant to take action to prevent this from happening, the A-Ping might find himself in the frying pan.

 

Before you go!

Recommended: Eating insects Is Healthy, Tasty, And Cool: the United States.

Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day.

Like to write your article about healthy food?
Click on 'Register' or push the button 'Write An Article' on the 'HomePage.'

Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
SIGN UP FOR MONTHLY TIPS & TRICKS
More like this:

Try The Food Snack From Spider-Woman Tarantula

One of the most common fears in humankind? Arachnophobia, or an intense and somewhat unreasonable fear of spiders and spider-like creatures. We get it, these eight-legged creatures are not as cuddly as a run-of-the-mill rabbit or baby goat, with their itch-inciting appearance and fast and unpredictable way of moving around. Food Snack: Tarantula But the amount of tension that some people experience when faced with this member of the Araneae family is excessive.  Recent research has found that some of those who have arachnophobia would even prefer diving with great white sharks or jumping out of an airplane to being locked up in a room with one of those critters for ten whole minutes. Tarantula: Cultural Fears Speaking on an evolutionary level, there is absolutely no way in which we can rationalize this fear, or attribute it to our survival instincts. Instead, evidence points to it being a so-called institutionalized fear, a phobia that develops by exposure to the extreme reaction of others suffering from it.   This makes it a fear that is mostly cultural, rather than genetic. Those of us living in the western world are more prone to it, despite us not having any real poisonous types living in our area that we should legitimately be afraid of. Other cultures, living together with much more dangerous and sizeable members of the spider family, observe them with mild trepidation at best.   And different cultures simply eat them.   Food Snack: Spiders As A Delicacy In countries like Papua New Guinea and Cambodia, spiders are a real delicacy. (Coincidentally, these are also countries that rank very low on the global arachnophobia index - yes, this is a thing.) Tourists that visit Asian hotspot-on-the-rise Phnom Penh, capital of the Kingdom of Cambodia, are often amazed at the sight of street vendors selling fried tarantula and similar snacks.   {youtube}                                              Spider-Woman: Tarantula Staple Food Gets A Snack: Cambodia Cooking shows all around the world have already zeroed in on the phenomenon, with world-famous chefs like Gordon Ramsay having sampled it. And although reactions are mixed, most would agree that it is a unique part of Cambodian culture that should be treasured. A portion of their national heritage, if you wish. Recommended:  Insects As Food The New Agriculture Is Good For Our Climate Deep-fried spiders are surely not for everyone, but for those who have grown up with the phenomenon, it is hard to consider the crawly creatures to be anything but absolutely delicious. Scary? Not in their minds. Tasty, that’s more like it. Especially the female tarantulas are treasured, for the tasty, caviar-like eggs that their bellies contain.   Tarantulas As A Daily Source Of Protein To preserve this unique flavor, spiders are not gutted or cut up. Instead, after getting a quick wash in water, they are thrown in the pot and fried with some delicious spices. Alternative preparation methods include grilling them and serving them with a variety of dip sauces. Its taste is best described as crab, although the consistency is strikingly different.   A-Ping, as the locals call it, has been eaten as just your regular source of protein for generations and generations. The dish originates from the farmland that Cambodia is well-known for, with farmers taking home any tarantulas that they find on their land for dinner. Especially during the reign of the Khmer Rouge, the communist party of Cambodia, food was tight - and therefore, all possible food sources more than welcome. Even after the communist regime, people still enjoyed their tarantula snack, some also attributing health benefits to it: from aiding lung and heart diseases up to enhance sexual desire. The wealthiest of this small Asian country enjoy its uniqueness and rarity, while the people on the street just enjoy its flavor - making it a sought-after delicacy.   Food Snack Tarantula: Over-Hunting And Deforestation Unfortunately, it is one that is becoming increasingly harder to find. The rising demand has led to over-hunting, while the deforestation of the Cambodian land is drastically reducing the tarantula’s territory. In the last two decades alone, Cambodia has lost more than 2 million hectares of forest - an alarming 23 percent decline. This land has been re-allocated for agricultural purposes, giving way to enormous cashew and rubber plantations.   Recommended:  Deforestation: No! Celebrate National Tree Day With WhatsOrb As the tarantulas enjoy the woods, they are finding themselves struggling to stay in their preferred ecosystem. Furthermore, their declining number makes them much harder to find, which means that fewer people are still attempting to. It will be much more profitable to get a job on one of the plantations, instead of hunting for the tarantulas.   Tarantulas: Steep Decline In Population This leaves the job of hunting spiders to the poorest of the poor, who are often ruthless in their methods: over-hunting is commonplace, as is the use of dangerous chemicals, with no regulations whatsoever in place to protect the treasured species in her survival.   All of this has led to a steep decline in the tarantula population, which may soon find itself at risk of extinction. It may mean the end of not just another animal species, but also the end of a treasured piece of local cuisine - as well as threaten the livelihood of those who have turned it into a business. As long as the government remains hesitant to take action to prevent this from happening, the A-Ping might find himself in the frying pan.   Before you go! Recommended:  Eating insects Is Healthy, Tasty, And Cool: the United States . Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about healthy food? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations