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Community coronavirus hates social distancing | Upload Lifestyle

Coronavirus Hates Social Distancing

by: Moon Apple
coronavirus hates social distancing | Upload

Social Distancing brought a lot of innovations. Some far fetched some acceptable annoying. Jajaxed came with a 'beach belt kit.' Christophe Gernigon, French designer and interior decorator, designed a curvilinear bell to help to space the tables and Mediamatic ETEN introduced: Serres Sépparées (separate greenhouses).

Coronavirus Lockdown Unlocked

person, bell shaped conavirus covers

The designers are moving around the world to look for useful solutions to create social distancing with objects other than devastating plexiglass plates. After the greenhouses on the canals of Amsterdam, it is the turn of Christophe Gernigon, French interior designer and decorator who has worked in the sector for more than 20 years with experiences in Carré Blanc (home textiles), Maison Sarah Lavoine et Arts & Influences ( Brussels concept store) and creator of Designer Particulier.

Recommended: Which Sustainable Food Keeps Your Immune System Running?

Lockdown Unlocked: Safe Eating

In a stunt to encourage social distancing, a German restaurant gave its diners hats with pool noodles upon its reopening. Cafe & Konditorei Rothe in Schwerin, Germany, reopened last week as the country begins to lift certain coronavirus restrictions. It posted a photo of its diners on Facebook, showing them in straw hats with colorful pool noodles pointing in three different directions to encourage social distancing from all sides (cover photo).

man, woman, swimming noodle, street, drinking
Customers sitting outside Cafe & Konditorei Rothe in Schwerin, Germany, all wore straw hats with two swimming pool noddles taped to the top as the cafe makes sure they do not mock social distancing.

Safe Eating: Plexiglass

Playing on the words plexiglass and eat (eating), he created Plex'Eat, a suspension with a disc that has a diameter of 80 centimeters to which a curved and shaped bell-shaped plexiglass plate is fixed. The wave-cut in the photos distributed on the site is positioned on the back of the bell to avoid the feeling of total closure and to allow diners, even non-cohabitants, to eat at the same table without too much distance. But a simple rotation could allow cohabiting diners not also to have to worry about raising their voices to talk to each other.

Bell shaped coronavirus shields

Recommended: Lock-down? Stay Healthy With This Body Workout At Home

Lockdown Unlocked: The Idea From Music

I was worried about the restaurateurs. So I thought of a device that would allow you to rediscover conviviality around a table, but without taking risks. All the spacing solutions for restaurant customers I've seen so far have the appearance of prison parlors.

The prototype is much more pleasant than the plexiglass plates that have started to swarm on the tables of Italian restaurants. The idea of ​​the plexiglass bell was born from an armchair in a concept store in Asia that was equipped with a bell to listen to music. The object is not yet in production, but there is already the interest of some plexiglass producers to verify the feasibility and start manufacturing and marketing.

Recommended: Heat Waves And COVID-19: A Killers Mix On Its Way

Pandemic Safe Eating: From ‘Quarantine Greenhouses’ to ‘Sneezing Fences,’

As COVID-19 restrictions ease, restaurateurs are considering new ways to accommodate physical distancing. Outfitted in face shields and holding long wooden planks in gloved hands, servers slide meals into mini-greenhouses lining Amsterdam’s waterfront. A pandemic riff on private dining rooms - chambres séparées in French - a Dutch restaurant has dubbed its experiment Serres Sépparées (separate greenhouses).


                                       Mediamatic ETEN trials greenhouses to shield diners from coronavirus

More like dining in a fishbowl than a behind-closed-doors experience, the ETEN restaurant at Amsterdam’s Mediamatic art center is putting a playful spin on protective barriers. Big enough for up to three people to gather around a candlelit table, these transparent enclosures serve as an example of what dining during relaxed COVID-19 containment measures could look like.

Coronavirus Lockdown Unlocked: Greenhouses

The five greenhouses, which artist Diana Scherer created for her ‘Spectrum Crops Findings in Colour’ project, overlook the Oosterdok harbor. They are quite small, so we worried it would feel claustrophobic, but the consensus is that they feel very cozy and intimate.

Mediamatic restaurant, greenhouses, people

Restaurants in the Netherlands will open their door again on the 1st of June only if the Governments think it is saved to do so and with ‘a lot of’ restrictions.

Unlocked: Safe Mediamatic ETEN

Mediamatic ETEN, a plant-based restaurant in Amsterdam, is putting a playful spin on protective barriers. Mediamatic calls its greenhouse model ‘new safe hospitality.’ Set in the context of COVID-19, Serres Séparées is indeed novel. The pandemic presents particular demands, and for restaurants, devising ways for guests and staff to maintain a safe distance at all times is crucial.

Recommended: Tiny House Becomes Solar Water Collecting Off-grid Egg

Coronavirus Lockdown Unlocked: London, South Korea, Sweden, Canada

Although we’ve seen this style of private-yet-public dining before - from pre-pandemic pods on the banks of London’s River Thames to glass domes along Ottawa’s Rideau Canal -  it holds promise for businesses navigating the current crisis.

glass pod, people, tables, couches, London Bridge

As COVID-19 restrictions ease, restaurateurs are considering new ways to accommodate physical distancing. In South Korean dining halls, for example, plexiglass partitions separating seated guests are commonplace. A rural Swedish restaurant, Stedsans in the Woods, announced plans to install a clear ‘sneezing fence’ on communal tables so you can talk to and see people on the other side of the table without being sneezed on.

Recommended: Sustainable Arctic Architecture: A Geodesic Dome

In Canada, most restaurateurs are questioning their ability to reopen at all, let alone contemplating ways to fund glass greenhouses or other private dining options. Lack of capital is a significant issue. The biggest concern is 70 percent of people are worried (about whether) they have enough money to reopen. That’s going to be one thing that stands in the way of any innovation.

Pop Up domes, restaurants, plants, buildings, lights

Even if restaurants are permitted to operate at 50 percent capacity, he adds, most will struggle to resume dine-in service. In addition to regular operating costs, there will likely be increased staffing requirements to cover enhanced cleaning and crowd control. Kitchens will have to be reconfigured to allow for physical distancing among staff. All of this will need to be accomplished with half the number of tables they usually rely on to generate revenue.

With the restrictions still being on, it’s going to be hard for anybody to make any investments in things like you see in other countries. Once we’re through this, hopefully, they’ll find a way to counteract the effects of the virus, and people will be able to start assembling again. That’s when our industry will bounce back. That’s when you’ll see the real innovation and the actual resilience of our sector.”

Keep Distance On The Beach

The Jajaxd Collective has introduced the ‘beach belt’ kit, which helps people keep the specified social distance on the beach. Since the beach becomes a trendy destination for areas with hot summer weather, the studio wanted to ease the general uncertainty, allowing people to enjoy the sand and sea.

people, beach, sea, colorful belts
Foto by JAJA x D. Keep Distance Scream The Signs: Your Holiday 2.0

Social Distancing: Impossible Fashion

The fashion world has responded to the request of social distancing by coming up with rather funny but impossible costumes. Funny or not, they help you to keep a distance and don’t allow anybody to come close! The costumes remind people that keeping a distance is a ‘serious matter’ and, at the same time, can trigger smiles and ‘discussion.’

girls, street-crossing, petty coats
The petticoat dress by multiply office

In the swimming pool, you can wear a floating device that fits around your body like a ‘pancake.’ Swimming will be hard, but at least you can keep half of your body cool while keeping people on a distance.

man, woman, swimming-pool

Keep Distance: Shoes With A 'Message'

4 pair shoes, long noses
Shoes made by Grigore Lup, Spain.

Social Distancing: Recreation 

people, circles, grass
These socially distancing circles can be seen in Domino Park in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

grass field, people, trees
When the pandemic hit Elblag, Poland, and forced the closure of the city’s contemporary art gallery, Director Adriana Kotynska, an architect, came up with an innovative solution to safely attract visitors to its public outdoor space. She turned the gallery’s overgrown lawn into a green checkerboard, mowing the grass in a pattern to create individual social isolation zones.

Tram Concept With Social Distancing Solutions.

Italian architect Arturo Tedeschi has designed a tram concept for the city of Milan called Passerella, which is equipped with discreet social distancing solutions. Designed as a modern take on the classic ATM Class 1500 tram, which was first introduced to the city in 1929, the Passerella reinterprets the style and proportions of the first model numbered 1503.

tram, street, buildings
Design Arturo Tedeschi

Along with updating its form, Tedeschi added technologies and adaptations for life following the coronavirus pandemic. Its interior features plexiglass shields to separate individual seats and circle-shaped markers on the floor to act as discreet signals of where travelers should stand to keep a safe distance.

interior tram
Design Arturo Tedeschi

table, chairs, social distancing shields
Frank Kunert's older work, Privacy, has taken on new meaning in today's context

Kunert said social distancing has also caused him to look at older pieces in a new light, such as the 2017 piece simply titled Privacy where a round dining table is divided into individual dining booths. "Many of my scenes match our so-called 'new normal' which isn't all that surprising," he said. "I'm driven by the topic of communication and society." Several other creatives have turned to model-making as an artistic outlet during the pandemic.

plastic tents, people, street
Photo by Angela Weiss. People dine in plastic tents to enable coronavirus social distancing at a restaurant in Manhattan. 

Before you go!

Recommended: Urban Mobility: Friendliest Bike Cities Worldwide

Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day.

Like to write your article about COVID-19 or social distancing measures?
Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected], and we will write an interesting article based on your input.

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I'm interested in everything that has to do with sustainability. My house is solar powered and I have my own water supply and filtering system.  I grow my own vegetables and fruit. Most of the time I go on the road by bicycle and for long distances I use public transport.

I'm interested in everything that has to do with sustainability. My house is solar powered and I have my own water supply and filtering system.  I grow my own vegetables and fruit. Most of the time I go on the road by bicycle and for long distances I use public transport.

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Coronavirus Hates Social Distancing

Social Distancing brought a lot of innovations. Some far fetched some acceptable annoying. Jajaxed came with a 'beach belt kit.'   Christophe Gernigon, French designer and interior decorator, designed a curvilinear bell to help to space the tables and Mediamatic ETEN introduced: Serres Sépparées (separate greenhouses). Coronavirus Lockdown Unlocked The designers are moving around the world to look for useful solutions to create social distancing with objects other than devastating plexiglass plates. After the greenhouses on the canals of Amsterdam, it is the turn of Christophe Gernigon, French interior designer and decorator who has worked in the sector for more than 20 years with experiences in Carré Blanc (home textiles), Maison Sarah Lavoine et Arts & Influences ( Brussels concept store) and creator of Designer Particulier. Recommended:  Which Sustainable Food Keeps Your Immune System Running? Lockdown Unlocked: Safe Eating In a stunt to encourage social distancing, a German restaurant gave its diners hats with pool noodles upon its reopening. Cafe & Konditorei Rothe in Schwerin, Germany, reopened last week as the country begins to lift certain coronavirus restrictions. It posted a photo of its diners on Facebook, showing them in straw hats with colorful pool noodles pointing in three different directions to encourage social distancing from all sides (cover photo). Customers sitting outside Cafe & Konditorei Rothe in Schwerin , Germany, all wore straw hats with two swimming pool noddles taped to the top as the cafe makes sure they do not mock social distancing. Safe Eating: Plexiglass Playing on the words plexiglass and eat (eating), he created Plex'Eat, a suspension with a disc that has a diameter of 80 centimeters to which a curved and shaped bell-shaped plexiglass plate is fixed. The wave-cut in the photos distributed on the site is positioned on the back of the bell to avoid the feeling of total closure and to allow diners, even non-cohabitants, to eat at the same table without too much distance. But a simple rotation could allow cohabiting diners not also to have to worry about raising their voices to talk to each other. Recommended:  Lock-down? Stay Healthy With This Body Workout At Home Lockdown Unlocked: The Idea From Music I was worried about the restaurateurs. So I thought of a device that would allow you to rediscover conviviality around a table, but without taking risks. All the spacing solutions for restaurant customers I've seen so far have the appearance of prison parlors. The prototype is much more pleasant than the plexiglass plates that have started to swarm on the tables of Italian restaurants. The idea of ​​the plexiglass bell was born from an armchair in a concept store in Asia that was equipped with a bell to listen to music. The object is not yet in production, but there is already the interest of some plexiglass producers to verify the feasibility and start manufacturing and marketing. Recommended:  Heat Waves And COVID-19: A Killers Mix On Its Way Pandemic Safe Eating: From ‘Quarantine Greenhouses’ to ‘Sneezing Fences,’ As COVID-19 restrictions ease, restaurateurs are considering new ways to accommodate physical distancing. Outfitted in face shields and holding long wooden planks in gloved hands, servers slide meals into mini-greenhouses lining Amsterdam’s waterfront. A pandemic riff on private dining rooms - chambres séparées in French - a Dutch restaurant has dubbed its experiment Serres Sépparées (separate greenhouses). {youtube}                                         Mediamatic ETEN  trials greenhouses to shield diners from coronavirus More like dining in a fishbowl than a behind-closed-doors experience, the ETEN restaurant at Amsterdam’s Mediamatic art center  is putting a playful spin on protective barriers. Big enough for up to three people to gather around a candlelit table, these transparent enclosures serve as an example of what dining during relaxed COVID-19 containment measures could look like. Coronavirus Lockdown Unlocked: Greenhouses The five greenhouses, which artist Diana Scherer created for her ‘Spectrum Crops Findings in Colour’ project, overlook the Oosterdok harbor. They are quite small, so we worried it would feel claustrophobic, but the consensus is that they feel very cozy and intimate. Restaurants in the Netherlands will open their door again on the 1 st of June only if the Governments think it is saved to do so and with ‘a lot of’ restrictions. Unlocked: Safe Mediamatic ETEN Mediamatic ETEN, a plant-based restaurant in Amsterdam, is putting a playful spin on protective barriers. Mediamatic calls its greenhouse model ‘new safe hospitality.’ Set in the context of COVID-19, Serres Séparées is indeed novel. The pandemic presents particular demands, and for restaurants, devising ways for guests and staff to maintain a safe distance at all times is crucial. Recommended:  Tiny House Becomes Solar Water Collecting Off-grid Egg Coronavirus Lockdown Unlocked: London, South Korea, Sweden, Canada Although we’ve seen this style of private-yet-public dining before - from pre-pandemic pods on the banks of London’s River Thames to glass domes along Ottawa’s Rideau Canal -  it holds promise for businesses navigating the current crisis. As COVID-19 restrictions ease, restaurateurs are considering new ways to accommodate physical distancing. In South Korean dining halls, for example, plexiglass partitions separating seated guests are commonplace. A rural Swedish restaurant, Stedsans in the Woods, announced plans to install a clear ‘sneezing fence’ on communal tables so you can talk to and see people on the other side of the table without being sneezed on. Recommended:  Sustainable Arctic Architecture: A Geodesic Dome In Canada, most restaurateurs are questioning their ability to reopen at all, let alone contemplating ways to fund glass greenhouses or other private dining options. Lack of capital is a significant issue. The biggest concern is 70 percent of people are worried (about whether) they have enough money to reopen. That’s going to be one thing that stands in the way of any innovation. Even if restaurants are permitted to operate at 50 percent capacity, he adds, most will struggle to resume dine-in service. In addition to regular operating costs, there will likely be increased staffing requirements to cover enhanced cleaning and crowd control. Kitchens will have to be reconfigured to allow for physical distancing among staff. All of this will need to be accomplished with half the number of tables they usually rely on to generate revenue. With the restrictions still being on, it’s going to be hard for anybody to make any investments in things like you see in other countries. Once we’re through this, hopefully, they’ll find a way to counteract the effects of the virus, and people will be able to start assembling again. That’s when our industry will bounce back. That’s when you’ll see the real innovation and the actual resilience of our sector.” Keep Distance On The Beach The Jajaxd Collective has introduced the ‘beach belt’ kit, which helps people keep the specified social distance on the beach. Since the beach becomes a trendy destination for areas with hot summer weather, the studio wanted to ease the general uncertainty, allowing people to enjoy the sand and sea. Foto by  JAJA x D.  Keep Distance Scream The Signs: Your Holiday 2.0 Social Distancing: Impossible Fashion The fashion world has responded to the request of social distancing by coming up with rather funny but impossible costumes. Funny or not, they help you to keep a distance and don’t allow anybody to come close! The costumes remind people that keeping a distance is a ‘serious matter’ and, at the same time, can trigger smiles and ‘discussion.’ The petticoat dress by multiply office In the swimming pool, you can wear a floating device that fits around your body like a ‘pancake.’ Swimming will be hard, but at least you can keep half of your body cool while keeping people on a distance. Keep Distance: Shoes With A 'Message' Shoes made by Grigore Lup, Spain. Social Distancing: Recreation  These socially distancing circles can be seen in Domino Park in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. When the pandemic hit Elblag, Poland, and forced the closure of the city’s  contemporary art gallery, Director  Adriana Kotynska, an architect, came up with an innovative solution to safely attract visitors to its public outdoor space. She turned the gallery’s overgrown lawn into a green checkerboard, mowing the grass in a pattern to create individual social isolation zones. Tram Concept With Social Distancing Solutions. Italian architect Arturo Tedeschi has designed a tram concept for the city of Milan called Passerella, which is equipped with discreet social distancing solutions. Designed as a modern take on the classic ATM Class 1500 tram, which was first introduced to the city in 1929, the Passerella reinterprets the style and proportions of the first model numbered 1503. Design Arturo Tedeschi Along with updating its form, Tedeschi added technologies and adaptations for life following the coronavirus pandemic. Its interior features plexiglass shields to separate individual seats and circle-shaped markers on the floor to act as discreet signals of where travelers should stand to keep a safe distance. Design Arturo Tedeschi Frank Kunert's older work, Privacy, has taken on new meaning in today's context Kunert said social distancing has also caused him to look at older pieces in a new light, such as the 2017 piece simply titled Privacy where a round dining table is divided into individual dining booths. "Many of my scenes match our so-called 'new normal' which isn't all that surprising," he said. "I'm driven by the topic of communication and society." Several other creatives have turned to model-making as an artistic outlet during the pandemic. Photo by Angela Weiss. People dine in plastic tents to enable coronavirus social distancing at a restaurant in Manhattan.  Before you go! Recommended:  Urban Mobility: Friendliest Bike Cities Worldwide Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about COVID-19 or social distancing measures? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations