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Community best ethical fashion jargon 2020 global | Upload Lifestyle

Best Ethical Fashion Jargon 2020 Global

by: Sharai Hoekema
best ethical fashion jargon 2020 global | Upload

Everybody loves a good fashion deal. It is no wonder that H&M and Primark are almost bursting at their seams whenever a new collection comes in. We care about looking good, and we care about our wallet - and fashion that combines those two is what we are really longing for. Recently, a new wave has been going through the fashion industry, with a third variable added to the mix. 

Fashion Jargon 2020 Global: What Does It Mean?

Ethical or eco-friendly fashion is all the new rage. Even the cheapest brands have embraced terms like organic cotton, biodegradable, and sustainably sourced. Amongst many others, that is - making it hard to discern what ultimate environmental goal you are serving. Many are unsure whether it actually means something, instead of just another marketing ploy supposed to make us feel better about what we wear.

Your best bet is actually knowing what they are talking about—time to decode some of their favorite words so that you can decipher the real message.



                                     Meet FABSCRAP Founder Jessica Schreiber | One Small Step | NowThis

Ethical Fashion Jargon: Biodegradable

Biodegradable means to say that something can naturally break down and be returned to the earth without much effort. A small caveat: some products, including steel and some conventional plastics, are capable of breaking down - eventually. Emphasis on eventually, as it might take hundreds and hundreds of years.

girls, masks, dresses

Recommended: Sustainable 3D Fashion Print: Architecture Design Experiment

Carbon-Neutral

The way forward, according to all those companies touting it. It means that the carbon emissions of that company are, put nicely, “balanced out by funding an equivalent amount of carbon savings elsewhere in the world.” Meaning: we can damage the environment by releasing damaging carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, but as long as we mitigate this by funding projects that actually remove CO2 from the air, we should be alright.

Recommended: Australian Hype: Carbon-Neutral Houses Made Of Recycled Materials

Circular Fashion

The circular economy is famous for its full-circle approach, where waste is absolutely minimized at all stages in the value chain through the re-use of parts and components. Circular fashion tries to do the same. The so-called ‘on-going life cycle’ is key here, so even if the original owner no longer wants to wear a piece, it can be rented, swapped, or sold again. It could even be taken apart and re-invented in another clothing piece.

Recommended: Economic Growth Is Dead: Welcome To The Circular Economy

Cost-Per-Wear

A trendy way of finding out the ‘real’ cost of your piece of clothing, by offsetting the price against the number of times you get to wear it. Cheap fashion that gets destroyed in the washing machine after 1 or 2 cycles will definitely lose out against the sturdy brand that stays good for a near lifetime. Hence, the cost-per-wear of carefully created tops of organic cotton will be lower than that of mass-produced, cheap material-used shirts.

Closed Loop

Comparable to circular fashion, a closed-loop indicates that clothes will continue to be used as long as possible. This is done by making these clothes repairable or reusable. Similarly, waste is minimized throughout the production process, making use of recyclable materials as much as possible.

Close the loop fashion graph

Recommended: Global Organic Textile Stink No More! It’s Possible: Denmark

Cruelty-Free

A great tagline for your new pair of jeans. Cruelty-free products have not been tested on animals and are produced by a company that does not conduct, commission, or approve animal testing procedures.

Recommended: Factory Farms May Soon Banned In Switzerland: Animal Welfare

Greenwashing

The process through which a brand misleads consumers by making itself appear way more sustainable than it really is. Usually done by using claims such as the ones included in this list, without proper evidence. 

Fast Fashion

Clothes produced in a mass production process focused on speed and quantity, with a minimum shelf life. These items become nearly disposables, with multiple collections per year hitting the stores and products being phased out every week.

women, sewing machines

Recommended: Fashion From Algae Absorbs CO2: Is It possible To Wear?

FSC-certified

Although usually associated with paper products, the Forest Stewardship Council certification ensures that materials used come from sustainably managed forests. Tree-friendly all the way.

Living Wage

It does pretty much what it says, with companies using this label committing to paying all of its workers a fair salary, above the legal minimum - to allow them a decent, comfortable standard of living.

Organic Cotton

Cotton is grown without toxic pesticides, genetically engineered seeds, and all kinds of synthetic fertilizers. Regular cotton is very chemical intensive, something that organic cotton has vowed to cut back on.

Recycling

Clothes are created by re-using other clothes components - or even other items, like clothes made out of plastic bottles.

woman, container, recycled cloth

Second-hand

‘Pre-loved’ clothes that had already had a life before you bought them with another owner. You buy them second-hand, thus extending their useful life.

Slow Fashion

See fast fashion—the opposite, with clothes that are crafted using high-quality, slow production processes that minimize waste. Similarly, the style is timeless and classic, making the fashion as relevant today as it will be in ten years.

Social responsibility

Socially responsible companies are working hard to do well for society and the environment by running or funding all kinds of projects and charities, investing heavily in the local community and/or environment.

Recommended: Corporate Social Responsibility Report? Does yours Need One?

Traceability

These brands make sure that their entire production process can be accounted for by making materials and components traceable. They know all of their suppliers, including potential subcontractors, and keep a close eye on their activities to ensure all is done as it should be. Accountability is usually high.

Transparency

Very similar to traceability. Transparent brands are upfront and honest about their production process, disclosing as much information about their suppliers and (sub)contractors as they can. This includes everything from the farmers who create the raw materials to produce their packaging materials. All supply chain intel will be publicly available.

Upcycling

Takes recycling one step further. It does not simply re-use products and components but actually incorporates them in something new and fantastic. This is what happens if you take a worn-down pair of jeans and decide to pretty it up using pieces of fabric or materials taken from other clothes.

Vegan

Not just for food-related matters. Vegan products are completely animal-product-free. This includes leather, suede, feathers, or animal skins. Although the label is somewhat misleading, animal-derived products may still be used in the production process - including solvents and glue derived from animal bones or dyes created from crushed insects.

Cover photo by Yolande Ave

Recommended: CO2 Footprint Food: Focus On What You Eat, Not If It Is Local

Before you go!

Recommended: Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say And Resale Expect?

Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day.

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Click on 'Register' or push the button 'Write An Article' on the 'HomePage.'

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Best Ethical Fashion Jargon 2020 Global

Everybody loves a good fashion deal. It is no wonder that H&M and Primark are almost bursting at their seams whenever a new collection comes in. We care about looking good, and we care about our wallet - and fashion that combines those two is what we are really longing for. Recently, a new wave has been going through the fashion industry, with a third variable added to the mix.   Fashion Jargon 2020 Global: What Does It Mean? Ethical or eco-friendly fashion is all the new rage. Even the cheapest brands have embraced terms like organic cotton, biodegradable, and sustainably sourced. Amongst many others, that is - making it hard to discern what ultimate environmental goal you are serving. Many are unsure whether it actually means something, instead of just another marketing ploy supposed to make us feel better about what we wear. Your best bet is actually knowing what they are talking about—time to decode some of their favorite words so that you can decipher the real message. {youtube}                                      Meet FABSCRAP Founder Jessica Schreiber | One Small Step | NowThis Ethical Fashion Jargon:  Biodegradable Biodegradable means to say that something can naturally break down and be returned to the earth without much effort. A small caveat: some products, including steel and some conventional plastics, are capable of breaking down - eventually. Emphasis on eventually, as it might take hundreds and hundreds of years. Recommended:  Sustainable 3D Fashion Print: Architecture Design Experiment Carbon-Neutral The way forward, according to all those companies touting it. It means that the carbon emissions of that company are, put nicely, “balanced out by funding an equivalent amount of carbon savings elsewhere in the world.” Meaning: we can damage the environment by releasing damaging carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, but as long as we mitigate this by funding projects that actually remove CO2 from the air, we should be alright. Recommended:  Australian Hype: Carbon-Neutral Houses Made Of Recycled Materials Circular Fashion The circular economy is famous for its full-circle approach, where waste is absolutely minimized at all stages in the value chain through the re-use of parts and components. Circular fashion tries to do the same. The so-called ‘on-going life cycle’ is key here, so even if the original owner no longer wants to wear a piece, it can be rented, swapped, or sold again. It could even be taken apart and re-invented in another clothing piece. Recommended:  Economic Growth Is Dead: Welcome To The Circular Economy Cost-Per-Wear A trendy way of finding out the ‘real’ cost of your piece of clothing, by offsetting the price against the number of times you get to wear it. Cheap fashion that gets destroyed in the washing machine after 1 or 2 cycles will definitely lose out against the sturdy brand that stays good for a near lifetime. Hence, the cost-per-wear of carefully created tops of organic cotton will be lower than that of mass-produced, cheap material-used shirts. Closed Loop Comparable to circular fashion, a closed-loop indicates that clothes will continue to be used as long as possible. This is done by making these clothes repairable or reusable. Similarly, waste is minimized throughout the production process, making use of recyclable materials as much as possible. Recommended:  Global Organic Textile Stink No More! It’s Possible: Denmark Cruelty-Free A great tagline for your new pair of jeans. Cruelty-free products have not been tested on animals and are produced by a company that does not conduct, commission, or approve animal testing procedures. Recommended:  Factory Farms May Soon Banned In Switzerland: Animal Welfare Greenwashing The process through which a brand misleads consumers by making itself appear way more sustainable than it really is. Usually done by using claims such as the ones included in this list, without proper evidence.   Fast Fashion Clothes produced in a mass production process focused on speed and quantity, with a minimum shelf life. These items become nearly disposables, with multiple collections per year hitting the stores and products being phased out every week. Recommended:  Fashion From Algae Absorbs CO2: Is It possible To Wear? FSC-certified Although usually associated with paper products, the Forest Stewardship Council certification ensures that materials used come from sustainably managed forests. Tree-friendly all the way. Living Wage It does pretty much what it says, with companies using this label committing to paying all of its workers a fair salary, above the legal minimum - to allow them a decent, comfortable standard of living. Organic Cotton Cotton is grown without toxic pesticides, genetically engineered seeds, and all kinds of synthetic fertilizers. Regular cotton is very chemical intensive, something that organic cotton has vowed to cut back on. Recycling Clothes are created by re-using other clothes components - or even other items, like clothes made out of plastic bottles. Second-hand ‘Pre-loved’ clothes that had already had a life before you bought them with another owner. You buy them second-hand, thus extending their useful life. Slow Fashion See fast fashion—the opposite, with clothes that are crafted using high-quality, slow production processes that minimize waste. Similarly, the style is timeless and classic, making the fashion as relevant today as it will be in ten years. Social responsibility Socially responsible companies are working hard to do well for society and the environment by running or funding all kinds of projects and charities, investing heavily in the local community and/or environment. Recommended:  Corporate Social Responsibility Report? Does yours Need One? Traceability These brands make sure that their entire production process can be accounted for by making materials and components traceable. They know all of their suppliers, including potential subcontractors, and keep a close eye on their activities to ensure all is done as it should be. Accountability is usually high. Transparency Very similar to traceability. Transparent brands are upfront and honest about their production process, disclosing as much information about their suppliers and (sub)contractors as they can. This includes everything from the farmers who create the raw materials to produce their packaging materials. All supply chain intel will be publicly available. Upcycling Takes recycling one step further. It does not simply re-use products and components but actually incorporates them in something new and fantastic. This is what happens if you take a worn-down pair of jeans and decide to pretty it up using pieces of fabric or materials taken from other clothes. Vegan Not just for food-related matters. Vegan products are completely animal-product-free. This includes leather, suede, feathers, or animal skins. Although the label is somewhat misleading, animal-derived products may still be used in the production process - including solvents and glue derived from animal bones or dyes created from crushed insects. Cover photo by Yolande Ave Recommended:  CO2 Footprint Food: Focus On What You Eat, Not If It Is Local Before you go! Recommended:  Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say And Resale Expect? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
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