Energy

About: <p>Fossil&nbsp;fuels&nbsp;are non-renewable, they draw on finite resources that will eventually dwindle, becoming too expensive or too environmentally damaging to retrieve. In contrast, the many types of&nbsp;renewable energy&nbsp;resources such as wind and solar&nbsp;energy are constantly replenished and will never run out.<br />Wind turbines and solar panels are an increasingly common sight. But why? What are the benefits of renewable energies and how do they improve our health, environment, and economy?</p> <p>The WhatsOrb category &lsquo;Energy&rsquo; explores and shows the many positive impacts of clean energy, including the benefits of&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/energy/wind">wind</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/energy/solar">solar</a> and&nbsp;geothermal. Next to it critical articles about nuclear and unknown energy sources.</p> <p>If there was an urge to come up with renewable energy forms and to ​​change energy use, it is now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about these topics and share them with the world. How you minimalize your energy consumption, the solar panels you choose and how did you isolate your house. In a nutshell; how to change your and other people&rsquo;s lifestyle.</p> <p>Global sustainability X change, that is what you can do together with WhatsOrb. <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/newsletter/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in it for me</a>?</p>
Close Welcome writers, influencers and dreamers, make the world a greener place
Register here
Forgot password
Forgot password
or
or

Close
Close For sustainability news hunters! The WhatsOrb newsletter!

Receive monthly the newest updates about sustainability from influencers and fellow writers. Cutting edge innovations and global environmental developments.

Close For sustainability news hunters! The WhatsOrb newsletter!

Receive monthly the newest updates about sustainability from influencers and fellow writers. Cutting edge innovations and global environmental developments.

Close Reset password
your profile is 33% complete:
33%
Update profile Close
Close WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-Change

For writers, influencers and dreamers who want to make the world a greener place.

WhatsOrb reaches monthly about 28.000 thousand visitors who want - like you - to make the world a greener place. Share your expertise and all can benefit.

Become an influencer and write and share sustainable news and innovations globally
Are you a writer or do you have ideas about sustainability which you want to share? Register and share your green knowledge and news. WhatsOrb offers you global exposure for your article.

If your article meets certain standards, you receive promotional gains like Facebook promotions and Google Ads advertising.

Energy categorybanner ALL SOLUTIONS

MenuMenu
Wind Turbines: Cheaper, More Efficient. Make Them Telescopic
Wind turbine project the ELICAN is a first-of-its-kind telescopic wind turbine which takes offshore wind turbine technology to the next level. Wind Turbines which are telescopic It is more efficient, faster, and cheaper to build and install into the marine environment because it doesn’t require costly and scarce heavy-lifting vessels. The entire structure, foundation, turbine, and blades are assembled onshore. Recommended:  The First Floating Wind-farm Is Operating In Scotland Photo by: CORDIS Wind Turbines Which Are Telescopic: Construction                                            Wind Turbines: Cheaper, More Efficient. Make Them Telescopic The structure consists of a gravity-based foundation configuration that acts as a floating platform with an integrated auto-lift telescopic (made up of tubular sections designed to slide into one another) tower. All the parts are made of prefabricated concrete panels. The wind turbine is installed atop the tower as the final step before the entire structure is towed to its position out at sea. Recommended:  Wind Turbine From Wood: Made By EAZ-Wind, Netherlands Photo by: CORDIS. Telescopic wind turbine's 'mast' When they are towing the wind turbine out, the telescopic configuration of the tower in its collapsed position brings down the center of gravity. This also allows the bottom foundation to act as a self-stable floating barge temporarily. Once towed to location, the foundation is lowered and ballasted to rest on the seabed. The tower can then be pulled out to its final position utilizing cables and conventional heavy-lift strand jacks lifting the sections one level at a time. The entire process is carried out from a single access platform. Recommended:  Vortex Bladeless Wind Turbine - The Future of Wind Turbines? Wind Turbines: Cheaper, More Efficient It took three years from design to completion of the project. It was co-financed by the European Commission under their Horizon 2020 program for Research and Development, which aims to innovate and design greener types of energy. The program helps finance ground-breaking ideas such as the ELICAN project – ones that will help the EU reach its target to go carbon-neutral by 2050. Photo & Graph by: ELISA/ Esteyco According to Javier Nieto, the Offshore Division Manager at ESTEYCO: The aim is to build bigger and more commercially viable wind turbine farms, which will contain from 50 to 70 constructions each. This target is still a long way off, but the hope is that Europe can lead the way as an innovator on environmental policies and inspire other nations and continents to start going green, sooner, rather than later. The installation costs are reduced by 35% compared to conventional offshore wind turbines, which require all the parts to be assembled at the final location. And the system can be easily scaled up to meet the needs of installing giant next-gen offshore wind turbines, such as the 12MW, when it arrives. Before you go! Recommended:  Gravitricity: Key Energy Storage Or Too Good To Be True? Do you like this article about Gravitricity or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write and publish your own article about wind turbines? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Wind turbine project the ELICAN is a first-of-its-kind telescopic wind turbine which takes offshore wind turbine technology to the next level. Wind Turbines which are telescopic It is more efficient, faster, and cheaper to build and install into the marine environment because it doesn’t require costly and scarce heavy-lifting vessels. The entire structure, foundation, turbine, and blades are assembled onshore. Recommended:  The First Floating Wind-farm Is Operating In Scotland Photo by: CORDIS Wind Turbines Which Are Telescopic: Construction                                            Wind Turbines: Cheaper, More Efficient. Make Them Telescopic The structure consists of a gravity-based foundation configuration that acts as a floating platform with an integrated auto-lift telescopic (made up of tubular sections designed to slide into one another) tower. All the parts are made of prefabricated concrete panels. The wind turbine is installed atop the tower as the final step before the entire structure is towed to its position out at sea. Recommended:  Wind Turbine From Wood: Made By EAZ-Wind, Netherlands Photo by: CORDIS. Telescopic wind turbine's 'mast' When they are towing the wind turbine out, the telescopic configuration of the tower in its collapsed position brings down the center of gravity. This also allows the bottom foundation to act as a self-stable floating barge temporarily. Once towed to location, the foundation is lowered and ballasted to rest on the seabed. The tower can then be pulled out to its final position utilizing cables and conventional heavy-lift strand jacks lifting the sections one level at a time. The entire process is carried out from a single access platform. Recommended:  Vortex Bladeless Wind Turbine - The Future of Wind Turbines? Wind Turbines: Cheaper, More Efficient It took three years from design to completion of the project. It was co-financed by the European Commission under their Horizon 2020 program for Research and Development, which aims to innovate and design greener types of energy. The program helps finance ground-breaking ideas such as the ELICAN project – ones that will help the EU reach its target to go carbon-neutral by 2050. Photo & Graph by: ELISA/ Esteyco According to Javier Nieto, the Offshore Division Manager at ESTEYCO: The aim is to build bigger and more commercially viable wind turbine farms, which will contain from 50 to 70 constructions each. This target is still a long way off, but the hope is that Europe can lead the way as an innovator on environmental policies and inspire other nations and continents to start going green, sooner, rather than later. The installation costs are reduced by 35% compared to conventional offshore wind turbines, which require all the parts to be assembled at the final location. And the system can be easily scaled up to meet the needs of installing giant next-gen offshore wind turbines, such as the 12MW, when it arrives. Before you go! Recommended:  Gravitricity: Key Energy Storage Or Too Good To Be True? Do you like this article about Gravitricity or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write and publish your own article about wind turbines? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Wind Turbines: Cheaper, More Efficient. Make Them Telescopic
Wind Turbines: Cheaper, More Efficient. Make Them Telescopic
Green Hydrogen Power: The Enormous Potential Worldwide
There is an urgent need to reduce CO2: is renewable hydrogen the answer to our CO2 problems? Hydrogen is versatile: it can be used for heating, power, and transportation and, therefore, in many industries. The worldwide potential of renewable hydrogen is huge: which country will step up to be the leading green hydrogen economy? National Hydrogen And Fuel Cell Day National Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Day. A clean and sustainable future for everyone! In the United States, October 8 is National Hydrogen And Full Cell Day (fun fact – this aptly chosen date stands for the atomic weight of hydrogen, which is 1.008). This National Day is still little-known, but not only scientists seem to celebrate Hydrogen Day. What is hydrogen and fuel cells? A fuel cell is a device that converts chemical potential energy (energy stored in molecular bonds) into electrical energy. A PEM (Proton Exchange Membrane) cell uses hydrogen gas (H2) and oxygen gas (O2) as fuel. The products of the reaction in the cell are water, electricity, and heat. This year, French industrial giant Air Liquide revealed their plans to build a new plant that produces renewable liquid hydrogen in Las Vegas, Nevada, which ´will have a production capacity of 30 tons of liquid hydrogen a day. ‘Air Liquide is committed to producing hydrogen to meet the renewable requirements of the mobility market in California’. Recommended:  Hydrogen-Powered Tug Launched In Antwerp: Unique In Belgium Green Hydrogen Power: Supply Is Only Half Of The Equation The announcement adds to the sense of a trend in the emerging sector. "Green hydrogen seems like it’s at some sort of possible inflection," said Ben Gallagher, an expert on carbon and emerging technology at Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables. "There’s definitely something in the air." Although hydrogen is still in its infancy, this hydrogen trend could turn into a global phenomenon. Investors and policymakers are starting to get triggered. More and more countries expressed interested in green hydrogen: the potential of the element is seen worldwide. There is an urgent need to reduce CO2 and renewable hydrogen could be the answer – at least according to these nine countries. {youtube}                                           Green Hydrogen Economy: The Enormous Potential Worldwide                                                 Energy Storage in Hydrogen : Does this beat batteries? Australia Steps Up It’s Participation In The Hydrogen Market The green hydrogen is not that big of a hype in Australia - yet. The country is planning to replace fossil fuel export with an alternative: for Japan, perhaps? "Generally, we’d be looking for a country that is an energy importer and is seeking a low-emission fuel,” said Paul Graham, energy flagship chief economist at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, to Green Tech Media . Canada: Green Hydrogen And Fuel Cells Canada Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association The Great White North not only wants to produce the hydrogen gas but wants to manufacture fuel cells. Canada is well-positioned to benefit from growing international demand for hydrogen and fuel cells. Canada has a hydrogen and fuel cell sector that thrives in export markets and that include global leader Ballard Power Systems. France: Green Hydrogen A Rage In France, hydrogen is al well-known word, as then-Minister Hulot plight to put France in the driver seat of the world green hydrogen market – and invested 100 million euro in technology to do so. Hulot resigned, but the will of France to get in that driver seat has not lessened. It’s first hydrogen-power passenger bus was unveiled in Houdain, for example. R ecommended:  Solar And Hydrogen Boats Win The Future: France, Monaco Germany: Hydrogen Power Applications Germany, already a big player in the green hydrogen market, has unveiled a new plan to invest in research labs for a budget of 100 million euros. Managing director at FNB Gas, Inga Posch, said: "Hydrogen is one of the hottest topics in the energy transition in the country at the moment." What are Hydrogen applications Hydrogen is used in various in industrial applications; these include metalworking (primarily in metal alloying), flat glass production (hydrogen used as an inerting or protective gas), the electronics industry (used as a protective and carrier gas, in deposition processes, for cleaning, in etching, in reduction Japan: Most Advanced Green Hydrogen Market With manufacturers as Honda and Toyota, Japan takes the lead in hydrogen fuel cell transportation development and has the most advanced green hydrogen market. Also, the government revealed plans to set up 10,000 refuelling stations over the next decade. Norway: Hydrogen And Hydropower After the world’s first accident in a hydrogen filling station (in which two people were injured), Norway still holds on to its pioneer position in the hydrogen market. After the accident happened, Nel Hydrogen did everything to prevent the happening from becoming an obstruction for commercialization. Japan is thinking of importing Norwegian wind and gas by sea in the form of liquid hydrogen. This could also be interesting for Europe, and at the same time offer Norway new prospects for exports. South Korea: Ambitious Hydrogen Plans In South Korea, The South Korean government planned to have 850.000 fuel cell vehicles by 2050, but an explosion in a research facility where two people were killed and six were injured, nourished concerns. U.K.: Wind market And Green Hydrogen For the U.K., hydrogen is a way to make the heating sector greener, as well to reduce gas imports – which is a plus for the country, nowadays. The U.K. is blessed with a vast wind market, and the government plans to invest 12 billion pounds in using four gigawatts of offshore wind for renewable hydrogen production. U.S.: California World-Leading Market For a country where National Hydrogen Day is celebrated, you would expect more of the green hydrogen development. Luckily, California has a massive interest in hydrogen:  it can help the state with its callosal decarbonization targets. Of course, with a little help from its high-profile technology developers in Silicon Valley – California is leading in the hydrogen market.  Before you go! Recommended:  Solar And Hydrogen Boats Win The Future: France, Monaco Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about Green Hydrogen? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
There is an urgent need to reduce CO2: is renewable hydrogen the answer to our CO2 problems? Hydrogen is versatile: it can be used for heating, power, and transportation and, therefore, in many industries. The worldwide potential of renewable hydrogen is huge: which country will step up to be the leading green hydrogen economy? National Hydrogen And Fuel Cell Day National Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Day. A clean and sustainable future for everyone! In the United States, October 8 is National Hydrogen And Full Cell Day (fun fact – this aptly chosen date stands for the atomic weight of hydrogen, which is 1.008). This National Day is still little-known, but not only scientists seem to celebrate Hydrogen Day. What is hydrogen and fuel cells? A fuel cell is a device that converts chemical potential energy (energy stored in molecular bonds) into electrical energy. A PEM (Proton Exchange Membrane) cell uses hydrogen gas (H2) and oxygen gas (O2) as fuel. The products of the reaction in the cell are water, electricity, and heat. This year, French industrial giant Air Liquide revealed their plans to build a new plant that produces renewable liquid hydrogen in Las Vegas, Nevada, which ´will have a production capacity of 30 tons of liquid hydrogen a day. ‘Air Liquide is committed to producing hydrogen to meet the renewable requirements of the mobility market in California’. Recommended:  Hydrogen-Powered Tug Launched In Antwerp: Unique In Belgium Green Hydrogen Power: Supply Is Only Half Of The Equation The announcement adds to the sense of a trend in the emerging sector. "Green hydrogen seems like it’s at some sort of possible inflection," said Ben Gallagher, an expert on carbon and emerging technology at Wood Mackenzie Power & Renewables. "There’s definitely something in the air." Although hydrogen is still in its infancy, this hydrogen trend could turn into a global phenomenon. Investors and policymakers are starting to get triggered. More and more countries expressed interested in green hydrogen: the potential of the element is seen worldwide. There is an urgent need to reduce CO2 and renewable hydrogen could be the answer – at least according to these nine countries. {youtube}                                           Green Hydrogen Economy: The Enormous Potential Worldwide                                                 Energy Storage in Hydrogen : Does this beat batteries? Australia Steps Up It’s Participation In The Hydrogen Market The green hydrogen is not that big of a hype in Australia - yet. The country is planning to replace fossil fuel export with an alternative: for Japan, perhaps? "Generally, we’d be looking for a country that is an energy importer and is seeking a low-emission fuel,” said Paul Graham, energy flagship chief economist at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, to Green Tech Media . Canada: Green Hydrogen And Fuel Cells Canada Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association The Great White North not only wants to produce the hydrogen gas but wants to manufacture fuel cells. Canada is well-positioned to benefit from growing international demand for hydrogen and fuel cells. Canada has a hydrogen and fuel cell sector that thrives in export markets and that include global leader Ballard Power Systems. France: Green Hydrogen A Rage In France, hydrogen is al well-known word, as then-Minister Hulot plight to put France in the driver seat of the world green hydrogen market – and invested 100 million euro in technology to do so. Hulot resigned, but the will of France to get in that driver seat has not lessened. It’s first hydrogen-power passenger bus was unveiled in Houdain, for example. R ecommended:  Solar And Hydrogen Boats Win The Future: France, Monaco Germany: Hydrogen Power Applications Germany, already a big player in the green hydrogen market, has unveiled a new plan to invest in research labs for a budget of 100 million euros. Managing director at FNB Gas, Inga Posch, said: "Hydrogen is one of the hottest topics in the energy transition in the country at the moment." What are Hydrogen applications Hydrogen is used in various in industrial applications; these include metalworking (primarily in metal alloying), flat glass production (hydrogen used as an inerting or protective gas), the electronics industry (used as a protective and carrier gas, in deposition processes, for cleaning, in etching, in reduction Japan: Most Advanced Green Hydrogen Market With manufacturers as Honda and Toyota, Japan takes the lead in hydrogen fuel cell transportation development and has the most advanced green hydrogen market. Also, the government revealed plans to set up 10,000 refuelling stations over the next decade. Norway: Hydrogen And Hydropower After the world’s first accident in a hydrogen filling station (in which two people were injured), Norway still holds on to its pioneer position in the hydrogen market. After the accident happened, Nel Hydrogen did everything to prevent the happening from becoming an obstruction for commercialization. Japan is thinking of importing Norwegian wind and gas by sea in the form of liquid hydrogen. This could also be interesting for Europe, and at the same time offer Norway new prospects for exports. South Korea: Ambitious Hydrogen Plans In South Korea, The South Korean government planned to have 850.000 fuel cell vehicles by 2050, but an explosion in a research facility where two people were killed and six were injured, nourished concerns. U.K.: Wind market And Green Hydrogen For the U.K., hydrogen is a way to make the heating sector greener, as well to reduce gas imports – which is a plus for the country, nowadays. The U.K. is blessed with a vast wind market, and the government plans to invest 12 billion pounds in using four gigawatts of offshore wind for renewable hydrogen production. U.S.: California World-Leading Market For a country where National Hydrogen Day is celebrated, you would expect more of the green hydrogen development. Luckily, California has a massive interest in hydrogen:  it can help the state with its callosal decarbonization targets. Of course, with a little help from its high-profile technology developers in Silicon Valley – California is leading in the hydrogen market.  Before you go! Recommended:  Solar And Hydrogen Boats Win The Future: France, Monaco Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about Green Hydrogen? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Green Hydrogen Power: The Enormous Potential Worldwide
Green Hydrogen Power: The Enormous Potential Worldwide
Green Energy Which Is Not Renewable: Who’s Afraid Of Thorium
Green energy and renewable energy are too often used in the same breath. That is to say, if someone mentions the concept of green energy, they often refer to renewable sources like wind, solar and wave energy. It has created the false illusion that all green energy initiatives are renewable, and that all renewable energy sources are green. Long story short: not necessarily the case. Green Energy: Wind Turbines And Solar  In a similar sense, the term carbon-free is not exclusively reserved for renewables. There are several energy sources that are not-renewable, but definitely carbon-free. This makes them great - and not frequently talked about - alternatives for the famed wind turbines and solar panels. Obviously, the fact that they cannot be renewed means that they are not the all-inclusive solution to our current problem, nor can they be exclusively relied upon to power the growing demands of the world. What that means to say is that renewables should always be a part of the energy mix. Yet they hold downsides, including the large energy requirements for the build, maintenance and storage. Furthermore, the amount of square footage required to build enough windmills and solar panels is substantial, meaning that either ground will have to be acquired or people will have to be encouraged to build it on their land. Recommended:  Vortex Bladeless Wind Turbine - The Future of Wind Turbines? Nuclear Energy Has A Bad Rep For No Real Reason It is about time that we stop referring to renewables as the only green source. It is unlikely that they will ever be generating sufficient energy for all of us, so the search for other green energy sources should never cease. Some are staring us right in the face, like nuclear energy. Over the past century, this form of energy generation has saved the atmosphere from millions and millions of tonnes of CO2 being emitted into it. Yet it is still suffering from a pretty bad rep. Bumper cars, Chernobyl Most people will instantly mention ‘Chernobyl’ or ‘Fukushima’, making the dangers of a potential meltdown seem much larger than they actually are. With the proper precautions and warning mechanisms, I dare say that fears for a second Chernobyl have been reduced to mere figments of the mind. Yet the public opinion matters, and that opinion is pretty loud and clear - we do not want more nuclear waste, nor do we want to live next to a nuclear reactor. Recommended:  Nuclear Power: Will It Destroy Or Save The World? There might be a solution. Although it is not yet implemented anywhere in the world due to its priciness and complexity, there might be a way of splitting atoms without the waste, meltdowns and costs associated with building and maintaining the reactors. Green Energy Which Is Not Renewable: SMR Nuclear Is Ideal Yes, it does have nuclear in the name. This might already lose some interest of some, but try to bear with me, as it might be the nuclear implementation that we have been waiting for. SMRs, or Small Modular Reactors, could be the solution. In particular Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactors, or LFTRs, are showing great promise - in theory, that is. Thorium is an element on the periodic table of elements that is just two behind uranium. This makes it a weakly radioactive substance - with the upside that it is much more abundant than its radioactive brother. A golf ball-sized bit of thorium could, theoretically, power a small city for several decades. After that it cannot be re-used, hence the non-renewable part - but that really kind of pales in comparison to its upsides. Recommended:  Climate Change Halted By Nuclear Reactors: Fission, Fusion Green Energy: Technical Details Of Thorium Power {youtube}                                                               Thorium and the Future of Nuclear Energy The LFTR resembles an ‘ordinary’ reactor, although there are some technical differences. Thorium-232 and uranium-233 are mixed with fluoride salts in the reactor core. During the fission, the released heat and neutrons are absorbed by the salt surrounding it. This leads to the creation of a uranium-233 isotope, with thorium-232 taking on an additional neutron. Next, the salt melts and is used to heat gasses like helium, which power a turbine - and generate electricity. There is no waste. The uranium is separated from the salt after the process, and then re-used in the core. Another benefit is the lower costs for the commissioning of the thorium reactor: the salts are about $150/kg and the thorium some $30/kg. This price is likely to go down if thorium becomes popular, as it is abundantly available in the earth’s crust. The world’s supply of thorium can power a large number of LFTRs for thousands of years. Not quite renewable, but pretty close. More arguments for those who need convincing: thorium can be used in its natural state, so no expensive processing is required. And the fuel used in the LFTR will almost completely be re-consumed by the reactor, making it clean and low-waste. Not Renewable: Why SMR Nuclear Is Safer Than Traditional So, there is significantly less radioactive waste. Separated uranium can be re-used in the fission process, while the fluoride salts have a high boiling point, eliminating the need for high-pressure water coolants. This high boiling point, combined with the design of LFTRs to work as low-pressure systems, means that the reactors are much more stable and less susceptible to incidents. Combine this with the failsafe shutdown sequence, where an overheated core will trigger a gravity-enabled passive response. The radiated salt will be sent into an underground containment chamber while the reactor is powering down. This makes it extremely safe: you just can’t argue with gravity. Not Renewable: The Downsides No energy source comes without its flaws. While the concept of thorium-based energy sounds great in practice, opponents will argue that it is as of yet untested, not commercially viable, and - most importantly - still nuclear. The safety arguments for this technology seem valid, although they have not been tested in real life. This really forms the major concern, with much-needed research on the necessary materials missing and the processing facilities for the used salts still a rough concept drawn up in explorative papers but nowhere near viable construction. The argument of it still being nuclear should not be overlooked either. Nuclear means that, theoretically, waste could be stolen and used to create deadly nuclear weapons or wreak all other sorts of havoc on the world. Although it has not been proven that LFTR reactors will have waste that could be used for this purpose, proper safely and security measures will be a must if we are to go through with this. Recommended:  Nuclear Floating Power Plants: A Floating Chernobyl: Russia Green Energy Which Is Not Renewable: What’s Next? Once again, let me reiterate that I do not believe that thorium-based energy will solve all of our problems. As mentioned before, it is all about getting that energy mix right. We can and must invest in renewable sources, regardless of their intermittent nature - and fill up the gaps with clean and green non-renewable sources. All energy sources bring along their own set of problems, which makes the balancing of the mix even more complicated. Recommended:  The Artificial Sun Is Heating Up: Nuclear Fusion On Earth Yet the best we can do now is figure out how to make the most out of non-renewable green sources, even if that means diving in the deep with previously untested sources. Before you go! Recommended:  Gravitricity: Fast, Versatile Energy Storage Solution, UK Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about energy storage? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Green energy and renewable energy are too often used in the same breath. That is to say, if someone mentions the concept of green energy, they often refer to renewable sources like wind, solar and wave energy. It has created the false illusion that all green energy initiatives are renewable, and that all renewable energy sources are green. Long story short: not necessarily the case. Green Energy: Wind Turbines And Solar  In a similar sense, the term carbon-free is not exclusively reserved for renewables. There are several energy sources that are not-renewable, but definitely carbon-free. This makes them great - and not frequently talked about - alternatives for the famed wind turbines and solar panels. Obviously, the fact that they cannot be renewed means that they are not the all-inclusive solution to our current problem, nor can they be exclusively relied upon to power the growing demands of the world. What that means to say is that renewables should always be a part of the energy mix. Yet they hold downsides, including the large energy requirements for the build, maintenance and storage. Furthermore, the amount of square footage required to build enough windmills and solar panels is substantial, meaning that either ground will have to be acquired or people will have to be encouraged to build it on their land. Recommended:  Vortex Bladeless Wind Turbine - The Future of Wind Turbines? Nuclear Energy Has A Bad Rep For No Real Reason It is about time that we stop referring to renewables as the only green source. It is unlikely that they will ever be generating sufficient energy for all of us, so the search for other green energy sources should never cease. Some are staring us right in the face, like nuclear energy. Over the past century, this form of energy generation has saved the atmosphere from millions and millions of tonnes of CO2 being emitted into it. Yet it is still suffering from a pretty bad rep. Bumper cars, Chernobyl Most people will instantly mention ‘Chernobyl’ or ‘Fukushima’, making the dangers of a potential meltdown seem much larger than they actually are. With the proper precautions and warning mechanisms, I dare say that fears for a second Chernobyl have been reduced to mere figments of the mind. Yet the public opinion matters, and that opinion is pretty loud and clear - we do not want more nuclear waste, nor do we want to live next to a nuclear reactor. Recommended:  Nuclear Power: Will It Destroy Or Save The World? There might be a solution. Although it is not yet implemented anywhere in the world due to its priciness and complexity, there might be a way of splitting atoms without the waste, meltdowns and costs associated with building and maintaining the reactors. Green Energy Which Is Not Renewable: SMR Nuclear Is Ideal Yes, it does have nuclear in the name. This might already lose some interest of some, but try to bear with me, as it might be the nuclear implementation that we have been waiting for. SMRs, or Small Modular Reactors, could be the solution. In particular Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactors, or LFTRs, are showing great promise - in theory, that is. Thorium is an element on the periodic table of elements that is just two behind uranium. This makes it a weakly radioactive substance - with the upside that it is much more abundant than its radioactive brother. A golf ball-sized bit of thorium could, theoretically, power a small city for several decades. After that it cannot be re-used, hence the non-renewable part - but that really kind of pales in comparison to its upsides. Recommended:  Climate Change Halted By Nuclear Reactors: Fission, Fusion Green Energy: Technical Details Of Thorium Power {youtube}                                                               Thorium and the Future of Nuclear Energy The LFTR resembles an ‘ordinary’ reactor, although there are some technical differences. Thorium-232 and uranium-233 are mixed with fluoride salts in the reactor core. During the fission, the released heat and neutrons are absorbed by the salt surrounding it. This leads to the creation of a uranium-233 isotope, with thorium-232 taking on an additional neutron. Next, the salt melts and is used to heat gasses like helium, which power a turbine - and generate electricity. There is no waste. The uranium is separated from the salt after the process, and then re-used in the core. Another benefit is the lower costs for the commissioning of the thorium reactor: the salts are about $150/kg and the thorium some $30/kg. This price is likely to go down if thorium becomes popular, as it is abundantly available in the earth’s crust. The world’s supply of thorium can power a large number of LFTRs for thousands of years. Not quite renewable, but pretty close. More arguments for those who need convincing: thorium can be used in its natural state, so no expensive processing is required. And the fuel used in the LFTR will almost completely be re-consumed by the reactor, making it clean and low-waste. Not Renewable: Why SMR Nuclear Is Safer Than Traditional So, there is significantly less radioactive waste. Separated uranium can be re-used in the fission process, while the fluoride salts have a high boiling point, eliminating the need for high-pressure water coolants. This high boiling point, combined with the design of LFTRs to work as low-pressure systems, means that the reactors are much more stable and less susceptible to incidents. Combine this with the failsafe shutdown sequence, where an overheated core will trigger a gravity-enabled passive response. The radiated salt will be sent into an underground containment chamber while the reactor is powering down. This makes it extremely safe: you just can’t argue with gravity. Not Renewable: The Downsides No energy source comes without its flaws. While the concept of thorium-based energy sounds great in practice, opponents will argue that it is as of yet untested, not commercially viable, and - most importantly - still nuclear. The safety arguments for this technology seem valid, although they have not been tested in real life. This really forms the major concern, with much-needed research on the necessary materials missing and the processing facilities for the used salts still a rough concept drawn up in explorative papers but nowhere near viable construction. The argument of it still being nuclear should not be overlooked either. Nuclear means that, theoretically, waste could be stolen and used to create deadly nuclear weapons or wreak all other sorts of havoc on the world. Although it has not been proven that LFTR reactors will have waste that could be used for this purpose, proper safely and security measures will be a must if we are to go through with this. Recommended:  Nuclear Floating Power Plants: A Floating Chernobyl: Russia Green Energy Which Is Not Renewable: What’s Next? Once again, let me reiterate that I do not believe that thorium-based energy will solve all of our problems. As mentioned before, it is all about getting that energy mix right. We can and must invest in renewable sources, regardless of their intermittent nature - and fill up the gaps with clean and green non-renewable sources. All energy sources bring along their own set of problems, which makes the balancing of the mix even more complicated. Recommended:  The Artificial Sun Is Heating Up: Nuclear Fusion On Earth Yet the best we can do now is figure out how to make the most out of non-renewable green sources, even if that means diving in the deep with previously untested sources. Before you go! Recommended:  Gravitricity: Fast, Versatile Energy Storage Solution, UK Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about energy storage? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Green Energy Which Is Not Renewable: Who’s Afraid Of Thorium
Green Energy Which Is Not Renewable: Who’s Afraid Of Thorium
Green Energy: Old Watermills Become Hydro Power Turbines
Hydropower Small Scale: Sustainable Way of Generating Energy. As we all know hydropower is capable of producing enormous amounts of electric energy. In some places it is less harmful than in others. Hydro Power Turbines: Large Scale From large scale hydro power the side effects are evident as stated in the contribution of Peter Sant: The harrowing consequences of 'sustainable' hydropower plants. The loss of habitat for various species is evident. Beside that fish get killed in the turbines. So why does hydropower have such an aura of sustainability? Recommended:  Sustainable Hydro-Power Plants Contribute To Climate Change First of all, water is always flowing. The hydropower plants don’t produce CO2 and the live span of hydroelectric installations is several decades. Besides that, hydropower is very effective: around 70-80% of the potential energy is converted in electricity. And they run at full power around 80% of the year. So, the materials used for fabricating the plant is more effective than any other energy resource. Martin Eillebrecht and Peter Vree working at a water mill With these advantages and the possible drawbacks in mind Gratia Hydro found the way to bring hydropower back to the people. As it was in the 19 th century and before. When inhabiting North America settlers would build water mills to saw lumber, grind corn or extract oil form linseed. These  are the installations that got abandoned when cheap electrical power came abundant in the 20 th century. But we can restore these old water mills and make them to use for our 21 st century life. Without destruction. Without losing habitat. Without killing fish and other water fauna. But in harmony with nature. With respect for historical heritage. Showing our children where energy comes from and what enormous forces are at work. Recommended:  Green Energy: The WaveRoller Sustainable Clean Ocean Power But restoring an old water mill is expensive. You should think of 1.000 $/€ per installed kW of power. Most time too expensive for a mill owner. And when you have the installation restored you would generate to much electricity for your own use. With that in mind there were two possibilities which are widespread. One: burn the electricity in electric heaters. Two: sell it 'on' the grid. Burning electricity in an electric heater is very efficient from a physical point of view, but a waste of a highly valuable energy carrier.  {youtube}                                                                             Water Mill Generator Selling it to the grid gives the mill owner a sort of income, but revenue is small since the naked price for green electricity is a few cents; way less that you would pay as a consumer due to grid costs, energy tax and VAT.  Recommended:  Solar Canopies Supply Shade Electricity And Filter Rainwater The solution is as simple as sustainable; both form CO2 perspective as for communities: restore old watermills together and make use of the electric energy in your car. When you would have a plug out car (like the Sion from Sono Motors) you can harvest your electricity at the mill and take it to your home. And not only you. You do that together with 10 other households, thus creating a sustainable community. Recommended:  Solar Sono Motors Car: Developed in Germany, Made In Sweden You might be connected to the grid for stability and a place to get rid of the excessive energy, but the majority of the electricity comes right to the participants without gird transport costs, energy tax and VAT. Like that restoring a small water mill is still expensive, but the return on investment is as high. Depending on local tax rules the payback time is between 6 and 12 years for a typical 5 kW mill. And after that you can still use it for the next 50 to 100 years. That is Sustainability as it should be. Contact: Gratia Hydro Micro Hydroelectricity Before you go! Recommended:  Energy Miracle Algae. 10.000 Barrels A Day, Less CO2: 2025 Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about water mills? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Hydropower Small Scale: Sustainable Way of Generating Energy. As we all know hydropower is capable of producing enormous amounts of electric energy. In some places it is less harmful than in others. Hydro Power Turbines: Large Scale From large scale hydro power the side effects are evident as stated in the contribution of Peter Sant: The harrowing consequences of 'sustainable' hydropower plants. The loss of habitat for various species is evident. Beside that fish get killed in the turbines. So why does hydropower have such an aura of sustainability? Recommended:  Sustainable Hydro-Power Plants Contribute To Climate Change First of all, water is always flowing. The hydropower plants don’t produce CO2 and the live span of hydroelectric installations is several decades. Besides that, hydropower is very effective: around 70-80% of the potential energy is converted in electricity. And they run at full power around 80% of the year. So, the materials used for fabricating the plant is more effective than any other energy resource. Martin Eillebrecht and Peter Vree working at a water mill With these advantages and the possible drawbacks in mind Gratia Hydro found the way to bring hydropower back to the people. As it was in the 19 th century and before. When inhabiting North America settlers would build water mills to saw lumber, grind corn or extract oil form linseed. These  are the installations that got abandoned when cheap electrical power came abundant in the 20 th century. But we can restore these old water mills and make them to use for our 21 st century life. Without destruction. Without losing habitat. Without killing fish and other water fauna. But in harmony with nature. With respect for historical heritage. Showing our children where energy comes from and what enormous forces are at work. Recommended:  Green Energy: The WaveRoller Sustainable Clean Ocean Power But restoring an old water mill is expensive. You should think of 1.000 $/€ per installed kW of power. Most time too expensive for a mill owner. And when you have the installation restored you would generate to much electricity for your own use. With that in mind there were two possibilities which are widespread. One: burn the electricity in electric heaters. Two: sell it 'on' the grid. Burning electricity in an electric heater is very efficient from a physical point of view, but a waste of a highly valuable energy carrier.  {youtube}                                                                             Water Mill Generator Selling it to the grid gives the mill owner a sort of income, but revenue is small since the naked price for green electricity is a few cents; way less that you would pay as a consumer due to grid costs, energy tax and VAT.  Recommended:  Solar Canopies Supply Shade Electricity And Filter Rainwater The solution is as simple as sustainable; both form CO2 perspective as for communities: restore old watermills together and make use of the electric energy in your car. When you would have a plug out car (like the Sion from Sono Motors) you can harvest your electricity at the mill and take it to your home. And not only you. You do that together with 10 other households, thus creating a sustainable community. Recommended:  Solar Sono Motors Car: Developed in Germany, Made In Sweden You might be connected to the grid for stability and a place to get rid of the excessive energy, but the majority of the electricity comes right to the participants without gird transport costs, energy tax and VAT. Like that restoring a small water mill is still expensive, but the return on investment is as high. Depending on local tax rules the payback time is between 6 and 12 years for a typical 5 kW mill. And after that you can still use it for the next 50 to 100 years. That is Sustainability as it should be. Contact: Gratia Hydro Micro Hydroelectricity Before you go! Recommended:  Energy Miracle Algae. 10.000 Barrels A Day, Less CO2: 2025 Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about water mills? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Green Energy: Old Watermills Become Hydro Power Turbines
Green Energy: Old Watermills Become Hydro Power Turbines
Green Electric Power: A Zero Carbon Global Economy
Is it possible to have a zero-carbon economy in the world? This is only possible if the government is bold enough to pursue a policy that accelerates the production of clean electricity. Can we limit climate change? Looking At The Prospects If we look at the prospects, in the year 2100, the world will enjoy cheap zero-carbon energy. Museums are the only ones that use coal, and the use of gas and oil has drastically reduced. We need a zero-carbon global economy to prevent the potentially catastrophic climate change. Therefore, we need a strategic view and strong policy support. Electricity will be dominating. At this moment, we only use 20 per cent of electricity as energy. Fossil Fuels are the main energy source for transport, for heating and heavy industry. However, all of above could be powered by electricity which would be way more effective. {youtube}                                                      How Close Are We to Zero-Emissions Electricity? Batteries Instead Of Fuel For example, electric engines are far more effective, like for 90 per cent more than internal-combustion engines. Electric motors are easier to produce, it is cheaper, because you need batteries instead of gas, and you will compensate that within five years. So, electric vehicles are less expensive than gasoline or diesel vehicles. Another example, electric heat pumps can deliver more residential heat than a gas boiler (3 kilowatt-hours for one kilowatt of energy input instead of 0,9 kWh for the same input with a gas boiler). Molten salt battery At this moment we cannot rely on batteries only for long-distance flights or intercontinental shipping. We have to wait a few decades because batteries are too heavy to power. It is supposed that ship engines could burn ammonia instead of fuel oil. Ammonia could be a zero-carbon fuel if it is produced from hydrogen. Something to wait for in the future... Recommended:  Solar And Wind Power Makes The Current Sail Cargo Ship The Role Of Hydrogen Hydrogen will have a crucial role in the future in the decarbonization process. You can use hydrogen as a fuel or as an essential chemical input. By 2050, we could create a global economy in which electricity supplies 65-70 per cent of final demand for energy and hydrogen, ammonia or synthetic fuel supplies another 12-15 per cent. By then, fossil fuels and bioenergy would only be about 20 per cent of the total energy use. Could we have a zero-carbon economy? Recommended:  Hydrogen Powered Car That Emits Water No CO2: The Rasa The Benefits Of Using Electricity It would have enormous environmental benefits when using electricity. We could reduce wasted heat, pollution, noise produced by burning fossil fuels. To build this kind of economy, we need about 90,000 TWh, compared to the 23,000 TWh right now. But it has to be produced in a zero-carbon way, and this is almost impossible. We could use solar energy; the costs have decreased, and the sun has enough power to cover humans' daily energy needs 8,000 times. Battery costs have dropped by more than 80 per cent since 2010 and are expected to reduce with a further 50% by 2030. All of this makes it inevitable that we will enough clean and cheap energy. We need to prevent catastrophic climate change. The use of fossil fuels still rises, and global warming is increasing. Recommended:  Fossil Fuel Will Dominate Energy Use Through 2050: Globally Strong Government Policies The macroeconomic cost of such an attempt is not at all discouraging: the total additional investment needed to build a decarbonised economy by 2050 is about 1-1.5 per cent of global GDP per year. But the necessary acceleration will not take place without strong government policies. We can only achieve the goals mentioned above if we acknowledge we need to purify electricity. We need to use hydrogen to have a zero-carbon economy.  It is challenging for governments to set some goals to use more renewable energy. The strategies for road transport should focus on the complete removal of internal combustion engines from our roads by 2050 at the latest. This requires a ban on the sale of new internal combustion engines. Moreover, a carbon price is crucial for industrial decarbonisation to take place economically. Lastly, governments should encourage new technologies with first-time application grants, which have quickly helped reduce the cost of photovoltaic solar technology, wind turbines and batteries. Recommended:  Tiny House With Solar Panels Is Off Grid: The Netherlands Policies like this should help the world to create a zero-carbon economy very quickly. We could limit climate change, but if we do not take the right measures soon enough, it could be too late... Before you go! Recommended:  Renewable Energy Turns CO2 Into Fuel For Hydrogen Batteries Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about clean energy? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Is it possible to have a zero-carbon economy in the world? This is only possible if the government is bold enough to pursue a policy that accelerates the production of clean electricity. Can we limit climate change? Looking At The Prospects If we look at the prospects, in the year 2100, the world will enjoy cheap zero-carbon energy. Museums are the only ones that use coal, and the use of gas and oil has drastically reduced. We need a zero-carbon global economy to prevent the potentially catastrophic climate change. Therefore, we need a strategic view and strong policy support. Electricity will be dominating. At this moment, we only use 20 per cent of electricity as energy. Fossil Fuels are the main energy source for transport, for heating and heavy industry. However, all of above could be powered by electricity which would be way more effective. {youtube}                                                      How Close Are We to Zero-Emissions Electricity? Batteries Instead Of Fuel For example, electric engines are far more effective, like for 90 per cent more than internal-combustion engines. Electric motors are easier to produce, it is cheaper, because you need batteries instead of gas, and you will compensate that within five years. So, electric vehicles are less expensive than gasoline or diesel vehicles. Another example, electric heat pumps can deliver more residential heat than a gas boiler (3 kilowatt-hours for one kilowatt of energy input instead of 0,9 kWh for the same input with a gas boiler). Molten salt battery At this moment we cannot rely on batteries only for long-distance flights or intercontinental shipping. We have to wait a few decades because batteries are too heavy to power. It is supposed that ship engines could burn ammonia instead of fuel oil. Ammonia could be a zero-carbon fuel if it is produced from hydrogen. Something to wait for in the future... Recommended:  Solar And Wind Power Makes The Current Sail Cargo Ship The Role Of Hydrogen Hydrogen will have a crucial role in the future in the decarbonization process. You can use hydrogen as a fuel or as an essential chemical input. By 2050, we could create a global economy in which electricity supplies 65-70 per cent of final demand for energy and hydrogen, ammonia or synthetic fuel supplies another 12-15 per cent. By then, fossil fuels and bioenergy would only be about 20 per cent of the total energy use. Could we have a zero-carbon economy? Recommended:  Hydrogen Powered Car That Emits Water No CO2: The Rasa The Benefits Of Using Electricity It would have enormous environmental benefits when using electricity. We could reduce wasted heat, pollution, noise produced by burning fossil fuels. To build this kind of economy, we need about 90,000 TWh, compared to the 23,000 TWh right now. But it has to be produced in a zero-carbon way, and this is almost impossible. We could use solar energy; the costs have decreased, and the sun has enough power to cover humans' daily energy needs 8,000 times. Battery costs have dropped by more than 80 per cent since 2010 and are expected to reduce with a further 50% by 2030. All of this makes it inevitable that we will enough clean and cheap energy. We need to prevent catastrophic climate change. The use of fossil fuels still rises, and global warming is increasing. Recommended:  Fossil Fuel Will Dominate Energy Use Through 2050: Globally Strong Government Policies The macroeconomic cost of such an attempt is not at all discouraging: the total additional investment needed to build a decarbonised economy by 2050 is about 1-1.5 per cent of global GDP per year. But the necessary acceleration will not take place without strong government policies. We can only achieve the goals mentioned above if we acknowledge we need to purify electricity. We need to use hydrogen to have a zero-carbon economy.  It is challenging for governments to set some goals to use more renewable energy. The strategies for road transport should focus on the complete removal of internal combustion engines from our roads by 2050 at the latest. This requires a ban on the sale of new internal combustion engines. Moreover, a carbon price is crucial for industrial decarbonisation to take place economically. Lastly, governments should encourage new technologies with first-time application grants, which have quickly helped reduce the cost of photovoltaic solar technology, wind turbines and batteries. Recommended:  Tiny House With Solar Panels Is Off Grid: The Netherlands Policies like this should help the world to create a zero-carbon economy very quickly. We could limit climate change, but if we do not take the right measures soon enough, it could be too late... Before you go! Recommended:  Renewable Energy Turns CO2 Into Fuel For Hydrogen Batteries Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about clean energy? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Green Electric Power: A Zero Carbon Global Economy
Green Electric Power: A Zero Carbon Global Economy
Energy

Fossil fuels are non-renewable, they draw on finite resources that will eventually dwindle, becoming too expensive or too environmentally damaging to retrieve. In contrast, the many types of renewable energy resources such as wind and solar energy are constantly replenished and will never run out.
Wind turbines and solar panels are an increasingly common sight. But why? What are the benefits of renewable energies and how do they improve our health, environment, and economy?

The WhatsOrb category ‘Energy’ explores and shows the many positive impacts of clean energy, including the benefits of windsolar and geothermal. Next to it critical articles about nuclear and unknown energy sources.

If there was an urge to come up with renewable energy forms and to ​​change energy use, it is now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about these topics and share them with the world. How you minimalize your energy consumption, the solar panels you choose and how did you isolate your house. In a nutshell; how to change your and other people’s lifestyle.

Global sustainability X change, that is what you can do together with WhatsOrb. What's in it for me?

Get updates on environmental sustainability in your mailbox every month.