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Sustainable fabric by IKEA and NIKE textile without pollution
Recently, the Netherlands-based textile company DyeCoo announced that they have agreed on long-term collaborations with industry giants Nike and IKEA. This is quite a big step for a company that has a ‘mere’ 15 years of experience in their core business: integrating CO2 technologies in the creation of textiles. Does that sound confusingly brilliant? Well, we are pretty sure that it is. Through their lean and clean production methods, DyeCoo has made it its mission to lead the textile industry to a sustainable future.   Whereas most ‘traditional’ fabric producers rely on heavy chemicals, extensive use of scarce resources like water, and extremely cheap labour in sweatshops; this company from the town of Weesp has developed a 100% water-free and process chemical-free textile processing solution - that has attracted the attention of the before mentioned multinationals. Water-free textile production The CO2 technology has been proudly patented, having proven itself in a industrial setting. It replaces the water needed in the production process with reclaimed CO2. This is used as the dyeing agent in a closed loop process. After it gets pressurised, CO2 turns supercritical (SC-CO2). When this happens, its solvency power increases - which will let the dye dissolve very easily. This high permeability will transport the dyes easily and deeply in fibres, resulting in strikingly vibrant colours.   This entire process is 'dry', without any need to evaporate water. Combined with efficient colour absorption and short batch cycles, this has made the entire technology very energy efficient as well: another factor contributing to the significantly reduced operating costs.   On top of the significantly reduced water and energy needs, the dyeing process that uses CO2 does not require the addition of processed chemicals in order to dissolve the dye. Instead, the technology uses 100% pure dyes, that benefit from a 98% uptake - minimising waste. Actually, the entire production processed is focused on this minimisation of waste - including ( waste ) water and chemicals. This removes the need for water treatment.   Reclaimed materials at the basis Most of the materials used during the dying process, including the CO2, are reclaimed from the existing industrial processes. A brilliant 95% is recycled in the closed loop system. DyeCoo has remained steadfast in its proposal, employing a team of specialised engineers and textile experts to keep the process running smoothly. This includes a variety of personnel, including chemical and mechanical engineers, CO2 specialists, physicists and material experts.   All of this has allowed the company to scale up activities, yet remaining true to its core. The entire chain is optimised for accountability and sustainability, so not just the mechanics of the production process alone, but also the procurement of fabrics and dyes; as well as the handling of the finished product. This has led to an increased focus on implementing best practices throughout the textile chain. Scaling-up as the challenge After proving its technology, DyeCoo has now stepped up and is looking for ways of scaling up. The main selling point, besides the sustainable production process, is the vibrancy of the colours - that really stands out. The use of 100% pure dyestuff allows for those beautiful colours to be added evenly, adding to the high quality standards. Additionally, the company has claimed that it is able to “dye fabric in the middle of the Sahara”: the geographic freedom is unlimited now that the need for water has been eliminated.   Production can be kickstarted literally anywhere on the globe, opening up some great new opportunities - for instance, allowing the production to be performed closer to relevant markets, shortening the lead times, and being more 'lean' altogether. The immense potential has been realised by Nike and IKEA, amongst others. They have actively invested in the technology, which even led to demand for CO2-dyed fabric outgrowing the current supply. Now that the 'big players' have acknowledged that the product generated in a more energy-efficient and generally more sustainable manner does not have to constitute a compromise on quality, revenue or functionality; we will soon start to see the results. Nike already introduced a product line that features the DyeCoo technology, with a bunch of additional products being added in the near future.   It is a great example of how, once suppliers get their heads in the game, small technological improvements can make a world of difference: without having to compromise on product quality or appeal, the greener process makes for a much more sustainable one. And that is great news for all of us. {youtube} https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Recently, the Netherlands-based textile company DyeCoo announced that they have agreed on long-term collaborations with industry giants Nike and IKEA. This is quite a big step for a company that has a ‘mere’ 15 years of experience in their core business: integrating CO2 technologies in the creation of textiles. Does that sound confusingly brilliant? Well, we are pretty sure that it is. Through their lean and clean production methods, DyeCoo has made it its mission to lead the textile industry to a sustainable future.   Whereas most ‘traditional’ fabric producers rely on heavy chemicals, extensive use of scarce resources like water, and extremely cheap labour in sweatshops; this company from the town of Weesp has developed a 100% water-free and process chemical-free textile processing solution - that has attracted the attention of the before mentioned multinationals. Water-free textile production The CO2 technology has been proudly patented, having proven itself in a industrial setting. It replaces the water needed in the production process with reclaimed CO2. This is used as the dyeing agent in a closed loop process. After it gets pressurised, CO2 turns supercritical (SC-CO2). When this happens, its solvency power increases - which will let the dye dissolve very easily. This high permeability will transport the dyes easily and deeply in fibres, resulting in strikingly vibrant colours.   This entire process is 'dry', without any need to evaporate water. Combined with efficient colour absorption and short batch cycles, this has made the entire technology very energy efficient as well: another factor contributing to the significantly reduced operating costs.   On top of the significantly reduced water and energy needs, the dyeing process that uses CO2 does not require the addition of processed chemicals in order to dissolve the dye. Instead, the technology uses 100% pure dyes, that benefit from a 98% uptake - minimising waste. Actually, the entire production processed is focused on this minimisation of waste - including ( waste ) water and chemicals. This removes the need for water treatment.   Reclaimed materials at the basis Most of the materials used during the dying process, including the CO2, are reclaimed from the existing industrial processes. A brilliant 95% is recycled in the closed loop system. DyeCoo has remained steadfast in its proposal, employing a team of specialised engineers and textile experts to keep the process running smoothly. This includes a variety of personnel, including chemical and mechanical engineers, CO2 specialists, physicists and material experts.   All of this has allowed the company to scale up activities, yet remaining true to its core. The entire chain is optimised for accountability and sustainability, so not just the mechanics of the production process alone, but also the procurement of fabrics and dyes; as well as the handling of the finished product. This has led to an increased focus on implementing best practices throughout the textile chain. Scaling-up as the challenge After proving its technology, DyeCoo has now stepped up and is looking for ways of scaling up. The main selling point, besides the sustainable production process, is the vibrancy of the colours - that really stands out. The use of 100% pure dyestuff allows for those beautiful colours to be added evenly, adding to the high quality standards. Additionally, the company has claimed that it is able to “dye fabric in the middle of the Sahara”: the geographic freedom is unlimited now that the need for water has been eliminated.   Production can be kickstarted literally anywhere on the globe, opening up some great new opportunities - for instance, allowing the production to be performed closer to relevant markets, shortening the lead times, and being more 'lean' altogether. The immense potential has been realised by Nike and IKEA, amongst others. They have actively invested in the technology, which even led to demand for CO2-dyed fabric outgrowing the current supply. Now that the 'big players' have acknowledged that the product generated in a more energy-efficient and generally more sustainable manner does not have to constitute a compromise on quality, revenue or functionality; we will soon start to see the results. Nike already introduced a product line that features the DyeCoo technology, with a bunch of additional products being added in the near future.   It is a great example of how, once suppliers get their heads in the game, small technological improvements can make a world of difference: without having to compromise on product quality or appeal, the greener process makes for a much more sustainable one. And that is great news for all of us. {youtube} https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Sustainable fabric by IKEA and NIKE textile without pollution
Sustainable fabric by IKEA and NIKE textile without pollution
Israeli 3D printed fashion as sustainable works of art
Israeli fashion design have been drawing international attention in recent years. More specifically is the 3D printed fashion that has the wow-factor, not least since Israeli designer Danit Peleg created the world’s first entirely 3D printed fashion collection. Creators in Israel and all over the globe are looking with interest at the limitless possibilities of 3D printed fashion and its multisensorial effects, testing their own imaginative boundaries in a notoriously fickle industry. Also, 3D printing in fashion can be a more sustainable option for designers to safeguard their art while supporting an environmentally conscious ecosystem. Reshaping fashion through 3D printing One of these designers is Ganit Goldstein, whose creations have embraced 3D printing to create remarkable and sustainable, works of art. As a graduate of the prestigious Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem, Goldstein has embarked on a path that seeks to reshape fashion through a unique blend of art and technology. The designer recently launched a collection entitled ‘Between the Layers’, which was created as a graduation project. The collection is made using 3D printing and consists of seven outfits and six pairs of shoes that are made with thermoplastic polyurethane and polylactic acid. The unique pieces in Ganit Goldstein’s fashion collection feature a visual interaction between traditional artistic methods and the dynamic and evolving technologies of artistic expression. Goldstein chose to express this by “fusing additive manufacturing and computer engineering with traditional crafting techniques, such as weaving”, according to her statement. “The technique of 3D layer printing allows me to re-examine which layers can be added and what new connections I can create.” Beautiful ánd waste -averse During her time in an university exchange program in Japan, Goldstein began experimenting with up-cycling and reconstruction techniques, shredding a range of second-hand fabrics and industrial textile leftovers and using a traditional Japanese textile technique called IKAT weaving to create captivating designs. Upon her return to Israel, Goldstein started developing a weaving process using an Orginal Prusa i3 Mk3 3D printer and finished off her designs adding hand-woven layers. Alongside her art-meets-technology mix, Goldstein has been devoting attention to the creation of garments, shoes and jewelry pieces that are not only beautiful but also sustainable and waste-averse. The technique of 3D printing in fashion is a great sustainable tool. “With this technique, we are able to choose exactly which materials to print and how much we need, as well as the precise pattern we want to obtain, without incurring unneeded waste, a notion that is both empowering and impactful,” Goldstein says. The future of 3D printing: personalized and one-of-a-kind Looking ahead, Goldstein says she would like to further explore the use of recycled plastics. “Creating designs from recycled plastic is an ever-growing interest of mine and I would like to create a growing number of designs that utilize this material,” she says. Goldstein has recently been touring the world with her collection of 3D printed clothing and shoes. She predicts that 3D printed fashion “will change the way people design and wear clothes. ‘Personalized’, ‘one-of-a-kind’ pieces that are specifically created for one single person are the future of 3D printed fashion.” Other Israeli 3 D printed fashion pioneers to watch Israel’s forward-looking innovation in the field of 3D printed fashion is inspirational and some creative ideas by a number of Israeli talents have already garnered international attention. Designer Danit Peleg created the world’s first entirely 3D printed fashion collection, which included five full outfits that took over 2,000 hours to print. Noa Raviv, whose work has been displayed in the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art, created a 3D print collection by manipulating digital images using computer modelling software. Israeli textile designer Eden Saadon used a 3D printing pen for a lacy lingerie collection. Also, Nitzan Kish attracted media attention. She has been using 3D tech to create uniquely shaped clothing and jewellery with a special purpose in mind – self-defence, specifically in urban environments. 3D printing can and will be the future in fashion, especially according to the innovative fashion designers in Israel. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Israeli fashion design have been drawing international attention in recent years. More specifically is the 3D printed fashion that has the wow-factor, not least since Israeli designer Danit Peleg created the world’s first entirely 3D printed fashion collection. Creators in Israel and all over the globe are looking with interest at the limitless possibilities of 3D printed fashion and its multisensorial effects, testing their own imaginative boundaries in a notoriously fickle industry. Also, 3D printing in fashion can be a more sustainable option for designers to safeguard their art while supporting an environmentally conscious ecosystem. Reshaping fashion through 3D printing One of these designers is Ganit Goldstein, whose creations have embraced 3D printing to create remarkable and sustainable, works of art. As a graduate of the prestigious Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem, Goldstein has embarked on a path that seeks to reshape fashion through a unique blend of art and technology. The designer recently launched a collection entitled ‘Between the Layers’, which was created as a graduation project. The collection is made using 3D printing and consists of seven outfits and six pairs of shoes that are made with thermoplastic polyurethane and polylactic acid. The unique pieces in Ganit Goldstein’s fashion collection feature a visual interaction between traditional artistic methods and the dynamic and evolving technologies of artistic expression. Goldstein chose to express this by “fusing additive manufacturing and computer engineering with traditional crafting techniques, such as weaving”, according to her statement. “The technique of 3D layer printing allows me to re-examine which layers can be added and what new connections I can create.” Beautiful ánd waste -averse During her time in an university exchange program in Japan, Goldstein began experimenting with up-cycling and reconstruction techniques, shredding a range of second-hand fabrics and industrial textile leftovers and using a traditional Japanese textile technique called IKAT weaving to create captivating designs. Upon her return to Israel, Goldstein started developing a weaving process using an Orginal Prusa i3 Mk3 3D printer and finished off her designs adding hand-woven layers. Alongside her art-meets-technology mix, Goldstein has been devoting attention to the creation of garments, shoes and jewelry pieces that are not only beautiful but also sustainable and waste-averse. The technique of 3D printing in fashion is a great sustainable tool. “With this technique, we are able to choose exactly which materials to print and how much we need, as well as the precise pattern we want to obtain, without incurring unneeded waste, a notion that is both empowering and impactful,” Goldstein says. The future of 3D printing: personalized and one-of-a-kind Looking ahead, Goldstein says she would like to further explore the use of recycled plastics. “Creating designs from recycled plastic is an ever-growing interest of mine and I would like to create a growing number of designs that utilize this material,” she says. Goldstein has recently been touring the world with her collection of 3D printed clothing and shoes. She predicts that 3D printed fashion “will change the way people design and wear clothes. ‘Personalized’, ‘one-of-a-kind’ pieces that are specifically created for one single person are the future of 3D printed fashion.” Other Israeli 3 D printed fashion pioneers to watch Israel’s forward-looking innovation in the field of 3D printed fashion is inspirational and some creative ideas by a number of Israeli talents have already garnered international attention. Designer Danit Peleg created the world’s first entirely 3D printed fashion collection, which included five full outfits that took over 2,000 hours to print. Noa Raviv, whose work has been displayed in the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art, created a 3D print collection by manipulating digital images using computer modelling software. Israeli textile designer Eden Saadon used a 3D printing pen for a lacy lingerie collection. Also, Nitzan Kish attracted media attention. She has been using 3D tech to create uniquely shaped clothing and jewellery with a special purpose in mind – self-defence, specifically in urban environments. 3D printing can and will be the future in fashion, especially according to the innovative fashion designers in Israel. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Israeli 3D printed fashion as sustainable works of art
Israeli 3D printed fashion as sustainable works of art
Sustainable fashion (in sport): the necessary step
Nowadays lots of people are getting a more sustainable mindset: they eat organic food, drive electric cars and buy second hand clothing. There is still a very long way to go, but let’s face it: the topic is hot. Many brands wants to get in the sustainable hype. It does not take a genius to see that a lot of companies acting green are actually just green washing. This seems like a bad thing, but it still does some part of the trick: creating the right mindset. Which of course is needed for the right actions. Sustainable fashion Like many other industries, fashion is making great steps in getting more sustainable. Also in fashion we see a lot of greenwashing (not calling names here). Usually the smaller brands are the ones that are really fair and sustainable. And also the ones who are very inovatif in ways to become sustainable. Like ( this article ) which shows perfect examples of looking further than the standard ways to go. Sportswear Were some parts of fashion are leading on the topic of fair fashion, baby clothing is one of them, some parts are tragically behind. An example of this is the sportswear industry. Thinking about this makes it a little ironic. Most people who are passionate about sports are very committed to mother nature. Running, climbing, swimming, ice skating, and so forth. Why is their apparel not sustainable? There are plenty of beautiful options for creating sustainable sportswear (like discussed here ). Recycled polyester When looking at sportswear the first thing to notice is that lots of it is from polyester. The image of polyester is getting worse by the day. And for good reason! Everybody knows the terrible images of plastic soups and animals getting killed by it. But besides that, polyester is a beautiful material for sportswear. When used sustainable it is still an option fabric option. Polyester is available in hundreds of different chemical compositions. The most common one is known as RPET. This is the one of which sports fabric is made. And here is the good part: it lends itself perfectly for recycling. The fiber from raw material (from oil) is exactly the same as a recycled fiber. So, why not use all this  plastic waste in our advantage, and create something beautiful from it? Bamboo Another great option for sustainable sportswear is bamboo. It has advantages on two levels: the growing of it and the attributes of it for sports applications. Bamboo is one of the fastest growing plants out there. Some types grow by a meter a day! Also, it needs very little water and can grow where nothing else will, so no forest is needed to clear (like needed for cotton for example). If that is not enough, know that bamboo is resistant of a lot of bugs and diseases, so very little to no pesticides are needed. Of course, this is all very helpful for our already plagued environment. For sportswear, bamboo is excellent in comparing it to other materials. The fabric has great isolation, which makes it warmer when it’s cold, but fresher when its warm. Also, the fabric has great ventilation because of the micro holes in the fiber. When you do sweat, it absorbs moisture very good and also drains it fast. If this is not enough for you, then use it because it is soft as silk and strong as leather! Besides the material There are several other points you need to take into account when talking about sustainable fashion. Of course, these doesn’t just apply for sportswear, but for every item of clothing you produce (and want to do it fair and sustainable). The fashion industry has made a name for itself in treating workers poorly. We all know the sad stories about sweatshops and dangerous working conditions. It goes to far for this article to dig into this matter, but please be aware that just because a t-shirt is made from bamboo, it is not necessarily sustainable. There is plenty to go on for your own research, just start reading and figuring out what’s important for you! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Nowadays lots of people are getting a more sustainable mindset: they eat organic food, drive electric cars and buy second hand clothing. There is still a very long way to go, but let’s face it: the topic is hot. Many brands wants to get in the sustainable hype. It does not take a genius to see that a lot of companies acting green are actually just green washing. This seems like a bad thing, but it still does some part of the trick: creating the right mindset. Which of course is needed for the right actions. Sustainable fashion Like many other industries, fashion is making great steps in getting more sustainable. Also in fashion we see a lot of greenwashing (not calling names here). Usually the smaller brands are the ones that are really fair and sustainable. And also the ones who are very inovatif in ways to become sustainable. Like ( this article ) which shows perfect examples of looking further than the standard ways to go. Sportswear Were some parts of fashion are leading on the topic of fair fashion, baby clothing is one of them, some parts are tragically behind. An example of this is the sportswear industry. Thinking about this makes it a little ironic. Most people who are passionate about sports are very committed to mother nature. Running, climbing, swimming, ice skating, and so forth. Why is their apparel not sustainable? There are plenty of beautiful options for creating sustainable sportswear (like discussed here ). Recycled polyester When looking at sportswear the first thing to notice is that lots of it is from polyester. The image of polyester is getting worse by the day. And for good reason! Everybody knows the terrible images of plastic soups and animals getting killed by it. But besides that, polyester is a beautiful material for sportswear. When used sustainable it is still an option fabric option. Polyester is available in hundreds of different chemical compositions. The most common one is known as RPET. This is the one of which sports fabric is made. And here is the good part: it lends itself perfectly for recycling. The fiber from raw material (from oil) is exactly the same as a recycled fiber. So, why not use all this  plastic waste in our advantage, and create something beautiful from it? Bamboo Another great option for sustainable sportswear is bamboo. It has advantages on two levels: the growing of it and the attributes of it for sports applications. Bamboo is one of the fastest growing plants out there. Some types grow by a meter a day! Also, it needs very little water and can grow where nothing else will, so no forest is needed to clear (like needed for cotton for example). If that is not enough, know that bamboo is resistant of a lot of bugs and diseases, so very little to no pesticides are needed. Of course, this is all very helpful for our already plagued environment. For sportswear, bamboo is excellent in comparing it to other materials. The fabric has great isolation, which makes it warmer when it’s cold, but fresher when its warm. Also, the fabric has great ventilation because of the micro holes in the fiber. When you do sweat, it absorbs moisture very good and also drains it fast. If this is not enough for you, then use it because it is soft as silk and strong as leather! Besides the material There are several other points you need to take into account when talking about sustainable fashion. Of course, these doesn’t just apply for sportswear, but for every item of clothing you produce (and want to do it fair and sustainable). The fashion industry has made a name for itself in treating workers poorly. We all know the sad stories about sweatshops and dangerous working conditions. It goes to far for this article to dig into this matter, but please be aware that just because a t-shirt is made from bamboo, it is not necessarily sustainable. There is plenty to go on for your own research, just start reading and figuring out what’s important for you! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Sustainable fashion (in sport): the necessary step
Sustainable fashion (in sport): the necessary step
State of Fashion: Searching for the New Luxury
Last month we have already discussed circular fashion, a way of manufacturing and utilising clothes and accessories in a way that will what we wear more environmentally friendly. Today, we would like to introduce you to State of Fashion 2018: Searching for the New Luxury – an exhibition that explores new techniques and technologies that aim to make fashion more sustainable. This exhibition is currently taking place in Arnhem, the Netherlands, a country that, as we discovered in our previous article, is at the forefront of making fashion more sustainable.  It features works by established designers and fashion houses, such as G-Star Raw, Hermes and Vivienne Westwood, as well as upcoming studios like Threeasfour and Algaefabrics. This event aims to rethink what fashion is on a fundamental level and help consumers make better choices in a market that is focused on launching new things as quickly as possible. Why New Luxury? The exhibition explores a new definition of what luxury is – less waste and pollution, more equality, welfare and inclusiveness. According to José Teunissen, the curator of this exhibition, "The new luxury is about imagination and coming up with new ideas, and a new universe that matches better with our daily lives and values. It's about agency and taking control." The future of  sustainable fashion State of Fashion acts as a host to multitude of projects that are focusing on various areas and aspects of fashion and we would like to introduce you to some of the most innovative and interesting ones. First on our list is Funghi Fashion, also known as MycoTex, a project from NEFFA and one of the 5 winners of 2018 Global Change Awards. Like many of us, they were very becoming very aware of the waste that fast fashion creates and they have decided to tackle the problem at its root – quite literally. Funghi Fashion use mycelium – mushroom roots – in combination with their Body-Based modelling process to create perfectly fitting custom garments.  Unlike traditional clothing, these garments do not need to be cut and sewn and their shorter supply chain reduces water usage and eliminates need for chemical and pesticides. But best of all is the fact that after you have worn the garment, you can simply burry it in the ground and it will naturally decompose. This innovative scheme tackles many major concerns that exist in apparel production and we would love to see more designs from Funghi Fashion! Another project that is looking to introduce new materials into the world of fashion is AlgaeFabrics. As the name suggests, they are working on developing a new type of raw textile material from algae. Algae are found in abundance in oceans and lakes and have many amazing properties – they act as a crucial food source for many species, they convert large volumes of  CO2 to oxygen and help clean up the oceans by absorbing waste. However, when they grow excessively, algae can become a nuisance and have a negative impact on water quality and thus local communities. They often get removed from the lakes and burnt, but Tjeerd Veenhoven, the founder of AlgaeFabrics, sees it as a waste. Algae are rich in cellulose, which means that they have a great potential. While this project is still in development, we are sure that it has a great potential and who knows, perhaps this could become the most fashionable material in floating communities of the future? Japanese designer Yuima Nakazato takes a different approach to sustainable fashion. Instead of inventing new materials, he is focusing on developing a new garment construction system called Unit Constructed Textile. His designs are made with panels of fabric called Units that are all connected in a way that allows them to be easily replaced. This unique system lets consumers repair their clothing with ease and make changes to the design, potentially allowing the garments to be handed down over generations. The last company on our list, Fashion 4 Freedom calls themselves “the first socially responsible, ethical and transparent supply chain in Vietnam”. In the recent years there was a lot of controversy surrounding working conditions on many clothing factories and more companies have pledged to conduct more thorough checks of their suppliers. Unfortunately, most companies outsource their production and rely on agents to oversee that process, which makes it hard for them to have full control over day-to-day operations. Fashion 4 Freedom connects companies directly with local artisans, craft and textile villages and partnered companies without the need for middlemen. Their system allows for production of higher quality garments, preservation of many crafts, higher transparency and economic empowerment for the artisans. As the companies have more control and awareness of where and how their garments are manufactured, they will be more willing to share this with the consumers. This is a truly inspiring initiative that benefits many and it would be great to see more companies adopt this approach! What do you think the new luxury should be? Are there any new companies in the fashion industry that you think can make a real change? Share your thoughts with us in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Last month we have already discussed circular fashion, a way of manufacturing and utilising clothes and accessories in a way that will what we wear more environmentally friendly. Today, we would like to introduce you to State of Fashion 2018: Searching for the New Luxury – an exhibition that explores new techniques and technologies that aim to make fashion more sustainable. This exhibition is currently taking place in Arnhem, the Netherlands, a country that, as we discovered in our previous article, is at the forefront of making fashion more sustainable.  It features works by established designers and fashion houses, such as G-Star Raw, Hermes and Vivienne Westwood, as well as upcoming studios like Threeasfour and Algaefabrics. This event aims to rethink what fashion is on a fundamental level and help consumers make better choices in a market that is focused on launching new things as quickly as possible. Why New Luxury? The exhibition explores a new definition of what luxury is – less waste and pollution, more equality, welfare and inclusiveness. According to José Teunissen, the curator of this exhibition, "The new luxury is about imagination and coming up with new ideas, and a new universe that matches better with our daily lives and values. It's about agency and taking control." The future of  sustainable fashion State of Fashion acts as a host to multitude of projects that are focusing on various areas and aspects of fashion and we would like to introduce you to some of the most innovative and interesting ones. First on our list is Funghi Fashion, also known as MycoTex, a project from NEFFA and one of the 5 winners of 2018 Global Change Awards. Like many of us, they were very becoming very aware of the waste that fast fashion creates and they have decided to tackle the problem at its root – quite literally. Funghi Fashion use mycelium – mushroom roots – in combination with their Body-Based modelling process to create perfectly fitting custom garments.  Unlike traditional clothing, these garments do not need to be cut and sewn and their shorter supply chain reduces water usage and eliminates need for chemical and pesticides. But best of all is the fact that after you have worn the garment, you can simply burry it in the ground and it will naturally decompose. This innovative scheme tackles many major concerns that exist in apparel production and we would love to see more designs from Funghi Fashion! Another project that is looking to introduce new materials into the world of fashion is AlgaeFabrics. As the name suggests, they are working on developing a new type of raw textile material from algae. Algae are found in abundance in oceans and lakes and have many amazing properties – they act as a crucial food source for many species, they convert large volumes of  CO2 to oxygen and help clean up the oceans by absorbing waste. However, when they grow excessively, algae can become a nuisance and have a negative impact on water quality and thus local communities. They often get removed from the lakes and burnt, but Tjeerd Veenhoven, the founder of AlgaeFabrics, sees it as a waste. Algae are rich in cellulose, which means that they have a great potential. While this project is still in development, we are sure that it has a great potential and who knows, perhaps this could become the most fashionable material in floating communities of the future? Japanese designer Yuima Nakazato takes a different approach to sustainable fashion. Instead of inventing new materials, he is focusing on developing a new garment construction system called Unit Constructed Textile. His designs are made with panels of fabric called Units that are all connected in a way that allows them to be easily replaced. This unique system lets consumers repair their clothing with ease and make changes to the design, potentially allowing the garments to be handed down over generations. The last company on our list, Fashion 4 Freedom calls themselves “the first socially responsible, ethical and transparent supply chain in Vietnam”. In the recent years there was a lot of controversy surrounding working conditions on many clothing factories and more companies have pledged to conduct more thorough checks of their suppliers. Unfortunately, most companies outsource their production and rely on agents to oversee that process, which makes it hard for them to have full control over day-to-day operations. Fashion 4 Freedom connects companies directly with local artisans, craft and textile villages and partnered companies without the need for middlemen. Their system allows for production of higher quality garments, preservation of many crafts, higher transparency and economic empowerment for the artisans. As the companies have more control and awareness of where and how their garments are manufactured, they will be more willing to share this with the consumers. This is a truly inspiring initiative that benefits many and it would be great to see more companies adopt this approach! What do you think the new luxury should be? Are there any new companies in the fashion industry that you think can make a real change? Share your thoughts with us in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
State of Fashion: Searching for the New Luxury
State of Fashion: Searching for the New Luxury
Circular fashion - sustainability is set to become the biggest trend of the century
For centuries, humans have used clothing as a way to express themselves and underline their status in society. Aristocracy was constantly chasing new rare materials, continuing world exploration made exotic fabrics very sought after and when new emerald green arsenic fabric dye was developed in 1814 in Europe for some it became (quite literally) to die for.  These days fashion became much more attainable. Thanks to the fast fashion trend and clothing giants like Primark, H&M and Zara anyone can look like they stepped right off the runway without spending a fortune. But with clothing prices being so low and fashion changing so often, it can sometimes feel like it is easier to buy a brand new garment rather than fix one that has slight signs of wear. This current “Take-Make-Dispose” system puts pressure on economies around the world, requires consumption of a very significant amount of already-limited resources and increases pollution.  According to Ellen McArthur Foundation, if nothing changes in the way that the current clothing supply chain system operates then by 2050 our non-renewable resource consumption will increase threefold and our oceans will have a whopping 22 million tons of microfiber added to them over the span of the next 32 years. This is something that neither nature nor economy can sustain and luckily many apparel, shoe and accessories manufacturers are already looking to better the industry. So what is circular fashion? Circular fashion is a term that was coined in 2014 and it combines the concepts of circular economy and sustainable fashion. The key principles of circular fashion define a system where wearable items are designed, sourced, produced, used and recycled in such a way that the materials can be reused over and over for production of new items with minimal environmental impact and high degree of social responsibility.  This also means eliminating many toxic materials from our clothing, making sure it will last for a long time and encouraging sharing among multiple users. Over the past 4 years a lot has been done to being the switch to this more sustainable approach. Many big brands have pledged to increase use of recycled textiles and use more sustainable practices and materials. Slowing down fast  fashion H&M is a company that is normally seen as one of the biggest names in fast fashion, however they are actually the ones who have been trying to popularize circular fashion – in fact, they might have been the first ones to use the term! They have committed to following sustainable and ethical practices in every step of the apparel creation process and they offer customers incentives such as discounts for bringing in their old clothing to be reused and recycled. G-Star Raw have also shown their dedication to increasing sustainability and social responsibility throughout their supply chain. They have not only been focusing on their own products, but are collaborating with other companies to help push the industry towards using more environmentally friendly materials and practices. They continue to innovate and one of their most prominent innovations was Bionic Yarn, a comfortable and durable material that is made out of ocean plastic. Not only does this material help find a great use for the plastic that is collected from the ocean, but it also minimizes the release of plastic microfibers back into the oceans. Another company who is trying to make a change is MudJeans. This is a European company that has pioneered a “Lease a Jeans” business model. It is simple: you pick a pair of jeans, pay a monthly fee for a year and then you can either chose to keep the jeans, send them back to MudJeans or lease another pair. The jeans that are returned to the company get recycled and turned into new pieces of clothing. According to MudJeans, their innovative business model and manufacturing technologies help them cut water usage by 78% per pair compared to average jeans manufacturers. New professionals to raise the sustainability bar With such acceleration in adoption of circular fashion, there is a need for more intra- and entrepreneurs who have the skills necessary to build and run businesses with sustainable goals at their core. The Amsterdam Fashion Institute is the first one to offer a Circular Fashion Master’s. According to Leslie Holden, Head of design and of the Master of Fashion Enterprise, this programme is essential to safeguarding the long-term future of the fashion industry. And in the UK the online retail giant Asos has just announced that it will be partnering with London College of Fashion’s Centre for  Sustainable Fashion to run a pilot training programme on circular fashion! The Netherlands is one of the countries that are really set to push the circular fashion movement forward – throughout February and March the first edition of The Circular Fashion Games took place in Eindhoven and Amsterdam. Sponsored by C&A Foundation, this event saw 40 students, scientists, designers and entrepreneurs from different countries present their innovations for the fashion industry, which ranged from new ways to spread awareness of sustainability in fashion to introducing new technologies that would allow use of other materials in textiles. This event helped bring industry leaders together with the new players and from what we’ve heard, one of the winners might be working with G-Star Raw in the future. We are looking forward to the second edition of the Games and are hoping to see it go global! Do you know of other companies in the fashion industry that are introducing interesting sustainable innovations? What changes would you like to see when it comes to how our clothes are made? Share your thoughts and ideas with us in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
For centuries, humans have used clothing as a way to express themselves and underline their status in society. Aristocracy was constantly chasing new rare materials, continuing world exploration made exotic fabrics very sought after and when new emerald green arsenic fabric dye was developed in 1814 in Europe for some it became (quite literally) to die for.  These days fashion became much more attainable. Thanks to the fast fashion trend and clothing giants like Primark, H&M and Zara anyone can look like they stepped right off the runway without spending a fortune. But with clothing prices being so low and fashion changing so often, it can sometimes feel like it is easier to buy a brand new garment rather than fix one that has slight signs of wear. This current “Take-Make-Dispose” system puts pressure on economies around the world, requires consumption of a very significant amount of already-limited resources and increases pollution.  According to Ellen McArthur Foundation, if nothing changes in the way that the current clothing supply chain system operates then by 2050 our non-renewable resource consumption will increase threefold and our oceans will have a whopping 22 million tons of microfiber added to them over the span of the next 32 years. This is something that neither nature nor economy can sustain and luckily many apparel, shoe and accessories manufacturers are already looking to better the industry. So what is circular fashion? Circular fashion is a term that was coined in 2014 and it combines the concepts of circular economy and sustainable fashion. The key principles of circular fashion define a system where wearable items are designed, sourced, produced, used and recycled in such a way that the materials can be reused over and over for production of new items with minimal environmental impact and high degree of social responsibility.  This also means eliminating many toxic materials from our clothing, making sure it will last for a long time and encouraging sharing among multiple users. Over the past 4 years a lot has been done to being the switch to this more sustainable approach. Many big brands have pledged to increase use of recycled textiles and use more sustainable practices and materials. Slowing down fast  fashion H&M is a company that is normally seen as one of the biggest names in fast fashion, however they are actually the ones who have been trying to popularize circular fashion – in fact, they might have been the first ones to use the term! They have committed to following sustainable and ethical practices in every step of the apparel creation process and they offer customers incentives such as discounts for bringing in their old clothing to be reused and recycled. G-Star Raw have also shown their dedication to increasing sustainability and social responsibility throughout their supply chain. They have not only been focusing on their own products, but are collaborating with other companies to help push the industry towards using more environmentally friendly materials and practices. They continue to innovate and one of their most prominent innovations was Bionic Yarn, a comfortable and durable material that is made out of ocean plastic. Not only does this material help find a great use for the plastic that is collected from the ocean, but it also minimizes the release of plastic microfibers back into the oceans. Another company who is trying to make a change is MudJeans. This is a European company that has pioneered a “Lease a Jeans” business model. It is simple: you pick a pair of jeans, pay a monthly fee for a year and then you can either chose to keep the jeans, send them back to MudJeans or lease another pair. The jeans that are returned to the company get recycled and turned into new pieces of clothing. According to MudJeans, their innovative business model and manufacturing technologies help them cut water usage by 78% per pair compared to average jeans manufacturers. New professionals to raise the sustainability bar With such acceleration in adoption of circular fashion, there is a need for more intra- and entrepreneurs who have the skills necessary to build and run businesses with sustainable goals at their core. The Amsterdam Fashion Institute is the first one to offer a Circular Fashion Master’s. According to Leslie Holden, Head of design and of the Master of Fashion Enterprise, this programme is essential to safeguarding the long-term future of the fashion industry. And in the UK the online retail giant Asos has just announced that it will be partnering with London College of Fashion’s Centre for  Sustainable Fashion to run a pilot training programme on circular fashion! The Netherlands is one of the countries that are really set to push the circular fashion movement forward – throughout February and March the first edition of The Circular Fashion Games took place in Eindhoven and Amsterdam. Sponsored by C&A Foundation, this event saw 40 students, scientists, designers and entrepreneurs from different countries present their innovations for the fashion industry, which ranged from new ways to spread awareness of sustainability in fashion to introducing new technologies that would allow use of other materials in textiles. This event helped bring industry leaders together with the new players and from what we’ve heard, one of the winners might be working with G-Star Raw in the future. We are looking forward to the second edition of the Games and are hoping to see it go global! Do you know of other companies in the fashion industry that are introducing interesting sustainable innovations? What changes would you like to see when it comes to how our clothes are made? Share your thoughts and ideas with us in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Circular fashion - sustainability is set to become the biggest trend of the century
Circular fashion - sustainability is set to become the biggest trend of the century
Fashion

Many individuals and brands are now producing clothing and accessories that promote a sustainable lifestyle or otherwise contribute to improve the environment. Read all about the latest efforts to make wearable contributions to the environment.

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