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Climate climate change  china floods the arctic on fire | Upload Man-Made

Climate Change: China Floods The Arctic On Fire

by: Peter Sant
climate change  china floods the arctic on fire | Upload

Since early June, the water levels of 433 rivers in China have risen over the danger mark, with 33 of them rising to historical highs. In Siberia, nearly 300 wildfires are blazing amid record warm weather.

China Is Flooding: Torrential Rains

China has a four-tier, color-coded weather warning system, with red representing the most severe, followed by orange, yellow, and blue. Since July, 31 people have died or are missing, and 23.85 million people have been affected due to floods in 24 provincial regions, including East China's Anhui and Jiangxi provinces. Water levels on many rivers have been unusually high this year because of torrential rains. Blasting dams and embankments to discharge water was an extreme response employed during China’s worst floods in recent years.

Last week, the huge Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze opened three floodgates after the water level rose more than 15 meters (50ft) above flood level.

Three Gorges Dam, water, blue sky

Elsewhere, soldiers and workers have been testing the strength of embankments and shoring them up with sandbags and rocks. Recently, firefighters and others finished filling in a 188-meter (620ft) break on Poyang Lake, China’s largest freshwater lake, that had caused widespread flooding across 15 villages and agricultural fields in Jiangxi province. More than 14,000 people were evacuated. Seasonal flooding strikes large parts of China annually, especially in its central and southern regions, but has been especially severe this summer.

Recommended: Climate Change Pictures: Weird Global Anomalies

The second-highest rainfall that's swamped China in more than a half-century has fuelled new questions about the world's biggest hydroelectric facility, billed as helping to tame floodwaters.

Vice Minister of Emergency Management Zheng Guoguang told reporters that the Yangtze, Asia's longest river, and parts of its watershed had seen the second-highest rainfall since 1961 over the past six months. But after weeks of devastating flooding, questions are being raised about the Three Gorges Dam's impact on Yangtze floods and if the massive structure itself may be at risk.

fllod, brown water roofs, houses

One of the primary justifications for the Three Gorges Dam was flood control, but less than 20 years after its completion, we have the highest floodwater in recorded history. But the fact is that it cannot prevent these severe events.”

China Is Flooding: The Three Gorges Dam

The Three Gorges Dam was officially completed in 2006. Its power operation went online in 2012, and it is one of China’s most expensive and questionable developmental projects. Some 1.4 million people had to be resettled as a result of the massive project on the Yangtze River.

Three Gorges Dam, water, buildings, cranes
Photo by Yao Yilong. The Three Gorges Dam is spanning the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) near Yichang, Hubei province, China.

The dam also was touted as the best way to end centuries of flooding along the Yangtze and provide power for China's industrial boom. But some geologists contended that damming up too much water in the reservoir carried a heightened risk of earthquakes and prolonged damage to the river's ecology.

In 2012, the Ministry of Land Resources said the number of landslides and other disasters around the reservoir had increased 70 percent after the water level in the $23 billion projects rose to its maximum in 2010.

Recommended: Asia’s Water War: Is The Mekong Still A River?

Critics of the project, like Chinese geologist Fan Xiao, have said that Three Gorges and other major dam projects may make flooding worse by altering the flow of sedimentation down the river. Three Gorges, storage capacity amounts to less than 9 percent of average floodwaters. “It can only partially and temporarily intercept the upstream floods, and is powerless to help with floods caused by heavy rainfall in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River,” he said.


                                                      Climate change blamed for China flood disaster

Damage from this season's floods has been estimated in the hundreds of millions of dollars, further pressuring an economy deeply impacted by the

Flooding In Hubei Province

Hubei province, through which the Yangtze flows, is known for its numerous lakes and rivers and is under particular threat. The province's capital Wuhan was the epicenter of China's coronavirus outbreak. Residents in the Yangtze River basin in recent weeks have expressed concerns over the ability of the massive dam to handle more heavy rain, even though authorities have been releasing floodwater from the structure.

China Is Flooding: Wuhan

The central Chinese city of Wuhan and the provinces of Anhui, Jiangxi, and Zhejiang declared red alerts as heavy rain threatened to swell rivers and lakes and bring more disruption across the countryside and to global commerce.

Wuhan, on the banks of the Yangtze River, where the novel coronavirus emerged late last year, warned residents to take precautions as water levels fast their maximum guaranteed safety level. The giant Three Gorges reservoir, which has been holding back more water to try to ease downstream flood risks, is more than 10 meters higher than its warning level, with inflows now at more than 50,000 cubic meters a second.

Recommended: Coronavirus: Symptoms Flu And Climate Change

The Poyang Lake in Jiangxi province, which is formed from the overspill of the Yangtze, is 2.5 meters higher than its warning level. It has expanded by more than 2,000 square kilometers during thus flood season, and parts of the surrounding town have been inundated.

China Is Flooding: Delays In Delivering Of PPE

Further east, the Tai lake near Shanghai has also declared a red alert after its water level rose to nearly a meter higher than its safe level. The summer rainy season brings floods to China almost every year, but the impact of the disruption they cause is being felt further afield as Chinese goods become more important in supply chains of items such as personal protective equipment (PPE).

woman, glases, boxes, masks

"It's just creating another major roadblock here in terms of PPE getting into the United States - it is the worst of times for it to happen, but that's what we're dealing with right now," said Michael Einhorn, president of Dealmed. This U.S. medical supply distributor sources disposable lab coats and other products from Wuhan and nearby regions.

Recommended: Coronavirus: Will The Weather Help Us Beat It?

"We cannot get the product out for over a week, which is a very long time in our business," he said, adding that the delays could last another two or three weeks. Economic activity in parts of China, especially construction and steel and cement demand, continues to be hurt by the flooding, analysts say, suggesting some loss of momentum after a stronger than expected bounce in the second quarter from the coronavirus crisis.

The Artic, Siberia On Fire

You have after reading above already a lot on your mind, but may I suggest one additional topic of alarm for consideration: Siberia is on fire.

Siberia, the proverbial coldest place, situated way up at the top of the globe in the Arctic circle, is experiencing record warm temperatures, melting sea ice, and massive wildfires — changes to the environment that even the scientists most urgently tracking the climate crisis didn’t expect to see for another several decade. As New York’s David Wallace-Wells wrote of one town that hit triple-digit temperatures on June 20, “In a world without climate change, this anomaly, one Danish meteorologist calculated, would be a 1-in-100,000-year event.”

trees, fire, sky

Recommended: Climate Change: Antarctica Is Melting Says NASA

“We always expected the Arctic to change faster than the rest of the globe,” one researcher told the Washington Post. “But I don’t think anyone expected the changes to happen as fast as we are seeing them happen.” Siberian towns are experiencing a heatwave throughout the region, with many smashing centuries-old temperature records, records that are now being broken year after year. Scientists say that the area is warming at three times the rate of the rest of the world, due to a phenomenon called “Arctic amplification,” in which melting ice exposes more dark sea and lake waters. These turning zones were once net heat-reflecting into heat-absorbing. And temperatures rise even more.

The effects of that increase are myriad and terrifying. Melting snow creates dry vegetation for wildfires, which have reached record levels this summer, sending out giant plumes of smoke and releasing more greenhouse gases than ever before. Some of these are troublingly named “zombie fires,” which don’t go out in winter but burn under the snow and ice only to erupt in the air once again once the snow melts. People in Siberia are at risk of infrastructure collapse as towns built for the severe strain under new, extreme conditions. At the same time, the melting of Arctic ice contributes to sea-level rise and irregular weather patterns around the world. Perhaps scariest is the potential calamity of total permafrost melting: Permafrost is a layer of continuous ice that covers nearly a quarter of the landmass in the Northern Hemisphere, in which approximately 1,460 billion to 1,600 billion metric tons of organic carbon is trapped. That’s more than twice the amount of carbon currently in the atmosphere. If with previously stable permafrost subject to never-before-seen heat, it is released, we could reach a tipping point beyond human intervention.

Siberia On Fire And The Coronavirus: A Connection?

With much of the world consumed by the coronavirus pandemic, and with the United States engaged in reckoning on racial injustice on top of reaching a record number of virus cases, temperature records in Siberia might seem like a faraway problem. But seemingly separate crises are not so disconnected; studies recently show, for example, how warming affects poor pregnant women in the U.S., and Black expecting mothers, in particular, a disparity that will get even worse as warming continues.

Recommended: Bushfires Australia Generate Their Own Weather

“When we develop a fever, it’s a sign. It’s a warning sign that something is wrong, and we stop, and we take note,” a Colorado-based Arctic researcher said to the Post. “The Arctic is on fire. It has a fever right now, and so it’s a good warning sign that we need to stop, take note, and figure out what’s going on.

Flooding And Climate Change

China has perennial flooding in summer, but a combination of climate reasons and human behavior has contributed to a longer-than-usual duration and incessant rainfall in some regions. The subtropical high-pressure system over the western North Pacific was robust this year. Its intersection with cold air has led to continuous heavy rain in the Yangtze River basin.

people, rescue boat, flood, water houses, blue umbrella

Another reason was global warming. We cannot say a single extreme weather event is directly caused by climate change, but seeing it over the long term, global warming has led to an increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events.

From 1961 to 2018, there has been an increase in ‘hefty rainfall’ events in China, according to the China Climate Change Blue Book (2019). And since the mid-1990s, the frequency of extreme precipitation has increased dramatically.

Recommended: China Will Make It Rain In Tibet: Space Technology

Over the past 60 years, the number of days of heavy rain has gone up by 3.9 percent a decade. Aside from the rainfall, human behavior has also contributed to the severity of the floods in China.

Decades of land reclamation and dam-building on nearby rivers had reduced the area and volume of Poyang Lake, the country’s largest freshwater lake, which is located in Jiangxi. Some 1,300 sq km (502 sq miles) of land was reclaimed there from 1954 to 1998, which caused the surface area of the lake to shrink from 5,160 sq km (1,992 sq miles) to 3,860 sq km (1,490 sq miles), according to a study by University of Alabama geographer David Shankman.

Environmental volunteer Zhang Wenbin said he had investigated illegal land reclamation activities at Tuolin, another lake in the province. He said some of the projects around the lake were still underway last year, even though they had been ordered to stop by environmental inspectors from Beijing.

“There are many similar cases,” Zhang said, adding that Tuolin Lake had also shrunk in size, reducing its storage capacity for floodwaters.

Flooding: How Does It Compare To Other Years?

China’s worst known floods were in 1931 when more than 2 million people were killed. The flooding inundated an area the size of England and half of Scotland combined, affecting about 25 million people – or a tenth of the population at the time, Chris Courtney, an assistant professor at Durham University, wrote like Disaster in China.

Since the People’s Republic of China was founded in 1949, there have been two catastrophic floods.

  • The first was in the summer of 1954 along the Yangtze River, resulting in over 30,000 deaths and affecting 18 million people.
  • The second was in 1998, again along the Yangtze but also in the south and north of the country. It was the worst flooding in recent years, with more than 3,000 people killed, 15 million left homeless, and US$24 billion in economic losses.

The Artic On Fire And Climate Change

Climate change has lit parts of the Arctic on fire, with the region also recording temperature highs of 38C (100F), sparking concern among scientists worried about the ramifications for the rest of the world.

This year the fires have begun burning even earlier than the usual July start, said Vladimir Chuprov, director of the project department at Greenpeace Russia. Unseasonably warm weather, particularly if coupled with wildfires, causes permafrost to thaw faster. This, in turn, exacerbates global warming by releasing large amounts of methane. This methane a potent greenhouse gas 28 times stronger than carbon dioxide.

areal, Siberia, smoke, trees

Recommended: Our Focus On CO2 Alone: Other Climate Culprits

Methane escaping from permafrost thaw sites enters the atmosphere and circulates the globe. Methane that originates in the Arctic, does not stay in the Arctic. It has global ramifications. What is taking place in the Arctic can even warp the weather in Europe and the US.

In the summer, the unusual warming lessens the temperature and pressure difference between the Arctic and lower latitudes where more people live. This phenomenon appears to weaken or even stall the jet stream. And the effect of this means weather systems such as those bringing extreme heat or rain can remain in place for several days.

Meteorologists at Russian weather agency Rosgidrome believe factors including a high-pressure system with a clear sky and the Sun being very high, extremely long daylight hours, and short warm nights have contributed to the Siberian temperature spike. The ground surface heats up intensively. The nights are hot; the air doesn't have time to cool and continues to heat up for several days." The scientific consensus is the spike indicates a far more extensive global warming trend.

Dr. Freja Vamborg, the senior scientist at the UK's Copernicus Climate Change Service, said: "The key point is that the climate is changing and global temperatures are warming. "We will be breaking more and more records as we go."

A catastrophic oil spill from a collapsed storage tank last month near the Arctic city of Norilsk has also partly blamed on melting permafrost. In 2011, part of a residential building in Yakutsk, a town in the Sakha Republic, actually collapsed due to the thawing of the frozen ground.

The ground surface heats up intensively. The nights are hot; the air doesn't have time to cool and continues to heat up for several days. Scientists agree that the spike is indicative of a much bigger global warming trend.

Before you go!

Recommended: Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope?

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Being involved in sustainability activities has changed my view on this subject a lot. Climate change and pollution are borderless and thus solutions and information has to be shared globally. Rich, 'developed' countries have to start supporting countries that don't have the means and knowledge to improve their situation. Sustainability movement is as strong as its weakest link - whatsorb.com is a helpful platform to speed up the X-Change of Global Sustainability.

 

Being involved in sustainability activities has changed my view on this subject a lot. Climate change and pollution are borderless and thus solutions and information has to be shared globally. Rich, 'developed' countries have to start supporting countries that don't have the means and knowledge to improve their situation. Sustainability movement is as strong as its weakest link - whatsorb.com is a helpful platform to speed up the X-Change of Global Sustainability.

 

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Climate Change: China Floods The Arctic On Fire

Since early June, the water levels of 433 rivers in China have risen over the danger mark, with 33 of them rising to historical highs. In Siberia, nearly 300 wildfires are blazing amid record warm weather. China Is Flooding: Torrential Rains China has a four-tier, color-coded weather warning system, with red representing the most severe, followed by orange, yellow, and blue. Since July, 31 people have died or are missing, and 23.85 million people have been affected due to floods in 24 provincial regions, including East China's Anhui and Jiangxi provinces. Water levels on many rivers have been unusually high this year because of torrential rains. Blasting dams and embankments to discharge water was an extreme response employed during China’s worst floods in recent years. Last week, the huge Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze opened three floodgates after the water level rose more than 15 meters (50ft) above flood level. Elsewhere, soldiers and workers have been testing the strength of embankments and shoring them up with sandbags and rocks. Recently, firefighters and others finished filling in a 188-meter (620ft) break on Poyang Lake, China’s largest freshwater lake, that had caused widespread flooding across 15 villages and agricultural fields in Jiangxi province. More than 14,000 people were evacuated. Seasonal flooding strikes large parts of China annually, especially in its central and southern regions, but has been especially severe this summer. Recommended:  Climate Change Pictures: Weird Global Anomalies The second-highest rainfall that's swamped China in more than a half-century has fuelled new questions about the world's biggest hydroelectric facility, billed as helping to tame floodwaters. Vice Minister of Emergency Management Zheng Guoguang told reporters that the Yangtze, Asia's longest river, and parts of its watershed had seen the second-highest rainfall since 1961 over the past six months. But after weeks of devastating flooding, questions are being raised about the Three Gorges Dam's impact on Yangtze floods and if the massive structure itself may be at risk. One of the primary justifications for the Three Gorges Dam was flood control, but less than 20 years after its completion, we have the highest floodwater in recorded history. But the fact is that it cannot prevent these severe events.” China Is Flooding: The Three Gorges Dam The Three Gorges Dam was officially completed in 2006. Its power operation went online in 2012, and it is one of China’s most expensive and questionable developmental projects. Some 1.4 million people had to be resettled as a result of the massive project on the Yangtze River. Photo by Yao Yilong.  The Three Gorges Dam is spanning the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) near Yichang, Hubei province, China. The dam also was touted as the best way to end centuries of flooding along the Yangtze and provide power for China's industrial boom. But some geologists contended that damming up too much water in the reservoir carried a heightened risk of earthquakes and prolonged damage to the river's ecology. In 2012, the Ministry of Land Resources said the number of landslides and other disasters around the reservoir had increased 70 percent after the water level in the $23 billion projects rose to its maximum in 2010. Recommended:  Asia’s Water War: Is The Mekong Still A River? Critics of the project, like Chinese geologist Fan Xiao, have said that Three Gorges and other major dam projects may make flooding worse by altering the flow of sedimentation down the river. Three Gorges, storage capacity amounts to less than 9 percent of average floodwaters. “It can only partially and temporarily intercept the upstream floods, and is powerless to help with floods caused by heavy rainfall in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River,” he said. {youtube}                                                       Climate change blamed for China flood disaster Damage from this season's floods has been estimated in the hundreds of millions of dollars, further pressuring an economy deeply impacted by the Flooding In Hubei Province Hubei province, through which the Yangtze flows, is known for its numerous lakes and rivers and is under particular threat. The province's capital Wuhan was the epicenter of China's coronavirus outbreak. Residents in the Yangtze River basin in recent weeks have expressed concerns over the ability of the massive dam to handle more heavy rain, even though authorities have been releasing floodwater from the structure. China Is Flooding: Wuhan The central Chinese city of Wuhan and the provinces of Anhui, Jiangxi, and Zhejiang declared red alerts as heavy rain threatened to swell rivers and lakes and bring more disruption across the countryside and to global commerce. Wuhan, on the banks of the Yangtze River, where the novel coronavirus emerged late last year, warned residents to take precautions as water levels fast their maximum guaranteed safety level. The giant Three Gorges reservoir, which has been holding back more water to try to ease downstream flood risks, is more than 10 meters higher than its warning level, with inflows now at more than 50,000 cubic meters a second. Recommended:  Coronavirus: Symptoms Flu And Climate Change The Poyang Lake in Jiangxi province, which is formed from the overspill of the Yangtze, is 2.5 meters higher than its warning level. It has expanded by more than 2,000 square kilometers during thus flood season, and parts of the surrounding town have been inundated. China Is Flooding: Delays In Delivering Of PPE Further east, the Tai lake near Shanghai has also declared a red alert after its water level rose to nearly a meter higher than its safe level. The summer rainy season brings floods to China almost every year, but the impact of the disruption they cause is being felt further afield as Chinese goods become more important in supply chains of items such as personal protective equipment (PPE). "It's just creating another major roadblock here in terms of PPE getting into the United States - it is the worst of times for it to happen, but that's what we're dealing with right now," said Michael Einhorn, president of Dealmed. This U.S. medical supply distributor sources disposable lab coats and other products from Wuhan and nearby regions. Recommended:  Coronavirus: Will The Weather Help Us Beat It? "We cannot get the product out for over a week, which is a very long time in our business," he said, adding that the delays could last another two or three weeks. Economic activity in parts of China, especially construction and steel and cement demand, continues to be hurt by the flooding, analysts say, suggesting some loss of momentum after a stronger than expected bounce in the second quarter from the coronavirus crisis. The Artic, Siberia On Fire You have after reading above already a lot on your mind, but may I suggest one additional topic of alarm for consideration: Siberia is on fire. Siberia, the proverbial coldest place, situated way up at the top of the globe in the Arctic circle, is experiencing record warm temperatures, melting sea ice, and massive wildfires — changes to the environment that even the scientists most urgently tracking the climate crisis didn’t expect to see for another several decade. As New York’s David Wallace-Wells wrote of one town that hit triple-digit temperatures on June 20, “In a world without climate change, this anomaly, one Danish meteorologist calculated, would be a 1-in-100,000-year event.” Recommended:  Climate Change: Antarctica Is Melting Says NASA “We always expected the Arctic to change faster than the rest of the globe,” one researcher told the Washington Post. “But I don’t think anyone expected the changes to happen as fast as we are seeing them happen.” Siberian towns are experiencing a heatwave throughout the region, with many smashing centuries-old temperature records, records that are now being broken year after year. Scientists say that the area is warming at three times the rate of the rest of the world, due to a phenomenon called “Arctic amplification,” in which melting ice exposes more dark sea and lake waters. These turning zones were once net heat-reflecting into heat-absorbing. And temperatures rise even more. The effects of that increase are myriad and terrifying. Melting snow creates dry vegetation for wildfires, which have reached record levels this summer, sending out giant plumes of smoke and releasing more greenhouse gases than ever before. Some of these are troublingly named “zombie fires,” which don’t go out in winter but burn under the snow and ice only to erupt in the air once again once the snow melts. People in Siberia are at risk of infrastructure collapse as towns built for the severe strain under new, extreme conditions. At the same time, the melting of Arctic ice contributes to sea-level rise and irregular weather patterns around the world. Perhaps scariest is the potential calamity of total permafrost melting: Permafrost is a layer of continuous ice that covers nearly a quarter of the landmass in the Northern Hemisphere, in which approximately 1,460 billion to 1,600 billion metric tons of organic carbon is trapped. That’s more than twice the amount of carbon currently in the atmosphere. If with previously stable permafrost subject to never-before-seen heat, it is released, we could reach a tipping point beyond human intervention. Siberia On Fire And The Coronavirus: A Connection? With much of the world consumed by the coronavirus pandemic, and with the United States engaged in reckoning on racial injustice on top of reaching a record number of virus cases, temperature records in Siberia might seem like a faraway problem. But seemingly separate crises are not so disconnected; studies recently show, for example, how warming affects poor pregnant women in the U.S., and Black expecting mothers, in particular, a disparity that will get even worse as warming continues. Recommended:  Bushfires Australia Generate Their Own Weather “When we develop a fever, it’s a sign. It’s a warning sign that something is wrong, and we stop, and we take note,” a Colorado-based Arctic researcher said to the Post. “The Arctic is on fire. It has a fever right now, and so it’s a good warning sign that we need to stop, take note, and figure out what’s going on. Flooding And Climate Change China has perennial flooding in summer, but a combination of climate reasons and human behavior has contributed to a longer-than-usual duration and incessant rainfall in some regions. The subtropical high-pressure system over the western North Pacific was robust this year. Its intersection with cold air has led to continuous heavy rain in the Yangtze River basin. Another reason was global warming. We cannot say a single extreme weather event is directly caused by climate change, but seeing it over the long term, global warming has led to an increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events. From 1961 to 2018, there has been an increase in ‘hefty rainfall’ events in China, according to the China Climate Change Blue Book (2019). And since the mid-1990s, the frequency of extreme precipitation has increased dramatically. Recommended:  China Will Make It Rain In Tibet: Space Technology Over the past 60 years, the number of days of heavy rain has gone up by 3.9 percent a decade. Aside from the rainfall, human behavior has also contributed to the severity of the floods in China. Decades of land reclamation and dam-building on nearby rivers had reduced the area and volume of Poyang Lake, the country’s largest freshwater lake, which is located in Jiangxi. Some 1,300 sq km (502 sq miles) of land was reclaimed there from 1954 to 1998, which caused the surface area of the lake to shrink from 5,160 sq km (1,992 sq miles) to 3,860 sq km (1,490 sq miles), according to a study by University of Alabama geographer David Shankman. Environmental volunteer Zhang Wenbin said he had investigated illegal land reclamation activities at Tuolin, another lake in the province. He said some of the projects around the lake were still underway last year, even though they had been ordered to stop by environmental inspectors from Beijing. “There are many similar cases,” Zhang said, adding that Tuolin Lake had also shrunk in size, reducing its storage capacity for floodwaters. Flooding: How Does It Compare To Other Years? China’s worst known floods were in 1931 when more than 2 million people were killed. The flooding inundated an area the size of England and half of Scotland combined, affecting about 25 million people – or a tenth of the population at the time, Chris Courtney, an assistant professor at Durham University, wrote like Disaster in China . Since the People’s Republic of China was founded in 1949, there have been two catastrophic floods. The first was in the summer of 1954 along the Yangtze River, resulting in over 30,000 deaths and affecting 18 million people. The second was in 1998, again along the Yangtze but also in the south and north of the country. It was the worst flooding in recent years, with more than 3,000 people killed, 15 million left homeless, and US$24 billion in economic losses. The Artic On Fire And Climate Change Climate change has lit parts of the Arctic on fire, with the region also recording temperature highs of 38C (100F), sparking concern among scientists worried about the ramifications for the rest of the world. This year the fires have begun burning even earlier than the usual July start, said Vladimir Chuprov, director of the project department at Greenpeace Russia. Unseasonably warm weather, particularly if coupled with wildfires, causes permafrost to thaw faster. This, in turn, exacerbates global warming by releasing large amounts of methane. This methane a potent greenhouse gas 28 times stronger than carbon dioxide. Recommended:  Our Focus On CO2 Alone: Other Climate Culprits Methane escaping from permafrost thaw sites enters the atmosphere and circulates the globe. Methane that originates in the Arctic, does not stay in the Arctic. It has global ramifications. What is taking place in the Arctic can even warp the weather in Europe and the US. In the summer, the unusual warming lessens the temperature and pressure difference between the Arctic and lower latitudes where more people live. This phenomenon appears to weaken or even stall the jet stream. And the effect of this means weather systems such as those bringing extreme heat or rain can remain in place for several days. Meteorologists at Russian weather agency Rosgidrome believe factors including a high-pressure system with a clear sky and the Sun being very high, extremely long daylight hours, and short warm nights have contributed to the Siberian temperature spike. The ground surface heats up intensively. The nights are hot; the air doesn't have time to cool and continues to heat up for several days." The scientific consensus is the spike indicates a far more extensive global warming trend. Dr. Freja Vamborg, the senior scientist at the UK's Copernicus Climate Change Service, said: "The key point is that the climate is changing and global temperatures are warming. "We will be breaking more and more records as we go." A catastrophic oil spill from a collapsed storage tank last month near the Arctic city of Norilsk has also partly blamed on melting permafrost. In 2011, part of a residential building in Yakutsk, a town in the Sakha Republic, actually collapsed due to the thawing of the frozen ground. The ground surface heats up intensively. The nights are hot; the air doesn't have time to cool and continues to heat up for several days. Scientists agree that the spike is indicative of a much bigger global warming trend. Before you go! Recommended:  Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about the effect of climate change in your neighborhood? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations