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Community collapse  the world according to whatsorb | Upload General

Collapse: The World According To WhatsOrb

by: Sharai Hoekema
collapse  the world according to whatsorb | Upload

Humans are blind to the imminent environmental collapse. As it turns out, the acceleration of biodiversity loss may just be the sleeper event of the 21st century.

Collapse: The World According To WhatsOrb

The World According To WhatsOrb is an eight-part series describing the dire situation in which the world and humanity have now found itself. In continued chapters, it represents solutions, which could make short term improvements and save nature and humanity in the long term. It offers short-term goals that are highly achievable

The first chapter - this chapter - highlights the grim situation we are in, our mindset, and our instincts. In the end, it is about our 'infinite' world and a fantastic event somewhere on our nearby horizon. For the first time in human existence, its growth peak!

The second (Climate Cascade) and third chapters (Oceans Suffocateddiscuss the current state of affairs, including climate change and our dying oceans. These will not be for the faint of heart, as they will highlight the inexcusable predatory behavior as displayed by humanity.

Chapter 4 talks about the loss of biodiversity, a decline of insect populations, and the use of pesticides. But it is also about agriculture, permaculture, and food.

Chapter 5 talks about energy and resources. It is about ancient fossil fuels, nuclear power, and renewables, which are still at the embryonic stage. What do we need and how can we get this

Chapter 6 moves on to the topic of transportation. It is about commuting and traveling. But it is also about our homes, our cities, villages, and towns. How they are organized and how they should be held.

Chapter 7 then finally touches upon solutions for production and the industry. It talks about recycling and how to create a truly circular economy.

Chapter 8 is the last article of the series. It explores the timeframe of this all, attempting to find out just how much time we have to get our act together. 

Collapse: The World According To WhatsOrb is not about what we want to change by 2040 or 2050. It talks about what we can do tomorrow. It offers short-term goals that are highly achievable and can be understood by anyone, regardless of your background knowledge on the topic. The best part? The results will be visible and measurable within months - or even less.

Join us on the journey of Collapse: The World According To WhatsOrb and find out how you can do your part in preventing the soon inevitable collapse of nature.

The World According To WhatsOrb: The Human Enterprise

Do you know what the unifying yet decidedly unfavorable treat is that we, as humans, all share? We are curious. We always want to find out more, even if it harms us in the long run. This is how we managed to come up with such an extensive database of climate change-related matters, how we founded entire libraries on topics like habitat destruction and soil degradation. How we devised algorithms so precise, we could map the impact of a single millimeter’s rise in sea levels on indigenous monkey populations in the heart of the Amazon.

Woman, backpack, street
Photo by: Timo Ster, Unsplash. Curiosity makes us travel the world.

So far, so good. We know a lot of things, and if we do not understand something, we will set our hearts on finding out. This, combined with our ancient survival instincts, is why we are at the top of the world’s food chain. Bring in the unfavorable part of this trait. When we find out something that we do not necessarily enjoy or that threatens any part of our lives, we employ the ostrich-method. Meaning, we stick our heads in the sand and pretend we are not here.

people, head covered in sand, bottums
The ostrich-method

When we are faced with striking images of starving kids in Africa, we tend to look away. Rationalize it by saying that those images were doctored, and those things do not happen anymore. Actively fight it, by arguing that those charities are out to rob us and those poor babies will never see a cent of the donations. Notable exceptions aside, our first instinct is to turn a blind eye. We have this natural blind spot for things that we just don’t like.

Recommended: Hurting The Environment: The Palm Oil Paradox

Enter the heaps and heaps of data gathered on how exactly we are harming Mother Nature. The evidence is there, laid out for all of us to see. Unfortunately, most of us will look at this and agree that we are headed for our imminent demise but concede within the next breath that there is nothing ‘they’ can do about it right now. Let’s make it someone else’s problem at another time. Not here, not now. That would be inconvenient, after all.

Unfortunately, biodiversity does not have the time to wait ‘one more moment.’ There are a whole bunch of papers highlighting an alarming trend, in which the number of insects is found to be declining at a bizarre pace - up to 75% over the past few decades. Bird populations are faced with similar declines. This is a mass-murder event, but no news outlet feels obliged to report it. Why?

bird, wings, pole
Photo by Santanu Banduri, Unsplash. We like birds and a Bee-eater like on the picture, but do we care?

It appears that the loss of biodiversity has become the sleeper event of this century. As we, The Human Enterprise, continue to grow our operations, we do so at the detriment of other businesses. Or, in this case, all non-human life on earth. We take away their habitats, we change the climate that they thrive in, we excessively use pesticides, we pollute their soil and water, and we leave them homeless as we continue to expand.

The World: Finite

We tend to think of our world as a constant, a given. Something that will always be there, no matter what. We could not be further from the truth. The world is finite. Always has been, always will be. Together with millions and millions of other species, we share limited resources, too. And as one species thrives, it will inevitably lead to the demise of different species. That’s what survival of the fittest is all about.

In recent years, we lost track of this whole survival of the fittest proposition. Instead, we appear to be headed for our demise. We are no longer the most qualified, most suitable at adapting to our (changing) environment. Instead, we are the most headstrong, thinking that we can solve all of our problems by expanding and producing some more. This makes the battle between protecting nature and fostering economic growth such a heated one.

areal city, fish eye view
Photo by: Sergio Souza, Unsplash. Thinking that we can solve all of our problems by expanding and producing some more

We are actively pushing other species out of the game. In the past 50 years, we managed to decrease worldwide wildlife populations by 60 percent. A large number of animals have found themselves ranking near the top of the WWF’s most endangered list, including the African elephant, black rhino, tigers and killer whale. This cannot be the plan.

Worldwide decline of the entomofauna: A review of its drivers' PDF

At least these animals still get some attention. It is quite unprecedented how much effort has been put in the protection and forced procreation of pandas, for instance - with great thanks to its cuddliness. There are many more animals which are not so lucky. They lack the appeal, let’s just call it charisma, of some of the before-mentioned animals. These are the insects, microbes, and amphibians that we so direly need to keep the world as it is. Hence, the imminent collapse.

Recommended: Mankind Could Disappear Globally But The Earth Will Survive

Collapse: We Don’t Give A Damn

Funnily enough, most of us just do not seem to give a damn about the imminence and severity of this collapse. We claim not to care much for nature. Let’s see how much we care about our food, though. A large portion of foods that people undoubtedly enjoy is grown with the help of some of these animals, that now find themselves threatened by our very existence. Through pollination, for instance. 

Recommended: Robot Bees Are All The Buzz: Bees In Decline

Let’s not forget that we are not the ones who created this earth as we know it. We are the result of billions and billions of years of evaluation and progress, all of which performed at the hands of - you guessed it - nature and the microbes living in it.



                                          Humans and the Environment | Essentials of Environmental Science

Only Half-Century’s Worth Of Arable Soils Left

If someone would walk up to you today and tell you that we only have enough soil left to last us some 50 years, you would probably stop in your tracks and stare at this person. You might either feel scared or find yet another way of rationalizing their claim: ‘But we will probably have found suitable alternatives by then…’

The fact is that biological processes cannot be recreated. These are the processes that ‘make’ the earth as it is. They maintain the chemical balance of our oceans. They foster plants and bacteria that produce oxygen through photosynthesis. And they provide the healthy soil that we need to grow our food, courtesy of countless bacteria, microbes, and fungi. 

We are disrupting these processes to such an extent that nature cannot rebound. Soil, for instance, will be depleted in some 50 years. That was not a joke. Agriculture, building, and industry took away so much of it that it did not have enough time to restore. That process takes a long time, much longer than we would ideally want to. Denial of this basic scientific fact led to the precarious position that we find ourselves in today, where we will indeed run out of soil soon.

This might pose an even more significant threat than climate change. Without soil, we cannot produce the food that we need to survive. Similarly, biodiversity loss will be disastrous for many crucial processes as well, while the lack of sufficient renewable energy sources will, in effect, do the same. It will lead to shortages of essential elements. Soil. Energy. Water. Crops. Insects. Some of the necessary ingredients of life.

Why Are We Not Alarmed?

We are coming back to the earlier point. How come we are taking this beating while sitting down? Why are we not standing up and fighting back? We ought to protect our oceans, our soils, our biodiversity. It really should not be that hard. If one earth-crucial process fails, the entire system will start to collapse. And as more and more operations grind to a halt, this system collapse will only accelerate, dragging all of us down with it.

Recommended: Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth

Avoiding this collapse should be our number 1 issue right now. It is what global leaders should be talking about; it is what voters should be most concerned with. Unfortunately, this does not seem to be the case. The number of people who are sticking their heads out above the sand to face the problem head-on is just too small. They cannot do it alone. Too bad the rest of us, including most government leaders, seem to be in denial.

The Human Growth Peak

As we are battling the COVID-19 pandemic, the first contours of our future society take shape. One that sees nature preserving over economic prosperity, one that has something outside of our control, takes over our lives - leaving us scrambling to catch up. We moan and whine about life ‘as we know it’ has ended, with the limitations pushed upon us by the ‘new reality’ only now starting to sink in. 

Recommended: Climate Change And Viruses: Do Threats Converge?

Life will change. Those who are holding out hope that someday soon everything will return to normal will find themselves disillusioned in the end. There are many more catastrophic events waiting around the corner. We have pushed nature to her limits, and she now appears to be taking back control.

man, woman, stairs, mouth masks
Photo by: Cheng Feng, Unsplash. Catastrophic events are waiting around the corner. Coronavirus, COVID-19, 2020.

At the same time, the human growth peak is approaching. And we can feel it in our bones. For the first time in our history, we might be looking at a declining world population. But this means that there will have to be a peak first. This is expected to occur around 2050, after which the downward trend will start. For the first time, more people will die than people are being born. A pretty significant event - that might just be the turning point in history.

Radical Change

So, ever since our ‘species’ came to being, our number has increased. Sometimes more rapidly, other times are slowing down, but the world population has been growing at a steady pace. It has done so since the first homo sapiens stood up. We started spreading around the world after our ancestors left Africa, some 70,000 years ago. It may have just been a handful of humans, but they were determined to find new lands. They moved to Asia, with some of them moving up further to Europe. Others walked across Siberia and ‘found’ the Americas, with a few of them moving down and reaching the southernmost tip of Patagonia. 

This was some 15,000 years ago. Humanity had spread all across the world. This kickstarted an era of even more significant growth, with civilizations forming and clashing with one another in a bet for land, power, or resources. While different cultures were leading at different points in time, it was eventually the West that prospered most. 'The West' was the first to set sail and cross oceans to - often forcefully - get their hands on prized resources, that would fuel their prosperity even more. Colonization had begun. And it hasn’t stopped yet.

Colonize It, Enslave It, Control It And Dominate It

Our behavior led to the creation of a so-called predatory-exploitative mindset, one that now characterizes us as a species. We are in this game to win it. We consider ourselves to be on top of the food chain, capable of ‘getting’ whatever we want, no matter the cost. 

Recommended: Inequality And Over-Exploitation: All People Matter

We are predatory. We exploit to get what we want. This is who we are as a species. We use other countries, other people. We use nature and scarce resources to get what we need. Or ‘deserve,’ as we seem to think. Those who win are always right, and it is only up to history to prove their wrong. Cue the Roman emperors, European colonizers, and slave-owners. The Nazis. They all thought they were doing the right thing for ‘their’ people. They colonized, enslaved, controlled, and dominated. No matter the cost.

This Age Is Troubled: The Exponential Curve

This is where our current age is so significant. We will soon cease to grow—both in number and mindset. There are no more lands left to discover, nor can we continue our colonization and domination of the earth. We will no longer be able to do so, even if we would want to.

We are entering some troubled times. As the world population peaks, we will find ourselves fighting for a limited - and decreasing - number of resources, along with a record number of other people. Cue social unrest. Violence. Poverty. Rage, despair. Rise of fascism and different extreme political views. People want more. But for the first time in history, we cannot have more. 

people, fire, protest
Photo: Shutterstock. Hong Kong protesters as a black bloc that built barricades and set up a fire.

Our mindset will have to shift from the predatory-exploitative mindset to something more accommodating. There’s nothing left to hunt down, nothing left to exploit. You know what most animals tend to do when they have performed their job at the top of the food-chain so thoroughly that there is nothing left to hunt? Right, they turn on their own. Precisely what we are doing today. We just do not know what else to do. 

Humanity At The End Has Matured

In a fun twist of event, some biological definitions would finally place us, as a species, at the point of reaching maturity. We are no longer growing and expanding, but instead settling down, finally having accepted our limitations and stopped our wild ‘wandering about.’ Humanity is now mature. We are now adults. This means that we have to start acting like it as well.

And as we all are well-aware, adulthood means stopping the senseless rebellion, letting go of a spirit-filled with wanderlust and greed. It means rising above what we have been and acknowledging our past mistakes. We can - and must! - be better. This especially goes for our treasured earth. We have to do right by her - and this might be the right occasion. 

It is time to let go of our predatory-exploitative mindset and start caring. Move to a mindset that is more conscious, more constructive. One that builds up instead of breaks down. Creating this mindset will take a lot of time. It requires hard work and an open mind. This series of articles hopes to point the way. But coming up first: what processes are on the brink of collapsing?

Before you go!

Recommended: Brazil Is Burning For Your Beef: Amazon’s Nature, Our Luxury

Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below.
We try to respond the same day.

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More like this:

Collapse: The World According To WhatsOrb

Humans are blind to the imminent environmental collapse. As it turns out, the acceleration of biodiversity loss may just be the sleeper event of the 21st century. Collapse: The World According To WhatsOrb The World According To WhatsOrb is an eight-part series describing the dire situation in which the world and humanity have now found itself. In continued chapters, it represents solutions, which could make short term improvements and save nature and humanity in the long term. It offers short-term goals that are highly achievable The first chapter - this chapter - highlights the grim situation we are in, our mindset, and our instincts. In the end, it is about our 'infinite' world and a fantastic event somewhere on our nearby horizon. For the first time in human existence, its growth peak! The second ( Climate Cascade ) and third chapters ( Oceans Suffocated )  discuss the current state of affairs, including climate change and our dying oceans. These will not be for the faint of heart, as they will highlight the inexcusable predatory behavior as displayed by humanity. Chapter 4 talks about the loss of biodiversity, a decline of insect populations, and the use of pesticides. But it is also about agriculture, permaculture, and food. Chapter 5 talks about energy and resources. It is about ancient fossil fuels, nuclear power, and renewables, which are still at the embryonic stage. What do we need and how can we get this Chapter 6 moves on to the topic of transportation. It is about commuting and traveling. But it is also about our homes, our cities, villages, and towns. How they are organized and how they should be held. Chapter 7 then finally touches upon solutions for production and the industry. It talks about recycling and how to create a truly circular economy. Chapter 8 is the last article of the series. It explores the timeframe of this all, attempting to find out just how much time we have to get our act together.   Collapse: The World According To WhatsOrb is not about what we want to change by 2040 or 2050. It talks about what we can do tomorrow. It offers short-term goals that are highly achievable and can be understood by anyone, regardless of your background knowledge on the topic. The best part? The results will be visible and measurable within months - or even less. Join us on the journey of Collapse: The World According To WhatsOrb and find out how you can do your part in preventing the soon inevitable collapse of nature. The World According To WhatsOrb: The Human Enterprise Do you know what the unifying yet decidedly unfavorable treat is that we, as humans, all share? We are curious . We always want to find out more, even if it harms us in the long run. This is how we managed to come up with such an extensive database of climate change-related matters, how we founded entire libraries on topics like habitat destruction and soil degradation. How we devised algorithms so precise, we could map the impact of a single millimeter’s rise in sea levels on indigenous monkey populations in the heart of the Amazon. Photo by: Timo Ster, Unsplash. Curiosity makes us travel the world. So far, so good. We know a lot of things, and if we do not understand something, we will set our hearts on finding out. This, combined with our ancient survival instincts, is why we are at the top of the world’s food chain. Bring in the unfavorable part of this trait. When we find out something that we do not necessarily enjoy or that threatens any part of our lives, we employ the ostrich-method. Meaning, we stick our heads in the sand and pretend we are not here. The ostrich-method When we are faced with striking images of starving kids in Africa, we tend to look away. Rationalize it by saying that those images were doctored, and those things do not happen anymore. Actively fight it, by arguing that those charities are out to rob us and those poor babies will never see a cent of the donations. Notable exceptions aside, our first instinct is to turn a blind eye. We have this natural blind spot for things that we just don’t like. Recommended:  Hurting The Environment: The Palm Oil Paradox Enter the heaps and heaps of data gathered on how exactly we are harming Mother Nature. The evidence is there, laid out for all of us to see. Unfortunately, most of us will look at this and agree that we are headed for our imminent demise but concede within the next breath that there is nothing ‘they’ can do about it right now. Let’s make it someone else’s problem at another time. Not here, not now. That would be inconvenient, after all. Unfortunately, biodiversity does not have the time to wait ‘one more moment.’ There are a whole bunch of papers highlighting an alarming trend, in which the number of insects is found to be declining at a bizarre pace - up to 75% over the past few decades. Bird populations are faced with similar declines. This is a mass-murder event, but no news outlet feels obliged to report it. Why? Photo by Santanu Banduri, Unsplash. We like birds and a Bee-eater like on the picture, but do we care? It appears that the loss of biodiversity has become the sleeper event of this century. As we, The Human Enterprise, continue to grow our operations, we do so at the detriment of other businesses. Or, in this case, all non-human life on earth. We take away their habitats, we change the climate that they thrive in, we excessively use pesticides, we pollute their soil and water, and we leave them homeless as we continue to expand. The World: Finite We tend to think of our world as a constant, a given. Something that will always be there, no matter what. We could not be further from the truth. The world is finite. Always has been, always will be. Together with millions and millions of other species, we share limited resources, too. And as one species thrives, it will inevitably lead to the demise of different species. That’s what survival of the fittest is all about. In recent years, we lost track of this whole survival of the fittest proposition. Instead, we appear to be headed for our demise. We are no longer the most qualified, most suitable at adapting to our (changing) environment. Instead, we are the most headstrong, thinking that we can solve all of our problems by expanding and producing some more. This makes the battle between protecting nature and fostering economic growth such a heated one. Photo by: Sergio Souza, Unsplash. Thinking that we can solve all of our problems by expanding and producing some more We are actively pushing other species out of the game. In the past 50 years, we managed to decrease worldwide wildlife populations by 60 percent. A large number of animals have found themselves ranking near the top of the WWF’s most endangered list, including the African elephant, black rhino, tigers and killer whale. This cannot be the plan. Worldwide decline of the entomofauna: A review of its drivers' PDF At least these animals still get some attention. It is quite unprecedented how much effort has been put in the protection and forced procreation of pandas, for instance - with great thanks to its cuddliness. There are many more animals which are not so lucky. They lack the appeal, let’s just call it charisma, of some of the before-mentioned animals. These are the insects, microbes, and amphibians that we so direly need to keep the world as it is. Hence, the imminent collapse. Recommended:  Mankind Could Disappear Globally But The Earth Will Survive Collapse: We Don’t Give A Damn Funnily enough, most of us just do not seem to give a damn about the imminence and severity of this collapse. We claim not to care much for nature. Let’s see how much we care about our food, though. A large portion of foods that people undoubtedly enjoy is grown with the help of some of these animals, that now find themselves threatened by our very existence. Through pollination, for instance.   Recommended:  Robot Bees Are All The Buzz: Bees In Decline Let’s not forget that we are not the ones who created this earth as we know it. We are the result of billions and billions of years of evaluation and progress, all of which performed at the hands of - you guessed it - nature and the microbes living in it. {youtube}                                           Humans and the Environment | Essentials of Environmental Science Only Half-Century’s Worth Of Arable Soils Left If someone would walk up to you today and tell you that we only have enough soil left to last us some 50 years, you would probably stop in your tracks and stare at this person. You might either feel scared or find yet another way of rationalizing their claim: ‘But we will probably have found suitable alternatives by then…’ The fact is that biological processes cannot be recreated. These are the processes that ‘make’ the earth as it is. They maintain the chemical balance of our oceans. They foster plants and bacteria that produce oxygen through photosynthesis. And they provide the healthy soil that we need to grow our food, courtesy of countless bacteria, microbes, and fungi.   We are disrupting these processes to such an extent that nature cannot rebound. Soil, for instance, will be depleted in some 50 years. That was not a joke. Agriculture, building, and industry took away so much of it that it did not have enough time to restore. That process takes a long time, much longer than we would ideally want to. Denial of this basic scientific fact led to the precarious position that we find ourselves in today, where we will indeed run out of soil soon. This might pose an even more significant threat than climate change. Without soil, we cannot produce the food that we need to survive. Similarly, biodiversity loss will be disastrous for many crucial processes as well, while the lack of sufficient renewable energy sources will, in effect, do the same. It will lead to shortages of essential elements. Soil. Energy. Water. Crops. Insects. Some of the necessary ingredients of life. Why Are We Not Alarmed? We are coming back to the earlier point. How come we are taking this beating while sitting down? Why are we not standing up and fighting back? We ought to protect our oceans, our soils, our biodiversity. It really should not be that hard. If one earth-crucial process fails, the entire system will start to collapse. And as more and more operations grind to a halt, this system collapse will only accelerate, dragging all of us down with it. Recommended:  Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth Avoiding this collapse should be our number 1 issue right now. It is what global leaders should be talking about; it is what voters should be most concerned with. Unfortunately, this does not seem to be the case. The number of people who are sticking their heads out above the sand to face the problem head-on is just too small. They cannot do it alone. Too bad the rest of us, including most government leaders, seem to be in denial. The Human Growth Peak As we are battling the COVID-19 pandemic, the first contours of our future society take shape. One that sees nature preserving over economic prosperity, one that has something outside of our control, takes over our lives - leaving us scrambling to catch up. We moan and whine about life ‘as we know it’ has ended, with the limitations pushed upon us by the ‘new reality’ only now starting to sink in.   Recommended:  Climate Change And Viruses: Do Threats Converge? Life will change. Those who are holding out hope that someday soon everything will return to normal will find themselves disillusioned in the end. There are many more catastrophic events waiting around the corner. We have pushed nature to her limits, and she now appears to be taking back control. Photo by: Cheng Feng, Unsplash. Catastrophic events are waiting around the corner. Coronavirus, COVID-19, 2020. At the same time, the human growth peak is approaching. And we can feel it in our bones. For the first time in our history, we might be looking at a declining world population. But this means that there will have to be a peak first. This is expected to occur around 2050, after which the downward trend will start. For the first time, more people will die than people are being born. A pretty significant event - that might just be the turning point in history. Radical Change So, ever since our ‘species’ came to being, our number has increased. Sometimes more rapidly, other times are slowing down, but the world population has been growing at a steady pace. It has done so since the first homo sapiens stood up. We started spreading around the world after our ancestors left Africa, some 70,000 years ago. It may have just been a handful of humans, but they were determined to find new lands. They moved to Asia, with some of them moving up further to Europe. Others walked across Siberia and ‘found’ the Americas, with a few of them moving down and reaching the southernmost tip of Patagonia.   This was some 15,000 years ago. Humanity had spread all across the world. This kickstarted an era of even more significant growth, with civilizations forming and clashing with one another in a bet for land, power, or resources. While different cultures were leading at different points in time, it was eventually the West that prospered most. 'The West' was the first to set sail and cross oceans to - often forcefully - get their hands on prized resources, that would fuel their prosperity even more. Colonization had begun. And it hasn’t stopped yet. Colonize It, Enslave It, Control It And Dominate It Our behavior led to the creation of a so-called predatory-exploitative mindset, one that now characterizes us as a species. We are in this game to win it. We consider ourselves to be on top of the food chain, capable of ‘getting’ whatever we want, no matter the cost.   Recommended:  Inequality And Over-Exploitation: All People Matter We are predatory. We exploit to get what we want. This is who we are as a species. We use other countries, other people. We use nature and scarce resources to get what we need. Or ‘deserve,’ as we seem to think. Those who win are always right, and it is only up to history to prove their wrong. Cue the Roman emperors, European colonizers, and slave-owners. The Nazis. They all thought they were doing the right thing for ‘their’ people. They colonized, enslaved, controlled, and dominated. No matter the cost. This Age Is Troubled: The Exponential Curve This is where our current age is so significant. We will soon cease to grow—both in number and mindset. There are no more lands left to discover, nor can we continue our colonization and domination of the earth. We will no longer be able to do so, even if we would want to. We are entering some troubled times. As the world population peaks, we will find ourselves fighting for a limited - and decreasing - number of resources, along with a record number of other people. Cue social unrest. Violence. Poverty. Rage, despair. Rise of fascism and different extreme political views. People want more. But for the first time in history, we cannot have more.   Photo: Shutterstock. Hong Kong protesters as a black bloc that built barricades and set up a fire. Our mindset will have to shift from the predatory-exploitative mindset to something more accommodating. There’s nothing left to hunt down, nothing left to exploit. You know what most animals tend to do when they have performed their job at the top of the food-chain so thoroughly that there is nothing left to hunt? Right, they turn on their own. Precisely what we are doing today. We just do not know what else to do.   Humanity At The End Has Matured In a fun twist of event, some biological definitions would finally place us, as a species, at the point of reaching maturity. We are no longer growing and expanding, but instead settling down, finally having accepted our limitations and stopped our wild ‘wandering about.’ Humanity is now mature. We are now adults. This means that we have to start acting like it as well. And as we all are well-aware, adulthood means stopping the senseless rebellion, letting go of a spirit-filled with wanderlust and greed. It means rising above what we have been and acknowledging our past mistakes. We can - and must! - be better. This especially goes for our treasured earth. We have to do right by her - and this might be the right occasion.   It is time to let go of our predatory-exploitative mindset and start caring. Move to a mindset that is more conscious, more constructive. One that builds up instead of breaks down. Creating this mindset will take a lot of time. It requires hard work and an open mind. This series of articles hopes to point the way. But coming up first: what processes are on the brink of collapsing? Before you go! Recommended:  Brazil Is Burning For Your Beef: Amazon’s Nature, Our Luxury Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about human enterprise? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations