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The e-bike Mamachari is Japan’s moms favorite smart idea
If you are lucky enough to live in an area where biking is encouraged and a widespread activity, you will surely have witnessed the forced versatility of this mode of transportation. Entire households can fit on the small frame of this iron horse; pets, several children, suitcases and boxes included. Those skilled in biking can juggle umbrellas, smartphones and backpacks seemingly without difficulties, while still somehow paying attention to the surrounding traffic as well. Now, if you are even luckier to have visited Japan in recent years, you might recognise the term Mamachari. Loosely translated at ‘mom-bikes’, this ingenious piece of engineering has taken the notion of bike-travel and combined it with all the much needed features that make our daily life a lot easier.   Still ‘just an e-bike’, but much more than that While the Mamachari, that are a common sight in virtually all regions in the Asian country, might appear to be a no-frills, purely functional object at a first glance; those who dare to look closer will be stunned by its possibilities. Without any real difficulties, it can be transformed into a grocery getter, an easy commuter bike, a pizza delivery service or a taxi ride for your kids to school.   Various western manufacturers have jumped on the bandwagon and introduced their own version of the iconic Japanese bicycle. Take the Cero One. This self-proclaimed cargo bike is uncompromising in its ambition to match and possibly even improve the mom-bike. Yet it has paid significant attention to the design as well. Most people will not even discern this cargo bike from the regular ones driving down the street. Equipped with handy baskets and rackets The large rear wheel does not only make for a cool look, it also supports the extra weight that the bike can carry. This extra weight can be stored in a wide collection of modular baskets and rackets, adding up to some 12 pieces in total that are designed to fit any kind of carry-on luggage. When this heavy load gets too much, you will be happy to find out that the built-in electric motor can take you on a trip of up to 93 miles. As for its purpose? Japanese designer Kiyoshi Iwai claims that “ [the] goal was to design and build a modern version of the Japanese Mamachari, a practical utility bike that could be used by almost anyone as a replacement for a car in their daily lives .”   Cycling towards a better environment So, in short, the goal is to find a sustainable car replacement. While some people might be hesitant to go for a grocery run on their two-wheeler, anticipating the heavy bags on the return trip, the Cero One wants to take away those concerns. It wants to replace the car and other polluting means of transportation for daily chores such as picking up the kids, delivering pizzas or mail, or commuting to work.   Or, as Iwai puts it: “ The CERO One allows urban dwellers to do almost anything they'd do in a car, but more quickly and efficiently. A powerful electric motor and wide range of accessories make the bike perfect for getting around town as well as carrying almost anything, whether that's groceries, pizza for delivery or precious cargo .” Biking for a more  sustainable way of living And even though it has an electric motor, it technically still is a bike - meaning that it will be better for your health as well. Biking is a stress-relieving, fun way of getting around. It allows you to enjoy the outdoors whilst working on a sustainable, healthy lifestyle that includes sufficient exercise. You can take part in bike races, or even enjoy the very therapeutic activity of bike repairs. Even more importantly, when taking your kids to school on a bike, you will teach them that it is not normal to be chauffeured around by car everywhere they go.   These values of sustainability, health and exercise will become more and more valuable in years to come. Why not get a head start by finding your own smart utility bike? Mamachari is not just an object. It is a way of living, a statement that shares your values with the world. Whether you are a mom, a dad, or a young professional making his way through town: it will make your life better. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/transportation/cycling
If you are lucky enough to live in an area where biking is encouraged and a widespread activity, you will surely have witnessed the forced versatility of this mode of transportation. Entire households can fit on the small frame of this iron horse; pets, several children, suitcases and boxes included. Those skilled in biking can juggle umbrellas, smartphones and backpacks seemingly without difficulties, while still somehow paying attention to the surrounding traffic as well. Now, if you are even luckier to have visited Japan in recent years, you might recognise the term Mamachari. Loosely translated at ‘mom-bikes’, this ingenious piece of engineering has taken the notion of bike-travel and combined it with all the much needed features that make our daily life a lot easier.   Still ‘just an e-bike’, but much more than that While the Mamachari, that are a common sight in virtually all regions in the Asian country, might appear to be a no-frills, purely functional object at a first glance; those who dare to look closer will be stunned by its possibilities. Without any real difficulties, it can be transformed into a grocery getter, an easy commuter bike, a pizza delivery service or a taxi ride for your kids to school.   Various western manufacturers have jumped on the bandwagon and introduced their own version of the iconic Japanese bicycle. Take the Cero One. This self-proclaimed cargo bike is uncompromising in its ambition to match and possibly even improve the mom-bike. Yet it has paid significant attention to the design as well. Most people will not even discern this cargo bike from the regular ones driving down the street. Equipped with handy baskets and rackets The large rear wheel does not only make for a cool look, it also supports the extra weight that the bike can carry. This extra weight can be stored in a wide collection of modular baskets and rackets, adding up to some 12 pieces in total that are designed to fit any kind of carry-on luggage. When this heavy load gets too much, you will be happy to find out that the built-in electric motor can take you on a trip of up to 93 miles. As for its purpose? Japanese designer Kiyoshi Iwai claims that “ [the] goal was to design and build a modern version of the Japanese Mamachari, a practical utility bike that could be used by almost anyone as a replacement for a car in their daily lives .”   Cycling towards a better environment So, in short, the goal is to find a sustainable car replacement. While some people might be hesitant to go for a grocery run on their two-wheeler, anticipating the heavy bags on the return trip, the Cero One wants to take away those concerns. It wants to replace the car and other polluting means of transportation for daily chores such as picking up the kids, delivering pizzas or mail, or commuting to work.   Or, as Iwai puts it: “ The CERO One allows urban dwellers to do almost anything they'd do in a car, but more quickly and efficiently. A powerful electric motor and wide range of accessories make the bike perfect for getting around town as well as carrying almost anything, whether that's groceries, pizza for delivery or precious cargo .” Biking for a more  sustainable way of living And even though it has an electric motor, it technically still is a bike - meaning that it will be better for your health as well. Biking is a stress-relieving, fun way of getting around. It allows you to enjoy the outdoors whilst working on a sustainable, healthy lifestyle that includes sufficient exercise. You can take part in bike races, or even enjoy the very therapeutic activity of bike repairs. Even more importantly, when taking your kids to school on a bike, you will teach them that it is not normal to be chauffeured around by car everywhere they go.   These values of sustainability, health and exercise will become more and more valuable in years to come. Why not get a head start by finding your own smart utility bike? Mamachari is not just an object. It is a way of living, a statement that shares your values with the world. Whether you are a mom, a dad, or a young professional making his way through town: it will make your life better. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/transportation/cycling
The e-bike Mamachari is Japan’s moms favorite smart idea
The e-bike Mamachari is Japan’s moms favorite smart idea
Cruise the world on solar power alone on the Silent 55 yacht
Humans have always been drawn to the water on our planet. To the lakes, the rivers, the seas all around us. Not surprising, considering how important this liquid substance is to our daily lives. Yet at times it may be a bit… much. Just think about those individuals who are so fond of boating and sailing that they embark on all kinds of wild oceanic adventures. From crossing the Pacific and Atlantic to sailing around the world, there seems to be an undeniable appeal to exploring the best our earth has to offer from the water. The richest-of-the-rich have added an extra layer to this with their expensive yachting hobbies. Huge ships that are best described as floating palaces grace the most gorgeous seas and coasts, entertaining guests and cruising coastal hot-spots. The ecological price of yachting These expensive hobbies do however carry a higher price tag than merely the one attached to its hull upon purchase. Large boats are notorious polluters, that use up scarce resources and fuels in its operation and frequently leave a trail of waste and pollution in its wake. The use of renewable energy for boating is still in its infancy. This is exactly why we are so excited to discover initiatives that are dedicated to making ocean-travel more sustainable, while not taking away the luxury and pleasure it brings along. Take the Silent 55, a solar-powered yacht that can cruise for weeks at a time on solar energy alone. A prototype of carbon-neutral yachts using renewable  energy Ok, let’s nuance the previous statement a bit. It is not like you can actually keep on going continuously for weeks at a time at top speed, using nothing but renewable energy. According to its manufacturer, the Silent 55 can cruise for up to 160 km per day. The energy needs are directly derived from its 30 high-efficiency photovoltaic solar panels. These panels deliver peaks around 10 kilowatts into an inverter and charge the battery.   Unfortunately the manufacturer has not revealed any specifications with regard to the capacity or size of this battery. The critical solar energy connoisseur will recognise that the numbers mentioned above are not exactly spectacular. The amount of solar energy generated seems low, especially when offsetting it to the options the manufacturer provides for engine power: respectively at 2x135 kW (E-Power configuration) and 2x 30 kW (cruiser configuration).   Frugality is key to saving the planet : go easy on the engine   Founder Michael Köhler does, however, insist that this is sufficient to cruise at a ‘normal’ speed for hours at a time, although he recommends a reduced speed in the evenings and at night. In order to reach optimum efficiency, it seems important to cut back your use of other on-board appliances that require energy, and go easy on the throttles.   If you are afraid that you will quite literally end up dead in the water, several add-ons are available that may offer some much needed support. For those who are not entirely opposed to coughing out some extra CO2 in the atmosphere, a diesel generator can be added that will provide some 100 kW.   For those who prefer the natural approach and insist on renewable energy sources only, the inclusion of a mast and sails is the way to go. A particularly intriguing option is the ‘sky sail’, which is basically a large kite that will be let up in the air to an altitude of 150 meters. This way, it can take advantage of the high-altitude winds while its shadow does not interfere with the solar panels’ capacity to soak up direct sunlight. Comfortable and customisable living on-board While the concept of powering the yacht by solar panels is promising, the inventors were clearly more concerned with the technology than with its design. While the top deck is completely taken over by the solar panels, you have ample space to relax on the main deck. Inside, you can enjoy some 40 square meters of living space and a variety of options for sleeping quarters (up to 3 bedrooms, each with en-suite bathroom). For some €1.4 million this eco-friendly yacht can be yours. Quite a steal, considering the lower costs of fuel and maintenance. Although the interior might not be for you if you are used to ‘regular’ yachts with over-the-top-bling and accessories. For those of you, we recommend looking into the larger versions (19,5 meters and 24 meters respectively) that Silent Yachts is working on. Gives you just that little extra space for a grand kitchen or media room. https://www.whatsorb.com/transportation/-solar-catamaran-makes--green--tourism-just-shine-a-little-more-
Humans have always been drawn to the water on our planet. To the lakes, the rivers, the seas all around us. Not surprising, considering how important this liquid substance is to our daily lives. Yet at times it may be a bit… much. Just think about those individuals who are so fond of boating and sailing that they embark on all kinds of wild oceanic adventures. From crossing the Pacific and Atlantic to sailing around the world, there seems to be an undeniable appeal to exploring the best our earth has to offer from the water. The richest-of-the-rich have added an extra layer to this with their expensive yachting hobbies. Huge ships that are best described as floating palaces grace the most gorgeous seas and coasts, entertaining guests and cruising coastal hot-spots. The ecological price of yachting These expensive hobbies do however carry a higher price tag than merely the one attached to its hull upon purchase. Large boats are notorious polluters, that use up scarce resources and fuels in its operation and frequently leave a trail of waste and pollution in its wake. The use of renewable energy for boating is still in its infancy. This is exactly why we are so excited to discover initiatives that are dedicated to making ocean-travel more sustainable, while not taking away the luxury and pleasure it brings along. Take the Silent 55, a solar-powered yacht that can cruise for weeks at a time on solar energy alone. A prototype of carbon-neutral yachts using renewable  energy Ok, let’s nuance the previous statement a bit. It is not like you can actually keep on going continuously for weeks at a time at top speed, using nothing but renewable energy. According to its manufacturer, the Silent 55 can cruise for up to 160 km per day. The energy needs are directly derived from its 30 high-efficiency photovoltaic solar panels. These panels deliver peaks around 10 kilowatts into an inverter and charge the battery.   Unfortunately the manufacturer has not revealed any specifications with regard to the capacity or size of this battery. The critical solar energy connoisseur will recognise that the numbers mentioned above are not exactly spectacular. The amount of solar energy generated seems low, especially when offsetting it to the options the manufacturer provides for engine power: respectively at 2x135 kW (E-Power configuration) and 2x 30 kW (cruiser configuration).   Frugality is key to saving the planet : go easy on the engine   Founder Michael Köhler does, however, insist that this is sufficient to cruise at a ‘normal’ speed for hours at a time, although he recommends a reduced speed in the evenings and at night. In order to reach optimum efficiency, it seems important to cut back your use of other on-board appliances that require energy, and go easy on the throttles.   If you are afraid that you will quite literally end up dead in the water, several add-ons are available that may offer some much needed support. For those who are not entirely opposed to coughing out some extra CO2 in the atmosphere, a diesel generator can be added that will provide some 100 kW.   For those who prefer the natural approach and insist on renewable energy sources only, the inclusion of a mast and sails is the way to go. A particularly intriguing option is the ‘sky sail’, which is basically a large kite that will be let up in the air to an altitude of 150 meters. This way, it can take advantage of the high-altitude winds while its shadow does not interfere with the solar panels’ capacity to soak up direct sunlight. Comfortable and customisable living on-board While the concept of powering the yacht by solar panels is promising, the inventors were clearly more concerned with the technology than with its design. While the top deck is completely taken over by the solar panels, you have ample space to relax on the main deck. Inside, you can enjoy some 40 square meters of living space and a variety of options for sleeping quarters (up to 3 bedrooms, each with en-suite bathroom). For some €1.4 million this eco-friendly yacht can be yours. Quite a steal, considering the lower costs of fuel and maintenance. Although the interior might not be for you if you are used to ‘regular’ yachts with over-the-top-bling and accessories. For those of you, we recommend looking into the larger versions (19,5 meters and 24 meters respectively) that Silent Yachts is working on. Gives you just that little extra space for a grand kitchen or media room. https://www.whatsorb.com/transportation/-solar-catamaran-makes--green--tourism-just-shine-a-little-more-
Cruise the world on solar power alone on the Silent 55 yacht
Cruise the world on solar power alone on the Silent 55 yacht
The micro electric car Microlino. Italian charm German made
A recent deal in the automobile world made headlines: the German sports carmaker Artega acquired all rights to the micro electric car Microlino, as designed by the Swiss company Micro Mobility Systems and previously produced by the Italian Tazzari. Thus, an electric car that has been influenced by three of the most remarkable countries in Europe - and that is about to take the next step in its lifecycle. The Microlino is an electric city car , targeting ways of optimising urban transportation and mobility. In its design, it is uncompromisingly influenced by the cult classic BMW Isetta, fondly nicknamed bubble car. This two-seater adds up to a length of 2,40 meters and weights 435 kg, making it a great option for busy cities where traffic is a huge problem and parking is scarce.   Tazzari: founders of the ZERO Project Now that Italian producer Tazzari has decided to move out of the urban segment, it sold the headliners of this division to Artega - including its electric taxi e-cab and this electric Isetta look-a-like. Quite a shame, as Tazzari has a rich and exciting history when it comes to producing great electric vehicles. Its heydays started after it announced the ZERO Project in 2006, with the ambitious goal of creating an electric city car with unprecedented technical features, such as an ultralight chassis technology and sophisticated technology to manage the lithium batteries powering the car, to ensure unparalleled performance and autonomy.   Through the extensive research that Tazzari had performed in the past on such technologies, it was quickly able to gain an edge in this industry - aided by its experience in electronics and design. And this leading position clearly shows, as electric cars as produced by Tazzari have the benefit of millions of kilometers of experience, that were driven all over the world. Artega: a quick follower Artega really started to make its move on the world stage back in 2007, upon launching the Artega GT. After that, the German company started specialising in electric sports cars, with their latest project being the Superelletra - a very high-end product that, most likely, will only be sold as part of a limited edition run. Those who fear that the Microlino will go down the same path can rest assured. All signs are pointing towards Artega taking on a much more dynamic approach for their sales strategy. They are certainly not taking half measures: with the current pre-series production being moved in the upcoming weeks from Imola, Italy to their 3,000 square meter production hall in their hometown Delbrück. Production plans for Microlino According to the latest projections, Artega are hoping to produce some 8,000 electric cars out of this factory per year, with production starting next January. This is not to say that you could, if you’d like, purchase a Microlino right away. Only the lucky residents of Switzerland will actually be able to do so, as this is where the first deliveries will be headed to, closely followed by Germany. If small  electronic cars are your thing, then the Microlino might just make you fall in love with it. While it is just as compact and efficient as the electric Smart, it retails at only half the price, at 12,000 euros. Similarly, the hommage to the BMW Isetta is adorable and charming, surely something that will win over the hearts of car lovers.   The developers also cleverly made use of customer participation: on social media, followers were invited to vote on their favourite colour that the car should be produced in. After a massive number of responses, eight colours were chosen: black, white, blue, red, orange, green, brown and grey. Even more important, as the Microlino completed the EU homologation last July, the vehicle is roadworthy and street legal in all countries within Europe. Thus, it will not just be a nice addition to your carpark, it will actually get you to where you want to go, without restrictions. That is, as long as you stay within the official range of 126 km with the small battery and 202 km with the larger battery - which will, at its top speed of 90 km p/h, last you for about 1,5 to 2,5 hours. Running out of power? Then you can recharge your vehicle at any conventional domestic power socket in merely 4 hours, or even in as little as 1 hour if provided with a type-2 connector. Why should you care? If you are finding yourself as part of a large family, with a bunch of kids and dogs, and frequent family trips that require dozens of bags, the Microlino would not be able to transport all of you. It does not have the space, nor the reach. However, if your travel is mainly restricted to short rides in urban areas, its small size might actually be a huge advantage. You will be able to navigate it through busy streets rather easily, and front-park it in small spaces, significantly increasing your chances of finding a decent parking spot. The Microlino is what it is: a smart, compact electric car that will make urban driving a lot more comfortable. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
A recent deal in the automobile world made headlines: the German sports carmaker Artega acquired all rights to the micro electric car Microlino, as designed by the Swiss company Micro Mobility Systems and previously produced by the Italian Tazzari. Thus, an electric car that has been influenced by three of the most remarkable countries in Europe - and that is about to take the next step in its lifecycle. The Microlino is an electric city car , targeting ways of optimising urban transportation and mobility. In its design, it is uncompromisingly influenced by the cult classic BMW Isetta, fondly nicknamed bubble car. This two-seater adds up to a length of 2,40 meters and weights 435 kg, making it a great option for busy cities where traffic is a huge problem and parking is scarce.   Tazzari: founders of the ZERO Project Now that Italian producer Tazzari has decided to move out of the urban segment, it sold the headliners of this division to Artega - including its electric taxi e-cab and this electric Isetta look-a-like. Quite a shame, as Tazzari has a rich and exciting history when it comes to producing great electric vehicles. Its heydays started after it announced the ZERO Project in 2006, with the ambitious goal of creating an electric city car with unprecedented technical features, such as an ultralight chassis technology and sophisticated technology to manage the lithium batteries powering the car, to ensure unparalleled performance and autonomy.   Through the extensive research that Tazzari had performed in the past on such technologies, it was quickly able to gain an edge in this industry - aided by its experience in electronics and design. And this leading position clearly shows, as electric cars as produced by Tazzari have the benefit of millions of kilometers of experience, that were driven all over the world. Artega: a quick follower Artega really started to make its move on the world stage back in 2007, upon launching the Artega GT. After that, the German company started specialising in electric sports cars, with their latest project being the Superelletra - a very high-end product that, most likely, will only be sold as part of a limited edition run. Those who fear that the Microlino will go down the same path can rest assured. All signs are pointing towards Artega taking on a much more dynamic approach for their sales strategy. They are certainly not taking half measures: with the current pre-series production being moved in the upcoming weeks from Imola, Italy to their 3,000 square meter production hall in their hometown Delbrück. Production plans for Microlino According to the latest projections, Artega are hoping to produce some 8,000 electric cars out of this factory per year, with production starting next January. This is not to say that you could, if you’d like, purchase a Microlino right away. Only the lucky residents of Switzerland will actually be able to do so, as this is where the first deliveries will be headed to, closely followed by Germany. If small  electronic cars are your thing, then the Microlino might just make you fall in love with it. While it is just as compact and efficient as the electric Smart, it retails at only half the price, at 12,000 euros. Similarly, the hommage to the BMW Isetta is adorable and charming, surely something that will win over the hearts of car lovers.   The developers also cleverly made use of customer participation: on social media, followers were invited to vote on their favourite colour that the car should be produced in. After a massive number of responses, eight colours were chosen: black, white, blue, red, orange, green, brown and grey. Even more important, as the Microlino completed the EU homologation last July, the vehicle is roadworthy and street legal in all countries within Europe. Thus, it will not just be a nice addition to your carpark, it will actually get you to where you want to go, without restrictions. That is, as long as you stay within the official range of 126 km with the small battery and 202 km with the larger battery - which will, at its top speed of 90 km p/h, last you for about 1,5 to 2,5 hours. Running out of power? Then you can recharge your vehicle at any conventional domestic power socket in merely 4 hours, or even in as little as 1 hour if provided with a type-2 connector. Why should you care? If you are finding yourself as part of a large family, with a bunch of kids and dogs, and frequent family trips that require dozens of bags, the Microlino would not be able to transport all of you. It does not have the space, nor the reach. However, if your travel is mainly restricted to short rides in urban areas, its small size might actually be a huge advantage. You will be able to navigate it through busy streets rather easily, and front-park it in small spaces, significantly increasing your chances of finding a decent parking spot. The Microlino is what it is: a smart, compact electric car that will make urban driving a lot more comfortable. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
The micro electric car Microlino. Italian charm German made
The micro electric car Microlino. Italian charm German made
A solar powered car made from plastic waste. Follow Clean2Antartca on Antartica
WhatsOrb is an official partner from Clean2Antartica Since November 2018, WhatsOr is an official sponsor from the Clean2Antartica project. Adventure for Change. Waste meets adventure Two people are heading for the South Pole in a vehicle made of plastic waste, powered by the sun. Join us, because creating a cleaner world is an adventure for everyone. How did the Clean2Antartica challenge start? Liesbeth and Edwin (Netherlands) were making dinner, when they tossed away another plastic packaging. It was the straw that broke the camel’s back. They turned around their trashcan and their mindset. Why is plastic suddenly worthless? Why do we blame the government or the supermarket? Leaving your comfort zone all the way to Antartica The next day they went to the butcher with their own reusable packaging. An uncomfortable situation, but a moment of success that set off a personal adventure. Liesbeth and Edwin went from the discomfort of their own trash to taking on the freezing challenge of Antarctica. Start small, but start today to ‘recycle plastic waste How do you go from the kitchen table to Antarctica? By starting, failing, and adjusting. People said it's impossible. They said plastic waste wouldn't be good enough, the car would fail. But here we are, ready to be the first to reach the South Pole with clean technology. Liesbeth and Edwin don't want to set a record. They want to inspire you to take your own step for a better a world. Expedition to Antarctica by ‘plastic waste car powered by solar An expedition for a cleaner world on the coldest continent on earth. A test of man and machine, to inspire a personal adventure at home. Photo by: Clean2Antartica Leaving the comfort zone From Antarctica’s base camp, Liesbeth and Edwin will drive to the South Pole and back. A journey of 2400 km through an icy desert where the sun never sets. In -30°C, man and machine will be tested on the driest, coldest, and highest continent on the planet. This is about the power of embracing discomfort. Whether it's about an expedition or taking the first steps to reduce your plastic . A zero waste continent: Antartica Antarctica contains 90% of the world’s ice and belongs to no one. It is zero waste by law, making it the perfect destination for a zero waste adventure. We can learn from Antarctica and make sure it stays that way. We also want to raise awareness for the Antarctic treaty. If not extended in 2048, the continent will be opened for commercial exploitation. Adventure with purpose We want people to rediscover their world. To experiment with plastic waste and explore a world of possibilities. Our expedition is a spark for personal adventure. It has all the charm of a classical expedition and the purpose of creating a better world. Going on an adventure, at home or far away, can make us better humans. We arrived on the South pole. -27 °C. The expedition with the  solar powered car has started! “We got a little impatient here in our Mission Control Center. Rumors went that the expedition team had already landed on Monday and that turned out to be true. Nevertheless, we had contact with them for the first time on Wednesday. Exciting! Photo by: Clean2Antartica Bad weather and a small incident with the wheel of the Solar Voyager caused some delay, but we have good news. We see movement in our Mission Control Center, it looks like they are going to drive today! Yes, that did not look too good. The suspension of the front wheel had been shot off. Probably because two rings were not installed properly. Fortunately everything was still complete and the Solar Voyager could continue. This accident has ensured that the team is even sharper. Hopefully this will not cause any further problems in the expedition.” Episodes Antarctica: Our start and many more adventures with the solar waste car Rough start! Strong wind and a crash, but they arrived at Union Glacier. Episode 3, the arrival on Union Glacier. And as Liesbeth says, we’re ready to rock and roll! All systems work. Panels are tested. Food is packed. On Monday, we leave for Union Glacier, for our first steps on Antartica. Follow the mission our Antarctica. Check out the expedition videos and stay tuned for new updates about this adventure. https://www.clean2antarctica.nl/en https://www.whatsorb.com/news/electric-car-sion-attracts-5-000-reservations-for-it-s-unique-solar-battery-concept
WhatsOrb is an official partner from Clean2Antartica Since November 2018, WhatsOr is an official sponsor from the Clean2Antartica project. Adventure for Change. Waste meets adventure Two people are heading for the South Pole in a vehicle made of plastic waste, powered by the sun. Join us, because creating a cleaner world is an adventure for everyone. How did the Clean2Antartica challenge start? Liesbeth and Edwin (Netherlands) were making dinner, when they tossed away another plastic packaging. It was the straw that broke the camel’s back. They turned around their trashcan and their mindset. Why is plastic suddenly worthless? Why do we blame the government or the supermarket? Leaving your comfort zone all the way to Antartica The next day they went to the butcher with their own reusable packaging. An uncomfortable situation, but a moment of success that set off a personal adventure. Liesbeth and Edwin went from the discomfort of their own trash to taking on the freezing challenge of Antarctica. Start small, but start today to ‘recycle plastic waste How do you go from the kitchen table to Antarctica? By starting, failing, and adjusting. People said it's impossible. They said plastic waste wouldn't be good enough, the car would fail. But here we are, ready to be the first to reach the South Pole with clean technology. Liesbeth and Edwin don't want to set a record. They want to inspire you to take your own step for a better a world. Expedition to Antarctica by ‘plastic waste car powered by solar An expedition for a cleaner world on the coldest continent on earth. A test of man and machine, to inspire a personal adventure at home. Photo by: Clean2Antartica Leaving the comfort zone From Antarctica’s base camp, Liesbeth and Edwin will drive to the South Pole and back. A journey of 2400 km through an icy desert where the sun never sets. In -30°C, man and machine will be tested on the driest, coldest, and highest continent on the planet. This is about the power of embracing discomfort. Whether it's about an expedition or taking the first steps to reduce your plastic . A zero waste continent: Antartica Antarctica contains 90% of the world’s ice and belongs to no one. It is zero waste by law, making it the perfect destination for a zero waste adventure. We can learn from Antarctica and make sure it stays that way. We also want to raise awareness for the Antarctic treaty. If not extended in 2048, the continent will be opened for commercial exploitation. Adventure with purpose We want people to rediscover their world. To experiment with plastic waste and explore a world of possibilities. Our expedition is a spark for personal adventure. It has all the charm of a classical expedition and the purpose of creating a better world. Going on an adventure, at home or far away, can make us better humans. We arrived on the South pole. -27 °C. The expedition with the  solar powered car has started! “We got a little impatient here in our Mission Control Center. Rumors went that the expedition team had already landed on Monday and that turned out to be true. Nevertheless, we had contact with them for the first time on Wednesday. Exciting! Photo by: Clean2Antartica Bad weather and a small incident with the wheel of the Solar Voyager caused some delay, but we have good news. We see movement in our Mission Control Center, it looks like they are going to drive today! Yes, that did not look too good. The suspension of the front wheel had been shot off. Probably because two rings were not installed properly. Fortunately everything was still complete and the Solar Voyager could continue. This accident has ensured that the team is even sharper. Hopefully this will not cause any further problems in the expedition.” Episodes Antarctica: Our start and many more adventures with the solar waste car Rough start! Strong wind and a crash, but they arrived at Union Glacier. Episode 3, the arrival on Union Glacier. And as Liesbeth says, we’re ready to rock and roll! All systems work. Panels are tested. Food is packed. On Monday, we leave for Union Glacier, for our first steps on Antartica. Follow the mission our Antarctica. Check out the expedition videos and stay tuned for new updates about this adventure. https://www.clean2antarctica.nl/en https://www.whatsorb.com/news/electric-car-sion-attracts-5-000-reservations-for-it-s-unique-solar-battery-concept
A solar powered car made from plastic waste. Follow Clean2Antartca on Antartica
A solar powered car made from plastic waste. Follow Clean2Antartca on Antartica
The Solar Bike, a mix between a trustworthy two-wheeler and a Tesla
Most people associate true sustainable and green transport with trustworthy methods of getting from A to B: by foot, horse, or the bicycle. In recent years, some innovative means of transport were added to this list - including the electric vehicles of Elon Musk’s Tesla. So, what do you get when you cross the trustworthy two-wheeler with a Tesla? That is the question that Danish engineer Jesper Frausig pondered, before coming up with the Solar Bike: a fully  elektric bike that runs entirely on renewable solar power. Using the power of the sun, it will take its rider wherever he needs to go using the ancient-old allure of the bike - but without the heavy work. Regular bike meets battery power While it is designed to resemble a regular  bicycle as closely as possible, the Solar Bike has specially engineered wheels, fitted with very efficient photovoltaic cells - so solar panels attached to the wheels. The energy that it generates is directly transmitted to the battery when the bike is stationary. Hence, the Solar Bike does not require any additional, long-waiting charging time, as it will automatically start charging when it is parked. Then, while in motion, this stored energy is used to power the motor. And those who worry that it might not suffice, will be surprised to learn that speeds range from 25 km/hour to 50 km/hour. Practically, depending upon the net sunshine, the solar cells might provide sufficient power to have the bike run for anywhere between 2 km and 25 km per day.   A bright future for solar-powered e-bikes No word yet as to the planned release date for the bike. In fact, since the ‘big launch’ of the concept in the summer of 2015, it has been somewhat quiet around Frausig’s team. Not to worry: the basic idea is good and has already been adopted by many other bike manufacturers. This makes it only a matter of time before the first solar-powered bike will hit the market. https://www.whatsorb.com/transportation/the-me-mover-brings-sustainable-transport-and-training-together
Most people associate true sustainable and green transport with trustworthy methods of getting from A to B: by foot, horse, or the bicycle. In recent years, some innovative means of transport were added to this list - including the electric vehicles of Elon Musk’s Tesla. So, what do you get when you cross the trustworthy two-wheeler with a Tesla? That is the question that Danish engineer Jesper Frausig pondered, before coming up with the Solar Bike: a fully  elektric bike that runs entirely on renewable solar power. Using the power of the sun, it will take its rider wherever he needs to go using the ancient-old allure of the bike - but without the heavy work. Regular bike meets battery power While it is designed to resemble a regular  bicycle as closely as possible, the Solar Bike has specially engineered wheels, fitted with very efficient photovoltaic cells - so solar panels attached to the wheels. The energy that it generates is directly transmitted to the battery when the bike is stationary. Hence, the Solar Bike does not require any additional, long-waiting charging time, as it will automatically start charging when it is parked. Then, while in motion, this stored energy is used to power the motor. And those who worry that it might not suffice, will be surprised to learn that speeds range from 25 km/hour to 50 km/hour. Practically, depending upon the net sunshine, the solar cells might provide sufficient power to have the bike run for anywhere between 2 km and 25 km per day.   A bright future for solar-powered e-bikes No word yet as to the planned release date for the bike. In fact, since the ‘big launch’ of the concept in the summer of 2015, it has been somewhat quiet around Frausig’s team. Not to worry: the basic idea is good and has already been adopted by many other bike manufacturers. This makes it only a matter of time before the first solar-powered bike will hit the market. https://www.whatsorb.com/transportation/the-me-mover-brings-sustainable-transport-and-training-together
The Solar Bike, a mix between a trustworthy two-wheeler and a Tesla
The Solar Bike, a mix between a trustworthy two-wheeler and a Tesla
Transportation

Easy transportation of goods is one of the backbones of our modern society. Unfortunately a lot of energy is involved in getter your goods from A to B. In these articles we try to tell you all about carbon neutral fuel and other sustainable efforts to move goods around the world.

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