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Australian hype: carbon-neutral houses made of recycled materials
The other week, a new Australian project caught our attention. A self-proclaimed feminist architecture studio called Whispering Smith came up with the very first prototype of their brainchild. This House A, as the first of its kind is lovingly called, is built as a hybrid between an apartment and a house. With its 753 square feet, it is definitely making the most of the land on which it is situated. Increasing popularity of small and tiny houses It is only the latest fad on a wave of small and tiny house projects. The obsession with creating small(er) living spaces has swept the globe, with people from Austria to Australia coming up with innovative, cutting-edge designs for their own version of a small home. Not only are they much more sustainable and cost-effective, they also have significantly lower heating and water bills. Another argument for downsizing could be that it forces people to cut back on its possessions and only keep those items that they really need - which should, according to popular theories, allow them to live happier and fuller lives as there is less clutter in their lives holding them down. Apartment-house made of recycled materials As for House A, which was built to accommodate the directors of the architecture studio developing it, a focus on recycling seemed to be the main focus. Its small size is optimised for building on small lots, while using various recycled materials to constructing the house - including whitewashed brick, timber, cabinetry and 65-percent-recycled-slag and concrete tilt-up panels.   A location near Perth, Australia was carefully chosen for this project. The house was built in a neighbourhood that is known for its dedication to sustainability: House A was the first of three carbon-neutral residences that were to be built here. And even though it only measures 70 square meters, it feels remarkably comfortable: its three compact levels include a full-sized garage underground and two living floors.   Simple and basic interior Even the interior fits the mentality of scaling down and recycling. Its palette is monochromatic and industrious in its execution, meaning that small flaws and imperfections are still visible rather than hidden away. At the same time, the building is constructed in an open space kind of setting, with minimal use of walls and doors to separate spaces.   This gives the interior an effortless flow, in which spaces blend together effortlessly. This includes the outdoor space, which can easily be added to the house through moveable walls and sliding doors. Perth normally has a climate that allows for this luxurious blending of indoor and outdoor living, which only adds to the spacious feel of the home.   The appeal of House A and other tiny houses Even though the advantages of living small are obvious, there are quite a few who wonder what the actual appeal of such a lifestyle is. Yet the developers are convinced that this movement in small living is going to make a huge difference in the lives of the new generation: “ House A embodies our desire to build something relevant for our generation. A lot of younger people and downsizers don't have a lot of stuff or are having children much later and we are using our homes for all kinds of things, from starting businesses or hosting a long table dinner for 20. We wanted to build a prototype house that did all of these things, while being affordable, sustainable and made from really beautiful, long lasting materials, and we thought the best way was just to design and build it ourselves. ” Other sustainable measures Apart from mostly using recycled materials for its construction and attention paid to the way in which spaces interact with themselves and the outdoors, more measures have been implemented in House A that serve a greater purpose. For instance, an underground rainwater-collecting tank provides water for most of the house. Solar panels offset the electricity needs, and an indoor clothes-drying line provides a natural way of drying laundry - removing the need for mechanical solutions, such as an actual dryer.   All of these measures add up to a carbon neutral way of living, while the home’s garden might even elevate its status to being carbon negative. The garden space is a sanctuary for native plant species to grown and blossom, allowing local bird species to thrive. This makes it a great outdoor space that respects its environment while being a great space to relax for the human inhabitants. House A is definitely ranking up there with other small and tiny house projects. It is innovative, yet nifty and very sustainable. Plus, it definitely pleases the eye - if you are into bare and minimalistic living, that is.
The other week, a new Australian project caught our attention. A self-proclaimed feminist architecture studio called Whispering Smith came up with the very first prototype of their brainchild. This House A, as the first of its kind is lovingly called, is built as a hybrid between an apartment and a house. With its 753 square feet, it is definitely making the most of the land on which it is situated. Increasing popularity of small and tiny houses It is only the latest fad on a wave of small and tiny house projects. The obsession with creating small(er) living spaces has swept the globe, with people from Austria to Australia coming up with innovative, cutting-edge designs for their own version of a small home. Not only are they much more sustainable and cost-effective, they also have significantly lower heating and water bills. Another argument for downsizing could be that it forces people to cut back on its possessions and only keep those items that they really need - which should, according to popular theories, allow them to live happier and fuller lives as there is less clutter in their lives holding them down. Apartment-house made of recycled materials As for House A, which was built to accommodate the directors of the architecture studio developing it, a focus on recycling seemed to be the main focus. Its small size is optimised for building on small lots, while using various recycled materials to constructing the house - including whitewashed brick, timber, cabinetry and 65-percent-recycled-slag and concrete tilt-up panels.   A location near Perth, Australia was carefully chosen for this project. The house was built in a neighbourhood that is known for its dedication to sustainability: House A was the first of three carbon-neutral residences that were to be built here. And even though it only measures 70 square meters, it feels remarkably comfortable: its three compact levels include a full-sized garage underground and two living floors.   Simple and basic interior Even the interior fits the mentality of scaling down and recycling. Its palette is monochromatic and industrious in its execution, meaning that small flaws and imperfections are still visible rather than hidden away. At the same time, the building is constructed in an open space kind of setting, with minimal use of walls and doors to separate spaces.   This gives the interior an effortless flow, in which spaces blend together effortlessly. This includes the outdoor space, which can easily be added to the house through moveable walls and sliding doors. Perth normally has a climate that allows for this luxurious blending of indoor and outdoor living, which only adds to the spacious feel of the home.   The appeal of House A and other tiny houses Even though the advantages of living small are obvious, there are quite a few who wonder what the actual appeal of such a lifestyle is. Yet the developers are convinced that this movement in small living is going to make a huge difference in the lives of the new generation: “ House A embodies our desire to build something relevant for our generation. A lot of younger people and downsizers don't have a lot of stuff or are having children much later and we are using our homes for all kinds of things, from starting businesses or hosting a long table dinner for 20. We wanted to build a prototype house that did all of these things, while being affordable, sustainable and made from really beautiful, long lasting materials, and we thought the best way was just to design and build it ourselves. ” Other sustainable measures Apart from mostly using recycled materials for its construction and attention paid to the way in which spaces interact with themselves and the outdoors, more measures have been implemented in House A that serve a greater purpose. For instance, an underground rainwater-collecting tank provides water for most of the house. Solar panels offset the electricity needs, and an indoor clothes-drying line provides a natural way of drying laundry - removing the need for mechanical solutions, such as an actual dryer.   All of these measures add up to a carbon neutral way of living, while the home’s garden might even elevate its status to being carbon negative. The garden space is a sanctuary for native plant species to grown and blossom, allowing local bird species to thrive. This makes it a great outdoor space that respects its environment while being a great space to relax for the human inhabitants. House A is definitely ranking up there with other small and tiny house projects. It is innovative, yet nifty and very sustainable. Plus, it definitely pleases the eye - if you are into bare and minimalistic living, that is.
Australian hype: carbon-neutral houses made of recycled materials
Australian hype: carbon-neutral houses made of recycled materials
How to make your company carbon neutral: let your business make the world a better place
Although most CEO’s and business owners will agree that they are actually trying to leave their footprints on the world, as this will be a testament to the value that their company adds to the life of customers, there is one footprint that they’d like to get rid of. This would be their carbon footprint, or the impact that running their operations has on the environment at large.   It seems as if customers have developed a rather significant soft spot for companies who are - or who claim to be - committed to ‘doing the right thing’. Greening up their activities, making their supply chain more transparant and printing their business cards on recycled paper: as long as it can be sold as a ‘sustainable practice’, it will be employed, and promoted heavily to boot. For a very good reason, too. Companies who give back are generally enjoying a higher stock price and higher profits than those who usually forgo investments in their corporate social responsibility. Thus, it is hardly surprising that a growing number of businesses have announced their ambitions to become carbon neutral.   A real-life company that has already wiped out its carbon footprint Yet becoming carbon neutral is something that is much easier said than done, as most who have attempted to do so will wholeheartedly agree on. There are, however, some who have already managed to do so. Take the architect practice of Luigi Rosselli Architects, based in Sydney, Australia. Not only have they designed their practice to take full advantage of carbon neutrality, they are definitely walking the talk.   The company has made a business out of designing energy-efficient buildings for its customers, who are eager to jump on the carbon neutral bandwagon as well. Its portfolio includes elegant residential places that usually focus on off-form concrete, that appear to seamlessly blend in to the landscape - being completely in tune with its environment. But even more importantly, the company has dedicated itself to being fully carbon neutral. The entire practice micromanages all of its employees’ behaviours and activities. This ranges from the way that the employees travel to and from work, to the amount of paper that is used and wasted.   How does it work, a  carbon neutral company? The company’s founder Luigi Rosselli recently gave an interview to Archinect Features, in which he highlighted the ways in which the company has managed to achieve carbon neutrality. He explains how the company first focused on the energy that was used on a day-to-day basis. All of this is generated by solar panels.   At the same time, the amount of energy needed is reduced drastically by the smart office design, where the building houses all kind of passive cooling measures: including a terracotta tile rise soleil that reflects the hot sun, and large windows that can be opened for cross ventilation. Another huge issue that was tackled upfront is that of waste reduction. Printing is restricted and only done when there is no other option, and even then still done on recycled paper (double sided, obviously). Besides paper, single use plastics and disposable coffee cups are also largely banned. Instead, workers are using paper crockery and reusable containers for their lunches, whether they bring it from home or pick it up from one of the local, organic cafes in the area. Packaging and other soft plastic materials are diligently recycled, while  food leftovers and coffee grounds are used as fertiliser for the gorgeous roof terrace garden and street level planting. Some more ways of achieving a carbon neutral status A large share of most companies’ carbon footprint is made up of transportation - in particular, that of its employees travelling to and from work. Rosselli introduced a system that heavily encourages its workers to use public transportation or to go to work on foot or by bike. For this purpose, the office is conveniently located close to a major transport hub and boasts various easily accessible facilities for storing bikes. Any air travel required is offset directly when booking, through the airline. And at the end of each year, a complete inventory is made: how much energy was consumed, how much waste was generated, and what was the impact of transportation and travelling? The remainder is usually offset through carbon credits. Or, according to Rosselli: “We are always innovating and looking for proactive ways to reduce our carbon footprint so that we can eventually almost eliminate this stage of the process.” This is a great effort that should be applauded. Even if other companies would only take on a fraction of this attitude, perhaps only focusing on reducing the transportation needs of its employees, it could already make a big difference. It never is a zero-sum game, and it definitely is not now: companies should, if anything, consider the positive example it will set for others to follow. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/circular-econ-
Although most CEO’s and business owners will agree that they are actually trying to leave their footprints on the world, as this will be a testament to the value that their company adds to the life of customers, there is one footprint that they’d like to get rid of. This would be their carbon footprint, or the impact that running their operations has on the environment at large.   It seems as if customers have developed a rather significant soft spot for companies who are - or who claim to be - committed to ‘doing the right thing’. Greening up their activities, making their supply chain more transparant and printing their business cards on recycled paper: as long as it can be sold as a ‘sustainable practice’, it will be employed, and promoted heavily to boot. For a very good reason, too. Companies who give back are generally enjoying a higher stock price and higher profits than those who usually forgo investments in their corporate social responsibility. Thus, it is hardly surprising that a growing number of businesses have announced their ambitions to become carbon neutral.   A real-life company that has already wiped out its carbon footprint Yet becoming carbon neutral is something that is much easier said than done, as most who have attempted to do so will wholeheartedly agree on. There are, however, some who have already managed to do so. Take the architect practice of Luigi Rosselli Architects, based in Sydney, Australia. Not only have they designed their practice to take full advantage of carbon neutrality, they are definitely walking the talk.   The company has made a business out of designing energy-efficient buildings for its customers, who are eager to jump on the carbon neutral bandwagon as well. Its portfolio includes elegant residential places that usually focus on off-form concrete, that appear to seamlessly blend in to the landscape - being completely in tune with its environment. But even more importantly, the company has dedicated itself to being fully carbon neutral. The entire practice micromanages all of its employees’ behaviours and activities. This ranges from the way that the employees travel to and from work, to the amount of paper that is used and wasted.   How does it work, a  carbon neutral company? The company’s founder Luigi Rosselli recently gave an interview to Archinect Features, in which he highlighted the ways in which the company has managed to achieve carbon neutrality. He explains how the company first focused on the energy that was used on a day-to-day basis. All of this is generated by solar panels.   At the same time, the amount of energy needed is reduced drastically by the smart office design, where the building houses all kind of passive cooling measures: including a terracotta tile rise soleil that reflects the hot sun, and large windows that can be opened for cross ventilation. Another huge issue that was tackled upfront is that of waste reduction. Printing is restricted and only done when there is no other option, and even then still done on recycled paper (double sided, obviously). Besides paper, single use plastics and disposable coffee cups are also largely banned. Instead, workers are using paper crockery and reusable containers for their lunches, whether they bring it from home or pick it up from one of the local, organic cafes in the area. Packaging and other soft plastic materials are diligently recycled, while  food leftovers and coffee grounds are used as fertiliser for the gorgeous roof terrace garden and street level planting. Some more ways of achieving a carbon neutral status A large share of most companies’ carbon footprint is made up of transportation - in particular, that of its employees travelling to and from work. Rosselli introduced a system that heavily encourages its workers to use public transportation or to go to work on foot or by bike. For this purpose, the office is conveniently located close to a major transport hub and boasts various easily accessible facilities for storing bikes. Any air travel required is offset directly when booking, through the airline. And at the end of each year, a complete inventory is made: how much energy was consumed, how much waste was generated, and what was the impact of transportation and travelling? The remainder is usually offset through carbon credits. Or, according to Rosselli: “We are always innovating and looking for proactive ways to reduce our carbon footprint so that we can eventually almost eliminate this stage of the process.” This is a great effort that should be applauded. Even if other companies would only take on a fraction of this attitude, perhaps only focusing on reducing the transportation needs of its employees, it could already make a big difference. It never is a zero-sum game, and it definitely is not now: companies should, if anything, consider the positive example it will set for others to follow. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/circular-econ-
How to make your company carbon neutral: let your business make the world a better place
How to make your company carbon neutral: let your business make the world a better place
Hurting the environment: the palm oil paradox
At the beginning of the 2010s, big companies such as Dove, Mars and Nestlé were publicly shamed for their continued use of palm oil. Not because it is a product that harms our health directly, or because it contains hidden substances - but rather because its production really hurts our environment. And while they pledged at the time to stop their purchase of “dirty” palm oil and make serious efforts to alleviate the damage that they caused; a story recently hit the news that most of them are allegedly ignoring these promises made and continue to use protected land for the growth of palm oil. According to the whistleblower, these companies have largely set aside the plans in favour of gearing up their production. “ For too many years, Nestlé, Mars and Hershey have cherry-picked their [palm oil] targets and then moved the goalposts when they don’t achieve them. There’s just no further room for error to prevent the extinction of tigers, orang-utans and elephants .” Why is palm oil so important to those companies? Clearly there must be something rather important to this illustrious substance, for these large multinationals to risk seriously damaging their reputation. And sure enough, it is. Palm oil is an edible vegetable oil harvested from the pulp of the fruit of the oil palm. It is one of the world’s most adaptable and frequently used commodities.   Besides, it is quite cheap - while posing unique characteristics that make it desirable for its lubricating, cleansing and vitamin-rich nature. This combination of low costs and high effectiveness make it very appealing for those companies who want to keep their costs down while maintaining their product quality. Despite the negative attention that it may draw to them. Who uses palm oil and what are the alternatives? In large areas of the world, palm oil is used as a common cooking ingredient - not only as an ingredient, but also as oil. Large parts of Africa and Brazil and the whole of Southeast Asia heavily rely on it for their daily diet. This appeal largely comes from the low cost and high saturation when used for frying. Thus, a huge portion of products that they use on a daily basis will contain palm oil in one form or the other. This ranges from chips, chocolate and instant noodles to toothpaste, lipstick and body lotions.   India is one of those countries where it is still frequently used. Latest estimates put the number of Indians that use palm oil on a daily basis at a staggering 50%. And this is still growing: the rapidly developing country is only just now moving on from other sources, such as oils based on groundnut and coconut. And with the country growing rapidly and becoming richer (consumption has doubled in recent decades), palm oil has become indispensable in feeding its 1.3 million population. The country is facing a huge challenge in finding ways of bringing cheap sources of  food to their rapidly expanding population, while facing an alarmingly high poverty rate and very limited use of land. At the same time, India really wants to boost its domestic production and reduce its reliance on imports. For this, palm oil seems to be the only solution that ticks all the boxes, and as such, the Asian country is working hard to ramp up its domestic production, freeing up huge amounts of land for this purpose. App to discover palm oil in products. Why is palm oil getting so much negative attention? So far, so good: it looks as if this raw material can solve a stringent issue. However, there is a flip side; and a reason why there has been such a public outcry against the use of palm oil. Its production causes severe environmental damage ( deforestation, habitat, degradation, climate change, animal cruelty ) and often violates human rights. Sustainability is something that most producers are not concerned with, nor about traceability.   The production has singlehandedly endangered species, such as the orang-utan and Sumatran tiger, and pushed those to the brink of extinction. And while some might say that India freeing up available land will lead to a more sustainable way of production, this could not be further from the truth. The harsh reality is that India does - and will - only produce a fraction of the palm oil needed to meet the growing demand.   The remainder is - and will be - imported from other countries, particularly Malaysia and Indonesia. And these rising imports will put more pressure on those countries, which in turn leads to worse circumstances; once again encouraging “dirty palm oil” producers to benefit - without due cause for the damage done to the environment. There you have it, a doubled-edged sword. In order to feed the growing population of India, they will have to import significant amounts of palm oil - the core component of their people’s diet. The strain that this puts on our environment is tremendous and causing irreparable damage.   Feeding ànd saving the planet simultaneously appears to be a trickier issue than most will think, although it will be a crucial one to solve if we are to even take a remote shot at saving our world. https://www.whatsorb.com/gardening---agriculture/the-environment-is-our-economy  
At the beginning of the 2010s, big companies such as Dove, Mars and Nestlé were publicly shamed for their continued use of palm oil. Not because it is a product that harms our health directly, or because it contains hidden substances - but rather because its production really hurts our environment. And while they pledged at the time to stop their purchase of “dirty” palm oil and make serious efforts to alleviate the damage that they caused; a story recently hit the news that most of them are allegedly ignoring these promises made and continue to use protected land for the growth of palm oil. According to the whistleblower, these companies have largely set aside the plans in favour of gearing up their production. “ For too many years, Nestlé, Mars and Hershey have cherry-picked their [palm oil] targets and then moved the goalposts when they don’t achieve them. There’s just no further room for error to prevent the extinction of tigers, orang-utans and elephants .” Why is palm oil so important to those companies? Clearly there must be something rather important to this illustrious substance, for these large multinationals to risk seriously damaging their reputation. And sure enough, it is. Palm oil is an edible vegetable oil harvested from the pulp of the fruit of the oil palm. It is one of the world’s most adaptable and frequently used commodities.   Besides, it is quite cheap - while posing unique characteristics that make it desirable for its lubricating, cleansing and vitamin-rich nature. This combination of low costs and high effectiveness make it very appealing for those companies who want to keep their costs down while maintaining their product quality. Despite the negative attention that it may draw to them. Who uses palm oil and what are the alternatives? In large areas of the world, palm oil is used as a common cooking ingredient - not only as an ingredient, but also as oil. Large parts of Africa and Brazil and the whole of Southeast Asia heavily rely on it for their daily diet. This appeal largely comes from the low cost and high saturation when used for frying. Thus, a huge portion of products that they use on a daily basis will contain palm oil in one form or the other. This ranges from chips, chocolate and instant noodles to toothpaste, lipstick and body lotions.   India is one of those countries where it is still frequently used. Latest estimates put the number of Indians that use palm oil on a daily basis at a staggering 50%. And this is still growing: the rapidly developing country is only just now moving on from other sources, such as oils based on groundnut and coconut. And with the country growing rapidly and becoming richer (consumption has doubled in recent decades), palm oil has become indispensable in feeding its 1.3 million population. The country is facing a huge challenge in finding ways of bringing cheap sources of  food to their rapidly expanding population, while facing an alarmingly high poverty rate and very limited use of land. At the same time, India really wants to boost its domestic production and reduce its reliance on imports. For this, palm oil seems to be the only solution that ticks all the boxes, and as such, the Asian country is working hard to ramp up its domestic production, freeing up huge amounts of land for this purpose. App to discover palm oil in products. Why is palm oil getting so much negative attention? So far, so good: it looks as if this raw material can solve a stringent issue. However, there is a flip side; and a reason why there has been such a public outcry against the use of palm oil. Its production causes severe environmental damage ( deforestation, habitat, degradation, climate change, animal cruelty ) and often violates human rights. Sustainability is something that most producers are not concerned with, nor about traceability.   The production has singlehandedly endangered species, such as the orang-utan and Sumatran tiger, and pushed those to the brink of extinction. And while some might say that India freeing up available land will lead to a more sustainable way of production, this could not be further from the truth. The harsh reality is that India does - and will - only produce a fraction of the palm oil needed to meet the growing demand.   The remainder is - and will be - imported from other countries, particularly Malaysia and Indonesia. And these rising imports will put more pressure on those countries, which in turn leads to worse circumstances; once again encouraging “dirty palm oil” producers to benefit - without due cause for the damage done to the environment. There you have it, a doubled-edged sword. In order to feed the growing population of India, they will have to import significant amounts of palm oil - the core component of their people’s diet. The strain that this puts on our environment is tremendous and causing irreparable damage.   Feeding ànd saving the planet simultaneously appears to be a trickier issue than most will think, although it will be a crucial one to solve if we are to even take a remote shot at saving our world. https://www.whatsorb.com/gardening---agriculture/the-environment-is-our-economy  
Hurting the environment: the palm oil paradox
Hurting the environment: the palm oil paradox
SMART COMMUNITIES: ECO-LIVING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY
Meet ReGen Villages. A concept for a smart community, based on eco-friendly living, as ideated by a Danish architectural firm. It is meant to actively combat  climate change and wasteful emissions, while living in a greener and more sustainable manner - through the philosophy of going ‘back to the basics’. After all, not too long ago, the world was not as connected as it is today. In earlier times, trade was limited to the exchanging of goods between villagers (“I give you fresh meat, if you share your berries with me”) or, at the most, between bordering villages. Just the thought of having tropical fruits such as pineapple and bananas available to you in Western Europe in the dead of winter, would be nothing short of laughable in medieval times. Community  were built to be self-reliant, rather than reliant on external factors, excessive power demands, and complicated (inter)national trade relations. If something could not be produced or generated, it was simply not available. In essence, this sums up what ReGen Villages are hoping to achieve. WHAT ARE REGEN VILLAGES? Essentially, ReGen villages aim to be a micro-city, which offer residents the luxury of living in a “high-tech eco village”. So, back to basics, in a high-tech manner! To reach this unique goal, artificial intelligence is integrated with self-providing systems. As such, this entire community is self-reliant and minimises its waste and energy use. Even if this means converting trash into sources of energy to fuel other projects in the village. And no, this project is not the ambitious dream of a dreamer. Plans for implementing it are in an advanced stage, with the first pilot community planned to be built in the Almere area in the Netherlands at the end of this year. Plans for similar ReGen Villages in Northern Europe, the USA, and even in Asia are well underway as well. So if you are looking to play your part in making the world a better place and always wanted to live in a small-scale, self-sufficient village, this might just be your chance. AGRICULTURAL COMMUNES The inventors drew inspiration from the idea of small  agriculture communes, that produce all the food that they need. And such initiatives could prove to be very valuable and much needed: one of the greatest threats to our earth is the excessive agriculture, serving to feed billions and billions of people. Resulting in deforestation, scarcity of water, higher CO2 emissions and excessive consumption water and fertiliser. Hence, a huge threat to the wellbeing of our future generations. By combining existing techniques, ReGen Villages will help the environment recover instead of actively destroying it. The small community hosts various buildings that are dedicated to the cultivation of certain vegetables and crops, all grown in a favourable climate through the use of greenhouses. This leads to a quiet and rustic, yet cohesive neighbourhood that feeds its diverse population with organic food, that meets the equally diverse nutritional needs. OFF-GRID SUSTAINABLE NEIGHBOURHOODS The villages will be positively off-grid, cleverly playing in to the ever increasing need of a place to unwind and settle down, in this increasingly noisier and busier time. They are comprised of power positive homes alone, while completely running on renewable energy, employing smart and sustainable water management, and using advanced waste-to-resource systems. All of these systems will continuously be subject to ongoing research to further improve and optimise its efficiency.   For these systems to work smoothly, artificial intelligence and the Internet of Things play an important role. Such as for the infrastructure of the community, eventually leading to more energy, water and organic food being produced per household than that it actually uses. The surplus can be exchanged for reduced mortgage payments.   WHY SHOULD YOU JOIN THE WAITING LIST? ReGen is just one of the many eco-village concepts that are popping up left, right and center. Although, as most of these projects are still in the stage of being built, you might not be able to move into one of these communities instantly. But if you are excited and passionate about the concept, you are welcome to join the waiting list for any of the planned communities in your desired country. Why, you ask? Well, for one, living in such a micro-city will ensure that the life of your family does not negatively impact the planet. Such eco villages combine smart living and the technology of  smart cities with a higher quality of life and more of that unique community-feel. At the same time, they offer an open platform for more innovation initiatives, especially when it comes to solutions for renewable energy, smart agriculture, and water and waste management. And, even more importantly, a platform that can easily be duplicated.   All of these are arguments that you could use to convince your spouse or significant other to pack your bags, put the house on sale, and secure your spot in a true eco-community. Although they might be more tempted by the stunning house and lack of noisy neighbours that come with the deal. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/general
Meet ReGen Villages. A concept for a smart community, based on eco-friendly living, as ideated by a Danish architectural firm. It is meant to actively combat  climate change and wasteful emissions, while living in a greener and more sustainable manner - through the philosophy of going ‘back to the basics’. After all, not too long ago, the world was not as connected as it is today. In earlier times, trade was limited to the exchanging of goods between villagers (“I give you fresh meat, if you share your berries with me”) or, at the most, between bordering villages. Just the thought of having tropical fruits such as pineapple and bananas available to you in Western Europe in the dead of winter, would be nothing short of laughable in medieval times. Community  were built to be self-reliant, rather than reliant on external factors, excessive power demands, and complicated (inter)national trade relations. If something could not be produced or generated, it was simply not available. In essence, this sums up what ReGen Villages are hoping to achieve. WHAT ARE REGEN VILLAGES? Essentially, ReGen villages aim to be a micro-city, which offer residents the luxury of living in a “high-tech eco village”. So, back to basics, in a high-tech manner! To reach this unique goal, artificial intelligence is integrated with self-providing systems. As such, this entire community is self-reliant and minimises its waste and energy use. Even if this means converting trash into sources of energy to fuel other projects in the village. And no, this project is not the ambitious dream of a dreamer. Plans for implementing it are in an advanced stage, with the first pilot community planned to be built in the Almere area in the Netherlands at the end of this year. Plans for similar ReGen Villages in Northern Europe, the USA, and even in Asia are well underway as well. So if you are looking to play your part in making the world a better place and always wanted to live in a small-scale, self-sufficient village, this might just be your chance. AGRICULTURAL COMMUNES The inventors drew inspiration from the idea of small  agriculture communes, that produce all the food that they need. And such initiatives could prove to be very valuable and much needed: one of the greatest threats to our earth is the excessive agriculture, serving to feed billions and billions of people. Resulting in deforestation, scarcity of water, higher CO2 emissions and excessive consumption water and fertiliser. Hence, a huge threat to the wellbeing of our future generations. By combining existing techniques, ReGen Villages will help the environment recover instead of actively destroying it. The small community hosts various buildings that are dedicated to the cultivation of certain vegetables and crops, all grown in a favourable climate through the use of greenhouses. This leads to a quiet and rustic, yet cohesive neighbourhood that feeds its diverse population with organic food, that meets the equally diverse nutritional needs. OFF-GRID SUSTAINABLE NEIGHBOURHOODS The villages will be positively off-grid, cleverly playing in to the ever increasing need of a place to unwind and settle down, in this increasingly noisier and busier time. They are comprised of power positive homes alone, while completely running on renewable energy, employing smart and sustainable water management, and using advanced waste-to-resource systems. All of these systems will continuously be subject to ongoing research to further improve and optimise its efficiency.   For these systems to work smoothly, artificial intelligence and the Internet of Things play an important role. Such as for the infrastructure of the community, eventually leading to more energy, water and organic food being produced per household than that it actually uses. The surplus can be exchanged for reduced mortgage payments.   WHY SHOULD YOU JOIN THE WAITING LIST? ReGen is just one of the many eco-village concepts that are popping up left, right and center. Although, as most of these projects are still in the stage of being built, you might not be able to move into one of these communities instantly. But if you are excited and passionate about the concept, you are welcome to join the waiting list for any of the planned communities in your desired country. Why, you ask? Well, for one, living in such a micro-city will ensure that the life of your family does not negatively impact the planet. Such eco villages combine smart living and the technology of  smart cities with a higher quality of life and more of that unique community-feel. At the same time, they offer an open platform for more innovation initiatives, especially when it comes to solutions for renewable energy, smart agriculture, and water and waste management. And, even more importantly, a platform that can easily be duplicated.   All of these are arguments that you could use to convince your spouse or significant other to pack your bags, put the house on sale, and secure your spot in a true eco-community. Although they might be more tempted by the stunning house and lack of noisy neighbours that come with the deal. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/general
SMART COMMUNITIES: ECO-LIVING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY
SMART COMMUNITIES: ECO-LIVING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY
Barrow Foundation women
Barrow & Cousins Family foundation friendly ecovillage environment farm project. The village lies on the south Bank of the central River of the Gambia in the Niamina Dankunku. It has a population of about 3,500 people, ‘Mandinkas’ are the main ethnic group. Dankunku is about 10 km from the main road from Soma-Basse and is reached via a small access road. Dankunku has a public elementary school next to a small clinic, agriculture, cattle breeding  and forestry slightly. The village benefits from the project of rural water supply by the installation of standpipes at strategic locations in the community, but there is no water line connections to individual households. There is no electricity or telephone connections, this will in most parts of the community communication extremely difficult or it is very limited. People operate in the region, both livestock breeding and agriculture . The most important monoculture in the area are peanuts. The main food crops are rice, millet and various vegetables. However. Therefore they must rely heavily on support from other family members and / or relatives who live in other areas. Dankunku beside the river has a lot of wild horses, animals. These include monkeys, bush pigs, hyenas, and until a few years, tigers and leopards that occur, however, because of the high deforestation in the area no longer exists. Yet all this could be introduced in the area with the support of appropriate projects.My foundation would like to welcome members & visitors to our ecovillage village Project in Dankunku.Dankunku as a rich cultural / traditional heritage. Culture and tradition is usually seen in this community as an important factor to promote unity, cooperation for mutual trust, understanding and cohesion among the people. The annual cultural festival is held there will always be held as “Homecoming Festival” for people from Dankunku who currently reside far away. This provides an opportunity to the families, friends, relatives and loved ones to reconnect. Membership & Visitors Current members: 8 Open to new members Open to visitors We welcome Guest , volunteers workers ,exchange visitors & memebers in our Ecovillage Project . We provide entertainment , Mandinka Dancing & druming lesson & Camp Fire inside our ecovillage project every evening for our Guest,Visitors,volunteers and memebers of the community ,can offer people an opportunity to socialise with others from different social and cultural backgrounds. Volunteering roles You can get involved in a number of ways to make a positive changes in our community, some of the opportunities available include: Fundraising Planting trees Building Maintenance Teaching Children & Adult Education Event Management Volunteer programme Co-ordination Arts & African Dancing ,Drumming Workshops Facilitation IT support (SEO/Website Maintenance/Content Management) Trustee Roles There are lots of different reasons for volunteering with us: gaining work experience and gaining and improving employability skills, contributing to the local community while keeping busy, meeting new people in a great work environment , improving mental health and feeling valued, or simply for the rewarding feeling of helping the community So, what should you expect from us? We will look at the skills we, as an organisation, currently require, and match these up with your skills set. During your induction meeting, we shall agree a list of things you will be responsible for, so you always know what you are meant to be doing. You’ll also be assigned a supervisor to guide you and provide ongoing training. get involved:  https://ecovillage.org/get-involved/ https://www.whatsorb.com/category/community
Barrow & Cousins Family foundation friendly ecovillage environment farm project. The village lies on the south Bank of the central River of the Gambia in the Niamina Dankunku. It has a population of about 3,500 people, ‘Mandinkas’ are the main ethnic group. Dankunku is about 10 km from the main road from Soma-Basse and is reached via a small access road. Dankunku has a public elementary school next to a small clinic, agriculture, cattle breeding  and forestry slightly. The village benefits from the project of rural water supply by the installation of standpipes at strategic locations in the community, but there is no water line connections to individual households. There is no electricity or telephone connections, this will in most parts of the community communication extremely difficult or it is very limited. People operate in the region, both livestock breeding and agriculture . The most important monoculture in the area are peanuts. The main food crops are rice, millet and various vegetables. However. Therefore they must rely heavily on support from other family members and / or relatives who live in other areas. Dankunku beside the river has a lot of wild horses, animals. These include monkeys, bush pigs, hyenas, and until a few years, tigers and leopards that occur, however, because of the high deforestation in the area no longer exists. Yet all this could be introduced in the area with the support of appropriate projects.My foundation would like to welcome members & visitors to our ecovillage village Project in Dankunku.Dankunku as a rich cultural / traditional heritage. Culture and tradition is usually seen in this community as an important factor to promote unity, cooperation for mutual trust, understanding and cohesion among the people. The annual cultural festival is held there will always be held as “Homecoming Festival” for people from Dankunku who currently reside far away. This provides an opportunity to the families, friends, relatives and loved ones to reconnect. Membership & Visitors Current members: 8 Open to new members Open to visitors We welcome Guest , volunteers workers ,exchange visitors & memebers in our Ecovillage Project . We provide entertainment , Mandinka Dancing & druming lesson & Camp Fire inside our ecovillage project every evening for our Guest,Visitors,volunteers and memebers of the community ,can offer people an opportunity to socialise with others from different social and cultural backgrounds. Volunteering roles You can get involved in a number of ways to make a positive changes in our community, some of the opportunities available include: Fundraising Planting trees Building Maintenance Teaching Children & Adult Education Event Management Volunteer programme Co-ordination Arts & African Dancing ,Drumming Workshops Facilitation IT support (SEO/Website Maintenance/Content Management) Trustee Roles There are lots of different reasons for volunteering with us: gaining work experience and gaining and improving employability skills, contributing to the local community while keeping busy, meeting new people in a great work environment , improving mental health and feeling valued, or simply for the rewarding feeling of helping the community So, what should you expect from us? We will look at the skills we, as an organisation, currently require, and match these up with your skills set. During your induction meeting, we shall agree a list of things you will be responsible for, so you always know what you are meant to be doing. You’ll also be assigned a supervisor to guide you and provide ongoing training. get involved:  https://ecovillage.org/get-involved/ https://www.whatsorb.com/category/community
Barrow Foundation women
Barrow Foundation women's work camps group community
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