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Community sustainable housing reused materials and photo voltaic panels | Upload Green Architecture

Sustainable Housing Reused Materials And Photo-voltaic Panels

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by: Marike Boonstra
sustainable housing reused materials and photo voltaic panels | Upload

There are various problems concerning housing construction in countries as Lebanon: problems of waste management and construction pressure, for example. A solution could be Lifehaus, a new housing prototype for homes that regain building techniques from the ancestor and that use natural and recycled materials to create home-free emissions. The designers are aiming for a sustainable and inexpensive alternative that helps alleviate the problem of access to housing in developing countries.

Self-reliance and a low carbon footprint

The idea for Lifehaus emerged from the hand of Lebanese architect Nizar Haddad and Australian journalist Nadine Mazloum. The concept revolves around affordability, self-reliance and a low carbon footprint. The design corresponds to a house of 160 square meters: this surface consists of a study with living room, mezzanine, terrace, greenhouse and a technical room. The first experimental test was held in Baskinta, Lebanon.

The construction process

Lifehaus: comfortable, made with natural materials and low cost. It all sounds like a dream, but how does the design of Lifehaus actually work? In this video you will get to know in depth the construction process and the characteristics of this house, which is offered in three categories: economic, standard and luxury. It combines comfort with the application of traditional methods of construction and the use of natural materials available in the environment, to which parts and recycled products are added.

Reused materials and photovoltaic panels

The construction is shaped by different types of material. In particular, a fundamental part is based on local materials of low energy consumption such as limestone, clay, hemp or rock. Also, materials like reused glass bottles, tires and aluminium cans are discussed. Because there is no availability of wood or bamboo in the area, cement is chosen for the roofs.

The area around the house has been of great important in the design of Lifehaus. Created in a way that allows to retain heat and humidity, as well as to protect the interior of the external climatological conditions, this house is designed to operate outside the network and thus give a response to those who live in areas without access to electricity. Therefore, the design incorporates photovoltaic panels, as well as wind and hydraulic turbines to ensure the supply of the home.

The scarcity of water has also been included in the design. The house is equipped with a system for collecting rainwater, in addition to using recycled water for irrigation. And this model also seeks to alleviate the lack of food that effects millions of people in the world, which is why these houses also include a greenhouse and a hydroponic cultivation system.

A low-cost option

With Lifehaus, the creators want to facilitate access to housing by offering a low-cost option. Specifically, the price per square meter would be reduced by half compared to a house built by oneself. The reduced dependence on fuel and electricity would also mean significant savings for those who choose this type of house.

https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture

Sustainable Housing Reused Materials And Photo-voltaic Panels

There are various problems concerning housing construction in countries as Lebanon: problems of waste management and construction pressure, for example. A solution could be Lifehaus, a new housing prototype for homes that regain building techniques from the ancestor and that use natural and recycled materials to create home-free emissions. The designers are aiming for a sustainable and inexpensive alternative that helps alleviate the problem of access to housing in developing countries. Self-reliance and a low carbon footprint The idea for Lifehaus emerged from the hand of Lebanese architect Nizar Haddad and Australian journalist Nadine Mazloum. The concept revolves around affordability, self-reliance and a low carbon footprint. The design corresponds to a house of 160 square meters: this surface consists of a study with living room, mezzanine, terrace, greenhouse and a technical room. The first experimental test was held in Baskinta, Lebanon. The construction process Lifehaus: comfortable, made with natural materials and low cost. It all sounds like a dream, but how does the design of Lifehaus actually work? In this video you will get to know in depth the construction process and the characteristics of this house, which is offered in three categories: economic, standard and luxury. It combines comfort with the application of traditional methods of construction and the use of natural materials available in the environment, to which parts and recycled products are added. Reused materials and photovoltaic panels The construction is shaped by different types of material. In particular, a fundamental part is based on local materials of low energy consumption such as limestone, clay, hemp or rock. Also, materials like reused glass bottles, tires and aluminium cans are discussed. Because there is no availability of wood or bamboo in the area, cement is chosen for the roofs. The area around the house has been of great important in the design of Lifehaus. Created in a way that allows to retain heat and humidity, as well as to protect the interior of the external climatological conditions, this house is designed to operate outside the network and thus give a response to those who live in areas without access to electricity. Therefore, the design incorporates photovoltaic panels, as well as wind and hydraulic turbines to ensure the supply of the home. The scarcity of water has also been included in the design. The house is equipped with a system for collecting rainwater, in addition to using recycled water for irrigation. And this model also seeks to alleviate the lack of food that effects millions of people in the world, which is why these houses also include  a greenhouse and a hydroponic cultivation system. A low-cost option With Lifehaus, the creators want to facilitate access to housing by offering a low-cost option. Specifically, the price per square meter would be reduced by half compared to a house built by oneself. The reduced dependence on fuel and electricity would also mean significant savings for those who choose this type of house. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture
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