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Refuge du Gouter: Sustainable way to the top
Only a small number of us will ever be able to experience it: the last stop before the final climb to the top of the Mont Blanc. This stop on the main route was notorious for its lousy accommodation: a bland, uncomfortable building built in the sixties, that was not only painfully outdated but also an environmental hazard. Those visiting for an overnight stay would do well to prepare themselves for recurring problems with hygiene - the two outside toilets are not only inconvenient, they also heavily pollute the surrounding area through its direct emptying of waste on the mountainside - and freezing nightly temperatures, even inside.   Not exactly a great preparation for one of the biggest climbs in some climbers’ lives, yet it certainly adds a certain something to the charm and roughness associated with mountaineering. Right? Well, that logic might have been sound until recently, when it was high time to upgrade the lodging. A new, sustainable mountain hut This was done in the form of the Refuge du Goûter, a new and ecological hut. The remarkable structure, resembling some kind of futuristic egg, has four stories and an all-wooden structure that has been clad using stainless steel. It partly overhangs the cliff below, guaranteeing breathtaking views and enhancing its ‘curb appeal’. And appeal it certainly has. Not only from an architectural point of view (the Swiss designer Hervé Dessimoz spent five years merely designing the building), but also from an ecological point of view. The building is self-sufficient in its demand for energy and water, boasting a solar thermal system and self-sufficient water supply.   Plenty of ecological features This sophisticated system for water reclamation provides a supply of water for cooking and washing. It makes good use of the egg shape of the building: because of the wind, constant turbulence lets the snow slide across its outer skin, after which it accumulates in a grid of some 60 square meters. Within this grid, heat generated by solar panels melts this snow, after which it is collected in huge tanks. Due to the size of these tanks, the building can operate for 16 days without snow.   These solar panels also generate heat and electricity for the building, providing in nearly all of its heating and power needs - only the kitchen still makes use of gas. When there is no sunlight, a backup generator that runs on rapeseed oil will produce electricity.   Sewage farm and isolation Another huge plus: human waste will no longer be dumped on the mountainside. Instead, the six environmentally friendly toilets within the hut are built to be ecological and clean. The amount of water that they use is minimised through the implementation of a vacuum-suction system that most of us will know from aircrafts. Upon flushing, the human waste will be collected in a tiny sewage farm that processes it into some kind of highly compacted sludge that can, if required, be heliported down to the valley and be disposed properly. No longer will eager mountaineers have to suffer from the cold: the new location is equipped with triple glazing and dual-flow ventilation, as well as insulation provided by wood-fibre panels. All of this ensures an indoor temperature that ranges between 18 degrees Celsius and 22 degrees Celsius.   Construction in pieces The entire structure was put together in pieces: pre-assembled parts were taken in by helicopter and mounted securely using a specific resin adhesive. This drastically reduced the number of nuts and bolts that would be required. It took three years to complete construction, with work only possible in the warmer months of the years - and frequently interrupted by severe weather events.   Despite the difficulties, the project supervisor Thomas Büchi and architect Dessimoz never wavered in their dedication to the project: “ What we're saying is that, if it's possible to build a self-sufficient, eco-friendly building at 3,835 metres, there's no excuse for not doing it at sea level .” And right they are! The need for an ecologically sustainable building at this altitude and in this spot might have been doubted by some, yet it only seems to highlight the possibilities and the ease with which it can be executed, if only those in charge are dedicated to doing ‘the right thing’.   Countering the effects of global warming Even in this small Mont Blanc community, the effects of global warming and other strains that have been put on the natural  environment are starting to show. The number of serious accidents amongst climbers on the Mont Blanc has increased significantly in recent years, most of which resulting from falling rocks. In the past, snow and ice would keep them in place, yet due to warmer temperatures, they are loose and subject to sliding at any time. Last summer alone, more than 1,000 climbers experienced falling rocks on their ascent. With the ever-increasing number of people gearing up to conquer Europe’s highest mountain, it only seems to underline the importance of providing ecological and sustainable accommodation and facilities: to preserve this miracle of Mother Nature for many generations to come. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/architecture
Only a small number of us will ever be able to experience it: the last stop before the final climb to the top of the Mont Blanc. This stop on the main route was notorious for its lousy accommodation: a bland, uncomfortable building built in the sixties, that was not only painfully outdated but also an environmental hazard. Those visiting for an overnight stay would do well to prepare themselves for recurring problems with hygiene - the two outside toilets are not only inconvenient, they also heavily pollute the surrounding area through its direct emptying of waste on the mountainside - and freezing nightly temperatures, even inside.   Not exactly a great preparation for one of the biggest climbs in some climbers’ lives, yet it certainly adds a certain something to the charm and roughness associated with mountaineering. Right? Well, that logic might have been sound until recently, when it was high time to upgrade the lodging. A new, sustainable mountain hut This was done in the form of the Refuge du Goûter, a new and ecological hut. The remarkable structure, resembling some kind of futuristic egg, has four stories and an all-wooden structure that has been clad using stainless steel. It partly overhangs the cliff below, guaranteeing breathtaking views and enhancing its ‘curb appeal’. And appeal it certainly has. Not only from an architectural point of view (the Swiss designer Hervé Dessimoz spent five years merely designing the building), but also from an ecological point of view. The building is self-sufficient in its demand for energy and water, boasting a solar thermal system and self-sufficient water supply.   Plenty of ecological features This sophisticated system for water reclamation provides a supply of water for cooking and washing. It makes good use of the egg shape of the building: because of the wind, constant turbulence lets the snow slide across its outer skin, after which it accumulates in a grid of some 60 square meters. Within this grid, heat generated by solar panels melts this snow, after which it is collected in huge tanks. Due to the size of these tanks, the building can operate for 16 days without snow.   These solar panels also generate heat and electricity for the building, providing in nearly all of its heating and power needs - only the kitchen still makes use of gas. When there is no sunlight, a backup generator that runs on rapeseed oil will produce electricity.   Sewage farm and isolation Another huge plus: human waste will no longer be dumped on the mountainside. Instead, the six environmentally friendly toilets within the hut are built to be ecological and clean. The amount of water that they use is minimised through the implementation of a vacuum-suction system that most of us will know from aircrafts. Upon flushing, the human waste will be collected in a tiny sewage farm that processes it into some kind of highly compacted sludge that can, if required, be heliported down to the valley and be disposed properly. No longer will eager mountaineers have to suffer from the cold: the new location is equipped with triple glazing and dual-flow ventilation, as well as insulation provided by wood-fibre panels. All of this ensures an indoor temperature that ranges between 18 degrees Celsius and 22 degrees Celsius.   Construction in pieces The entire structure was put together in pieces: pre-assembled parts were taken in by helicopter and mounted securely using a specific resin adhesive. This drastically reduced the number of nuts and bolts that would be required. It took three years to complete construction, with work only possible in the warmer months of the years - and frequently interrupted by severe weather events.   Despite the difficulties, the project supervisor Thomas Büchi and architect Dessimoz never wavered in their dedication to the project: “ What we're saying is that, if it's possible to build a self-sufficient, eco-friendly building at 3,835 metres, there's no excuse for not doing it at sea level .” And right they are! The need for an ecologically sustainable building at this altitude and in this spot might have been doubted by some, yet it only seems to highlight the possibilities and the ease with which it can be executed, if only those in charge are dedicated to doing ‘the right thing’.   Countering the effects of global warming Even in this small Mont Blanc community, the effects of global warming and other strains that have been put on the natural  environment are starting to show. The number of serious accidents amongst climbers on the Mont Blanc has increased significantly in recent years, most of which resulting from falling rocks. In the past, snow and ice would keep them in place, yet due to warmer temperatures, they are loose and subject to sliding at any time. Last summer alone, more than 1,000 climbers experienced falling rocks on their ascent. With the ever-increasing number of people gearing up to conquer Europe’s highest mountain, it only seems to underline the importance of providing ecological and sustainable accommodation and facilities: to preserve this miracle of Mother Nature for many generations to come. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/architecture
Refuge du Gouter: Sustainable way to the top
Refuge du Gouter: Sustainable way to the top
MEET THE ECO-FRIENDLY TINY HOUSE BOAT
It is the perfect holiday or retirement plan for many. Waking up to the soothing feeling of waves gently rocking you, brushing your teeth to the sound of seabirds, and having your morning coffee whilst overlooking wide open bodies of water. Spending your days cruising the sea and throwing out your fishing rod. An idyllic fantasy, that all too often remains just that - a fantasy. The costs are too high, and not only the monetary costs. Boats have a huge impact on the environment, and the footprint that they leave is significant. That is, up until now. A trend is emerging in the boating industry where sustainability and green living take center stage. Instead of focusing on luxurious and high-tech solutions, manufacturers start looking at the use of renewables and recyclables. This has led to the launch of a number of particularly interesting products; the tiny house boat. Let’s zoom in on one of those innovations. TINY HOUSE BOAT Earlier this year, Canadian company The Daigno Group released their unique house boat concept ‘Le Koroc’. Prized as an ‘innovative, bold and refined concept’, it seeks to combine boat living with fishing excursions while providing a portable micro chalet or tiny house. The end-result is a small, yet comfortable boat with a decently sized deck and a living cabin, including a small kitchenette area and a bathroom with shower and toilet. It was built by a team of experienced fishermen, nature lovers and wood connoisseurs. This is clearly reflected in all aspects of the boat, with plenty of space for fishing amenities and add-ons, usage of high-quality and eco-friendly wood, and its sustainable production and consumption process. Or so its press release claims. SUSTAINABLE AND RECYCLABLE ‘Le Koroc’ is a good example of the boating industry moving towards greener and ecologically friendlier ways of doing business. Materials used are obtained from sustainable resources. The boat’s light weight - about 2,500 kg - ensures that its energy consumption is limited, both on water and on the road. Transporting the vehicle will therefore not use up valuable energy sources. Besides those two main ‘headlines’, there are more examples of nifty ways through which this sustainable tiny houseboat minimises its ecological footprint. For example, the water used in the shower and in the sinks first gets treated by a dedicated charcoal filtering system before being discharged. Photovoltaic panels on the boat serve to capture solar energy. The energy is stored in two batteries, one of which is used for the fridge and the other to power the LED-lighting on board. LED-lighting that, by the way, ensures lower and safer power consumption. The stove in the kitchenette is fuelled with propane, while customers could opt for a bio-controlled litter toilet. Although these are only some of the ways through which The Daigno Group has chosen for sustainability over profitability, it is clearly indicative of a shift towards eco-friendlier boats. WHY WOULD YOU? For those lucky few that can afford to buy a yacht and use it to cruise the world, sustainability has never been much of a focus point. Eco-friendly boats such as ‘Le Koroc’ are clearly trying to change this in several ways. First of all, due to its small size and simplicity, this generation of boats is very affordable, making that retirement dream mentioned in the beginning of this blog a reality. Secondly, and more importantly, it highlights the importance of finding greener vacation and/or living accommodations. Through its use of sustainable materials, reduced energy consumption, and waste-minimising solutions a whole another target group is reached. Would you still rather dream of that luxurious yacht? This is as good a time as any to remind you once again that luxury and sustainability are not necessarily a trade-off. Just look at ‘Le Koroc’, a handcrafted, personalised, complete and light tiny home-on-the-water. Perhaps you could have both.
It is the perfect holiday or retirement plan for many. Waking up to the soothing feeling of waves gently rocking you, brushing your teeth to the sound of seabirds, and having your morning coffee whilst overlooking wide open bodies of water. Spending your days cruising the sea and throwing out your fishing rod. An idyllic fantasy, that all too often remains just that - a fantasy. The costs are too high, and not only the monetary costs. Boats have a huge impact on the environment, and the footprint that they leave is significant. That is, up until now. A trend is emerging in the boating industry where sustainability and green living take center stage. Instead of focusing on luxurious and high-tech solutions, manufacturers start looking at the use of renewables and recyclables. This has led to the launch of a number of particularly interesting products; the tiny house boat. Let’s zoom in on one of those innovations. TINY HOUSE BOAT Earlier this year, Canadian company The Daigno Group released their unique house boat concept ‘Le Koroc’. Prized as an ‘innovative, bold and refined concept’, it seeks to combine boat living with fishing excursions while providing a portable micro chalet or tiny house. The end-result is a small, yet comfortable boat with a decently sized deck and a living cabin, including a small kitchenette area and a bathroom with shower and toilet. It was built by a team of experienced fishermen, nature lovers and wood connoisseurs. This is clearly reflected in all aspects of the boat, with plenty of space for fishing amenities and add-ons, usage of high-quality and eco-friendly wood, and its sustainable production and consumption process. Or so its press release claims. SUSTAINABLE AND RECYCLABLE ‘Le Koroc’ is a good example of the boating industry moving towards greener and ecologically friendlier ways of doing business. Materials used are obtained from sustainable resources. The boat’s light weight - about 2,500 kg - ensures that its energy consumption is limited, both on water and on the road. Transporting the vehicle will therefore not use up valuable energy sources. Besides those two main ‘headlines’, there are more examples of nifty ways through which this sustainable tiny houseboat minimises its ecological footprint. For example, the water used in the shower and in the sinks first gets treated by a dedicated charcoal filtering system before being discharged. Photovoltaic panels on the boat serve to capture solar energy. The energy is stored in two batteries, one of which is used for the fridge and the other to power the LED-lighting on board. LED-lighting that, by the way, ensures lower and safer power consumption. The stove in the kitchenette is fuelled with propane, while customers could opt for a bio-controlled litter toilet. Although these are only some of the ways through which The Daigno Group has chosen for sustainability over profitability, it is clearly indicative of a shift towards eco-friendlier boats. WHY WOULD YOU? For those lucky few that can afford to buy a yacht and use it to cruise the world, sustainability has never been much of a focus point. Eco-friendly boats such as ‘Le Koroc’ are clearly trying to change this in several ways. First of all, due to its small size and simplicity, this generation of boats is very affordable, making that retirement dream mentioned in the beginning of this blog a reality. Secondly, and more importantly, it highlights the importance of finding greener vacation and/or living accommodations. Through its use of sustainable materials, reduced energy consumption, and waste-minimising solutions a whole another target group is reached. Would you still rather dream of that luxurious yacht? This is as good a time as any to remind you once again that luxury and sustainability are not necessarily a trade-off. Just look at ‘Le Koroc’, a handcrafted, personalised, complete and light tiny home-on-the-water. Perhaps you could have both.
MEET THE ECO-FRIENDLY TINY HOUSE BOAT
MEET THE ECO-FRIENDLY TINY HOUSE BOAT
Summer tourists cause a 40% spike in plastic marine litter
Tourists are being urged to refuse plastic straws and avoid buying inflatable pool toys as new figures reveal holidaymakers cause a 40% spike in marine litter in the Mediterranean each summer. Nearly all the waste created by the surge in tourism over the summer months in countries like Italy, France and Turkey is plastic litter, says WWF in a new report. In a matter of weeks over the holiday season the rise in plastic marine pollution contributes to the estimated 150m tonnes of plastic in the ocean.   Tourists to Mediterranean told to ditch plastic to avoid huge rise in beach litter. Why is plastic being demonised?   Rubbish Beach, Spain Since the 1950s, 8.3bn tonnes of plastic has been produced. Plastic is seen as a versatile, indispensable product, but the environmental impact is becoming more stark. Plastic is now so pervasive that recycling systems cannot keep up and the leakage into the environment is such that by 2050 plastic in the ocean will outweigh fish. Last year scientists found plastic fibers in tap water, and plastic has been found in the stomachs of sea creatures in the deepest part of the ocean. Most plastic waste ends up in landfill sites or leaks into the natural environment, where it is causing huge damage to eco-systems on land and sea, creating near permanent contamination. According to academics in the United States, by 2015, of all the plastic waste generated since the 1950s, only 9% has been recycled, with 12% incinerated and 79% accumulated in landfill sites or the environment.   Why are the supermarkets under fire?   Producers of plastic include retailers, drinks companies and supermarkets. The Guardian revealed that supermarkets create more than half of the plastic waste in the household stream in the UK. But they refuse to reveal how much they put on to the streets and how much they pay towards recycling it. Supermarkets are under pressure to reduce their plastic packaging and campaigners argue they have the power to turn off the tap. Much of the packaging they sell to consumers is not recyclable: plastic film, black plastic trays, sleeves on drinks bottles and some colored plastic. The Recycling Association and other experts believe supermarkets could do much more to make packaging 100% recyclable and reduce the use of plastic.   Who pays to clean up the waste?   The taxpayer, overwhelmingly. Producers and retailers pay the lowest towards recycling and dealing with their waste in Europe. In other countries, the “polluter” is forced to pay much more. In France, a sliding system of charges means those who put more non- recyclable material on the market pay more.   What can shoppers do to help? Supermarkets are under pressure, not least from the prime minister, to create plastic-free aisles. A growing number of zero-waste shops are springing up and consumers are being encouraged to ask for products to be sold without plastic.   WWF said in its report the majority of plastic waste polluting the Mediterranean Sea comes from Turkey and Spain, followed by Italy, Egypt and France – countries to which more than 34 million British holidaymakers are preparing to travel this year. Tanya Steele, chief executive of WWF, said holidaymakers were leaving behind a toxic legacy of plastic waste. “The birds, fish and turtles of the Mediterranean are choking on plastic … plastic is ending up in the fish and seafood we eat on holiday. A Loggerhead Turtle trapped in a abandonend fishing net Mediterranean . Photo by: Jordi Chias, NPL, WWF “We’re asking people to think about how they can cut down on the amount of single-use plastic they use and throw away on holiday,” she said. Steele urges holidaymakers to drink tap water where it is safe to do so, refuse plastic straws and skip the purchase of inflatable pool toys. “We can all be part of the solution and not the problem,” she said. Recent pictures of Bournemouth beach after the Bank Holiday weekend in the UK showed mountains of plastic waste littered across the sand. In Europe plastics account for 95% of the waste in the open sea, posing a major threat to marine life, says WWF.   Bournemouth beach after the Bank Holiday weekend in the UK. Photo by: rspb.org.uk Europe is the second largest producer of plastic in the world after China   After China, Europe is the second largest producer of plastic in the world, producing 27m tonnes of plastic waste. The continent dumps up to an estimated 500,000 tonnes of macroplastics and 130,000 tonnes of microplastics in the sea every year, the report says.   But delays and gaps in plastic waste management in most Mediterranean countries mean only a third of the 60m tonnes of plastic produced is recycled. Half of all plastic waste in Italy, France and Spain ends up in landfills. Home to almost 25,000 plant and animal species – of which 60% are unique to the region – the Mediterranean holds only 1% of the world’s water but contains 7% of all of the world’s microplastic waste. Plastics have also been found in oysters and mussels, while crisp packets and cigarettes have been found in large fish, WWF says. Plastic waste remains in the environment for hundreds of years. Every plastic cup left by a tourist on a beach takes 50 years to break down, every plastic bag takes 20 years, and a fishing line can remain in the sea for up to 600 years, the report said. The Mediterranean, semi-enclosed by three continents and home to intense human activity, creates a trap for plastics which today account for 95% of marine litter in the sea. But Europe is in danger of being left behind on action against single-use plastic by emerging economies. In the most ambitious global action yet to curb plastic waste, India this week announced it was banning all single use plastics by 2022. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/travel   By: Sandra Laville, TheGuardian
Tourists are being urged to refuse plastic straws and avoid buying inflatable pool toys as new figures reveal holidaymakers cause a 40% spike in marine litter in the Mediterranean each summer. Nearly all the waste created by the surge in tourism over the summer months in countries like Italy, France and Turkey is plastic litter, says WWF in a new report. In a matter of weeks over the holiday season the rise in plastic marine pollution contributes to the estimated 150m tonnes of plastic in the ocean.   Tourists to Mediterranean told to ditch plastic to avoid huge rise in beach litter. Why is plastic being demonised?   Rubbish Beach, Spain Since the 1950s, 8.3bn tonnes of plastic has been produced. Plastic is seen as a versatile, indispensable product, but the environmental impact is becoming more stark. Plastic is now so pervasive that recycling systems cannot keep up and the leakage into the environment is such that by 2050 plastic in the ocean will outweigh fish. Last year scientists found plastic fibers in tap water, and plastic has been found in the stomachs of sea creatures in the deepest part of the ocean. Most plastic waste ends up in landfill sites or leaks into the natural environment, where it is causing huge damage to eco-systems on land and sea, creating near permanent contamination. According to academics in the United States, by 2015, of all the plastic waste generated since the 1950s, only 9% has been recycled, with 12% incinerated and 79% accumulated in landfill sites or the environment.   Why are the supermarkets under fire?   Producers of plastic include retailers, drinks companies and supermarkets. The Guardian revealed that supermarkets create more than half of the plastic waste in the household stream in the UK. But they refuse to reveal how much they put on to the streets and how much they pay towards recycling it. Supermarkets are under pressure to reduce their plastic packaging and campaigners argue they have the power to turn off the tap. Much of the packaging they sell to consumers is not recyclable: plastic film, black plastic trays, sleeves on drinks bottles and some colored plastic. The Recycling Association and other experts believe supermarkets could do much more to make packaging 100% recyclable and reduce the use of plastic.   Who pays to clean up the waste?   The taxpayer, overwhelmingly. Producers and retailers pay the lowest towards recycling and dealing with their waste in Europe. In other countries, the “polluter” is forced to pay much more. In France, a sliding system of charges means those who put more non- recyclable material on the market pay more.   What can shoppers do to help? Supermarkets are under pressure, not least from the prime minister, to create plastic-free aisles. A growing number of zero-waste shops are springing up and consumers are being encouraged to ask for products to be sold without plastic.   WWF said in its report the majority of plastic waste polluting the Mediterranean Sea comes from Turkey and Spain, followed by Italy, Egypt and France – countries to which more than 34 million British holidaymakers are preparing to travel this year. Tanya Steele, chief executive of WWF, said holidaymakers were leaving behind a toxic legacy of plastic waste. “The birds, fish and turtles of the Mediterranean are choking on plastic … plastic is ending up in the fish and seafood we eat on holiday. A Loggerhead Turtle trapped in a abandonend fishing net Mediterranean . Photo by: Jordi Chias, NPL, WWF “We’re asking people to think about how they can cut down on the amount of single-use plastic they use and throw away on holiday,” she said. Steele urges holidaymakers to drink tap water where it is safe to do so, refuse plastic straws and skip the purchase of inflatable pool toys. “We can all be part of the solution and not the problem,” she said. Recent pictures of Bournemouth beach after the Bank Holiday weekend in the UK showed mountains of plastic waste littered across the sand. In Europe plastics account for 95% of the waste in the open sea, posing a major threat to marine life, says WWF.   Bournemouth beach after the Bank Holiday weekend in the UK. Photo by: rspb.org.uk Europe is the second largest producer of plastic in the world after China   After China, Europe is the second largest producer of plastic in the world, producing 27m tonnes of plastic waste. The continent dumps up to an estimated 500,000 tonnes of macroplastics and 130,000 tonnes of microplastics in the sea every year, the report says.   But delays and gaps in plastic waste management in most Mediterranean countries mean only a third of the 60m tonnes of plastic produced is recycled. Half of all plastic waste in Italy, France and Spain ends up in landfills. Home to almost 25,000 plant and animal species – of which 60% are unique to the region – the Mediterranean holds only 1% of the world’s water but contains 7% of all of the world’s microplastic waste. Plastics have also been found in oysters and mussels, while crisp packets and cigarettes have been found in large fish, WWF says. Plastic waste remains in the environment for hundreds of years. Every plastic cup left by a tourist on a beach takes 50 years to break down, every plastic bag takes 20 years, and a fishing line can remain in the sea for up to 600 years, the report said. The Mediterranean, semi-enclosed by three continents and home to intense human activity, creates a trap for plastics which today account for 95% of marine litter in the sea. But Europe is in danger of being left behind on action against single-use plastic by emerging economies. In the most ambitious global action yet to curb plastic waste, India this week announced it was banning all single use plastics by 2022. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/travel   By: Sandra Laville, TheGuardian
Summer tourists cause a 40% spike in plastic marine litter
Summer tourists cause a 40% spike in plastic marine litter
Prague the greenest city in the world
What makes Prague the greenest city in the world? Nearly 56 percent of Prague consists of forests, nature reserves, parks, agricultural land, orchards and vineyards, golf courses or public gardens, making it the greenest city in the world. Online travel specialist TravelBird analyzed 50 cities on the basis of green areas. The Green Cities Index 2018 shows that the Czech capital is the 'greenest' of all. Forests and nature parks Almost half of Prague consists of 'green'. Especially forests, farmland and nature parks are well represented. According to TravelBird, more than 22 percent of Prague's land consists of agricultural land and 12.6 percent of forests. TravelBird also looked at the number of square meters of green per person. Prague drops to sixth place in this list and Reykjavik spans the throne with 410.84 m2 of green. Prague has a total of 220.54 m2 of green area in the city.   Prague is a beautiful city with a center full of historic buildings and impressive architecture. Visitors can enjoy the rich culture and liveliness. Just enough of the crowds? In Prague there are several parks and public gardens where visitors can escape the hectic pace of the city.    The fact that Prague has many parks is known to most people, but that the city has so much farmland and forests is a surprise to many. The study by TravelBird shows that Prague has the highest percentage of agricultural land (22.28%) and also the most square meters of agricultural land per person (86.61 m²). The city also scores high in terms of public gardens. The Czech capital is in the first place with the most square meters of public gardens per person (22.53m²). The five green places of Prague 1. In the Troja district is the 17 th century Troja castle with beautiful baroque castle gardens around it. The gardens are decorated with sculptures, pergolas, mazes and fountains. Close to these gardens is the Prague Zoo and the city's botanical garden. There is also a vineyard in Troja. Stroll along the vineyards and try the exclusive wine in the luxurious restaurant Vinařství Salabka. But where do you have to go to enjoy 'green' in Prague? CzechTourism Benelux lists five parks and gardens where nature lovers can escape the busy center. 2. Stromovka Park. This park, located in the district of Holašovice, is a favorite place with the inhabitants of Prague. The park was created in the 13 th century as a game reserve. There is a three kilometer trail, along with a dozen other small trails. Cyclists and inline skaters can extend the route by crossing the island (Císařský ostrov) to nearby Troja. It is a great place for slacklinen and you can have a nice picnic. In Stromovka park there is also the planetarium and there are several playgrounds for children. 3. The gardens of Kinsky are the most beautiful gardens in Prague. They lie on the southern and southeastern slope of Petřín and are separated with the other Petřín gardens by the hunger wall, making it often quieter. Families like to have a picnic here. The Kinsky summer palace and the wooden Greek-Catholic church of St. Michael are located in park. Do not forget to walk along the statue of the Gaston seal. The seal escaped from the Prague Zoo because it flooded in 2002. Gaston swam 300 km to Dresden where he was captured. Unfortunately, he died from exhaustion and stress. 4. The Rieger gardens or Riegrovy Sady are located in the center of Prague close to the train station. From here you have one of the best views of the city. This park is more than a century old and is a green oasis with wooded areas, lawns, a garden restaurant and large chestnut trees. In the park you will find several pubs, restaurants and beer gardens. This is the place for a beautiful sunset! 5. Grébovka park in Vinohrady is a bit further from the center, but is a wonderful place to relax and drink a glass of wine. The park is inspired by the Italian Renaissance and has fountains and waterfalls, lakes, pavilions, statues and a cave, as well as a unique view of the city. The charming vineyard pavilion is surrounded by large vineyards and the garden café Grébovka Pavilion. By: Elsemieke de Boer
What makes Prague the greenest city in the world? Nearly 56 percent of Prague consists of forests, nature reserves, parks, agricultural land, orchards and vineyards, golf courses or public gardens, making it the greenest city in the world. Online travel specialist TravelBird analyzed 50 cities on the basis of green areas. The Green Cities Index 2018 shows that the Czech capital is the 'greenest' of all. Forests and nature parks Almost half of Prague consists of 'green'. Especially forests, farmland and nature parks are well represented. According to TravelBird, more than 22 percent of Prague's land consists of agricultural land and 12.6 percent of forests. TravelBird also looked at the number of square meters of green per person. Prague drops to sixth place in this list and Reykjavik spans the throne with 410.84 m2 of green. Prague has a total of 220.54 m2 of green area in the city.   Prague is a beautiful city with a center full of historic buildings and impressive architecture. Visitors can enjoy the rich culture and liveliness. Just enough of the crowds? In Prague there are several parks and public gardens where visitors can escape the hectic pace of the city.    The fact that Prague has many parks is known to most people, but that the city has so much farmland and forests is a surprise to many. The study by TravelBird shows that Prague has the highest percentage of agricultural land (22.28%) and also the most square meters of agricultural land per person (86.61 m²). The city also scores high in terms of public gardens. The Czech capital is in the first place with the most square meters of public gardens per person (22.53m²). The five green places of Prague 1. In the Troja district is the 17 th century Troja castle with beautiful baroque castle gardens around it. The gardens are decorated with sculptures, pergolas, mazes and fountains. Close to these gardens is the Prague Zoo and the city's botanical garden. There is also a vineyard in Troja. Stroll along the vineyards and try the exclusive wine in the luxurious restaurant Vinařství Salabka. But where do you have to go to enjoy 'green' in Prague? CzechTourism Benelux lists five parks and gardens where nature lovers can escape the busy center. 2. Stromovka Park. This park, located in the district of Holašovice, is a favorite place with the inhabitants of Prague. The park was created in the 13 th century as a game reserve. There is a three kilometer trail, along with a dozen other small trails. Cyclists and inline skaters can extend the route by crossing the island (Císařský ostrov) to nearby Troja. It is a great place for slacklinen and you can have a nice picnic. In Stromovka park there is also the planetarium and there are several playgrounds for children. 3. The gardens of Kinsky are the most beautiful gardens in Prague. They lie on the southern and southeastern slope of Petřín and are separated with the other Petřín gardens by the hunger wall, making it often quieter. Families like to have a picnic here. The Kinsky summer palace and the wooden Greek-Catholic church of St. Michael are located in park. Do not forget to walk along the statue of the Gaston seal. The seal escaped from the Prague Zoo because it flooded in 2002. Gaston swam 300 km to Dresden where he was captured. Unfortunately, he died from exhaustion and stress. 4. The Rieger gardens or Riegrovy Sady are located in the center of Prague close to the train station. From here you have one of the best views of the city. This park is more than a century old and is a green oasis with wooded areas, lawns, a garden restaurant and large chestnut trees. In the park you will find several pubs, restaurants and beer gardens. This is the place for a beautiful sunset! 5. Grébovka park in Vinohrady is a bit further from the center, but is a wonderful place to relax and drink a glass of wine. The park is inspired by the Italian Renaissance and has fountains and waterfalls, lakes, pavilions, statues and a cave, as well as a unique view of the city. The charming vineyard pavilion is surrounded by large vineyards and the garden café Grébovka Pavilion. By: Elsemieke de Boer
Prague the greenest city in the world
Prague the greenest city in the world
Camping Tents Market Research by Product Type, by Manufacturing Process: Global Market Size, Trends, Competitive, Forecast Analysis 2018-2024.
Brandessence Market Research has published a new report titled “ Camping Tents Market : Historical and Forecasts by Product (Tunnel Tents, Dome Tents and Geodesic Tents), by Tent Capacity (4-person tent, 6-person tent and 8-person tent), by End-user (Individual users and Commercial users): Global Industry overview, Comprehensive Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2018 - 2024”. According to the Brandessence Market Research Analyst, camping tents market is expected to grow at around 5% CAGR during the forecast period 2018-2024. Introduction to Camping Tents Industry Camping is a leisure pursuits outdoor activity i.e., spending time in natural or semi-natural settings out of town. It specifically involves the overnight outdoor stays in a shelter like a tent. The tent is a temporary shelter made up of different types of fabric and a pole framework. Camping tents are available in different sizes based on number person capacity. These tents are usually foldable which packs in the small bag after folding. Compact design, lightweight, and eco-friendly materials are some of the features becoming common to camping tents. Request Free Sample copy of Camping Tents Industry Report @ https://www.brandessenceresearch.com/consumer-goods/global-camping-tents-market-2014-2024/ Market Dynamics for Camping Tents industry The global camping tents market is expected to grow at a significant pace by 2024. The major drivers of camping equipment are increasing lighthearted expenditure, changing lifestyle, and rising participation in outdoor activities. Increasing health benefits of outdoor activities are expected to give new shape to the camping equipment market in coming years. With the growing demand, the vendors are focusing on developing innovative camping tents to fulfill the dynamic needs of the consumers. Compact design, lightweight, and eco-friendly materials are some of the features becoming common to camping tents. Camping tents have some limitations to critical atmospheres such as storms may hamper the growth of this market. Global Camping Tents Market: Segment Overview The global Camping Tents market is estimated to register significant CAGR between 2018 and 2024. The report included a detailed competitive scenario and portfolio of leading vendors operating in Camping Tents market all across the world. The report gives detailed segments analysis of Camping Tents market in which the report describes the market as a product, tent capacity, end-users and regional segments. Based on product, camping tents market is classified as tunnel tents, dome tents, and geodesic tents. On the basis of tent capacity, camping tents market has been segmented as 4-person tent, 6-person tent, and 8-person tent. Based upon end-user, the market of camping tents is classified as individual users and commercial users. The regions covered in this report are North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of the World. Europe dominates the market with highest market share due to increasing tourist activity in countries like Austria, Norway, Germany, Russia, France, Sweden, and the U.K. Due to increasing investments by respective governments in the tourism industry, the camping tent market is expected to grow at fast pace in forecast period. Browse the full “Camping Tents Market: Historical and Forecasts by Product (Tunnel Tents, Dome Tents and Geodesic Tents), by Tent Capacity (4-person tent, 6-person tent and 8-person tent), by End-user (Individual users and Commercial users): Global Industry overview, Comprehensive Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2018 - 2024”.  Report @ https://www.brandessenceresearch.com/consumer-goods/global-camping-tents-market-2014-2024/ This report segment of global Camping Tents market as Follows: Global Camping Tents Market by Product, Tunnel Tents Dome Tents Geodesic Tents   Global Camping Tents Market by Tent Capacity, 4-person tent 6-person tent 8-person tent   Global Camping Tents Market by End-user, ·         Individual users ·         Commercial users Global Camping Tents Market by Regional ·         North America o   U.S. o   Mexico o   Canada ·         Europe o   UK o   France o   Germany o   Italy ·         Asia Pacific o   China o   Japan o   India o   Southeast Asia ·         Latin America o   Brazil ·         The Middle East and Africa o   GCC o   Africa o   Rest of MEA This Global Camping Tents Market Report Covers Top Players Like, ·         AMG Group ·         Hilleberg ·         Johnson Outdoors ·         Newell Brands ·         Oase Outdoors ·         Big Agnes ·         Exxel Outdoors ·         NEMO Equipment ·         Simex Outdoor International ·         Skandika ·         Snugpak ·         Sports Direct International ·         VF Corporation ·         Others Directly Purchase a copy of the report  with TOC @ https://www.brandessenceresearch.com/consumer-goods/global-camping-tents-market-2014-2024/ For Customized Report, Kindly Visit below Mentioned link to build your Report https://www.brandessenceresearch.com/build-report/ Related Report: ·         Global Guitar Market ·         Global First Aid Kit Market About Us: We publish market research reports & business insights produced by highly qualified and experienced industry analysts. Our research reports are available in a wide range of industry verticals including aviation, food & beverage, healthcare, ICT, Construction, Chemicals and lot more. Brand Essence Market Research report will be best fit for senior executives, business development managers, marketing managers, consultants, CEOs, CIOs, COOs, and Directors, governments, agencies, organizations and Ph.D. Students. We have a delivery center in Pune, India and our sales office is in London. Contact us at +44-2038074155 or mail us at sales@brandessenceresearch.com   Follow us on LinkedIn  https://www.linkedin.com/in/brandessence-market-research-929843152/ Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/BrandEssenceMR Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Brandessence-Market-Research-and-Consulting-Pvt-ltd-1557019054395026/ Follow us on Pinterest: https://in.pinterest.com/brandessencemrc/  Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brandessence1/ Follow us on Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/104633869584826035534  
Brandessence Market Research has published a new report titled “ Camping Tents Market : Historical and Forecasts by Product (Tunnel Tents, Dome Tents and Geodesic Tents), by Tent Capacity (4-person tent, 6-person tent and 8-person tent), by End-user (Individual users and Commercial users): Global Industry overview, Comprehensive Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2018 - 2024”. According to the Brandessence Market Research Analyst, camping tents market is expected to grow at around 5% CAGR during the forecast period 2018-2024. Introduction to Camping Tents Industry Camping is a leisure pursuits outdoor activity i.e., spending time in natural or semi-natural settings out of town. It specifically involves the overnight outdoor stays in a shelter like a tent. The tent is a temporary shelter made up of different types of fabric and a pole framework. Camping tents are available in different sizes based on number person capacity. These tents are usually foldable which packs in the small bag after folding. Compact design, lightweight, and eco-friendly materials are some of the features becoming common to camping tents. Request Free Sample copy of Camping Tents Industry Report @ https://www.brandessenceresearch.com/consumer-goods/global-camping-tents-market-2014-2024/ Market Dynamics for Camping Tents industry The global camping tents market is expected to grow at a significant pace by 2024. The major drivers of camping equipment are increasing lighthearted expenditure, changing lifestyle, and rising participation in outdoor activities. Increasing health benefits of outdoor activities are expected to give new shape to the camping equipment market in coming years. With the growing demand, the vendors are focusing on developing innovative camping tents to fulfill the dynamic needs of the consumers. Compact design, lightweight, and eco-friendly materials are some of the features becoming common to camping tents. Camping tents have some limitations to critical atmospheres such as storms may hamper the growth of this market. Global Camping Tents Market: Segment Overview The global Camping Tents market is estimated to register significant CAGR between 2018 and 2024. The report included a detailed competitive scenario and portfolio of leading vendors operating in Camping Tents market all across the world. The report gives detailed segments analysis of Camping Tents market in which the report describes the market as a product, tent capacity, end-users and regional segments. Based on product, camping tents market is classified as tunnel tents, dome tents, and geodesic tents. On the basis of tent capacity, camping tents market has been segmented as 4-person tent, 6-person tent, and 8-person tent. Based upon end-user, the market of camping tents is classified as individual users and commercial users. The regions covered in this report are North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of the World. Europe dominates the market with highest market share due to increasing tourist activity in countries like Austria, Norway, Germany, Russia, France, Sweden, and the U.K. Due to increasing investments by respective governments in the tourism industry, the camping tent market is expected to grow at fast pace in forecast period. Browse the full “Camping Tents Market: Historical and Forecasts by Product (Tunnel Tents, Dome Tents and Geodesic Tents), by Tent Capacity (4-person tent, 6-person tent and 8-person tent), by End-user (Individual users and Commercial users): Global Industry overview, Comprehensive Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2018 - 2024”.  Report @ https://www.brandessenceresearch.com/consumer-goods/global-camping-tents-market-2014-2024/ This report segment of global Camping Tents market as Follows: Global Camping Tents Market by Product, Tunnel Tents Dome Tents Geodesic Tents   Global Camping Tents Market by Tent Capacity, 4-person tent 6-person tent 8-person tent   Global Camping Tents Market by End-user, ·         Individual users ·         Commercial users Global Camping Tents Market by Regional ·         North America o   U.S. o   Mexico o   Canada ·         Europe o   UK o   France o   Germany o   Italy ·         Asia Pacific o   China o   Japan o   India o   Southeast Asia ·         Latin America o   Brazil ·         The Middle East and Africa o   GCC o   Africa o   Rest of MEA This Global Camping Tents Market Report Covers Top Players Like, ·         AMG Group ·         Hilleberg ·         Johnson Outdoors ·         Newell Brands ·         Oase Outdoors ·         Big Agnes ·         Exxel Outdoors ·         NEMO Equipment ·         Simex Outdoor International ·         Skandika ·         Snugpak ·         Sports Direct International ·         VF Corporation ·         Others Directly Purchase a copy of the report  with TOC @ https://www.brandessenceresearch.com/consumer-goods/global-camping-tents-market-2014-2024/ For Customized Report, Kindly Visit below Mentioned link to build your Report https://www.brandessenceresearch.com/build-report/ Related Report: ·         Global Guitar Market ·         Global First Aid Kit Market About Us: We publish market research reports & business insights produced by highly qualified and experienced industry analysts. Our research reports are available in a wide range of industry verticals including aviation, food & beverage, healthcare, ICT, Construction, Chemicals and lot more. Brand Essence Market Research report will be best fit for senior executives, business development managers, marketing managers, consultants, CEOs, CIOs, COOs, and Directors, governments, agencies, organizations and Ph.D. Students. We have a delivery center in Pune, India and our sales office is in London. Contact us at +44-2038074155 or mail us at sales@brandessenceresearch.com   Follow us on LinkedIn  https://www.linkedin.com/in/brandessence-market-research-929843152/ Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/BrandEssenceMR Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Brandessence-Market-Research-and-Consulting-Pvt-ltd-1557019054395026/ Follow us on Pinterest: https://in.pinterest.com/brandessencemrc/  Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brandessence1/ Follow us on Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/104633869584826035534  
Camping Tents Market Research by Product Type, by Manufacturing Process: Global Market Size, Trends, Competitive, Forecast Analysis 2018-2024.
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