Close Welcome writers, influencers and dreamers, make the world a greener place
Register here
Forgot password
Forgot password
or
or

Close
Close For sustainability news hunters! The WhatsOrb newsletter!

Receive monthly the newest updates about sustainability from influencers and fellow writers. Cutting edge innovations and global environmental developments.

Close For sustainability news hunters! The WhatsOrb newsletter!

Receive monthly the newest updates about sustainability from influencers and fellow writers. Cutting edge innovations and global environmental developments.

Close Reset password
your profile is 33% complete:
33%
Update profile Close
Close WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-Change

For writers, influencers and dreamers who want to make the world a greener place.

WhatsOrb reaches monthly about 28.000 thousand visitors who want - like you - to make the world a greener place. Share your expertise and all can benefit.

Become an influencer and write and share sustainable news and innovations globally
Are you a writer or do you have ideas about sustainability which you want to share? Register and share your green knowledge and news. WhatsOrb offers you global exposure for your article.

If your article meets certain standards, you receive promotional gains like Facebook promotions and Google Ads advertising.

Climate storms ellen  francis after dennis  extreme weather rising  | Upload Man-Made

Storms Ellen, Francis After Dennis: Extreme Weather Rising?

Share this post
by: Josh Collins
storms ellen  francis after dennis  extreme weather rising  | Upload

Storm Dennis left a trail of devastation as it swept across Flanders and the UK on Sunday. Gusts were stronger than last weekend when Storm Ciara had the country in its grip. Two storms in a week isn’t all that exceptional and the worst may not be over. Storms Ellen and Francis could be on the way as early as next weekend (22, 23th of February 2020).

Storms Ellen, Francis After Dennis and Ciara: Is Extreme Weather Rising?

At the minute it’s too early to offer details. They are coming from the North of the Atlantic. They still need to be formed. Storm Dennis meant gusty conditions and heavy rain especially towards evening. In Stabroek (Antwerp Province, Belgium) gusts of 108 km/h were recorded. Average rainfall of 5 to 15 litres per square metre were measured. Highs at 16.6° C in Brussels remained exceptionally mild.  It was nearly 18°C in the Kempen District. Storm Dennis caused greater damage than Storm Ciara thanks to stronger gusts inland. 

Storm Dennis Knocked On Your Door Last Weekend (15/16 February 2020)

Tupe, water, door, letterbox

Jump quickly to subject by clicking on:
Extreme Weather Events In Europe On The Rise
Damage Statistics
Storm And Flood Trends

Recommended: Climate Extremes Australia Floods, Wildfires And Destruction

After storm Ciara came storm Dennis. Dennis started in the Atlantic Ocean and reached Ireland and the Uk on Saterday (15th) and the Netherlands on Sunday (16th) afternoon. Storm Dennis generated winds of up to 100 to 120km/h on the northwest coast and on the Wadden Islands. Storm Dennis caused more damage then Ciara.

When did the North Sea 'flood'?
The 1953 North Sea flood was a major flood caused by a heavy storm that occurred on the night of Saturday, 31 January 1953 and morning of Sunday, 1 February 1953. The floods struck the Netherlands, Belgium, England and Scotland.


                                          STORM DENNIS to batter UK this weekend with heavy rain and gales

Dennis got his name from the Brits, just like Ciara. The names don’t carry any significance, they were sent in by the public, says a Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) spokesperson. The next storm will also get a name sent in by the Brits, but after that, it’s time for one sent in by the Dutch public.

houses, water
Goeree-Overflakkee (Zuid-Holland, Netherlands) during the major flood in 1953

The sixth storm will get the name Francis, after Francis Beaufort, creator of the Beaufort scale used to measure wind speed. The storm after Francis will get the Dutch name Gerda. After that, we’ll have to wait until J and P for the Dutch names Jan and Piet.

Does Europe get hit by hurricanes?
There is only one modern tropical cyclone officially regarded as directly impacting Europe, Hurricane Vince in 2005, which struck southwestern Spain—having made landfall in the European mainland while still fully tropical. Storms can move around the Bermuda high and turn to the northeast and affect Europe.

Storm Dennis Passed: One Storm After Another

It seemed we had to wait some more for calm spring weather, as Storm Dennis emerged last Sunday. First it was a nameless storm on Sunday the 9th when it appeared. Yes, it was nameless, unlike the recent Ciara because it was significantly weaker, reaching only 98 kilometres, compared to the heavier Ciara which had winds of up to 129 kilometres.

Recommended: Cooling Earth By A Sun Dimming Effect Or Warming By More CO2

Windy, Rainy And Snowy The Rest Of Week 7

Street, snow, man

Unfortunately, the weather did not significantly improve in week 7 of 2020. It showed it's typical mix of hail, the occasional sunshine peak, long enough only for you to miss it when it was gone, as well as potential wet snow in some places. The wind force also remained substantial at the coasts, reaching level 8, while being level 5 inland. 

Was Ciara a hurricane?
Storm Ciara was an active extratropical cyclone, and the third named storm of the 2019–20 Ireland, Netherlands and UK windstorm season. Ciara brought heavy rain and severe winds across much of the United Kingdom, Ireland, Sweden and other northern regions in Europe. Ciara is a popular Irish given name.

Storm Dennis 

Another 'named windy' visitor came last weekend. The weather teased us by becoming somewhat better on Friday (14th of February), but you needed not to be 'worried', there was no calm after the Ciara storm, just more storm. On Sunday Storm Dennis came on our doorway. It also got 15 degrees Celsius in some areas in the south last weekend.

What is your weather forecast for this week: first days of spring or last days of winter? Let us know in the comment Boxes below this article.

girl, umbrella, storm

Recommended: Climate Change Africa, Pakistan: Locust Destroy All Crops

Storm Dennis At 'Our Neighbors' Ireland And The UK

A number of sailings from Belfast, Dublin and Rosslare had been delayed or cancelled as an orange weather marine warning remained in place, along with a yellow weather snow/ice warning which was in place until midnight last Sunday the 16th of February 2020. Met Éireann issued a number of warnings over the days before as a cold snap set in across the country in the aftermath of a nationwide orange weather warning at the weekend when Storm Ciara made landfall.

Storm Dennis, Uk, Saturday
Storm Dennis on it's way

The Met Office in the UK, meanwhile had issued a warning over Storm Dennis which was on the way but predicted not to be as severe as Storm Ciara. Strong westerly winds continuid and high seas resulted in coastal floodings, especially around high tide. Gale force Meanwhile, an orange weather warning for coastal waters was in place as westerly winds reached gale force 8 or stronger gale 9 on all Irish coastal waters and on the Irish Sea.

What was the heaviest storm in the UK
The Great Storm of 1987 was a violent extratropical cyclone that occurred on the night of 15–16 October, with hurricane-force winds causing casualties in England, France and the Channel Islands as a severe depression in the Bay of Biscay moved northeast.

2 women, buildings

It 'occasionally touched storm force 10', Met Éireann announced. The wind warning prompted ferry operator Stena Line to cancel a number of crossings as a result. In a statement, it stated, Stena Line is continuing to see disruptions to its ferry sailings on the Irish Sea caused by high winds and rough seas in the aftermath of Storm Ciara.

As a result, sailings from Belfast to Liverpool have been delayed and Belfast to Heysham sailings have been cancelled. The Dublin to Holyhead route experienced delays of around an hour, while an early morning sailing was cancelled. All sailings from Rosslare were cancelled and resumed at 8am.

Overall, the weather forecast for the coming week looked 'unsettled but turning less cold from Thursday (13th of February0'. Ahead of Storm Dennis’ landfall in the UK, the Met Office had issued wind warnings for much of England and Wales for Saturday the 15th. A statement said: 'Storm Dennis brought a range of impacts, including delays and cancellations to transport services, damage to power supplies and large coastal waves. Another spell of very wet and windy ​weather came on Saturday, although Storm Dennis was not expected to be as severe as Ciara disruption came.

triangle traffic sign flood

Below a checklist (UK) of five steps that every household at risk of flooding should implement:

  1. Have a home emergency plan in place, which would include what to do in a flood and other scenarios such as a fire.
  2. Check that home insurance includes flood cover, and make sure that any changes to the T&Cs in the future do not change the type of cover you think you have.
  3. Sign up to receive Floodline alerts – the service is free and messages can be received in different formats (by phone, SMS).
  4. If Sepa (or bodies such as the Environment Agency in other parts of the UK) make river level data for a water body near where you live publicly available use this resource.
  5. Make use of publicly available resources such as Sepa’s flood risk maps to find out if a property you are considering buying is at risk of flooding.

Damage And Fatalities Extreme Weather Events In Europe On The Rise: Before Dennis

In the last two decades there has hardly been a year without weather disasters like storms in Europe. There were (mostly river) floods, in Italy, France and Switzerland in 2000, in the upper Elbe and Danube catchments in 2002 and 2013, along the lower Danube in 2006, in the United Kingdom in 2007, in the Adriatic region in 2014, and in Germany and France in 2016.

Red Train, Flood, Water
Flood in Dresden (Germany)

Severe heat waves and droughts marked the summers of 2003, 2010 and 2018, and large-scale wildfires burned in southern and eastern Europe in 2007, 2010 and 2017. Hailstorms caused a lot of damage in Germany in 2013, and the winter storms Kyrill (2007) and Xynthia (2010) left a trail of destruction in Western Europe. Social Disruption resulted from extreme snowpack in the northern Alps in 2006 and 2019.

Storms Like Dennis: Munich Re Has Collected Information On These Events Since 1974 

The company’s NatCatSERVICE database on losses caused by natural extreme events is among the world's largest and contains more than 40,000 entries. A distinction is made between disastrous weather events and geophysical events. The latter include earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and tsunamis. The weather disasters include winter storms and storm surges, thunderstorms and flash floods, river and lake flooding, landslides, winter hazards, heat waves, droughts, and wildfires. 

Damage Statistics: Storms And Floods Dominate

95% of all loss events in the period 1980-2018 are weather-related. Storms make up almost 50% of all events, and flooding almost another third. The so-called 'climatological' events, such as heat waves, droughts, wildfires and frost, account for 16%. The remaining 5% refer to geophysical hazards.

man, collapsed buildings
A man walks amidst rubble following an earthquake in Pescara del Tronto

Winter storms produce losses in excess of one billion dollars practically every year. The most expensive storm disasters since 1990 are winter storms Daria (1990), Lothar (1999), Kyrill (2007), and Xynthia (2010), with overall losses of US$ 7bn, 11.5bn, 9bn, and 6.1bn, respectively.

The most expensive weather-related disaster in Europe, affecting large parts of Germany and neighbouring countries, was the 2002 summer flood: two flood events caused a total of US$ 21.5bn (original values, not adjusted for inflation) across the continent. As a result, flood insurance has gained importance. The penetration of flood insurance for private homes in Germany increased countrywide to about 41% in 2018, as compared to around 26% in 2009 and only less than 10% in the year 2002.

Recommended: Climate Change: Cause Of The Next Global Economic Collapse

Europe's Average Annual Overall Losses For 1980-2018 Are Equal To US$ 16.2bn.

Casualties: 2003 and 2010 heat waves stand out

In all 1,719 events in Europe in which at least one person was killed, storms and floods are leading by a long way. However, 2003 and 2010 stand out as years with extremely high numbers of fatalities in Europe caused by heat waves: 70,000 and 56,000, respectively. These two events dominate the number of weather-related fatalities in Europe since 1980: the number of fatalities by all natural hazards combined in the period 1980-2018 is about 155,000.

High Temperature And Storms Also Enhance The Wildfire Danger

Wildfires in 2003 caused US$ 1.2bn of damage and killed 70 people in southern Europe. In 2010, the fires around Moscow approached a US$ 2bn loss and claimed 130 lives. More recently, in the summer of 2017, 123 people died in several wildfire episodes, 110 of them in Portugal alone. In 2018, 100 people perished in wildfires in Greece. 

Storm And Flood Trends?

With respect to damage, the number of severe floods seems to be increasing. With respect to fatalities, the mortality risk related to heat waves has been on the rise. Heat wave frequency, duration, and intensity are increasing, while resistance is decreasing because European societies are ageing.

people, boat, flood, houses, trees

Local inhabitants are evacuated from a flooded village of Sokolniki in Southern Poland, May 20, 2010

Altogether, from 1980 to 2018, 4,890 destructive weather events have been recorded in this database for Europe. 837 Of the events occurred in the 1980s, 1,239 in the 1990s, 1,345 in the first decade of the 21stcentury and 1,469 since 2010. The losses of 525 of these events exceeded US$ 100 m (in original values, not inflation-corrected); 92 were above US$ 1bn, and four even topped US$ 10bn.

The number of disastrous weather events in the Munich Re database is growing much faster than the number of geophysical events. Is this due to climate change? For a small part at most. Non-climatic factors such as land-use and land-cover change play a role as well. Nowadays, more people and more valuable assets are exposed to disasters because more people live in unsafe areas, such as floodplains.

Future Weather Outlook

Weather catastrophes constitute a growing burden on national economies and insurance companies, not least because of the costs of precautionary measures. The projections for the future look grim, the authors of this study conclude. The percentage of the European population affected by weather-related disasters may increase by an order of magnitude in a hundred years: from 5% in 1981-2010 to two-thirds by 2100. The record number of heat-related fatalities of 2003 may become the new norm by 2050.

Before you go!

Recommended: Climate Change: Hurricane Season With Big And Wet Storms

Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below.
We try to respond the same day.

Like to write your own article about the weather?
Click on 'Register' or push the button 'Write An Article' on the 'HomePage'

Messange
You
Share this post
profilepic

Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

profileimage

Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: [email protected] or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

Storms Ellen, Francis After Dennis: Extreme Weather Rising?

Storm Dennis left a trail of devastation as it swept across Flanders and the UK on Sunday. Gusts were stronger than last weekend when Storm Ciara had the country in its grip. Two storms in a week isn’t all that exceptional and the worst may not be over. Storms Ellen and Francis could be on the way as early as next weekend (22, 23th of February 2020). Storms Ellen, Francis After Dennis and Ciara: Is Extreme Weather Rising? At the minute it’s too early to offer details. They are coming from the North of the Atlantic. They still need to be formed. Storm Dennis meant gusty conditions and heavy rain especially towards evening. In Stabroek (Antwerp Province, Belgium) gusts of 108 km/h were recorded. Average rainfall of 5 to 15 litres per square metre were measured. Highs at 16.6° C in Brussels remained exceptionally mild.  It was nearly 18°C in the Kempen District. Storm Dennis caused greater damage than Storm Ciara thanks to stronger gusts inland.  Storm Dennis Knocked On Your Door Last Weekend (15/16 February 2020) Jump quickly to subject by clicking on: Extreme Weather Events In Europe On The Rise Damage Statistics Storm And Flood Trends Recommended:  Climate Extremes Australia Floods, Wildfires And Destruction After storm Ciara came storm Dennis. Dennis started in the Atlantic Ocean and reached Ireland and the Uk on Saterday (15th) and the Netherlands on Sunday (16th) afternoon. Storm Dennis generated winds of up to 100 to 120km/h on the northwest coast and on the Wadden Islands. Storm Dennis caused more damage then Ciara. When did the North Sea 'flood'? The 1953 North Sea flood was a major flood caused by a heavy storm that occurred on the night of Saturday, 31 January 1953 and morning of Sunday, 1 February 1953. The floods struck the Netherlands, Belgium, England and Scotland. {youtube}                                           STORM DENNIS to batter UK this weekend with heavy rain and gales Dennis got his name from the Brits, just like Ciara. The names don’t carry any significance, they were sent in by the public, says a Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) spokesperson. The next storm will also get a name sent in by the Brits, but after that, it’s time for one sent in by the Dutch public. Goeree-Overflakkee (Zuid-Holland, Netherlands) during the major flood in 1953 The sixth storm will get the name Francis, after Francis Beaufort, creator of the Beaufort scale used to measure wind speed. The storm after Francis will get the Dutch name Gerda. After that, we’ll have to wait until J and P for the Dutch names Jan and Piet. Does Europe get hit by hurricanes? There is only one modern tropical cyclone officially regarded as directly impacting Europe, Hurricane Vince in 2005, which struck southwestern Spain—having made landfall in the European mainland while still fully tropical. Storms can move around the Bermuda high and turn to the northeast and affect Europe. Storm Dennis Passed: One Storm After Another It seemed we had to wait some more for calm spring weather, as Storm Dennis emerged last Sunday. First it was a nameless storm on Sunday the 9 th  when it appeared. Yes, it was nameless, unlike the recent Ciara because it was significantly weaker, reaching only 98 kilometres, compared to the heavier Ciara which had winds of up to 129 kilometres. Recommended:  Cooling Earth By A Sun Dimming Effect Or Warming By More CO2 Windy, Rainy And Snowy The Rest Of Week 7 Unfortunately, the weather did not significantly improve in week 7 of 2020. It showed it's typical mix of hail, the occasional sunshine peak, long enough only for you to miss it when it was gone, as well as potential wet snow in some places. The wind force also remained substantial at the coasts, reaching level 8, while being level 5 inland.  Was Ciara a hurricane? Storm Ciara was an active extratropical cyclone, and the third named storm of the 2019–20 Ireland, Netherlands and UK windstorm season. Ciara brought heavy rain and severe winds across much of the United Kingdom, Ireland, Sweden and other northern regions in Europe. Ciara is a popular Irish given name. Storm Dennis  Another 'named windy' visitor came last weekend. The weather teased us by becoming somewhat better on Friday (14th of February), but you needed not to be 'worried', there was no calm after the Ciara storm, just more storm. On Sunday Storm Dennis came on our doorway. It also got 15 degrees Celsius in some areas in the south last weekend. What is your weather forecast for this week: first days of spring or last days of winter? Let us know in the comment Boxes below this article. Recommended:  Climate Change Africa, Pakistan: Locust Destroy All Crops Storm Dennis At 'Our Neighbors' Ireland And The UK A number of sailings from Belfast, Dublin and Rosslare had been delayed or cancelled as an orange weather marine warning remained in place, along with a yellow weather snow/ice warning which was in place until midnight last Sunday the 16th of February 2020. Met Éireann issued a number of warnings over the days before as a cold snap set in across the country in the aftermath of a nationwide orange weather warning at the weekend when Storm Ciara made landfall. Storm Dennis on it's way The Met Office in the UK, meanwhile had issued a warning over Storm Dennis which was on the way but predicted not to be as severe as Storm Ciara. Strong westerly winds continuid and high seas resulted in coastal floodings, especially around high tide. Gale force Meanwhile, an orange weather warning for coastal waters was in place as westerly winds reached gale force 8 or stronger gale 9 on all Irish coastal waters and on the Irish Sea. What was the heaviest storm in the UK The Great Storm of 1987 was a violent extratropical cyclone that occurred on the night of 15–16 October, with hurricane-force winds causing casualties in England, France and the Channel Islands as a severe depression in the Bay of Biscay moved northeast. It 'occasionally touched storm force 10', Met Éireann announced. The wind warning prompted ferry operator Stena Line to cancel a number of crossings as a result. In a statement, it stated, Stena Line is continuing to see disruptions to its ferry sailings on the Irish Sea caused by high winds and rough seas in the aftermath of Storm Ciara. As a result, sailings from Belfast to Liverpool have been delayed and Belfast to Heysham sailings have been cancelled. The Dublin to Holyhead route experienced delays of around an hour, while an early morning sailing was cancelled. All sailings from Rosslare were cancelled and resumed at 8am. Overall, the weather forecast for the coming week looked 'unsettled but turning less cold from Thursday (13th of February0'. Ahead of Storm Dennis’ landfall in the UK, the Met Office had issued wind warnings for much of England and Wales for Saturday the 15th. A statement said: 'Storm Dennis brought a range of impacts, including delays and cancellations to transport services, damage to power supplies and large coastal waves. Another spell of very wet and windy ​weather came on Saturday, although Storm Dennis was not expected to be as severe as Ciara disruption came. Below a checklist (UK) of five steps that every household at risk of flooding should implement: Have a home emergency plan in place, which would include what to do in a flood and other scenarios such as a fire. Check that home insurance includes flood cover, and make sure that any changes to the T&Cs in the future do not change the type of cover you think you have. Sign up to receive Floodline alerts – the service is free and messages can be received in different formats (by phone, SMS). If Sepa (or bodies such as the Environment Agency in other parts of the UK) make river level data for a water body near where you live publicly available use this resource. Make use of publicly available resources such as Sepa’s flood risk maps to find out if a property you are considering buying is at risk of flooding. Damage And Fatalities Extreme Weather Events In Europe On The Rise: Before Dennis In the last two decades there has hardly been a year without weather disasters like storms in Europe. There were (mostly river) floods, in Italy, France and Switzerland in 2000, in the upper Elbe and Danube catchments in 2002 and 2013, along the lower Danube in 2006, in the United Kingdom in 2007, in the Adriatic region in 2014, and in Germany and France in 2016. Flood in Dresden (Germany) Severe heat waves and droughts marked the summers of 2003, 2010 and 2018, and large-scale wildfires burned in southern and eastern Europe in 2007, 2010 and 2017. Hailstorms caused a lot of damage in Germany in 2013, and the winter storms Kyrill (2007) and Xynthia (2010) left a trail of destruction in Western Europe. Social Disruption resulted from extreme snowpack in the northern Alps in 2006 and 2019. Storms Like Dennis: Munich Re Has Collected Information On These Events Since 1974  The company’s NatCatSERVICE database on losses caused by natural extreme events is among the world's largest and contains more than 40,000 entries. A distinction is made between disastrous weather events and geophysical events. The latter include earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and tsunamis. The weather disasters include winter storms and storm surges, thunderstorms and flash floods, river and lake flooding, landslides, winter hazards, heat waves, droughts, and wildfires.   Damage Statistics: Storms And Floods Dominate 95% of all loss events in the period 1980-2018 are weather-related. Storms make up almost 50% of all events, and flooding almost another third. The so-called 'climatological' events, such as heat waves, droughts, wildfires and frost, account for 16%. The remaining 5% refer to geophysical hazards. A man walks amidst rubble following an earthquake in Pescara del Tronto Winter storms produce losses in excess of one billion dollars practically every year. The most expensive storm disasters since 1990 are winter storms Daria (1990), Lothar (1999), Kyrill (2007), and Xynthia (2010), with overall losses of US$ 7bn, 11.5bn, 9bn, and 6.1bn, respectively. The most expensive weather-related disaster in Europe, affecting large parts of Germany and neighbouring countries, was the 2002 summer flood: two flood events caused a total of US$ 21.5bn (original values, not adjusted for inflation) across the continent. As a result, flood insurance has gained importance. The penetration of flood insurance for private homes in Germany increased countrywide to about 41% in 2018, as compared to around 26% in 2009 and only less than 10% in the year 2002. Recommended:  Climate Change: Cause Of The Next Global Economic Collapse Europe's Average Annual Overall Losses For 1980-2018 Are Equal To US$ 16.2bn. Casualties: 2003 and 2010 heat waves stand out In all 1,719 events in Europe in which at least one person was killed, storms and floods are leading by a long way. However, 2003 and 2010 stand out as years with extremely high numbers of fatalities in Europe caused by heat waves: 70,000 and 56,000, respectively. These two events dominate the number of weather-related fatalities in Europe since 1980: the number of fatalities by all natural hazards combined in the period 1980-2018 is about 155,000. High Temperature And Storms Also Enhance The Wildfire Danger Wildfires in 2003 caused US$ 1.2bn of damage and killed 70 people in southern Europe. In 2010, the fires around Moscow approached a US$ 2bn loss and claimed 130 lives. More recently, in the summer of 2017, 123 people died in several wildfire episodes, 110 of them in Portugal alone. In 2018, 100 people perished in wildfires in Greece.   Storm And Flood Trends? With respect to damage, the number of severe floods seems to be increasing. With respect to fatalities, the mortality risk related to heat waves has been on the rise. Heat wave frequency, duration, and intensity are increasing, while resistance is decreasing because European societies are ageing. Local inhabitants are evacuated from a flooded village of Sokolniki in Southern Poland, May 20, 2010 Altogether, from 1980 to 2018, 4,890 destructive weather events have been recorded in this database for Europe. 837 Of the events occurred in the 1980s, 1,239 in the 1990s, 1,345 in the first decade of the 21stcentury and 1,469 since 2010. The losses of 525 of these events exceeded US$ 100 m (in original values, not inflation-corrected); 92 were above US$ 1bn, and four even topped US$ 10bn. The number of disastrous weather events in the Munich Re database is growing much faster than the number of geophysical events. Is this due to climate change? For a small part at most. Non-climatic factors such as land-use and land-cover change play a role as well. Nowadays, more people and more valuable assets are exposed to disasters because more people live in unsafe areas, such as floodplains. Future Weather Outlook Weather catastrophes constitute a growing burden on national economies and insurance companies, not least because of the costs of precautionary measures. The projections for the future look grim, the authors of this study conclude. The percentage of the European population affected by weather-related disasters may increase by an order of magnitude in a hundred years: from 5% in 1981-2010 to two-thirds by 2100. The record number of heat-related fatalities of 2003 may become the new norm by 2050. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change: Hurricane Season With Big And Wet Storms Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the weather? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Get updates on environmental sustainability in your mailbox every month.