Close Welcome writers, influencers and dreamers, make the world a greener place
Register here
Forgot password
Forgot password
or
or

Close
Close Inspiration on environmental sustainability, every month.

Currently 5,988 people are getting new inspiration every month from our global sustainability exchange. Do you want to stay informed? Fill in your e-mail address below:

Close For sustainability news hunters! The WhatsOrb newsletter!

Receive monthly the newest updates about sustainability from influencers and fellow writers. Cutting edge innovations and global environmental developments.

Close Reset password
your profile is 33% complete:
33%
Update profile Close
Close WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-Change

For writers, influencers and dreamers who want to make the world a greener place.

WhatsOrb reaches monthly about 7000 thousand visitors who want - like you - to make the world a greener place. Share your expertise and all can benefit.

Become an influencer and write and share sustainable news and innovations globally
Are you a writer or do you have ideas about sustainability which you want to share? Register and share your green knowledge and news. WhatsOrb offers you global exposure for your article.

If your article meets certain standards, you receive promotional gains like Facebook promotions and Google Ads advertising.



Community fellow travelers  we ve seen the world now let s save it | Upload Lifestyle

Fellow Travelers: We've Seen The World Now Let's Save It

Share this post
by: Al Liantz
fellow travelers  we ve seen the world now let s save it | Upload

If travellers use their purchasing power to influence travel suppliers to operate in a sustainable manner, there's no limit to what can be accomplished. Travellers, by their very nature, have an awareness about the world. Most Canadians are conscious of the damaging footprint travel can have on the environment and communities. They're witnessing the potential for destruction as they explore. They've observed attractions such as Angkor Wat, Cambodia's famous temple complex, deteriorate under the crush of vandalism, theft and blatant disregard as scores of tourists descended on the site every year. 

Pollution and exhaustion of resources

They've seen elephants forced to suffer through appalling conditions to lug tourists around on their backs. They've absorbed the reports on Canada's Arctic melting as a result of climate change and they've seen cultural traditions swept aside in exchange for cheap tourism dollars.

Elephant rides with people Asia
More than 3,000 elephants- including babies -are held captive in elephant tourist-attraction 'orphanages' and 'parks' across Asia 

Whether it's damage to the landscape, litter, pollution, exhaustion of resources or cultural erosion, an inundation of thoughtless tourists can overwhelm and desecrate a destination. World Tourism Day means, conscientious travellers must demand more from their travel suppliers. 

When I first joined the travel industry at the beginning of the decade, sustainability was not exactly the order of the day. That's not to say travel and sustainability coming together was unheard of — the travel sector first witnessed discussions and debates about the 'new promising field' of sustainable tourism in the 1970s — but, in my experience working for a magazine that covered the Canadian travel industry at large on a daily basis, I think it's fair to say the ideas of "sustainability" and "responsible travel" were rarely front-page news just a few years ago.

Climate change and sustainability

The last decade, as climate change compelled thinking on sustainability forward in general, a constantly growing number of responsible travellers are no longer willing to be part of the problem. Increasing power is being given to travellers to use their purchasing power to shape a more sustainable future for travel. If travellers use their purchasing power to influence travel suppliers to operate in a sustainable manner, there's no limit to what can be accomplished as it to relates a more sustainable future.

It's not complicated. Canadians simply need to know what to look for as they make their travel-related purchases. One thing that's valuable to keep in mind is that the best travel companies are great at executing unforgettable trips, but that doesn't mean they have the necessary expertise to deliver practical and impactful sustainability projects.

That's why progressive travel companies are increasingly partnering with leading sustainability organizations to help save wildlife and elevate communities in the places they visit. In doing so, they are giving agency to those leaders and organizers who are already knowledgeable and capable of delivering effective sustainable travel solutions and helping to ensure that what starts as good intentions actually has a positive effect on the world.

Sustainability is a journey

Travel companies are proud to talk about these critical relationships. They recognize that operating responsibly is valuable to their bottom line, and that's a good thing for everyone. By simply doing a little research online before booking your next trip, you can quickly discover which companies are supporting sustainable organizations in their efforts to ensure the negative impacts of the experiences they provide are minimal and managed.

It's also important to recognize that sustainability is a journey, not a destination. No travel company is going to flip a switch and become completely sustainable overnight, but those that are leading the charge towards a sustainable travel future are continually adopting new best practices and policies to reflect this ever-improving field.

Canadians have to ask about these policies. Let travel companies know that these things matter to you. For example, next time you're preparing to book a trip, inquire as to whether the operator has an animal welfare policy. Agreements or policies established with leading animal welfare organizations ensure that the animal-related experiences travel companies offer meet globally recognized animal welfare criteria.

You can also ask about their approach to in-destination purchases. Forward-looking travel companies work to help ensure the money you spend while travelling remains in the communities you visit, rather than simply taking as much as they can for themselves. Do their itineraries include stops in local shops and restaurants? The sale of locally made artisan handicrafts and products are vital to local economies. Culture and heritage-based work helps to create jobs, champion economic development, and build connections to the global marketplace. Companies that work to create itineraries that patronize local shops as often as possible put themselves in the best position to empower locals.

Lighthouse Bicycle Tours Hoi An, Vietnam
Photo by: Tran Thi Thuy Lien: Lighthouse Bicycle Tours visiting a local rice cracker bakery. Hoi An, Vietnam

You, the consumer, have the power. We must now use it effectively, obliging the travel industry to ensure that our beautiful planet can continue to provide us with the unforgettable opportunities to explore, experience, and exchange. It's now up to us all to apply the tenacious dedication and resolve we've demonstrated in exploring our planet to saving it.

As travellers, as explorers, we've always demonstrated our deeply rooted capacity to push beyond, to venture into the unknown, and to overcome the impossible. We do all this to satisfy our desire to push beyond preconceived limitations. We overcome oceans, deserts, mountains, political borders, language gaps and cultural differences because we believe in the beauty of our planet and we have a need to seek out and appreciate everything it has in store for us.

It's now up to us all to apply the tenacious dedication and resolve we've demonstrated in exploring our planet to saving it. For everything it's given us, we absolutely owe it that much.

By: Zach Vanasse

Cover photo: Pianist Paul Barton serenades Romsai the elephant with a performance of Beethoven’s Sonata Pathétique, repeating the melody section several times 'as he seems to like it'

https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/society

Messange
You
Share this post

I have interest in all topics that get us closer to a more sustainable world. My special focus lays on alternative energy such as cars driven by hydrogen and eletricity.

I have interest in all topics that get us closer to a more sustainable world. My special focus lays on alternative energy such as cars driven by hydrogen and eletricity.

Get updates on environmental sustainability in your mailbox every month.

Fellow Travelers: We've Seen The World Now Let's Save It

If travellers use their purchasing power to influence travel suppliers to operate in a sustainable manner, there's no limit to what can be accomplished. Travellers, by their very nature, have an awareness about the world. Most Canadians are conscious of the damaging footprint travel can have on the environment and communities. They're witnessing the potential for destruction as they explore. They've observed attractions such as Angkor Wat, Cambodia's famous temple complex, deteriorate under the crush of vandalism, theft and blatant disregard as scores of tourists descended on the site every year.  Pollution and exhaustion of resources They've seen elephants forced to suffer through appalling conditions to lug tourists around on their backs. They've absorbed the reports on Canada's Arctic melting as a result of climate change and they've seen cultural traditions swept aside in exchange for cheap tourism dollars. More than 3,000 elephants- including babies -are held captive in elephant tourist-attraction 'orphanages' and 'parks' across Asia  Whether it's damage to the landscape, litter, pollution, exhaustion of resources or cultural erosion, an inundation of thoughtless tourists can overwhelm and desecrate a destination. World Tourism Day means, conscientious travellers must demand more from their travel suppliers.  When I first joined the travel industry at the beginning of the decade, sustainability was not exactly the order of the day. That's not to say travel and sustainability coming together was unheard of — the travel sector first witnessed discussions and debates about the 'new promising field' of sustainable tourism in the 1970s — but, in my experience working for a magazine that covered the Canadian travel industry at large on a daily basis, I think it's fair to say the ideas of "sustainability" and "responsible travel" were rarely front-page news just a few years ago. Climate change and sustainability The last decade, as climate change compelled thinking on sustainability forward in general, a constantly growing number of responsible travellers are no longer willing to be part of the problem. Increasing power is being given to travellers to use their purchasing power to shape a more sustainable future for travel. If travellers use their purchasing power to influence travel suppliers to operate in a sustainable manner, there's no limit to what can be accomplished as it to relates a more sustainable future. It's not complicated. Canadians simply need to know what to look for as they make their travel-related purchases. One thing that's valuable to keep in mind is that the best travel companies are great at executing unforgettable trips, but that doesn't mean they have the necessary expertise to deliver practical and impactful sustainability projects. That's why progressive travel companies are increasingly partnering with leading sustainability organizations to help save wildlife and elevate communities in the places they visit. In doing so, they are giving agency to those leaders and organizers who are already knowledgeable and capable of delivering effective sustainable travel solutions and helping to ensure that what starts as good intentions actually has a positive effect on the world. Sustainability is a journey Travel companies are proud to talk about these critical relationships. They recognize that operating responsibly is valuable to their bottom line, and that's a good thing for everyone. By simply doing a little research online before booking your next trip, you can quickly discover which companies are supporting sustainable organizations in their efforts to ensure the negative impacts of the experiences they provide are minimal and managed. It's also important to recognize that sustainability is a journey, not a destination. No travel company is going to flip a switch and become completely sustainable overnight, but those that are leading the charge towards a sustainable travel future are continually adopting new best practices and policies to reflect this ever-improving field. Canadians have to ask about these policies. Let travel companies know that these things matter to you. For example, next time you're preparing to book a trip, inquire as to whether the operator has an animal welfare policy. Agreements or policies established with leading animal welfare organizations ensure that the animal-related experiences travel companies offer meet globally recognized animal welfare criteria. You can also ask about their approach to in-destination purchases. Forward-looking travel companies work to help ensure the money you spend while travelling remains in the communities you visit, rather than simply taking as much as they can for themselves. Do their itineraries include stops in local shops and restaurants? The sale of locally made artisan handicrafts and products are vital to local economies. Culture and heritage-based work helps to create jobs, champion economic development, and build connections to the global marketplace. Companies that work to create itineraries that patronize local shops as often as possible put themselves in the best position to empower locals. Photo by: Tran Thi Thuy Lien: Lighthouse Bicycle Tours visiting a local rice cracker bakery. Hoi An, Vietnam You, the consumer, have the power. We must now use it effectively, obliging the travel industry to ensure that our beautiful planet can continue to provide us with the unforgettable opportunities to explore, experience, and exchange. It's now up to us all to apply the tenacious dedication and resolve we've demonstrated in exploring our planet to saving it. As travellers, as explorers, we've always demonstrated our deeply rooted capacity to push beyond, to venture into the unknown, and to overcome the impossible. We do all this to satisfy our desire to push beyond preconceived limitations. We overcome oceans, deserts, mountains, political borders, language gaps and cultural differences because we believe in the beauty of our planet and we have a need to seek out and appreciate everything it has in store for us. It's now up to us all to apply the tenacious dedication and resolve we've demonstrated in exploring our planet to saving it. For everything it's given us, we absolutely owe it that much. By: Zach Vanasse Cover photo: Pianist Paul Barton serenades Romsai the elephant with a performance of Beethoven’s Sonata Pathétique, repeating the melody section several times 'as he seems to like it' https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/society