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Climate climate change  water scarcity  hunger  who cares | Upload General

Climate Change, Water Scarcity, Hunger: Who Cares

by: Marike Boonstra
climate change  water scarcity  hunger  who cares | Upload

Water shortage through climate change: we can’t live without it. Of course, people need it to survive, but water is also the throbbing vein of nature: vegetation, soil, and lakes are dependent on fluids. Without water, our agricultural production and food security will collapse, and so will our nutritional security.

Climate Change: ZeroHunger

That’s why we are facing an enormous problem: our freshwater resources are dwindling at an alarming rate by climate change and human activities. The UN reported that almost half of the population could be affected by water scarcity by 2050. Meanwhile, the world´s population keeps on growing, with higher living standards than ever before. How can we stop this growing water scarcity?

First, it is essential to understand the extent to which water is used in our existence. Did you know, for example, that we consume much more water through the food we eat then what we drink? According to an article from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, we need 2.000 to 5.000 liters of water to produce food consumed daily by one person. The FAO has evidence that suggests that two-thirds of the world population could be living in water-stressed countries by 2025 if current consumption patterns continue. “To achieve a #ZeroHunger world by 2030, we need to take action now,” the organization states.

Crops: Choose It Wisely

Agriculture is and will continue to be one of the leading causes of water scarcity – one of the biggest, actually next to climate change. The FAO states that farming accounts for almost 70 percent of all water withdrawals, and up to 95 percent in some developing countries. The choice for other crops is an answer to fight water scarcity because of agriculture, according to the FAO. For example, pulses crops have a small water footprint. For one kilogram of lentils, there are 1250 liters of water necessary, comparing to 15.500 liters for the same amount of beef.

Recommended: Blue Planet Earth: The Amount Of Water You Use

Wastewater Use To Decrease The Risk Of Famine.

We are facing climate change. As a result of the global warming environment, more water will be needed to keep food production going. On the other hand, there will be more frequent and more severe droughts that will further increase water scarcity. The solution? According to FAO, we need to take action to harvest and recycle our freshwater reserves. We can use wastewater to decrease the risk of famine and socioeconomic disruption.

The Efficiency Of Water In The Food Value Chain

Recommended: Agriculture, Using Wastewater As Natural Fertilizer: Mexico

We have yet a lot to learn about the efficient use of water in our food value chain. According to FAO, “key decisions such as site selection, technology, and suppliers are frequently made without taking into account the impacts on water resources, especially when water is not a limiting factor either in quantities and in price.”

 

                        How solar-powered desalination works - Sustainable clean water for islands & coastlines


Food Waste Is Water Waste.

Last but not least: food waste equals wasted water. To fight water scarcity, we have to fight wasted food. Let’s remember that if we throw away food, we also throw away the sources that made this food – water! According to FAO, “one-third of all the food produced is either lost or wasted each year — that translates into a volume of wasted water that is equal to around three times the volume of Lake Geneva.” The solution to food waste is simple: stop buying more than what you need. You can even go dumpster diving to save the environment and some money!

Recommended: Dumpster Diving: A Hobby That Helps To Combat Food Waste

As FAO says: “The issue of water scarcity is at the very core of sustainable development.” Without water, we can't grow our food. Fortunately, by changing our habits, we can fight water scarcity.

Recommended: Fog Catchers: Magicians Making Water Out Of Air

Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below.
We try to respond the same day.

Like to write your article about water issues?
Click on 'Register' or push the button 'Write An Article' on the 'HomePage.'

Climate Change, Water Scarcity, Hunger: Who Cares

Water shortage through climate change: we can’t live without it. Of course, people need it to survive, but water is also the throbbing vein of nature: vegetation, soil, and lakes are dependent on fluids. Without water, our agricultural production and food security will collapse, and so will our nutritional security. Climate Change: ZeroHunger That’s why we are facing an enormous problem: our freshwater resources are dwindling at an alarming rate by climate change and human activities. The UN reported that almost half of the population could be affected by water scarcity by 2050. Meanwhile, the world´s population keeps on growing, with higher living standards than ever before. How can we stop this growing water scarcity? First, it is essential to understand the extent to which water is used in our existence. Did you know, for example, that we consume much more water through the food we eat then what we drink? According to an article from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, we need 2.000 to 5.000 liters of water to produce food consumed daily by one person. The FAO has evidence that suggests that two-thirds of the world population could be living in water-stressed countries by 2025 if current consumption patterns continue. “To achieve a #ZeroHunger world by 2030, we need to take action now,” the organization states. Crops: Choose It Wisely Agriculture is and will continue to be one of the leading causes of water scarcity – one of the biggest, actually next to climate change. The FAO states that farming accounts for almost 70 percent of all water withdrawals, and up to 95 percent in some developing countries. The choice for other crops is an answer to fight water scarcity because of agriculture, according to the FAO. For example, pulses crops have a small water footprint. For one kilogram of lentils, there are 1250 liters of water necessary, comparing to 15.500 liters for the same amount of beef. Recommended:  Blue Planet Earth: The Amount Of Water You Use Wastewater Use To Decrease The Risk Of Famine. We are facing climate change. As a result of the global warming environment, more water will be needed to keep food production going. On the other hand, there will be more frequent and more severe droughts that will further increase water scarcity. The solution? According to FAO, we need to take action to harvest and recycle our freshwater reserves. We can use wastewater to decrease the risk of famine and socioeconomic disruption. The Efficiency Of Water In The Food Value Chain Recommended:  Agriculture, Using Wastewater As Natural Fertilizer: Mexico We have yet a lot to learn about the efficient use of water in our food value chain. According to FAO, “key decisions such as site selection, technology, and suppliers are frequently made without taking into account the impacts on water resources, especially when water is not a limiting factor either in quantities and in price.”   {youtube}                         How solar-powered desalination works - Sustainable clean water for islands & coastlines Food Waste Is Water Waste. Last but not least: food waste equals wasted water. To fight water scarcity, we have to fight wasted food. Let’s remember that if we throw away food, we also throw away the sources that made this food – water! According to FAO, “one-third of all the food produced is either lost or wasted each year — that translates into a volume of wasted water that is equal to around three times the volume of Lake Geneva.” The solution to food waste is simple: stop buying more than what you need. You can even go dumpster diving to save the environment and some money! Recommended:  Dumpster Diving: A Hobby That Helps To Combat Food Waste As FAO says: “The issue of water scarcity is at the very core of sustainable development.” Without water, we can't grow our food. Fortunately, by changing our habits, we can fight water scarcity. Recommended:  Fog Catchers: Magicians Making Water Out Of Air Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about water issues? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
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