Close Welcome writers, influencers and dreamers, make the world a greener place
Register here
Forgot password
Forgot password
or
or

Close
Close Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
Close Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
Close Reset password
your profile is 33% complete:
33%
Update profile Close
Close WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-Change

For writers, influencers and dreamers who want to make the world a greener place.

WhatsOrb reaches monthly about 28.000 thousand visitors who want - like you - to make the world a greener place. Share your expertise and all can benefit.

Become an influencer and write and share sustainable news and innovations globally
Are you a writer or do you have ideas about sustainability which you want to share? Register and share your green knowledge and news. WhatsOrb offers you global exposure for your article.

If your article meets certain standards, you receive promotional gains like Facebook promotions and Google Ads advertising.

Community naomi seibt and her opponents on climate change | Upload Society

Naomi Seibt And Her Opponents On Climate Change

by: Jans Jansen
naomi seibt and her opponents on climate change | Upload

The young German Naomi Seibt, who sees herself as a supporter of the libertarian movement (persons, actions, structures, organizations, etc. that promote absolute freedom), categorically denies climate change. How many opponents does she have?

Naomi Seibt On Climate Change

Naomi Seibt, Sophie Atzpodien and Sibylla Heckmann
How can a fuel cell be optimized and thus drive a vehicle in an environmentally friendly way? Naomi Seibt, Sophie Atzpodien, and Sibylla Heckmann from the St. Mauritz grammar school won third place with their physics contribution at 'Schüler experimentieren.'

In addition to her short scientific theses, her political background is particularly important. Naomi Seibt’s mother works as a lawyer for politicians from the AfD. Naomi herself repeatedly appeared with well-known extremists and officials of these identities in public and took part in their marches.

Naomi Seibt is almost as young as the climate crisis activist Greta Thunberg and many other activists. With one big difference: Naomi Seibt categorically denies climate change and deliberately argues against green electricity with dubious theories. Because of this, the German Naomi Seibt is increasingly criticized. 

Recommended: Who’s Greta Thunberg’s Rival On Climate Facts, Naomi Seibt?

Naomi Seibt: YOUTUBE

Despite everything, Naomi Seibt has almost 37,000 followers on YouTube but is highly controversial internationally due to her close ties to Alternative für Deutschland. Naomi Seibt’s mother, Karoline Seibt, works as a lawyer for AfD officials. The Pope did not receive Naomi Seibt, no bike was borrowed from Arnold Schwarzenegger, and no millionaires transported Naomi Seibt on carbon racing yachts across the Atlantic’! 

 


                                                                 Naomi Seibt - The Anti Greta Thunberg
                                                 Naomi Seibt And Her Many Opponents On Climate Change

Naomi Seibt's Followers Say: "Climate Doesn't Need Protection."

man, open door, sea
'Climate does not need protection'? Maybe life itself?

According to her information, Naomi Seibt wants to arouse the skepticism of her viewers with her videos. Because in her opinion, there is an absolute discussion taboo under the guise of scientific results. However, if you listen more closely, you will notice the contemptuous undertones of the blonde, innocent-looking 19-year-old Naomi Seibt. There is talk of a ‘censorship crisis’ after YouTube deleted one of Naomi Seibt’s videos and ‘harmful child-rearing’ and ‘fairness of performance.’

Naomi Seibt not so much to offer when it comes to climate change. 'The climate does not need protection.' This borders on an emotionalized personification of the climate. Climate is not one-dimensional. Climate is a complex and wholly misunderstood and not even clearly defined problem, ”says the 19-year-old Naomi Seibt in one of her YouTube videos. Given the temperatures - which are too warm for December - some would contradict her.

Recommended: Climate Extremes Australia Floods, Wildfires And Destruction

Propping Up A Synthetic Greta Thunberg

The Heartland Institute began working with popular young German YouTube personality Naomi Seibt. Funding for our Germany Environmental Issues project will enable Heartland to provide Naomi with the equipment and resources she needs to present a series of useful videos calling attention to the negative impacts of overreaching environmental regulations. This past year (2019), Naomi Seibt started a YouTube channel airing short videos in German and English, including her thoughts on climate change and other topics. Her most-watched video, posted seven months ago, has 176,000 views, according to YouTube, and is titled Climate Change Just Hot Air?

Instead of talking about the role that fossil fuels play in causing the climate crisis or what humans have to do to prevent catastrophic warming, Heartland’s video asks viewers to consider one teen versus another teen. That framing also invites viewers to overlook that one lone teenage climate activist isn’t the only person urging international action to ward off climate change.

Recommended: Global Warming By CO2 Or Cooling By A Grand Solar Minimum

Noami Seibt's Opponents On Climate Change

Jamie Margolin, 17, Climate Change

Margolin began organizing lobbying efforts and public demonstrations at the age of 14 in her hometown of Seattle, Washington, before she grew frustrated with the lack of engagement and response to enacting real change to address climate change. 

She then founded 'Zero Hour,' a youth-led climate action group that seeks to emphasize the urgency of the effects of climate change on communities across the world and organizes marches, summits, and demonstrations put on in partnership with other youth organizations, including their July youth summit in Miami and September's Global Climate Week of Action. This a totally different approach than Naomi Seibt!


                                                 Naomi Seibt And Her Many Opponents On Climate Change
                                               How a group of teens built the climate movement Zero Hour

Greta Thunberg, 16, Climate Change Awareness

Thunberg was first pictured sitting alone outside the Swedish parliament in a strike that she hoped would raise alarms among lawmakers. Soon, she had spurred an international movement of students striking on behalf of climate change.

Greta Thunberg Times
Greta Thunberg's foto for Time Magazine

Followers from Naomi Seibt call Naomi Seibt 'Counter Gretha' because of her different climate change thoughts. Greta Thunberg, in the meantime, moved her on-the-ground protests for official action on climate change to water, sailing across the Atlantic from her native Sweden to New York City on a zero-emissions sailboat to march with a crowd of more than 60,000 people before delivering a scathing speech at the United Nations General Assembly to shame leaders for their inaction on climate change.

Thunberg was nominated in March 2019 for the Nobel Peace Prize for her efforts, and she won the Nobel Prize in December 2019.

Recommended: Climate Change Natural Man-Made: Marching Towards Extinction

Isra Hirsi, 16, Climate Change Awareness

Hirsi is the eldest daughter of prominent Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar, but she's earned a reputation in her own right as a climate change activist.

Isra Hirsi head, fence
Isra Hirsi, climate change awareness

After learning about the sharp racially divided effects of climate change, then-15-year-old Hirsi sprang into action to get climate change on local and national lawmakers' official agendas.

 

                         Representative Ilhan Omar’s Daughter Takes On Climate Change | NBC News Now
                                          Naomi Seibt And Her Many Opponents On Climate Change

In January 2019, Hirsi founded the US Youth Climate Strike group, an American chapter of a global climate activist movement. In her role as executive director, Hirsi has been a critical part of activating a chapter to join the estimated 1.6 million students across 120 countries to skip school in March 2019 to demand official action on climate change and spoke at the Minneapolis march as part of the global climate strike on September 20.

Recommended: Climate Change Natural Man-Made: Causes And Facts

Mari Copeny, 11, Water Access

Copeny, also known as "Little Miss Flint," shot to fame when she was eight years old in March 2016 when she wrote a letter to President Barack Obama about the water crisis in Flint, Michigan. After reading her letter, Obama flew to Flint and shined a national spotlight on the disaster. 

Mari Copeny protesting Flint Water
Mary Copeny, protesting for clean water in Flint

After her big presidential moment, Copeny has continued her work, including in ads for the Peoples Climate March and starting the hashtag #WednesdaysForWater. She sends out a weekly alert about places in need of clean water. The company's partnership with a water-filtration company also facilitates drinkable water in deprived communities.


                                                 Naomi Seibt And Her Many Opponents On Climate Change
                 Watch 8-year-old Mari Copeny (2016) read her Flint water crisis letter to President Barack Obama

Helena Gualinga, 17, Climate Issues 

I grew up in a small community called Sarayaku in the Ecuadorian Amazon and has been fighting for climate issues 'her whole life'.

Helena Gualinga face, tatoo
Helena Gualinga, fighting for climate issues 'my entire life.'

And we have been fighting big oil since I was a little kid. I've seen my uncles and aunts fight against these big companies to protect our territories, and they've been criminalized for that. We realized that these companies are the same companies creating climate change. When I was little, my uncles used to run out in the jungle and keep the military out of our territories. Now it's in the courthouses, and with paperwork.

Recommended: Amazon Water War: Fires, Hydro Dams, Climate Change S.O.S.


                                                 Naomi Seibt And Her Many Opponents On Climate Change
                                             Ecuadorian Helena Gualinga participated in the Climate Summit.

I also work with indigenous women and children back in the Amazon. I post things on the internet and keep people informed of what's happening back in the Amazon. I'm trying to be a voice for my people, from Ecuador to what they have to say.

What inspired you to become a climate activist?

I was terrified of what would happen to my community, mainly because I also grew up partly in Europe, so I didn't know if I would go back home, and the only thing I would find would be destruction.

How do you think your generation's climate activism is different from what's been done in the past?

I think that climate activism has been something that has been going on, but it has not been as big as what we're seeing, and I think that will have a significant impact because everyone is in this together. I believe this is a massive revolution that's happening.

What's the first thing for people to do?

  • People at home should start doing today to fight the climate crisis? On an individual level, we should stop consuming everything we don't need
  • corporations to start doing today to fight the climate crisis? We need to stop the fossil-fuel industry. We can't continue with that. We have got to stop it now
  • world leaders should start doing today to fight the climate crisis? They can help us prevent the fossil-fuel industry and protect indigenous people in the Amazon because those are the people who have been protecting the world's rainforest for a very long time now. There are a lot of things happening to indigenous people. Governments and companies persecute them, and that would be a massive step if that stopped. And then also get involved and start to support indigenous communities to continue their healthy lifestyle and have this connection to the Western world.

Tekanang, 21, Climate Issues 

Tekanang, 21, is from the tiny reef-lined island nation of Tuvalu and has been involved in climate issues since 2013 "because I care about my home island, and I don't want it to be gone."

speech
Tekanang, 21, is from the tiny reef-lined island nation of Tuvalu and has been involved in climate issues since 2013 

The nine low-lying coral atolls of Tuvalu are spread across less than 20 square miles in the South Pacific and sit, on average, about 6 feet above sea level. In 2013, our government launched climate actions. They want the youth to be active and voice opinions and how we feel about our future. When we are at home, we usually spread awareness with posters, just for people to be aware of how we are struggling with climate change.

What inspired you to become a climate activist?

Our last prime minister, Enele Sopoaga. He inspired us all to climate action. In Tuvalu, we are always affected by sea-level rise and storm surges. It's different than when we were growing up. Now it seems like it's frequently occurring.

Recommended: Five Minutes To Midnight: Climate Change Action Fighting The Clock

Group of people fighting climate change sea level rising

A lot of people are panicking. They're thinking of migrating to other places. Most of all, we don't want to lose our nationality. We're Tuvaluans. If we go to different areas, we'll be deemed, refugees. In our home country, you can be yourself — you can be Tuvaluan, speak your language, with your tradition and culture, and your free will.

How do you think your generation's climate activism is different from what's been done in the past?

We are the future generation of our countries. We are doing this for ourselves and our sons and grandsons, our future selves too.

What's the first thing for people to do?

  • People at home should start doing today to fight the climate crisis? They should have a change of heart and mind, not to look down on us island communities or countries affected by climate change.
  • Should corporations start doing today to fight the climate crisis? They should lower their carbon emissions and use renewable energy.
  • Should world leaders start doing today to fight the climate crisis? They should lower their carbon emissions and use renewable energy.

Penny Tovar is 24, Climate Issues 

Penny Tovar is a social-media influencer and nurse from Portland, Oregon; she advocates for vegan and cruelty-free beauty who said she'd been involved in climate issues.

Penny Tovar colorful shirt, green trouser
Penny Tovar is 24. A social media influencer and nurse from Portland

I do content on YouTube and Instagram about beauty. I don't promote anything unless it's vegan, cruelty-free. I also work with beauty-recycling programs so that you can send them your empty containers, and they recycle it for you.

What inspired you to become a climate activist?

I ran across this video on YouTube from Lauren Singer. She did a video where she fit three years' worth of trash into a jar. Up until I saw that video, I never thought about my impact on the environment. And that's scary because that means that there are other people like that right now.

 

                                               I Spoke at the United Nations! Youth climate summit 2019
                                               Naomi Seibt And Her Many Opponents On Climate Change


That video made me think, whoa, how much trash am I producing as a single person? I had to completely reevaluate the products that I use on my skin, on my hair, the clothes that I wear, and especially what I promote to my audience because I have a total of 850,000 followers.

How do you think your generation's climate activism is different from what's been done in the past?

We have the internet. That's what's different. Back in the day, before there was the internet, the only way word spread was by mouth and by people on the streets, which is still active and powerful because it makes a statement. But now everyone can contribute, even by tweeting about something like "#climateaction this is what I want to see happen." This is why it's such a movement right now: Everybody can participate.

What's the first thing people should do?

  • People at home should start doing today to fight the climate crisis? Reevaluate your practices. Sit down. Look at your trash. What are you throwing away? For me, I noticed it was food packaging. I found a local grocery store that sells a lot of package-free goods. So now I always try to make my meals vegan, package-free.
  • Should corporations start doing today to fight the climate crisis? Reduce your waste. Someone earlier today mentioned how plastic bottles could be used to fix sidewalks and cement. Rethink what you're doing. Innovate
  • Should world leaders start doing today to fight the climate crisis? Listen, you can't eat money. People think it's very inconvenient to change our ways right now because we're so profoundly set in hundreds of years of habits. Still, the most significant inconvenience of all is running out of clean water, running out of fresh air, running out of food, and then we all die.

Sarah-Anna Awad, 26, Climate Change

Sarah-Anna Awad, 26, is from Austria, which she said is "facing a big crisis with our glaciers melting."

Sarah-Anna Awad, EU flag
Sarah-Anna Awad, 26, is from Austria, climate change.

I'm here to represent the World Association of Girl Scouts and Girl Guides. One of the biggest things that we're trying to do is enable all our girls to get involved, via our app, wherever protests are happening — not only climate protests, but also, for example, reforestation. We try to gather different projects and share them.

Austria is a country where tourism is extreme, and especially skiing tourism, winter tourism. Everyone is complaining that the glaciers are melting, but they are not ready to do something because they always want to profit.

What inspired you to become a climate activist?

At the United Nations Rio Earth Summit in 1992, a girl spoke up. When she did her speech, it was amazing for me. It was the first time that I saw someone speaking up that loudly.

How do you think your generation's climate activism is different from what's been done in the past?

It's a lot easier to get information from all around the world, and then we're sharing it. It's also the feeling of being connected and the support that you get worldwide.

What's the first thing people should do?

  • People at home should start doing today to fight the climate crisis? You just need to be aware of what you're doing, what you're buying, and the things you're eating. Even if it's only small things, every individual can change.
  • Should corporations start doing today to fight the climate crisis? There's a lot of solutions around. There's a lot of businesses that are focusing on becoming more sustainable. You need to invest in that if you want the long-term solution.
  • Should world leaders start doing today to fight the climate crisis? Governments need to listen to the experts. I think that's one of the most natural things that they can do. They don't need to come up with their ideas.

Bertine Lakjohn, 18, Climate Issues 

Bertine Lakjohn is from the Marshall Islands and said her interest in climate issues began when she was in high school.

Bertine Lakjohn sitting outside, camera's
Bertine Lakjohn is from the Marshall Islands

I facilitated a youth leadership camp focused on why leadership is essential in combating climate change. First, we educate them about leadership and the impacts of climate change. Then we have a dialog about climate change. We ask them to come up with the idea that they can present, and we invite relevant officials, government officials, to these climate dialogues.

What inspired you to become a climate activist?

I wrote a poem. That was sort of what inspired me to continue in this field. It was about how industrialization has a significant impact on the environment and our culture and traditions.

I moved to Japan for high school, and when I came back, everything was completely different. Before I left, the water was warmer in a place that I used to like swimming, and then when I came back, it was super cold. I assume that would change fish migration patterns because the fish that swam there is no longer there.

How do you think your generation's climate activism is different from what's been done in the past?

Before, what I interpret is that they were just informing people that this was happening. Now we're pressuring the government — not only people but also the people who can do something. We're urging them and telling them we need to do this now. We can't just keep denying or just waiting until the crisis hits us intensely.

What's the first thing people should do?

  • People at home should start doing today to fight the climate crisis? If you have a strong connection to environmental issues, I think you should be influencing others to take the same steps as you. Those that are uninformed informed them; that those who want to do more but don't know how to teach them.
  • Should corporations start doing today to fight the climate crisis? I think they should start investing in climate movements and get themselves involved.
  • Should world leaders start doing today to fight the climate crisis? In my country, the government should leave a space open for youth representation because it's mostly the youth taking the initiative on this climate-change issue. The best way for us to have a voice is to have that youth representation in the government. I think we should just end fossil-fuel usage for all three (individuals, corporations, and leaders).

Liza Zhytkova, 21, Climate Issues

Liza Zhytkova, 21, was born in Belarus but grew up in the US, where she says her interest in climate issues started within the past year.

Lizza Zhytkova, street, high rise buildings

I don't shop anymore; I thrift. Meat consumption has gone significantly down. I also use my social media as a platform to get my friends and people I know in my community engaged.

A lot of my friends have also stopped shopping at fast-fashion stores. A lot of them are going vegetarian. It's small activism. It's not anything as substantial as some people who work here and organize this event. But I'm hoping to get there eventually.

What inspired you to become a climate activist?

I think it was just a culmination of Greta's quick rise to fame, and then the Amazon burning that kind of really pushed this issue of climate to the forefront of my mind.

How do you think your generation's climate activism is different from what's been done in the past?

I think that, as opposed to previous movements in the '70s or the '60s, our generation is much more willing to work with the older generations, and we're more collaborative. In the past, it seemed like it was pushing against the status quo, versus now we just need to come up with solutions to help solve the issue, rather than fighting the people who are causing the problem.

What's the first thing people should do?

  • People at home should start doing today to fight the climate crisis? On an individual scale, it's the obvious things: Don't use as much water, be conscious of how much you're traveling, be aware of what you're buying. Be a conscious consumer. Reuse, recycle, all of that good stuff.
  • Should corporations start doing today to fight the climate crisis? I have a very bleak outlook on corporations. I don't think that they're going to change anytime soon. I believe that it's up to the government to regulate them because we live in a very capitalist, neoliberal world.
  • Should world leaders start doing today to fight the climate crisis? A very, very aggressive carbon tax to force people to cut down. Gradual easing into it just doesn't cut it anymore.

Veer Qumar Mattabadul Is 21, Involved In Climate Issues For About Four Years.

Veer Qumar Mattabadul is 21. Hailing from Mauritius's Indian Ocean island, he said he'd been involved in climate issues for about four years.

Veer Qumar Mattabadul, suit in front orange signs

I do blue cleanups, cleaning the sea, cleaning the seaside, and even cleaning rivers. We also have international stakeholders, professional swimmers, and divers, who are helping us. I'm also on the national youth council. We tend to reject youth because we are considered useless in most societies. I think the youth is not useless; we are simply used less. I also try to be a role model for others. I'm a little bit popular at the university, and since I'm popular, I try to do good things.

What inspired you to become a climate activist?

Barack Obama and Michelle Obama, because they try to promote youth.

How do you think your generation's climate activism is different from what's been done in the past?

In the past, our voices were oppressed. In my country, we were not given importance. But we're seeing the youth rising, for instance, with the climate strike. We are becoming more motivated. We are becoming more aware.

What's the first thing people should do?

  • People at home should start doing today to fight the climate crisis? Education is a priority. The only thing that is destroying humanity is the mentality of people. People are not aware of it. People will contribute to pollution, will ruin the environment until they know and understand the importance of their actions until they become victims.
  • Should corporations start doing today to fight the climate crisis? Sponsor youth, provide them with resources, promote them.
  • Should world leaders start doing today to fight the climate crisis? The laws need to be strict. The rules need to be specific about those who are polluting, those going against the laws.

Daniel Gbujie, Climate And The Health Effects Of A Changing Environment.

Daniel Gbujie, 30, started getting involved in climate issues about three years ago when he learned about the health effects of a changing environment as a young doctor.

Daniel Gbujie holding name tag

My journey started when I was a delegate of the World Medical Association at the UN Climate Change Convention in Marrakech in 2016. They started telling us about the health implications of climate change.

What inspired you to become a climate activist?

If you've been following the Nigerian narrative, you will understand that there was this Boko Haram incident, "Bring Back Our Girls." People don't know how that incident started.

The entire topography in northern Nigeria has changed in the last five years, meaning that herdsmen and cattle don't have glasses. People were just moving with guns and arrows everywhere, looking for grasses. And because there is a weak government, officials turned the other eye, and hundreds of girls went missing.

So my organization is trying to tell people where this problem starts from. We've been able to say to people, "Did you know climate change caused this senseless killing?" Team 54 Project, the organization I founded, designed a concept around an app that can notify people on the ground about ecological problems. Sometimes when people know the amount of rain coming, they will be able to plan. It's built to be a reporting app that will notify farmers in real-time through SMS.

How do you think your generation's climate activism is different from what's been done in the past?

Social media has helped us. We are seeing what people that are not our age are doing. We're seeing what Greta, a 16-year-old, is doing. It's time we work together.

What's the first thing people should do?

  • People at home should start doing today to fight the climate crisis? On an individual level, let us all return to organic farming, especially for subsistence farming.
  • Should corporations start doing today to fight the climate crisis? It is profitable for you as a businessperson to fight this. You are going to have two-thirds of the world population of young people. You are going to have two-thirds of the world population saying they want eco-friendly things, vegan things.
  • Should world leaders start doing today to fight the climate crisis? The government needs to give businesses incentives.

You just met young climate activists who have worries about the changing climate and their future. Most of them have a different opinion than Naomi Seibt. That does not mean that the ideas from Naomi Seibt are all wrong, or wrong at all. Both camps are scientists who agree with climate change but disagree about how humanity influences the climate compared to natural cycles. Naomi Seibt also doubts if solar and wind energy will be the right solution.

Recommended: Renewables In Danger! Solar And Wind Energy: Start Digging

Sophia Mathur, 12, Is Taking The Ontario Government To Court Over Climate Change

Sophia Mathur

My name is Sophia. I’m 12 years old, and I’m one of the seven young people – backed by Ecojustice – suing the Government of Ontario to weaken the province’s climate targets and violate Ontarians’ Charter rights.
For as long as I can remember, I’ve worried about the climate emergency. I’ve attended countless rallies, met with politicians, and spoken at conferences. This fall, I even got to meet Greta Thunberg! Getting to meet one of my heroes was fun. But I’m angry and a little sad that I have to do any of this.

I shouldn’t have had to become Canada’s first youth climate striker because in a rich country like Canada, with all our technological capability and access to the best science, governments should be doing much more than they are to lower emissions. I shouldn’t have to miss school to meet with politicians to convince them that my generation, my future is worth fighting for. And I shouldn’t have to take our government to court to defend our right to a safe climate and a healthy environment.

Mine east of Suncor in oil sands
Mine east of Suncor in oil sands

But we’re in a climate emergency, and with our futures on the line, staying home and hoping someone else will fix the problem is not an option. So I’m fighting – for me, for you, and for every living being that makes this planet their home.

Recommended: Climate Lawsuit Against Government Will It Work? Netherlands

Two weeks ago, at the press conference announcing our lawsuit, I was nervous. But I looked over my shoulder and saw my fellow applicants – the six other smart, funny, and daring young climate leaders who are also part of this lawsuit – and felt braver.

Then I looked across the stage and saw the powerful legal team Ecojustice has assembled to fight this case on our behalf and felt stronger. That’s when I knew that, as long as we stick together, we could win. But we’re going to need your help.

Everything Ecojustice is doing to support my fellow applicants and me cost money – even though they aren’t charging us a single dollar for their legal services. As an environmental law charity, they count on the generosity of people like you to develop, file, and win critical precedent-setting lawsuits just like this one.

We all have to be critical to reasons and solutions the various groups come up with to tackle climate change and provide the world with new sources of 'energy.' With everything people and organizations invent, we not only have to look at what it brings for the Western World but especially in developing countries. If our clean air means more child labor, environmental destruction, and exploitation, I wonder if we are on the right track!

Before you go!

Recommended: Is Neoliberalism Hurting Our Climate And The Paris Accord?

Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below.
We try to respond the same day.

Like to write your article about climate activism?
Click on 'Register' or push the button 'Write An Article' on the 'HomePage.'

Messange
You
Share this post
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
SIGN UP FOR MONTHLY TIPS & TRICKS
More like this:

Naomi Seibt And Her Opponents On Climate Change

The young German Naomi Seibt, who sees herself as a supporter of the libertarian movement (persons, actions, structures, organizations, etc. that promote absolute freedom), categorically denies climate change. How many opponents does she have? Naomi Seibt On Climate Change How can a fuel cell be optimized and thus drive a vehicle in an environmentally friendly way? Naomi Seibt, Sophie Atzpodien, and Sibylla Heckmann from the St. Mauritz grammar school won third place with their physics contribution at 'Schüler experimentieren.' In addition to her short scientific theses, her political background is particularly important. Naomi Seibt’s mother works as a lawyer for politicians from the AfD. Naomi herself repeatedly appeared with well-known extremists and officials of these identities in public and took part in their marches. Naomi Seibt is almost as young as the climate crisis activist Greta Thunberg and many other activists. With one big difference: Naomi Seibt categorically denies climate change and deliberately argues against green electricity with dubious theories. Because of this, the German Naomi Seibt is increasingly criticized.  Recommended:   Who’s Greta Thunberg’s Rival On Climate Facts, Naomi Seibt? Naomi Seibt: YOUTUBE Despite everything, Naomi Seibt has almost 37,000 followers on YouTube but is highly controversial internationally due to her close ties to Alternative für Deutschland. Naomi Seibt’s mother, Karoline Seibt, works as a lawyer for AfD officials. The Pope did not receive Naomi Seibt, no bike was borrowed from Arnold Schwarzenegger, and no millionaires transported Naomi Seibt on carbon racing yachts across the Atlantic’!                                                                     Naomi Seibt - The Anti Greta Thunberg                                                  Naomi Seibt And Her Many Opponents On Climate Change Naomi Seibt's Followers Say: "Climate Doesn't Need Protection." 'Climate does not need protection'? Maybe life itself? According to her information, Naomi Seibt wants to arouse the skepticism of her viewers with her videos. Because in her opinion, there is an absolute discussion taboo under the guise of scientific results. However, if you listen more closely, you will notice the contemptuous undertones of the blonde, innocent-looking 19-year-old Naomi Seibt. There is talk of a ‘censorship crisis’ after YouTube deleted one of Naomi Seibt’s videos and ‘harmful child-rearing’ and ‘fairness of performance.’ Naomi Seibt not so much to offer when it comes to climate change. 'The climate does not need protection.' This borders on an emotionalized personification of the climate. Climate is not one-dimensional. Climate is a complex and wholly misunderstood and not even clearly defined problem, ”says the 19-year-old Naomi Seibt in one of her YouTube videos. Given the temperatures - which are too warm for December - some would contradict her. Recommended:  Climate Extremes Australia Floods, Wildfires And Destruction Propping Up A Synthetic Greta Thunberg The Heartland Institute began working with popular young German YouTube personality Naomi Seibt. Funding for our Germany Environmental Issues project will enable Heartland to provide Naomi with the equipment and resources she needs to present a series of useful videos calling attention to the negative impacts of overreaching environmental regulations. This past year (2019), Naomi Seibt started a YouTube channel airing short videos in German and English, including her thoughts on climate change and other topics. Her most-watched video, posted seven months ago, has 176,000 views, according to YouTube, and is titled Climate Change Just Hot Air? Instead of talking about the role that fossil fuels play in causing the climate crisis or what humans have to do to prevent catastrophic warming, Heartland’s video asks viewers to consider one teen versus another teen. That framing also invites viewers to overlook that one lone teenage climate activist isn’t the only person urging international action to ward off climate change. Recommended:  Global Warming By CO2 Or Cooling By A Grand Solar Minimum Noami Seibt's Opponents On Climate Change Jamie Margolin, 17, Climate Change Margolin began organizing lobbying efforts and public demonstrations at the age of 14 in her hometown of Seattle, Washington, before she grew frustrated with the lack of engagement and response to enacting real change to address climate change.  She then founded 'Zero Hour,' a youth-led climate action group that seeks to emphasize the urgency of the effects of climate change on communities across the world and organizes marches, summits, and demonstrations put on in partnership with other youth organizations, including their July youth summit in Miami and September's Global Climate Week of Action. This a totally different approach than Naomi Seibt!                                                  Naomi Seibt And Her Many Opponents On Climate Change                                                How a group of teens built the climate movement Zero Hour Greta Thunberg, 16, Climate Change Awareness Thunberg was first pictured sitting alone outside the Swedish parliament in a strike that she hoped would raise alarms among lawmakers. Soon, she had spurred an international movement of students striking on behalf of climate change. Greta Thunberg's foto for Time Magazine Followers from Naomi Seibt call Naomi Seibt 'Counter Gretha' because of her different climate change thoughts. Greta Thunberg, in the meantime, moved her on-the-ground protests for official action on climate change to water, sailing across the Atlantic from her native Sweden to New York City on a zero-emissions sailboat to march with a crowd of more than 60,000 people before delivering a scathing speech at the United Nations General Assembly to shame leaders for their inaction on climate change. Thunberg was nominated in March 2019 for the Nobel Peace Prize for her efforts, and she won the Nobel Prize in December 2019. Recommended:  Climate Change Natural Man-Made: Marching Towards Extinction Isra Hirsi, 16, Climate Change Awareness Hirsi is the eldest daughter of prominent Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar, but she's earned a reputation in her own right as a climate change activist. Isra Hirsi, climate change awareness After learning about the sharp racially divided effects of climate change, then-15-year-old Hirsi sprang into action to get climate change on local and national lawmakers' official agendas.                            Representative Ilhan Omar’s Daughter Takes On Climate Change | NBC News Now                                           Naomi Seibt And Her Many Opponents On Climate Change In January 2019, Hirsi founded the US Youth Climate Strike group, an American chapter of a global climate activist movement. In her role as executive director, Hirsi has been a critical part of activating a chapter to join the estimated 1.6 million students across 120 countries to skip school in March 2019 to demand official action on climate change and spoke at the Minneapolis march as part of the global climate strike on September 20. Recommended:  Climate Change Natural Man-Made: Causes And Facts Mari Copeny, 11, Water Access Copeny, also known as "Little Miss Flint," shot to fame when she was eight years old in March 2016 when she wrote a letter to President Barack Obama about the water crisis in Flint, Michigan. After reading her letter, Obama flew to Flint and shined a national spotlight on the disaster.  Mary Copeny, protesting for clean water in Flint After her big presidential moment, Copeny has continued her work, including in ads for the Peoples Climate March and starting the hashtag #WednesdaysForWater. She sends out a weekly alert about places in need of clean water. The company's partnership with a water-filtration company also facilitates drinkable water in deprived communities.                                                  Naomi Seibt And Her Many Opponents On Climate Change                  Watch 8-year-old Mari Copeny (2016) read her Flint water crisis letter to President Barack Obama Helena Gualinga, 17, Climate Issues  I grew up in a small community called Sarayaku in the Ecuadorian Amazon and has been fighting for climate issues 'her whole life'. Helena Gualinga, fighting for climate issues 'my entire life.' And we have been fighting big oil since I was a little kid. I've seen my uncles and aunts fight against these big companies to protect our territories, and they've been criminalized for that. We realized that these companies are the same companies creating climate change. When I was little, my uncles used to run out in the jungle and keep the military out of our territories. Now it's in the courthouses, and with paperwork. Recommended:  Amazon Water War: Fires, Hydro Dams, Climate Change S.O.S.                                                  Naomi Seibt And Her Many Opponents On Climate Change                                              Ecuadorian Helena Gualinga participated in the Climate Summit . I also work with indigenous women and children back in the Amazon. I post things on the internet and keep people informed of what's happening back in the Amazon. I'm trying to be a voice for my people, from Ecuador to what they have to say. What inspired you to become a climate activist? I was terrified of what would happen to my community, mainly because I also grew up partly in Europe, so I didn't know if I would go back home, and the only thing I would find would be destruction. How do you think your generation's climate activism is different from what's been done in the past? I think that climate activism has been something that has been going on, but it has not been as big as what we're seeing, and I think that will have a significant impact because everyone is in this together. I believe this is a massive revolution that's happening. What's the first thing for people to do? People at home should start doing today to fight the climate crisis? On an individual level, we should stop consuming everything we don't need corporations to start doing today to fight the climate crisis? We need to stop the fossil-fuel industry. We can't continue with that. We have got to stop it now world leaders should start doing today to fight the climate crisis? They can help us prevent the fossil-fuel industry and protect indigenous people in the Amazon because those are the people who have been protecting the world's rainforest for a very long time now. There are a lot of things happening to indigenous people. Governments and companies persecute them, and that would be a massive step if that stopped. And then also get involved and start to support indigenous communities to continue their healthy lifestyle and have this connection to the Western world. Tekanang, 21, Climate Issues  Tekanang, 21, is from the tiny reef-lined island nation of Tuvalu and has been involved in climate issues since 2013 "because I care about my home island, and I don't want it to be gone." T ekanang, 21, is from the tiny reef-lined island nation of Tuvalu and has been involved in climate issues since 2013  The nine low-lying coral atolls of Tuvalu are spread across less than 20 square miles in the South Pacific and sit, on average, about 6 feet above sea level. In 2013, our government launched climate actions. They want the youth to be active and voice opinions and how we feel about our future. When we are at home, we usually spread awareness with posters, just for people to be aware of how we are struggling with climate change. What inspired you to become a climate activist? Our last prime minister, Enele Sopoaga. He inspired us all to climate action. In Tuvalu, we are always affected by sea-level rise and storm surges. It's different than when we were growing up. Now it seems like it's frequently occurring. Recommended:  Five Minutes To Midnight: Climate Change Action Fighting The Clock A lot of people are panicking. They're thinking of migrating to other places. Most of all, we don't want to lose our nationality. We're Tuvaluans. If we go to different areas, we'll be deemed, refugees. In our home country, you can be yourself — you can be Tuvaluan, speak your language, with your tradition and culture, and your free will. How do you think your generation's climate activism is different from what's been done in the past? We are the future generation of our countries. We are doing this for ourselves and our sons and grandsons, our future selves too. What's the first thing for people to do? People at home should start doing today to fight the climate crisis? They should have a change of heart and mind, not to look down on us island communities or countries affected by climate change. Should corporations start doing today to fight the climate crisis? They should lower their carbon emissions and use renewable energy. Should world leaders start doing today to fight the climate crisis? They should lower their carbon emissions and use renewable energy. Penny Tovar is 24, Climate Issues  Penny Tovar is a social-media influencer and nurse from Portland, Oregon; she advocates for vegan and cruelty-free beauty who said she'd been involved in climate issues. Penny Tovar is 24. A social media influencer and nurse from Portland I do content on YouTube and Instagram about beauty. I don't promote anything unless it's vegan, cruelty-free. I also work with beauty-recycling programs so that you can send them your empty containers, and they recycle it for you. What inspired you to become a climate activist? I ran across this video on YouTube from Lauren Singer. She did a video where she fit three years' worth of trash into a jar. Up until I saw that video, I never thought about my impact on the environment. And that's scary because that means that there are other people like that right now.                                                  I Spoke at the United Nations! Youth climate summit 2019                                                Naomi Seibt And Her Many Opponents On Climate Change That video made me think, whoa, how much trash am I producing as a single person? I had to completely reevaluate the products that I use on my skin, on my hair, the clothes that I wear, and especially what I promote to my audience because I have a total of 850,000 followers. How do you think your generation's climate activism is different from what's been done in the past? We have the internet. That's what's different. Back in the day, before there was the internet, the only way word spread was by mouth and by people on the streets, which is still active and powerful because it makes a statement. But now everyone can contribute, even by tweeting about something like "#climateaction this is what I want to see happen." This is why it's such a movement right now: Everybody can participate. What's the first thing people should do? People at home should start doing today to fight the climate crisis? Reevaluate your practices. Sit down. Look at your trash. What are you throwing away? For me, I noticed it was food packaging. I found a local grocery store that sells a lot of package-free goods. So now I always try to make my meals vegan, package-free. Should corporations start doing today to fight the climate crisis? Reduce your waste. Someone earlier today mentioned how plastic bottles could be used to fix sidewalks and cement. Rethink what you're doing. Innovate Should world leaders start doing today to fight the climate crisis? Listen, you can't eat money. People think it's very inconvenient to change our ways right now because we're so profoundly set in hundreds of years of habits. Still, the most significant inconvenience of all is running out of clean water, running out of fresh air, running out of food, and then we all die. Sarah-Anna Awad, 26, Climate Change Sarah-Anna Awad, 26, is from Austria, which she said is "facing a big crisis with our glaciers melting." Sarah-Anna Awad, 26, is from Austria, climate change. I'm here to represent the World Association of Girl Scouts and Girl Guides. One of the biggest things that we're trying to do is enable all our girls to get involved, via our app, wherever protests are happening — not only climate protests, but also, for example, reforestation. We try to gather different projects and share them. Austria is a country where tourism is extreme, and especially skiing tourism, winter tourism. Everyone is complaining that the glaciers are melting, but they are not ready to do something because they always want to profit. What inspired you to become a climate activist? At the United Nations Rio Earth Summit in 1992, a girl spoke up. When she did her speech, it was amazing for me. It was the first time that I saw someone speaking up that loudly. How do you think your generation's climate activism is different from what's been done in the past? It's a lot easier to get information from all around the world, and then we're sharing it. It's also the feeling of being connected and the support that you get worldwide. What's the first thing people should do? People at home should start doing today to fight the climate crisis? You just need to be aware of what you're doing, what you're buying, and the things you're eating. Even if it's only small things, every individual can change. Should corporations start doing today to fight the climate crisis? There's a lot of solutions around. There's a lot of businesses that are focusing on becoming more sustainable. You need to invest in that if you want the long-term solution. Should world leaders start doing today to fight the climate crisis? Governments need to listen to the experts. I think that's one of the most natural things that they can do. They don't need to come up with their ideas. Bertine Lakjohn, 18, Climate Issues  Bertine Lakjohn is from the Marshall Islands and said her interest in climate issues began when she was in high school. Bertine Lakjohn is from the Marshall Islands I facilitated a youth leadership camp focused on why leadership is essential in combating climate change. First, we educate them about leadership and the impacts of climate change. Then we have a dialog about climate change. We ask them to come up with the idea that they can present, and we invite relevant officials, government officials, to these climate dialogues. What inspired you to become a climate activist? I wrote a poem. That was sort of what inspired me to continue in this field. It was about how industrialization has a significant impact on the environment and our culture and traditions. I moved to Japan for high school, and when I came back, everything was completely different. Before I left, the water was warmer in a place that I used to like swimming, and then when I came back, it was super cold. I assume that would change fish migration patterns because the fish that swam there is no longer there. How do you think your generation's climate activism is different from what's been done in the past? Before, what I interpret is that they were just informing people that this was happening. Now we're pressuring the government — not only people but also the people who can do something. We're urging them and telling them we need to do this now. We can't just keep denying or just waiting until the crisis hits us intensely. What's the first thing people should do? People at home should start doing today to fight the climate crisis? If you have a strong connection to environmental issues, I think you should be influencing others to take the same steps as you. Those that are uninformed informed them; that those who want to do more but don't know how to teach them. Should corporations start doing today to fight the climate crisis? I think they should start investing in climate movements and get themselves involved. Should world leaders start doing today to fight the climate crisis? In my country, the government should leave a space open for youth representation because it's mostly the youth taking the initiative on this climate-change issue. The best way for us to have a voice is to have that youth representation in the government. I think we should just end fossil-fuel usage for all three (individuals, corporations, and leaders). Liza Zhytkova, 21, Climate Issues Liza Zhytkova, 21, was born in Belarus but grew up in the US, where she says her interest in climate issues started within the past year. I don't shop anymore; I thrift. Meat consumption has gone significantly down. I also use my social media as a platform to get my friends and people I know in my community engaged. A lot of my friends have also stopped shopping at fast-fashion stores. A lot of them are going vegetarian. It's small activism. It's not anything as substantial as some people who work here and organize this event. But I'm hoping to get there eventually. What inspired you to become a climate activist? I think it was just a culmination of Greta's quick rise to fame, and then the Amazon burning that kind of really pushed this issue of climate to the forefront of my mind. How do you think your generation's climate activism is different from what's been done in the past? I think that, as opposed to previous movements in the '70s or the '60s, our generation is much more willing to work with the older generations, and we're more collaborative. In the past, it seemed like it was pushing against the status quo, versus now we just need to come up with solutions to help solve the issue, rather than fighting the people who are causing the problem. What's the first thing people should do? People at home should start doing today to fight the climate crisis? On an individual scale, it's the obvious things: Don't use as much water, be conscious of how much you're traveling, be aware of what you're buying. Be a conscious consumer. Reuse, recycle, all of that good stuff. Should corporations start doing today to fight the climate crisis? I have a very bleak outlook on corporations. I don't think that they're going to change anytime soon. I believe that it's up to the government to regulate them because we live in a very capitalist, neoliberal world. Should world leaders start doing today to fight the climate crisis? A very, very aggressive carbon tax to force people to cut down. Gradual easing into it just doesn't cut it anymore. Veer Qumar Mattabadul Is 21, Involved In Climate Issues For About Four Years. Veer Qumar Mattabadul is 21. Hailing from Mauritius's Indian Ocean island, he said he'd been involved in climate issues for about four years. I do blue cleanups, cleaning the sea, cleaning the seaside, and even cleaning rivers. We also have international stakeholders, professional swimmers, and divers, who are helping us. I'm also on the national youth council. We tend to reject youth because we are considered useless in most societies. I think the youth is not useless; we are simply used less. I also try to be a role model for others. I'm a little bit popular at the university, and since I'm popular, I try to do good things. What inspired you to become a climate activist? Barack Obama and Michelle Obama, because they try to promote youth. How do you think your generation's climate activism is different from what's been done in the past? In the past, our voices were oppressed. In my country, we were not given importance. But we're seeing the youth rising, for instance, with the climate strike. We are becoming more motivated. We are becoming more aware. What's the first thing people should do? People at home should start doing today to fight the climate crisis? Education is a priority. The only thing that is destroying humanity is the mentality of people. People are not aware of it. People will contribute to pollution, will ruin the environment until they know and understand the importance of their actions until they become victims. Should corporations start doing today to fight the climate crisis? Sponsor youth, provide them with resources, promote them. Should world leaders start doing today to fight the climate crisis? The laws need to be strict. The rules need to be specific about those who are polluting, those going against the laws. Daniel Gbujie, Climate And The Health Effects Of A Changing Environment. Daniel Gbujie, 30, started getting involved in climate issues about three years ago when he learned about the health effects of a changing environment as a young doctor. My journey started when I was a delegate of the World Medical Association at the UN Climate Change Convention in Marrakech in 2016. They started telling us about the health implications of climate change. What inspired you to become a climate activist? If you've been following the Nigerian narrative, you will understand that there was this Boko Haram incident, "Bring Back Our Girls." People don't know how that incident started. The entire topography in northern Nigeria has changed in the last five years, meaning that herdsmen and cattle don't have glasses. People were just moving with guns and arrows everywhere, looking for grasses. And because there is a weak government, officials turned the other eye, and hundreds of girls went missing. So my organization is trying to tell people where this problem starts from. We've been able to say to people, "Did you know climate change caused this senseless killing?" Team 54 Project, the organization I founded, designed a concept around an app that can notify people on the ground about ecological problems. Sometimes when people know the amount of rain coming, they will be able to plan. It's built to be a reporting app that will notify farmers in real-time through SMS. How do you think your generation's climate activism is different from what's been done in the past? Social media has helped us. We are seeing what people that are not our age are doing. We're seeing what Greta, a 16-year-old, is doing. It's time we work together. What's the first thing people should do? People at home should start doing today to fight the climate crisis? On an individual level, let us all return to organic farming, especially for subsistence farming. Should corporations start doing today to fight the climate crisis? It is profitable for you as a businessperson to fight this. You are going to have two-thirds of the world population of young people. You are going to have two-thirds of the world population saying they want eco-friendly things, vegan things. Should world leaders start doing today to fight the climate crisis? The government needs to give businesses incentives. You just met young climate activists who have worries about the changing climate and their future. Most of them have a different opinion than Naomi Seibt. That does not mean that the ideas from Naomi Seibt are all wrong, or wrong at all. Both camps are scientists who agree with climate change but disagree about how humanity influences the climate compared to natural cycles. Naomi Seibt also doubts if solar and wind energy will be the right solution. Recommended:  Renewables In Danger! Solar And Wind Energy: Start Digging Sophia Mathur, 12, Is Taking The Ontario Government To Court Over Climate Change My name is Sophia. I’m 12 years old, and I’m one of the seven young people – backed by Ecojustice – suing the Government of Ontario to weaken the province’s climate targets and violate Ontarians’ Charter rights. For as long as I can remember, I’ve worried about the climate emergency. I’ve attended countless rallies, met with politicians, and spoken at conferences. This fall, I even got to meet Greta Thunberg! Getting to meet one of my heroes was fun. But I’m angry and a little sad that I have to do any of this. I shouldn’t have had to become Canada’s first youth climate striker because in a rich country like Canada, with all our technological capability and access to the best science, governments should be doing much more than they are to lower emissions. I shouldn’t have to miss school to meet with politicians to convince them that my generation, my future is worth fighting for. And I shouldn’t have to take our government to court to defend our right to a safe climate and a healthy environment. Mine east of Suncor in oil sands But we’re in a climate emergency, and with our futures on the line, staying home and hoping someone else will fix the problem is not an option. So I’m fighting – for me, for you, and for every living being that makes this planet their home. Recommended:  Climate Lawsuit Against Government Will It Work? Netherlands Two weeks ago, at the press conference announcing our lawsuit, I was nervous. But I looked over my shoulder and saw my fellow applicants – the six other smart, funny, and daring young climate leaders who are also part of this lawsuit – and felt braver. Then I looked across the stage and saw the powerful legal team Ecojustice has assembled to fight this case on our behalf and felt stronger. That’s when I knew that, as long as we stick together, we could win. But we’re going to need your help. Everything Ecojustice is doing to support my fellow applicants and me cost money – even though they aren’t charging us a single dollar for their legal services. As an environmental law charity, they count on the generosity of people like you to develop, file, and win critical precedent-setting lawsuits just like this one. We all have to be critical to reasons and solutions the various groups come up with to tackle climate change and provide the world with new sources of 'energy.' With everything people and organizations invent, we not only have to look at what it brings for the Western World but especially in developing countries. If our clean air means more child labor, environmental destruction, and exploitation, I wonder if we are on the right track! Before you go! Recommended:  Is Neoliberalism Hurting Our Climate And The Paris Accord? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about climate activism? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations