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Climate renewables in puerto rico are just two percent | Upload General

Renewables In Puerto Rico Are Just Two percent

by: Peter Sant
renewables in puerto rico are just two percent | Upload

Puerto Rico’s 3.4 million island residents are complete without power following a lashing by Hurricane Maria. Renewables In Puerto Rico Are Just Two percent which is neither a great help.

Electrical Infrastructure

Even before the storm battered the US territory—just two weeks after Hurricane Irma inflicted an estimated $1 billion in damage on the island—there were already problems with its electrical infrastructure. Now those issues will be felt more acutely as utility workers attempt to get aging power plants back online. The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) has said it needs $4 billion to replace its plants—filed for bankruptcy.

Electricity Generated By Fossil Fuels

According to The Washington Post, the authority oversees more than 2,470 miles of transmission lines that run from its plants and then close to 31,500 miles of shorter lines that transmit electricity from the power grid to individual customers, according to The Washington Post. One of the challenges for returning power quickly is that Puerto Rico relies almost entirely on electricity generated by fossil fuels to power its antiquated and exposed grid. In Florida, Irma had cut power to more than 6.7 million people. But some lights were back on more quickly than others thanks to homes and cities that had invested in solar panels, according to Inside Climate News. That suggests that renewable, decentralized sources could play a significant role in how communities can recover faster after destructive storms. It’s far from reality in Puerto Rico, where the power generated from alternative and renewable sources is almost non-existent.

Recommended: Climate Change: Renewables Stalled Globally 2018

Compare that to the mainland US, or even Costa Rica—where 98% of electricity came from renewable sources in 2016—for examples of more progress in diversifying energy sources. Nearby, the Dominican Republic also relies on fossil fuels for most of its electricity. According to the Energy Transition Initiative, in 2012, wind and hydroelectric power accounted for 14% of the generation. Because Puerto Rico is so reliant on fossil fuels, electricity rates have traditionally been close to double what mainland Americans pay. And while those rates have decreased somewhat in recent years as the oil price dropped, Puerto Rico still paid more than any state or territory except Hawaii. That is, in part, because the island does not produce or refine crude oil, forcing it to import almost all of its supply.

Recommended: Solar Rooftop Tiles: The Dutch Answer To Tesla

The International Monetary Fund has found that more than half of Caribbean nations rely almost exclusively (pdf) on fossil fuels. This poses problems every hurricane season when high winds and torrential rain knock out power and inflict significant public utility damage.

Before you go!

Recommended: Climate Change: Hurricane Season With Big And Wet Storms

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Being involved in sustainability activities has changed my view on this subject a lot. Climate change and pollution are borderless and thus solutions and information has to be shared globally. Rich, 'developed' countries have to start supporting countries that don't have the means and knowledge to improve their situation. Sustainability movement is as strong as its weakest link - whatsorb.com is a helpful platform to speed up the X-Change of Global Sustainability.

 

Being involved in sustainability activities has changed my view on this subject a lot. Climate change and pollution are borderless and thus solutions and information has to be shared globally. Rich, 'developed' countries have to start supporting countries that don't have the means and knowledge to improve their situation. Sustainability movement is as strong as its weakest link - whatsorb.com is a helpful platform to speed up the X-Change of Global Sustainability.

 

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Renewables In Puerto Rico Are Just Two percent

Puerto Rico’s 3.4 million island residents are complete without power following a lashing by Hurricane Maria. Renewables In Puerto Rico Are Just Two percent which is neither a great help. Electrical Infrastructure Even before the storm battered the US territory—just two weeks after Hurricane Irma inflicted an estimated $1 billion in damage on the island—there were already problems with its electrical infrastructure. Now those issues will be felt more acutely as utility workers attempt to get aging power plants back online. The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) has said it needs $4 billion to replace its plants—filed for bankruptcy. Electricity Generated By Fossil Fuels According to The Washington Post, the authority oversees more than 2,470 miles of transmission lines that run from its plants and then close to 31,500 miles of shorter lines that transmit electricity from the power grid to individual customers, according to The Washington Post. One of the challenges for returning power quickly is that Puerto Rico relies almost entirely on electricity generated by fossil fuels to power its antiquated and exposed grid. In Florida, Irma had cut power to more than 6.7 million people. But some lights were back on more quickly than others thanks to homes and cities that had invested in solar panels, according to Inside Climate News. That suggests that renewable, decentralized sources could play a significant role in how communities can recover faster after destructive storms. It’s far from reality in Puerto Rico, where the power generated from alternative and renewable sources is almost non-existent. Recommended:  Climate Change: Renewables Stalled Globally 2018 Compare that to the mainland US, or even Costa Rica—where 98% of electricity came from renewable sources in 2016—for examples of more progress in diversifying energy sources. Nearby, the Dominican Republic also relies on fossil fuels for most of its electricity. According to the Energy Transition Initiative, in 2012, wind and hydroelectric power accounted for 14% of the generation. Because Puerto Rico is so reliant on fossil fuels, electricity rates have traditionally been close to double what mainland Americans pay. And while those rates have decreased somewhat in recent years as the oil price dropped, Puerto Rico still paid more than any state or territory except Hawaii. That is, in part, because the island does not produce or refine crude oil, forcing it to import almost all of its supply. Recommended:  Solar Rooftop Tiles: The Dutch Answer To Tesla The International Monetary Fund has found that more than half of Caribbean nations rely almost exclusively (pdf) on fossil fuels. This poses problems every hurricane season when high winds and torrential rain knock out power and inflict significant public utility damage. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change: Hurricane Season With Big And Wet Storms Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the weather? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'Home Page'
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