Close Welcome writers, influencers and dreamers, make the world a greener place
Register here
Forgot password
Forgot password
or
or

Close
Close For sustainability news hunters! The WhatsOrb newsletter!

Receive monthly the newest updates about sustainability from influencers and fellow writers. Cutting edge innovations and global environmental developments.

Close For sustainability news hunters! The WhatsOrb newsletter!

Receive monthly the newest updates about sustainability from influencers and fellow writers. Cutting edge innovations and global environmental developments.

Close Reset password
your profile is 33% complete:
33%
Update profile Close
Close WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-Change

For writers, influencers and dreamers who want to make the world a greener place.

WhatsOrb reaches monthly about 28.000 thousand visitors who want - like you - to make the world a greener place. Share your expertise and all can benefit.

Become an influencer and write and share sustainable news and innovations globally
Are you a writer or do you have ideas about sustainability which you want to share? Register and share your green knowledge and news. WhatsOrb offers you global exposure for your article.

If your article meets certain standards, you receive promotional gains like Facebook promotions and Google Ads advertising.

Community bushfires australia generate their own weather | Upload Society

Bushfires Australia Generate Their Own Weather

Share this post
by: Joris Zuid
bushfires australia generate their own weather | Upload

The bushfires in Australia are now so big that they are generating their own weather, in the form of giant thunderstorms that start more fires, according to the Bureau of Meteorology in Victoria.

Graph firestorm, pyro-cumulonimbus clouds

Bushfires Generate Their Own Weather

Breaking News...Recommended: Taal Volcano: Hazardous Eruption Feared. What Is The Future?

Pyro-cumulonimbus clouds have developed to altitudes over 16km in East Gippsland this afternoon. These fire-induced storms can spread fires through lightning, lofting of embers and generation of severe wind outflows. Intense fires generate smoke, obviously. But their heat can also create a localised updraft powerful enough to create its own changes in the atmosphere above.

Recommended: Wildfires Globally: Australia, America, Africa, The Arctic, Siberia

As the heat and smoke rise, the cloud plume can cool off, generating a large, puffy cloud full of potential rain. The plume can also scatter embers and hot ash over a wider area. Eventually, water droplets in the cloud condense, generating a downburst of rain – maybe. But the ‘front’ between the calm air outside the fire zone and a pyro cumulonimbus storm cloud is so sharp that it also generates lightning and that can start new fires. If powerful enough, a pyro cumulonimbus storm can generate a fire tornado, which happened during the Canberra bushfires in 2003.

Why do Pyrocumulus clouds rise above the smoke?
This moisture then accumulates on smoke particles and rapidly condenses as it rises. Pyrocumulus clouds are more commonly seen above volcanic eruptions, which produce lots of steam. If you've ever seen an evil-looking cloud creating dry lightning above a volcano, that's a pyrocumulus cloud.

Graph firestorm, pyro-cumulonimbus clouds

Scientists worry that ‘pyroCbs’ are on the rise around the world, driven by warmer temperatures and more intense fires. Their plumes are so strong that they can even shoot smoke into the stratosphere, 6 to 30 miles (10 to 50 kilometres) above the Earth's surface.


Bushfires Australia Generate Their Own Weather. Time lapse of a pyro cumulonimbus storm in action

What types of clouds are associated with wildfires?
Simply put, it is a cumulus cloud that is formed by hot air and smoke being released into the sky, usually during volcanic eruptions, or in Australia’s case, by wildfires. The clouds are usually gray, black or brown

Smoke From Bushfires In Australia Has Spread To South America

Smoke particles from bushfires in Australia have reached South America, in a striking illustration of the intensity of the unprecedented blazes.

Satellites show atmospheric pollution created by the fires across New South Wales and Queensland has travelled more than 10,000 kilometres to Chile and Argentina. Researchers at the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) in Reading, UK, found a plume of carbon monoxide and aerosols trailing across the Pacific Ocean to South America.

Recommended: Brazil Is Burning For Your Beef: Amazon’s Nature, Our Luxury

Satelite image smoke above NSW

More pollution will follow, judging from the situation in Australia. From satellite imagery there’s thick smoke coming out of New South Wales, so more will be being pumped out, meaning a train of pollution going across the south Pacific, will follow the jet stream.

What is jet stream in geography?
A jet stream is defined as a current of rapidly moving air that is usually several thousand miles long and wide but is relatively thin. They are found in the upper levels of Earth's atmosphere at the tropopause - the boundary between the troposphere and stratosphere (see atmospheric layers).

While it is relatively unusual for pollution to travel so far, studies have shown Australia’s deadly 2009 “Black Saturday” fires released materials that travelled a similar distance. Only trace amounts of Australian pollution hitting South America have been recorded today by satellites, with carbon monoxide levels of 80 to 100 parts per billion. Anything above 110ppb is considered polluted air.

Black trees
Australia’s deadly 2009 'Black Saturday' fires

However, it is unlikely the pollution will affect local air quality in South America  which has experienced its own serious forest fires this year since the material is around 5 kilometres up in the atmosphere and likely to stay there. If the air comes down and reaches the surface it could add an extra bit on top of local air quality issues.

Recommended: Amazon’s Fires, Madonna And DiCaprio: Questions & Answers

Instead, the significance of the pollution reaching so far is what it tells us about the power of the fires in Australia. It’s reflecting the sheer intensity of the fires, particularly in New South Wales.

Smoke From Bushfires In Australia Reach New Zealand

Across the Tasman Sea, smoke from the wildfires are posing a new threat to New Zealand’s white glaciers, turning them black and staining snow brown.

Social media posts from tourists and helicopter services from the Franz Josef and Tasman glaciers show 'caramelised' snow and smoke-shrouded views. A climber who posted a video from the top of the Tasman glacier added: “We can actually smell the burning here in Christchurch.”

helicopter, yellow snow, 2 men

Ash from the smoke could accelerate melting snow on the glaciers, which already face a climate disaster of their own. The whiteness of snow and ice reflects the sun’s heat and slows melting, but as ash and dust settle on the snow, it absorbs more heat and melts at a faster rate.

How does the albedo effect work?
The albedo effect. Light surfaces reflect more heat than dark surfaces. This is called the albedo effect. When the Earth's temperature dropped because of its position in orbit around the Sun, and the tilt of the axis, the ice sheets grew.

Smike bushfires Australia, New Zealand

Over 3,000 glaciers in New Zealand are quickly disappearing due to global warming and many could completely melt away by the end of the century. If the ash stays on the surface then it will certainly enhance melt. If fire frequency, ash and dust transport increase, there is a chance that this will hasten the demise of New Zealand’s glaciers.

Recommended: Climate Change And Its Effects Like Droughts: The Heat Is On

Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below.
We try to respond the same day.

Like to write your own article about bush fires or climate change?
Click on 'Register' or push the button 'Write An Article' on the 'HomePage'

Messange
You
Share this post

I'm especially interested in new Hydrogen techniques. I'm convinced that - in the near future - Hydrogen will surpass the development of solar or wind as alternative energy source. Safety concerns will find a solution and Hydrogen will be applied massively in all forms of transportation. 

I'm especially interested in new Hydrogen techniques. I'm convinced that - in the near future - Hydrogen will surpass the development of solar or wind as alternative energy source. Safety concerns will find a solution and Hydrogen will be applied massively in all forms of transportation. 

Bushfires Australia Generate Their Own Weather

The bushfires in Australia are now so big that they are generating their own weather, in the form of giant thunderstorms that start more fires, according to the Bureau of Meteorology in Victoria. Bushfires Generate Their Own Weather Breaking News...Recommended:   Taal Volcano: Hazardous Eruption Feared. What Is The Future? Pyro-cumulonimbus clouds have developed to altitudes over 16km in East Gippsland this afternoon. These fire-induced storms can spread fires through lightning, lofting of embers and generation of severe wind outflows. Intense fires generate smoke, obviously. But their heat can also create a localised updraft powerful enough to create its own changes in the atmosphere above. Recommended:  Wildfires Globally: Australia, America, Africa, The Arctic, Siberia As the heat and smoke rise, the cloud plume can cool off, generating a large, puffy cloud full of potential rain. The plume can also scatter embers and hot ash over a wider area. Eventually, water droplets in the cloud condense, generating a downburst of rain – maybe. But the ‘front’ between the calm air outside the fire zone and a pyro cumulonimbus storm cloud is so sharp that it also generates lightning and that can start new fires. If powerful enough, a pyro cumulonimbus storm can generate a fire tornado, which happened during the Canberra bushfires in 2003. Why do Pyrocumulus clouds rise above the smoke? This moisture then accumulates on smoke particles and rapidly condenses as it rises. Pyrocumulus clouds are more commonly seen above volcanic eruptions, which produce lots of steam. If you've ever seen an evil-looking cloud creating dry lightning above a volcano, that's a pyrocumulus cloud. Scientists worry that ‘pyroCbs’ are on the rise around the world, driven by warmer temperatures and more intense fires. Their plumes are so strong that they can even shoot smoke into the stratosphere, 6 to 30 miles (10 to 50 kilometres) above the Earth's surface. Bushfires Australia Generate Their Own Weather. Time lapse of a pyro cumulonimbus storm in action What types of clouds are associated with wildfires? Simply put, it is a cumulus cloud that is formed by hot air and smoke being released into the sky, usually during volcanic eruptions, or in Australia’s case, by wildfires. The clouds are usually gray, black or brown Smoke From Bushfires In Australia Has Spread To South America Smoke particles from bushfires in Australia have reached South America, in a striking illustration of the intensity of the unprecedented blazes. Satellites show atmospheric pollution created by the fires across New South Wales and Queensland has travelled more than 10,000 kilometres to Chile and Argentina. Researchers at the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) in Reading, UK, found a plume of carbon monoxide and aerosols trailing across the Pacific Ocean to South America. Recommended:  Brazil Is Burning For Your Beef: Amazon’s Nature, Our Luxury More pollution will follow, judging from the situation in Australia. From satellite imagery there’s thick smoke coming out of New South Wales, so more will be being pumped out, meaning a train of pollution going across the south Pacific, will follow the jet stream. What is jet stream in geography? A jet stream is defined as a current of rapidly moving air that is usually several thousand miles long and wide but is relatively thin. They are found in the upper levels of Earth's atmosphere at the tropopause - the boundary between the troposphere and stratosphere (see atmospheric layers). While it is relatively unusual for pollution to travel so far, studies have shown Australia’s deadly 2009 “Black Saturday” fires released materials that travelled a similar distance. Only trace amounts of Australian pollution hitting South America have been recorded today by satellites, with carbon monoxide levels of 80 to 100 parts per billion. Anything above 110ppb is considered polluted air. Australia’s deadly 2009 'Black Saturday' fires However, it is unlikely the pollution will affect local air quality in South America  which has experienced its own serious forest fires this year since the material is around 5 kilometres up in the atmosphere and likely to stay there. If the air comes down and reaches the surface it could add an extra bit on top of local air quality issues. Recommended:  Amazon’s Fires, Madonna And DiCaprio: Questions & Answers Instead, the significance of the pollution reaching so far is what it tells us about the power of the fires in Australia. It’s reflecting the sheer intensity of the fires, particularly in New South Wales. Smoke From Bushfires In Australia Reach New Zealand Across the Tasman Sea, smoke from the wildfires are posing a new threat to New Zealand’s white glaciers, turning them black and staining snow brown. Social media posts from tourists and helicopter services from the Franz Josef and Tasman glaciers show 'caramelised' snow and smoke-shrouded views. A climber who posted a video from the top of the Tasman glacier added: “We can actually smell the burning here in Christchurch.” Ash from the smoke could accelerate melting snow on the glaciers, which already face a climate disaster of their own. The whiteness of snow and ice reflects the sun’s heat and slows melting, but as ash and dust settle on the snow, it absorbs more heat and melts at a faster rate. How does the albedo effect work? The albedo effect. Light surfaces reflect more heat than dark surfaces. This is called the albedo effect. When the Earth's temperature dropped because of its position in orbit around the Sun, and the tilt of the axis, the ice sheets grew. Over 3,000 glaciers in New Zealand are quickly disappearing due to global warming and many could completely melt away by the end of the century. If the ash stays on the surface then it will certainly enhance melt. If fire frequency, ash and dust transport increase, there is a chance that this will hasten the demise of New Zealand’s glaciers. Recommended:  Climate Change And Its Effects Like Droughts: The Heat Is On Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about bush fires or climate change? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Get updates on environmental sustainability in your mailbox every month.