Close Welcome writers, influencers and dreamers, make the world a greener place
Register here
Forgot password
Forgot password
or
or

Close
Close For sustainability news hunters! The WhatsOrb newsletter!

Receive monthly the newest updates about sustainability from influencers and fellow writers. Cutting edge innovations and global environmental developments.

Close For sustainability news hunters! The WhatsOrb newsletter!

Receive monthly the newest updates about sustainability from influencers and fellow writers. Cutting edge innovations and global environmental developments.

Close Reset password
your profile is 33% complete:
33%
Update profile Close
Close WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-Change

For writers, influencers and dreamers who want to make the world a greener place.

WhatsOrb reaches monthly about 7000 thousand visitors who want - like you - to make the world a greener place. Share your expertise and all can benefit.

Become an influencer and write and share sustainable news and innovations globally
Are you a writer or do you have ideas about sustainability which you want to share? Register and share your green knowledge and news. WhatsOrb offers you global exposure for your article.

If your article meets certain standards, you receive promotional gains like Facebook promotions and Google Ads advertising.



Climate floating cities  a sustainable concept for future communities | Upload General

Floating Cities: A Sustainable Concept For Future Communities

Share this post
by: Sharai Hoekema
floating cities  a sustainable concept for future communities | Upload

At the current pace, it seems almost unfathomable that we will be able to call a halt to sea levels rising, the result of climate change spinning out of control. As our climate system is shrouded in so many uncertainties and complexities, it is hard to predict to what extent it will occur, but one thing seems to be a certainty - those of us living in coastal regions are in for wet feet.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), one of the leading authorities on climate change, has made projections that would see our seas rising for up to 90 centimeters before the end of this century. However, many feel that this is a very conservative number, with other research placing the potential rise anywhere between 200 to 270 centimeters this century alone, describing those numbers as ‘potentially plausible’. 

Finding higher grounds:  floating cities

A general consensus seems to have been found in the expectation that for each Celsius degree of temperature rise, an irreversible 230 centimeters rise in sea levels will be triggered. Does this mean that you should be panicking if you happen to live near the shore with less than this to spare between the current sea level and your home? Well, not necessarily, as sea levels will not rise uniformly around the world. Due to tectonic activity and subsidence of land, tides, currents and storms, it might even drop in some areas. 

Once again though, it is very hard to predict which regions will be hit the hardest. Mother Nature has been giving us a preview of potential consequences, as illustrated by storms in the New York and Houston areas causing excessive flooding. Yet it is hard to pinpoint exactly where you might be ‘safe’. All the more reason to start preparing, which can be done in one of the following three ways: retreating (moving inland), protecting (by erecting sea walls) - or accommodating (adapting to the new status quo).

Floating city: Oceanix

A great example of accommodating to rising sea levels caused by climate change is the initiative launched by the architecture firm BIG, titled Oceanix City. Their startup Oceanix has secured partnerships with the United Nations and MIT as they aim to launch their first prototype of a floating city by 2030. Gorgeous 3D-rendered images show floating platforms of about five acres each, that are securely fixed to the sea floor. On these platforms, communities are built up using sustainable means, with platforms interconnected using walkways. 



     Climate Change: Floating Cities Are A Concept To Survive. 
Oceanix City: New York's Future Floating City

 

As such, it really forms a ‘city’ made out of connected artificial islands. Buildings will still give off a distinct urban feel, while being fully green - for example by using timber from sustainably grown forests. Furthermore, there will be plenty of space allocated to vertical farms, underwater gardens and greenhouses to provide a steady food supply for those living on it.

Similarly, power is mostly generated from renewable sources like wind and solar. Drinking water is derived straight from the sea and run through desalination plants, and a highly effective sewage and waste-recycling system will be in place. While it can be used as an extension of a coastal city - adding a new neighbourhood on the water -, it could theoretically also function as a thriving, self-sustaining metropolis.

Oceanix: philosophy of floating cities 

The idea surely is not new, with architects and city developers having touted similar thoughts in the past. One notable example is the American inventor Buckminster Fuller, who already envisioned a town of 5,000 inhabitants near Tokyo back in the 1960s. While ambitious, it had done little but fuel the fantasy of science-fiction writers around the world. 

Yet the refined way in which Oceanix has presented her vision has drawn the attention of many and serves as inspiration for more creative thinking and developing in this area. After all, the concept may have to grow up a lot faster than we would want it to. Another start-up, Singaporean company Blue Frontiers, has accepted this challenge as well - and is well underway to building the first actual floating village.

(Recommended: Floating City: A Sci-Fi Trope Or A Salvation For Many Nations?)

Floating village in Tahiti

Recently, they signed a memorandum of understanding with the government of French Polynesia, that would allow them to build a floating village in a Tahitian lagoon - with construction slated to begin next year. It will be the ideal testing ground for technologies aiding floating cities and set in motion a - hopefully steep - learning curve when it comes to letting communities live on the water.

At the same time, there will be some 300 people actually working and living in this floating village, measuring roughly 7,500 square meters. They will occupy themselves with the construction and operation of bungalows, apartments, research institutions, underwater restaurants, and facilities for new aquatic industries like wave power generation and seaweed farming.

This will all undoubtedly make it both a hotspot for eco-tourism and a testing ground for sustainable initiatives, a combination that has ultimately convinced the French Polynesian government to give it a shot. The project’s architect has described his vision as perfectly blending in with its surroundings, making it closely resemble a natural island. Roofs will be made up of gardens and walls cladded with local products like coconut wood. 

The goal is not to come up with something revolutionary and futuristic looking, but rather honour the ecosystem in which the community will have to live. Ultimately, it will even serve as a means of restoring natural ecosystems, including animal and plant species. 

(Recommended: Smart Sustainable Lifestyle Changing Tips & Tricks For 2019)

Accommodating rising sea levels

This last part really hits it out of the park and is the perfect representation of what we mean when we talk about ‘accommodating’ rising sea levels. No fancy installations, walls or communities that look as if they have been removed from the set of a sci-fi movie. No war-like efforts to combat our climate and the sea, as if they are the enemies that should be kept out of our lives at all costs. No, just plain and simple ways of ‘returning to our roots’, in a way, and finding sustainable ways of surviving by using our natural environment - not by fighting it. 

All about Climate Change

Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day.

Lee Keiser - 1 WEEK AGO
Post Reported Report Post
Your Comment is Under Moderation
Ha! I love it because it looks conceptually and stylistically identical to a project i did during my MLA at UCD.
Reply

Floating Cities: A Sustainable Concept For Future Communities

At the current pace, it seems almost unfathomable that we will be able to call a halt to sea levels rising, the result of climate change spinning out of control. As our climate system is shrouded in so many uncertainties and complexities, it is hard to predict to what extent it will occur, but one thing seems to be a certainty - those of us living in coastal regions are in for wet feet. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), one of the leading authorities on climate change, has made projections that would see our seas rising for up to 90 centimeters before the end of this century. However, many feel that this is a very conservative number, with other research placing the potential rise anywhere between 200 to 270 centimeters this century alone, describing those numbers as ‘potentially plausible’.   Finding higher grounds:  floating cities A general consensus seems to have been found in the expectation that for each Celsius degree of temperature rise, an irreversible 230 centimeters rise in sea levels will be triggered. Does this mean that you should be panicking if you happen to live near the shore with less than this to spare between the current sea level and your home? Well, not necessarily, as sea levels will not rise uniformly around the world. Due to tectonic activity and subsidence of land, tides, currents and storms, it might even drop in some areas.   Once again though, it is very hard to predict which regions will be hit the hardest. Mother Nature has been giving us a preview of potential consequences, as illustrated by storms in the New York and Houston areas causing excessive flooding. Yet it is hard to pinpoint exactly where you might be ‘safe’. All the more reason to start preparing, which can be done in one of the following three ways: retreating (moving inland), protecting (by erecting sea walls) - or accommodating (adapting to the new status quo). Floating city: Oceanix A great example of accommodating to rising sea levels caused by climate change is the initiative launched by the architecture firm BIG, titled Oceanix City. Their startup Oceanix has secured partnerships with the United Nations and MIT as they aim to launch their first prototype of a floating city by 2030. Gorgeous 3D-rendered images show floating platforms of about five acres each, that are securely fixed to the sea floor. On these platforms, communities are built up using sustainable means, with platforms interconnected using walkways.   {youtube}      Climate Change: Floating Cities Are A Concept To Survive.  Oceanix City: New York's Future Floating City   As such, it really forms a ‘city’ made out of connected artificial islands. Buildings will still give off a distinct urban feel, while being fully green - for example by using timber from sustainably grown forests. Furthermore, there will be plenty of space allocated to vertical farms, underwater gardens and greenhouses to provide a steady food supply for those living on it. Similarly, power is mostly generated from renewable sources like wind and solar. Drinking water is derived straight from the sea and run through desalination plants, and a highly effective sewage and waste-recycling system will be in place. While it can be used as an extension of a coastal city - adding a new neighbourhood on the water -, it could theoretically also function as a thriving, self-sustaining metropolis. Oceanix: p hilosophy of floating cities  The idea surely is not new, with architects and city developers having touted similar thoughts in the past. One notable example is the American inventor Buckminster Fuller, who already envisioned a town of 5,000 inhabitants near Tokyo back in the 1960s. While ambitious, it had done little but fuel the fantasy of science-fiction writers around the world.   Yet the refined way in which Oceanix has presented her vision has drawn the attention of many and serves as inspiration for more creative thinking and developing in this area. After all, the concept may have to grow up a lot faster than we would want it to. Another start-up, Singaporean company Blue Frontiers, has accepted this challenge as well - and is well underway to building the first actual floating village. ( Recommended:  Floating City: A Sci-Fi Trope Or A Salvation For Many Nations? ) Floating village in Tahiti Recently, they signed a memorandum of understanding with the government of French Polynesia, that would allow them to build a floating village in a Tahitian lagoon - with construction slated to begin next year. It will be the ideal testing ground for technologies aiding floating cities and set in motion a - hopefully steep - learning curve when it comes to letting communities live on the water. At the same time, there will be some 300 people actually working and living in this floating village, measuring roughly 7,500 square meters. They will occupy themselves with the construction and operation of bungalows, apartments, research institutions, underwater restaurants, and facilities for new aquatic industries like wave power generation and seaweed farming. This will all undoubtedly make it both a hotspot for eco-tourism and a testing ground for sustainable initiatives, a combination that has ultimately convinced the French Polynesian government to give it a shot. The project’s architect has described his vision as perfectly blending in with its surroundings, making it closely resemble a natural island. Roofs will be made up of gardens and walls cladded with local products like coconut wood.   The goal is not to come up with something revolutionary and futuristic looking, but rather honour the ecosystem in which the community will have to live. Ultimately, it will even serve as a means of restoring natural ecosystems, including animal and plant species.   ( Recommended:  Smart Sustainable Lifestyle Changing Tips & Tricks For 2019 ) Accommodating rising sea levels This last part really hits it out of the park and is the perfect representation of what we mean when we talk about ‘accommodating’ rising sea levels. No fancy installations, walls or communities that look as if they have been removed from the set of a sci-fi movie. No war-like efforts to combat our climate and the sea, as if they are the enemies that should be kept out of our lives at all costs. No, just plain and simple ways of ‘returning to our roots’, in a way, and finding sustainable ways of surviving by using our natural environment - not by fighting it.   All about Climate Change Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day.
Get updates on environmental sustainability in your mailbox every month.