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Community greenest buildings in the world  sustainable highlights | Upload Green Architecture

Greenest Buildings In The World: Sustainable Highlights

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by: Sharai Hoekema
greenest buildings in the world  sustainable highlights | Upload

The battle against global warming must be fought on all fronts. Not only should we be looking at industry action and a radical shift in means of transportation, we also ought to take a good hard look at the way we go about our daily business. At the way our cities are currently organised to not only become ‘smarter’, but also more sustainable. 

Under the growing pressure of urbanisation and sharply rising property prices, cities have to find ways of allowing more people to comfortably live in the same area - while decreasing their carbon footprint. A challenge that some are struggling with, while others are tackling it heads-on. One new trend is that of urban gardens and vertical farms, more and more of which are sprouting up in cities worldwide.

Architects are quick to jump on this trend as well, and are coming up with increasingly ingenious solutions to make their buildings greener. At times, it looks as if they are locked in a fierce competition to come up with the most striking, the most sustainable, and the most eye-catching design that really makes a green statement. 

Ready to get inspired? Then take a look at some of the most publicised or remarkable examples.

The Crystal, London, United Kingdom

Often hailed as ‘one of the greenest buildings ever built by mankind’, The Crystal is a stunning landmark that cleverly uses natural daylight to significantly cut back on lighting costs. The smart lighting system in place, powered by solar panels, further eliminates unnecessary lighting; integrating LED and fluorescent lights when needed. Serving as the headquarters of telecom-giant Siemens, The Crystal also recycles both rainwater and sewage to generate fresh drinking water. 

The Crystal Building London

Pixel Building, Melbourne, Australia

The Pixel Building was the first building ever to obtain a perfect Green Star score, setting the benchmark for sustainable architecture in Australia. Not only is it completely carbon-free, in that the carbon generated by the building’s operations are offset by its generation of renewable energy. It is also proud of its carbon-neutral status, having offset the carbon in materials that were used to construct the building.

Pixel building Melbourne Australia

The Change Initiative, Shaikh Zayed Road, Dubai

As one of the world’s leading nations in mind-bending architecture and design, Dubai could not stay behind. After having built some of the world’s tallest skyscrapers, The Change Initiative was the next prestige project - a commercial building that took over the Pixel Building’s status as most sustainable building in the world. Not only does it house various shops and restaurants promoting green living, it also frequently hosts exhibitions and events highlighting new sustainable innovations.

The Change Initiative, Shaikh Zayed Road, Dubai

Bullitt Center, Seattle, USA

Upon its presentation, the Bullitt Center was introduced as a building with an ideal lifespan of 250 years. This really set the mark for making buildings part of a more ‘natural’ ecosystem, having an expiration date, so to speak. This brainchild of Bullitt Foundation president Denis Hayes is carbon and energy neutral, hosts a self-sufficient water and sewage processing system, and generates its energy using photovoltaic solar panels.

Bullitt Center, Seattle, USA

 


                                                   Greenest Buildings In The World: Fighting Global Warming
                                                 Coolest Most Environmentally Friendly Buildings in The World

ACROS Fukuoka Foundation Building, Fukuoka, Japan

Japan’s seventh largest city Fukuoka has spared little expense in promoting the ACROS Fukuoka Foundation Building as one of its main attractions. It is a poster child of the architectural concept of eco-architecture, blending in local greenery with sharp building designs. The heart of this building is made up of a massive atrium, flooding the insides with natural light. The water drainage system on the roof is also remarkable: it flows down like a mountain, watering the vegetation on its way down in a perfectly mimicked natural process.

ACROS Fukuoka Foundation Building, Fukuoka, Japan

Phipps’ Center For Sustainable Landscapes, Pittsburgh, USA

For a building carrying this name, you would already expect something quite spectacular. Thankfully, the Phipps’ Center For Sustainable Landscapes does not disappoint. From its beautiful rooftop garden, where visitors can take a stroll over the green roof, to its plant-filled hallways and staircases. Extra pluses include its water recycling system and use of renewable energy sources like wind, solar and geothermal for its operations.

Phipps’ Center For Sustainable Landscapes, Pittsburgh, USA

Wat Pa Maha Chedi Kaew, Sisaket, Thailand

This modern Buddhist temple, located in the beautiful town of Khun Han, Sisaket, also goes by the name of The Million Bottle Temple. Refreshingly, this states exactly what it is made out of: a million empty beer bottles. Befittingly green Heineken bottles are mixed with the brown bottles of local beer brand Chang to create a stunning whole. Construction already started back in 1984, as in initiative of Buddhist monks, with the temple and its surrounding comfort rooms and crematorium now acting as a literal beacon of green innovation.

Wat Pa Maha Chedi Kaew, Sisaket, Thailand

Bahrain World Trade Center, Manama, Bahrain

Standing tall at 50 floors, this twin tower complex celebrated its tenth birthday last year. As of now, the Bahrain World Trade Center, or BWTC, is still the only skyscraper in the world to have incorporated wind turbines as part of its blueprint. In an exceptional design feat, the two towers are interconnected using imposing sky bridges, which also act as the beams to which 225 kW wind turbines are attached. It looks good - and does well.

Bahrain World Trade Center, Manama, Bahrain

Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Yishun Central, Singapore

You will not be surprised to find out that one of the greenest hospitals in the world can be found in the tiny Asian island nation of Singapore, a hotspot for modern architecture. In the Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, an overwhelmingly green environment has been created to provide a healing environment for its patients - but also to take care of our planet’s health, through the use of a solar water heating system and renewable energy sources.

Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Yishun Central, Singapore

Taipei Public Library, Beitou branch, Taiwan

Lingering on the topic of public buildings in tiny Asian nations, the Taipei Public Library was largely designed around its huge windows that can be opened wide - allowing both light and fresh air to come in, reducing the need for artificial light and fans or airconditioning systems. Its roof catches rainwater, which is used to flush the toilets, and renewable energy sources are the norm.

Taipei Public Library, Beitou branch, Taiwan

Toronto Tree Tower, Toronto, Canada

A must-mention on any self-respecting list of green buildings, the Toronto Tree Tower is an ambitious project that proposes to build a residential block out of timber, complete with staggering walls overgrown with plants and trees rooting on large balconies. Watch this space.

Toronto Tree Tower, Toronto, Canada

Yin & Yang House, Kassel, Germany

One would not quickly associate Yin & Yang retreats with the German town on Kassel, although one only has to look at it to be convinced of its benefits. The house boasts gorgeous, relaxing gardens on its interlocking roof, while being fully self-sufficient. Architect Chris Precht has described his vision as “ecological materials we want to touch. Integrated gardens we can smell and eat. And buildings we can hear because bees and birds nest in them.”

Yin & Yang House, Kassel, Germany

Park Royal Hotel Pickering, Singapore

High rise gardens, reflecting pools, waterfalls and green walls. Need we say more?

Park Royal Hotel Pickering, Singapore

Recommended: Sustainable Green Buildings, Innovative Architects: Globally

‘Off The Grid Office’, location undecided

Another ambitious idea that has not yet been constructed but certainly deserves a mention. The ‘Off The Grid Office’ tries to mimic nature in its design and construction, in an attempt to bring us closer to nature: “any kind of human environment should be integrated in the existing natural environment, because it already offers perks that we normally try to reproduce through artificial materials,” according to architect Stefan Mantu.

The ‘Off The Grid Office'

Shilda Winery, Kakheti, Georgia

In the remote location of Kakheti, Georgia, one will have to look hard to find the Shilda Winery. The building is quite literally embedded in the surrounding vineyards and immerses itself in its natural environment. It effectively uses the thermal mass of the soil to optimise cooling inside the building - a must-have for any good winery - and has been designed to face north and therefore avoid direct solar gain.

Shilda Winery, Kakheti, Georgia

Now we really want to go out and visit all of those impressive buildings in person.

Recommended: Sustainable Circular Architecture, The Svart Hotel: Norway

Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day.

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Greenest Buildings In The World: Sustainable Highlights

The battle against global warming must be fought on all fronts. Not only should we be looking at industry action and a radical shift in means of transportation, we also ought to take a good hard look at the way we go about our daily business. At the way our cities are currently organised to not only become ‘smarter’, but also more sustainable.   Under the growing pressure of urbanisation and sharply rising property prices, cities have to find ways of allowing more people to comfortably live in the same area - while decreasing their carbon footprint. A challenge that some are struggling with, while others are tackling it heads-on. One new trend is that of urban gardens and vertical farms, more and more of which are sprouting up in cities worldwide. Architects are quick to jump on this trend as well, and are coming up with increasingly ingenious solutions to make their buildings greener. At times, it looks as if they are locked in a fierce competition to come up with the most striking, the most sustainable, and the most eye-catching design that really makes a green statement.   Ready to get inspired? Then take a look at some of the most publicised or remarkable examples. The Crystal, London, United Kingdom Often hailed as ‘one of the greenest buildings ever built by mankind’, The Crystal is a stunning landmark that cleverly uses natural daylight to significantly cut back on lighting costs. The smart lighting system in place, powered by solar panels, further eliminates unnecessary lighting; integrating LED and fluorescent lights when needed. Serving as the headquarters of telecom-giant Siemens, The Crystal also recycles both rainwater and sewage to generate fresh drinking water.   Pixel Building, Melbourne, Australia The Pixel Building was the first building ever to obtain a perfect Green Star score, setting the benchmark for sustainable architecture in Australia. Not only is it completely carbon-free, in that the carbon generated by the building’s operations are offset by its generation of renewable energy. It is also proud of its carbon-neutral status, having offset the carbon in materials that were used to construct the building. The Change Initiative, Shaikh Zayed Road, Dubai As one of the world’s leading nations in mind-bending architecture and design, Dubai could not stay behind. After having built some of the world’s tallest skyscrapers, The Change Initiative was the next prestige project - a commercial building that took over the Pixel Building’s status as most sustainable building in the world. Not only does it house various shops and restaurants promoting green living, it also frequently hosts exhibitions and events highlighting new sustainable innovations. Bullitt Center, Seattle, USA Upon its presentation, the Bullitt Center was introduced as a building with an ideal lifespan of 250 years. This really set the mark for making buildings part of a more ‘natural’ ecosystem, having an expiration date, so to speak. This brainchild of Bullitt Foundation president Denis Hayes is carbon and energy neutral, hosts a self-sufficient water and sewage processing system, and generates its energy using photovoltaic solar panels.   {youtube}                                                    Greenest Buildings In The World: Fighting Global Warming                                                  Coolest Most Environmentally Friendly Buildings in The World ACROS Fukuoka Foundation Building, Fukuoka, Japan Japan’s seventh largest city Fukuoka has spared little expense in promoting the ACROS Fukuoka Foundation Building as one of its main attractions. It is a poster child of the architectural concept of eco-architecture, blending in local greenery with sharp building designs. The heart of this building is made up of a massive atrium, flooding the insides with natural light. The water drainage system on the roof is also remarkable: it flows down like a mountain, watering the vegetation on its way down in a perfectly mimicked natural process. Phipps’ Center For Sustainable Landscapes, Pittsburgh, USA For a building carrying this name, you would already expect something quite spectacular. Thankfully, the Phipps’ Center For Sustainable Landscapes does not disappoint. From its beautiful rooftop garden, where visitors can take a stroll over the green roof, to its plant-filled hallways and staircases. Extra pluses include its water recycling system and use of renewable energy sources like wind, solar and geothermal for its operations. Wat Pa Maha Chedi Kaew, Sisaket, Thailand This modern Buddhist temple, located in the beautiful town of Khun Han, Sisaket, also goes by the name of The Million Bottle Temple. Refreshingly, this states exactly what it is made out of: a million empty beer bottles. Befittingly green Heineken bottles are mixed with the brown bottles of local beer brand Chang to create a stunning whole. Construction already started back in 1984, as in initiative of Buddhist monks, with the temple and its surrounding comfort rooms and crematorium now acting as a literal beacon of green innovation. Bahrain World Trade Center, Manama, Bahrain Standing tall at 50 floors, this twin tower complex celebrated its tenth birthday last year. As of now, the Bahrain World Trade Center, or BWTC, is still the only skyscraper in the world to have incorporated wind turbines as part of its blueprint. In an exceptional design feat, the two towers are interconnected using imposing sky bridges, which also act as the beams to which 225 kW wind turbines are attached. It looks good - and does well. Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Yishun Central, Singapore You will not be surprised to find out that one of the greenest hospitals in the world can be found in the tiny Asian island nation of Singapore, a hotspot for modern architecture. In the Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, an overwhelmingly green environment has been created to provide a healing environment for its patients - but also to take care of our planet’s health, through the use of a solar water heating system and renewable energy sources. Taipei Public Library, Beitou branch, Taiwan Lingering on the topic of public buildings in tiny Asian nations, the Taipei Public Library was largely designed around its huge windows that can be opened wide - allowing both light and fresh air to come in, reducing the need for artificial light and fans or airconditioning systems. Its roof catches rainwater, which is used to flush the toilets, and renewable energy sources are the norm. Toronto Tree Tower, Toronto, Canada A must-mention on any self-respecting list of green buildings, the Toronto Tree Tower is an ambitious project that proposes to build a residential block out of timber, complete with staggering walls overgrown with plants and trees rooting on large balconies. Watch this space. Yin & Yang House, Kassel, Germany One would not quickly associate Yin & Yang retreats with the German town on Kassel, although one only has to look at it to be convinced of its benefits. The house boasts gorgeous, relaxing gardens on its interlocking roof, while being fully self-sufficient. Architect Chris Precht has described his vision as “ ecological materials we want to touch. Integrated gardens we can smell and eat. And buildings we can hear because bees and birds nest in them .” Park Royal Hotel Pickering, Singapore High rise gardens, reflecting pools, waterfalls and green walls. Need we say more? Recommended:  Sustainable Green Buildings, Innovative Architects: Globally ‘Off The Grid Office’, location undecided Another ambitious idea that has not yet been constructed but certainly deserves a mention. The ‘Off The Grid Office’ tries to mimic nature in its design and construction, in an attempt to bring us closer to nature: “ any kind of human environment should be integrated in the existing natural environment, because it already offers perks that we normally try to reproduce through artificial materials ,” according to architect Stefan Mantu. Shilda Winery, Kakheti, Georgia In the remote location of Kakheti, Georgia, one will have to look hard to find the Shilda Winery. The building is quite literally embedded in the surrounding vineyards and immerses itself in its natural environment. It effectively uses the thermal mass of the soil to optimise cooling inside the building - a must-have for any good winery - and has been designed to face north and therefore avoid direct solar gain. Now we really want to go out and visit all of those impressive buildings in person. Recommended:  Sustainable Circular Architecture, The Svart Hotel: Norway Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day.
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