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About: <p>A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.</p> <p>We belong to a group of individuals - <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/society">our society</a> - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and&nbsp;<span lang="en" tabindex="0">dependence</span>, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/green-architecture">Green architecture</a> is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build <a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/smart-cities">smart cities</a> where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.</p> <p><a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/lifestyle">Lifestyle</a> is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.</p> <p>If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it&rsquo;s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Global Sustainability X-change, that&rsquo;s what you can do together with WhatsOrb.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whatsorb.com/newsletter/your-shared-sustainable-ideas-make-our-earth-a-better-place">What's in for me?</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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Smart Cities Or Dumb Cities? Let’s Embrace Low Tech
Cities are increasingly focusing on becoming smarter. With the ever continuing urbanisation and the wave of digitisation sweeping across the globe, governments are seeking ways of living up to the extra demand for residential, commercial and industrial areas. At the same time, they are under intense scrutiny for their use of scarce resources and CO2 emissions.   Smart Cities: Cameras, Trackers And Sensors? The puzzle of having to expand cities while becoming greener and more sustainable, seems to have been solved by technology. Creating so-called smart cities, governed by the internet and connected devices, has long thought to be the answer. Unfortunately, if you are looking beyond the flashiness and sophistication of smart trashcans and autonomous people movers, there is a dark side to the smart city movement as well. There is a certain appeal to being dubbed a ‘smart city’, or so most governments seem to think. It appears to be the latest fad amongst mayors and city managers, with start-ups eager to present their latest brainchild that promises to drastically improve city life. Not only does it hit the sweet spot of everyone’s futuristic city dreams, it also solves quite a few notorious headache files. Easier solutions for trash collection and traffic congestion, anyone? Recommended:  Smart Cities, Safe And Efficient, But Are We Being Watched? While there is no consensus yet as to what makes a city smart, there are commonalities. For instance, they extensively use cameras, trackers and sensors to closely monitor whatever is happening in the city - be it on the roads, in the city center, or in hospitals and schools. The generated data is used to not only act on problems, but also to help make predictions about when similar problems are expected to occur in the future and to come up with the best course of action to either prevent or remedy them as soon as possible. The benefits are clear. But there is a clear downside as well. Who owns this data? Who has a right to use and possibly exploit it? What are your rights, as a private citizen, in the light of the privacy vs safety debate? Eventually, the only party that will stand to lose is us, those living in the cities. Smart Cities Or Dumb Cities? Let’s Embrace Low Tech The opposite of smart is dumb. Does this make a city that refuses to incorporate smart technologies a dumb city? Definitely not. At least, not in the meaning most commonly associated with dumb. For most issues that are faced by governmental bodies, there are ‘dumb’ solutions available that will do the job just as well. {youtube}                                                     Smart Cities Or Dumb Cities? Let’s Embrace Low Tech                             Life on the Mekong river in Cambodia. Floating village inhabited by fisherman and fish farmers. While smart cities are becoming huge breathing, living machines that rely on sensors and other input devices - not to mention its reliance on the internet -, they are also becoming vulnerable. When everything is connected to the internet, it could theoretically be accessed by anyone, anywhere. Those with bad intentions will be able to take over control of a city - and it will not be hard to picture what could happen next. Smart Cities Or Dumb Cities? Those with bad intentions will be able to take over control of a city Slightly less dramatic, but still relevant. Technology can break down, sensors can fail. Its operating, updating and maintenance requires a whole new team of, oftentimes expensive, personnel. It also requires a lot of energy, meaning that smart cities will initially have a larger carbon footprint. And this extra energy goes to issues that could be solved using low-tech measures as well. Recommended:  Eco-friendly Sustainable Megacities Clean By Trees: Globally Looking back in history and figuring out how our ancestors used to deal with the issues that we are facing today would be a great start. Progress for the sake of progress is an invalid argument when dismissing ancient methods of keeping our cities clean, dry and safe. And yes, this is probably a controversial claim, and I do not advocate going back to the dirty medieval towns, but there are some things to be learned from ‘how we used to do it’. Things that are not attached to a cable or dependent upon the IT helpdesk. Dumb Cities Are Not Dumb At All In the past, we managed to live together with nature in a harmonious and mutually benefitting relationship. The advance of technology is one of the major reasons why this fragile balance has been broken, with us now taking Mother Nature to the edge of destruction. Going back to a pre-technological age and finding ways of living together with nature, even in cities, does not make a city ‘dumb’. Instead, it makes it more resilient and sustainable. Green urban spaces or urban agriculture are some examples of what dumb cities invest in. They take know-how from the local population, based on tradition and history, and incorporate this in today’s world. Why build a fancy bridge if you can just as easily build one using trees and wood, that actually better withstands humidity and harsh weather elements, as experienced by the people in Northern India? Why not use green roofs, permeable pavements and terraced wetland parks in areas frequently stricken by monsoons - allowing for a better absorption of rainwater, hence preventing floods in a more natural way than expensive pumps? The Chinese already do this, as they have seen the benefits and enjoy the extra nature it brings to their overcrowded cities. Dumb City: Green And Blue Denmark has implemented a similar project in her capital city Copenhagen. Their ‘dumb’ solution for preventing floods is green and blue. They created a number of parks that can, during storms, become lakes. This allows for nature and animal species to thrive, while people enjoy the nature reserve it has created. Dumb City: Green And Blue Copenhagen Similar wetlands have been introduced in India, where the areas also function as cleaners of wastewater. This has proven to be more effective than high-tech sewage treatment, absorbing a bunch of pollution while fostering a lively fishing industry. Florida, Gainsville’s Sweetwater Wetland park Dumb Cities: On Stilts And Floating Makoko, the remarkable town in the African country of Lagos, is taking a different approach in battling rising sea levels. The town, that is home to 80,000 people, is sustainable, solar-fuelled - and on stilts. Rotterdam is working on a similar concept, planning a sustainable floating city. Dumb Cities On Stilts And Floating: Makoko Dumb Cities Have Dumb Airconditioning Another surprising idea that can be found in nature is the alternative it offers for airconditioning, a notorious polluter. Plants are the solution for cooling down on a hot summer day. With more tree cover, temperatures will be considerably lower. Also, green roofs are great for cooling down the buildings they cover.   Frankfurt was named European City of Trees and has approximately 200,000 of them in public spaces around the city. Dumb Cities Are Smart Cities The ‘dumb’ solutions to things that we are trying to make smarter are endless. This goes for virtually anything. Transportation, with the old-fashioned bike or walking shoes being superior low-emission solutions. Or airconditioning and heating, where plant cover can prove highly efficient. With a little effort, it is not hard to find alternatives for sensors, cameras and trackers.   Dumb Cities, Smart Citie: A Root Hangbridge We can make the world a better place if we would try a little harder to go back to the methods that worked in the distant past. If we would move beyond our current issues to a point where they did not exist yet. After all, if generations before us were able to make do without the internet and ‘smart’ solutions, why can’t we? Before you go! Recommended:  Greenest Buildings In The World: Sustainable Highlights Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about green sustainable architecture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Cities are increasingly focusing on becoming smarter. With the ever continuing urbanisation and the wave of digitisation sweeping across the globe, governments are seeking ways of living up to the extra demand for residential, commercial and industrial areas. At the same time, they are under intense scrutiny for their use of scarce resources and CO2 emissions.   Smart Cities: Cameras, Trackers And Sensors? The puzzle of having to expand cities while becoming greener and more sustainable, seems to have been solved by technology. Creating so-called smart cities, governed by the internet and connected devices, has long thought to be the answer. Unfortunately, if you are looking beyond the flashiness and sophistication of smart trashcans and autonomous people movers, there is a dark side to the smart city movement as well. There is a certain appeal to being dubbed a ‘smart city’, or so most governments seem to think. It appears to be the latest fad amongst mayors and city managers, with start-ups eager to present their latest brainchild that promises to drastically improve city life. Not only does it hit the sweet spot of everyone’s futuristic city dreams, it also solves quite a few notorious headache files. Easier solutions for trash collection and traffic congestion, anyone? Recommended:  Smart Cities, Safe And Efficient, But Are We Being Watched? While there is no consensus yet as to what makes a city smart, there are commonalities. For instance, they extensively use cameras, trackers and sensors to closely monitor whatever is happening in the city - be it on the roads, in the city center, or in hospitals and schools. The generated data is used to not only act on problems, but also to help make predictions about when similar problems are expected to occur in the future and to come up with the best course of action to either prevent or remedy them as soon as possible. The benefits are clear. But there is a clear downside as well. Who owns this data? Who has a right to use and possibly exploit it? What are your rights, as a private citizen, in the light of the privacy vs safety debate? Eventually, the only party that will stand to lose is us, those living in the cities. Smart Cities Or Dumb Cities? Let’s Embrace Low Tech The opposite of smart is dumb. Does this make a city that refuses to incorporate smart technologies a dumb city? Definitely not. At least, not in the meaning most commonly associated with dumb. For most issues that are faced by governmental bodies, there are ‘dumb’ solutions available that will do the job just as well. {youtube}                                                     Smart Cities Or Dumb Cities? Let’s Embrace Low Tech                             Life on the Mekong river in Cambodia. Floating village inhabited by fisherman and fish farmers. While smart cities are becoming huge breathing, living machines that rely on sensors and other input devices - not to mention its reliance on the internet -, they are also becoming vulnerable. When everything is connected to the internet, it could theoretically be accessed by anyone, anywhere. Those with bad intentions will be able to take over control of a city - and it will not be hard to picture what could happen next. Smart Cities Or Dumb Cities? Those with bad intentions will be able to take over control of a city Slightly less dramatic, but still relevant. Technology can break down, sensors can fail. Its operating, updating and maintenance requires a whole new team of, oftentimes expensive, personnel. It also requires a lot of energy, meaning that smart cities will initially have a larger carbon footprint. And this extra energy goes to issues that could be solved using low-tech measures as well. Recommended:  Eco-friendly Sustainable Megacities Clean By Trees: Globally Looking back in history and figuring out how our ancestors used to deal with the issues that we are facing today would be a great start. Progress for the sake of progress is an invalid argument when dismissing ancient methods of keeping our cities clean, dry and safe. And yes, this is probably a controversial claim, and I do not advocate going back to the dirty medieval towns, but there are some things to be learned from ‘how we used to do it’. Things that are not attached to a cable or dependent upon the IT helpdesk. Dumb Cities Are Not Dumb At All In the past, we managed to live together with nature in a harmonious and mutually benefitting relationship. The advance of technology is one of the major reasons why this fragile balance has been broken, with us now taking Mother Nature to the edge of destruction. Going back to a pre-technological age and finding ways of living together with nature, even in cities, does not make a city ‘dumb’. Instead, it makes it more resilient and sustainable. Green urban spaces or urban agriculture are some examples of what dumb cities invest in. They take know-how from the local population, based on tradition and history, and incorporate this in today’s world. Why build a fancy bridge if you can just as easily build one using trees and wood, that actually better withstands humidity and harsh weather elements, as experienced by the people in Northern India? Why not use green roofs, permeable pavements and terraced wetland parks in areas frequently stricken by monsoons - allowing for a better absorption of rainwater, hence preventing floods in a more natural way than expensive pumps? The Chinese already do this, as they have seen the benefits and enjoy the extra nature it brings to their overcrowded cities. Dumb City: Green And Blue Denmark has implemented a similar project in her capital city Copenhagen. Their ‘dumb’ solution for preventing floods is green and blue. They created a number of parks that can, during storms, become lakes. This allows for nature and animal species to thrive, while people enjoy the nature reserve it has created. Dumb City: Green And Blue Copenhagen Similar wetlands have been introduced in India, where the areas also function as cleaners of wastewater. This has proven to be more effective than high-tech sewage treatment, absorbing a bunch of pollution while fostering a lively fishing industry. Florida, Gainsville’s Sweetwater Wetland park Dumb Cities: On Stilts And Floating Makoko, the remarkable town in the African country of Lagos, is taking a different approach in battling rising sea levels. The town, that is home to 80,000 people, is sustainable, solar-fuelled - and on stilts. Rotterdam is working on a similar concept, planning a sustainable floating city. Dumb Cities On Stilts And Floating: Makoko Dumb Cities Have Dumb Airconditioning Another surprising idea that can be found in nature is the alternative it offers for airconditioning, a notorious polluter. Plants are the solution for cooling down on a hot summer day. With more tree cover, temperatures will be considerably lower. Also, green roofs are great for cooling down the buildings they cover.   Frankfurt was named European City of Trees and has approximately 200,000 of them in public spaces around the city. Dumb Cities Are Smart Cities The ‘dumb’ solutions to things that we are trying to make smarter are endless. This goes for virtually anything. Transportation, with the old-fashioned bike or walking shoes being superior low-emission solutions. Or airconditioning and heating, where plant cover can prove highly efficient. With a little effort, it is not hard to find alternatives for sensors, cameras and trackers.   Dumb Cities, Smart Citie: A Root Hangbridge We can make the world a better place if we would try a little harder to go back to the methods that worked in the distant past. If we would move beyond our current issues to a point where they did not exist yet. After all, if generations before us were able to make do without the internet and ‘smart’ solutions, why can’t we? Before you go! Recommended:  Greenest Buildings In The World: Sustainable Highlights Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about green sustainable architecture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Smart Cities Or Dumb Cities? Let’s Embrace Low Tech
Smart Cities Or Dumb Cities? Let’s Embrace Low Tech
Corona Virus, Flu And Climate Change: Is There A Connection?
No one will be surprised to hear that there is a worryingly wide range of problems associated with climate change. From extreme weather events to melting ice caps and the extinction of animal species - these have all been well-researched to fall somewhere in the range of ‘likely’ to ‘highly probable’. Perhaps not as obvious is the suddenly rise of the Corona virus and the flu, as a direct result of climate change. How does that even work? Let’s try to find out in this article and read the Tips & Tricks to avoid or treat Flu! Corona Virus And Climate Change: Winter And Traveling Makes People More Vurnerable New Coronavirus Can Spread Person-to-Person A new coronavirus that began sickening people in China late in 2019 can be transmitted from human to human, China’s health ministry announced last Monday. The mysterious respiratory illness emerged last month in a fish market in the central Chinese city of Wuhan, and officials thought it was mostly passed from animals to humans. However, Zhong Nanshan of China's National Health Commission said two people who lived hundreds of miles away caught the virus from a family member who had visited Wuhan. Corona Virus What is the coronavirus in humans? Coronaviruses are types of viruses that typically affect the respiratory tract of mammals, including humans. They are associated with the common cold, pneumonia  and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and can also affect the gut. The current cases show there is definitely human-to-human transmission. Officials on Tuesday 21-01-2020 also announced that the virus had killed six people. The illness can cause fever, cough, difficulty breathing and pneumonia. As of late Monday, it had sickened at least 291 people, 258 in Wuhan. Fifteen health workers have also been infected, and it has now spread to various places in China, including Beijing and Shanghai. Public Health Minister Anutin Charnvirakul, second right, shows visitors from Wuhan receiving health screening at Suvarnabhumi airport in Samut Prakan province on Jan 5. He said on Monday that a Chinese woman found infected with a new strain of coronavirus was in quarantine and being treated in Nonthaburi province. How do you catch coronavirus? Sometimes, but not often, a coronavirus can infect both animals and humans. Most coronaviruses spread the same way other cold-causing viruses do, through infected people coughing and sneezing, by touching an infected person's hands or face, or by touching things such as doorknobs that infected people have touched. The disease has also spread outside China: Two cases were diagnosed in Thailand, one in Japan, one in South Korea and one in Taiwan. The Philippines also reported a suspected case Tuesday. There are fears the disease could spread further as millions are expected to travel throughout Asia Tuesday for the Lunar New Year. Airports in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco will begin screening passengers coming from Wuhan. The new virus has raised the specter of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), another coronavirus that killed almost 800 people in 2002 and 2003. Zhong, who also helped discover SARS, said the new disease was not as infectious, but was ‘climbing’. How long does the coronavirus live? How long does the virus survive in the environment? Outdoors, the virus can usually only survive for hours or days. Indoors, in dried-up cat litter, it can survive for up to seven weeks. Corona Virus, Flu And Climate: The Corona Virus Has Been Underreported Researchers at Imperial College London also think the new virus has been severely underreported. Officials are also concerned that they do not yet know the exact source of the disease. What concerns me is the source of infection. They have no idea. That's the most important thing. At the moment, it is a bad flu. Yes, it is something to be concerned about and it is probably going to get worse in terms of infections and mortality, because it's winter. Climate Change And Flu Ironically, initial research seemed to point towards climate change actually benefitting our health. It was thought to be one of the few positives to a very negative, with fewer deaths to mourn as a result of respiratory illnesses. After all, those are common in colder areas, where flu gets to spread like a wildfire as the result of harsh winter days and poor ventilation. Warmer weather would, logically speaking, counteract this. Unfortunately, new research has cast doubt over this hypothesis. In a worrisome twist, some are now concerned that climate change could actually worsen pandemics. This has to do with the way in which viruses, including influenza and HIV, develop and spread. It has already been proven that certain strains of influenza, usually occurring in the winter, are now able to survive in warmer temperatures. Recommended:  Climate Change Causes Nature To Change: The World Affected What has also been found is that seasonal diseases like the influenza are rearing their ugly heads earlier in the year - all while being more powerful. There appears to be a strong link between warm winters and the consequent flu breakouts immediately after. Meaning, a warm winter with a mild flu season will usually trigger an earlier and more severe flu outbreak in the following year. This explains why these viruses have been found in Asia during their summer months, having been brought over by birds, who have been pushed further north by climate change and warmer winters. This allows them to come in contact with other bird species and, consequently, other forms of influenza. Together, this leads to poultry interchanging flu types and incubating new and potentially dangerous new strains. These feathered migrating creatures then hold the power of spreading these diseases over the world, with our regular influenza seeding in Southeast Asia before taking over the rest of the world in a miserable swoop during our winters. Older adults (above 65 years) According to the CDC , people aged 65 and older are at a greater risk for serious complications from the flu. This is because the immune system typically weakens with age. Flu infection can also worsen long-term health conditions, like heart disease, lung disease, and asthma. Some of this has been contributed to the changing La Niña, an increase in the intensity and frequency of this weather phenomenon, causing different flu types to converge as a result of birds and animals that are normally not found together mixing. Not only does this lead to more creatures being infected, it also moulds influenza genetic material in new combinations. We Can’t Predict How Bad 2019th Year’s Flu Season Will Be The outlook for 2019’s flu season is not particularly rosy, based on the relatively mild 2018 season and warm winters. Yet it is nearly impossible to predict until we find ourselves in the midst of the epidemic - at which point there is not much to do but sit it out. And ‘sitting it out’ can be anything from a mild nuisance to a life-threatening event. The influenza illness, or the flu in short, is characterised by a sudden onset of a high fever, chills, muscle aches, tiredness and a dry cough - symptoms that get progressively worse over the first few days. Although most people infected will not require any medical attention, there are instances where high-risk groups, including the pregnant and elderly, could suffer from very dangerous complications. {youtube}                                                                      Flu Virus 101 | National Geographic                                                            Climate Change And Flu: Is there A Connection?   In 2018, the World Health Organisation characterised that year’s flu season as pretty mild. This characterisation is made based on the speed of circulation, the seriousness, and the impact of the  disease. So, in short, how fast it spreads, how many people are hospitalised or even die, and the strain it puts on hospitals and doctors. In 2017, on the other hand, there was a pretty serious outbreak, that started early and had a serious impact on society. And it looks as if 2019 is going to follow in its footsteps. Flu, Why Is It So Hard To Predict? The problem with making predictions regarding the severity of the flu season is the fact that there are actually four different types of viruses to consider, that can be categorised in influenza types A, with subtypes H1N1pdm09 and H3N2, and B, with lineages B/Victoria and B/Yamagata. Although those at higher risk may choose to get vaccinated, these vaccinations only protect against certain of those (sub)types. What this means is that those vaccinated will not be fully covered against all types - nor will a previous infection with one type protect you against other types. Add to this that influenza viruses are in constant flux, meaning that a certain vaccine or previous infection will not grant immunity for next season’s slightly altered viruses, and it is not hard to see why flu can be such a tough opponent. Additionally, it poses a problem for tracking the specific (sub)types: hospitals and doctors generally do not collect information on the specific viruses that they come across in their practice. Not only is this process time-consuming and costly, it does not add anything of value to the treatment plan either. An unfortunate side effect is that it makes it that much harder to observe the circulation pattern of a specific virus, in turn making general flu patterns across seasons hard to predict. Flu, What’s Happening Elsewhere In The World? Not only is it hard to predict flu trends over time, it is equally hard to find trends over space. Even though increased (air) travel has made it easier for viruses to mutate and find their way across the globe, there is no consistent pattern of flu viruses travelling the globe. During the same flu season, very different viruses can dominate on different continents. Where is influenza most common? A study in 2015 looked into where influenza is most common, alongside how it spreads around the globe. While there are cases of it appearing all around the world, scientists found that it is far more prominent in the east than in the west, particularly in Southeast Asia. Even the timing can differ. Particularly in (sub)tropical areas, where there are no real winters, there can be multiple flu seasons each year, circulating at vastly different times. Some have pointed at climate or even tourism as the reason for this variation, although a causal relationship is yet to be established. It is notoriously hard to predict those kind of patterns as well, although we are slowly getting to a place where modern technologies and an increased understanding of the flu are allowing for better analysis and tracking. Yet there is still a long way to go. Definite History Of The Flu Looking back in time, though, we are certainly much more on the ball than we ever were before. We are documenting and analysing far more than our ancestors. The very first reported instances of the flu might date back to 500 BCE, with Greek historians reporting on a so-called ‘three-year plague’, that boasted symptoms much like our flu. However, descriptions were so scarce that many historians are not convinced that it actually was. What we do know is that the disease did not get its name until well in the 14th century, when the term ‘influenza’, the Italian word for ‘influence’, was coined to describe it. This ‘influence’ was contributed to either cold weather or a misalignment of stars and planets. And although many different terms have been used to describe it since, this is the one that stuck. Although the beast had been given a name, it was not until some 80 years ago that scientists actually managed to debunk the flu virus, thanks to the invention of the electron microscope. Pictures of the flu could now be made and shared, with distinctions finally made between the most prominent types. Soon after, the first influenza vaccines hit the market, including those that were capable of preventing more than one strain. As the world evolved, so did the flu and our ways of dealing with it. Unfortunately, with climate change ramping up, we are about to enter a new phase of epidemics, pandemics and the spread of diseases like the flu. Climate change might even amplify its causes and effects and lead to the creation of mutated, vaccine-resistant strains that can be equally hard to control and contain. Tips & Tricks to Avoid Colds And Flu This Winter That sounds like doom and gloom. Yet it is important to realise that there is always something that we can do about it. What is the best way of staying ahead of the flu, even in this time of climate change possibly amplifying its spread and severity? There are a few tips and tricks that will minimise your chances of contracting it. Wash hands For most of us, washing our hands is a totally normal thing to do. During flu season, you might consider doing so a bit more often. Most viruses are transmitted by air, although they can just as easily be transferred through physical contact. Once we get the disease-spreading germs on our hands, they can easily invade our bodies when we touch our eyes, mouths or noses. By frequently washing our hands with soap and drying them using clean hand towels or paper towels, it will be much harder for a virus to get a hold of us. Dress appropriately Although the concept of ‘having caught a cold’ by standing out in the literal cold has been somewhat debunked, it is still imperative to stay warm and dress appropriately during the colder seasons. Once we are cold, we tend to shiver - an action that affects our immune system, making us more susceptible to lurking viruses. Get yourself a decent sweater and coat, and don’t forget your hat, as we lose quite a bit of our body heat through our head. Avoid crowded spaces One of the preferred breeding grounds for viruses is public transportation, alongside crowded stores and poorly ventilated office buildings. Basically, small and cramped spaces in which a lot of people crowd together. Here, infections spread easily, jumping from one person to the next. The fact that central heating is blasting in most of those spaces does not help either, as this tends to weaken our natural defences and negatively affect our respiratory system. Take vitamins Vitamins are a great way of boosting your immune system. Various minerals and herbs have been proven to help us kick nasty viruses to the curb. Zinc, vitamin C and garlic have been found to reduce the frequency of colds and flu. Echinacea, a plant used by the native Americans to combat infections, is another great booster of our immune system. Taking some kind of multivitamin that includes those minerals and herbs can really do wonders in avoiding the next round of flu going around. Keep an eye on the weather Certain weather conditions have been found to be a real breeding ground for nasty germs. Especially when there are low cloud, dull and misty conditions, so when there is a lot of moist in the air, viruses tend to survive (much) longer. They will attach themselves to the water droplets, while a lack of wind will keep them around, instead of being blown away. So be wary of going outside when this kind of weather is forecast. Sleep well One of the hardest things to do in our busy lives is to ensure that we get a decent night’s sleep. Unfortunately, it is extremely important for our health: a lack of sleep has been found to be a risk factor for contracting the flu or other infections. Yet it is not just getting enough hours of sleep that matters, your state of mind also helps. If you are happy and content, this will reflect positively on your immune system. Being stressed and overworked, on the other hand, will be a sure way of catching that nasty bug going around at work. Drink plenty Drinking plenty of water is one of the most commonly given pieces of advice by doctors and medical professionals worldwide. Water will quite literally flush out all toxins and bad elements from our bodies, making it harder for any viruses to gain a foothold. And even if you find yourself having caught an infection, water will once again be your best friend, helping you to get it out of your system again as soon as possible. Exercise frequently Did you know that regular exercising will summon the so-called natural killer cells in our bodies? These little soldiers are tasked with finding and fighting all kind of invaders, making us more resistant against infections. At the same time, going on a jog or hitting the gym will be a great way of keeping our circulation going. Our bodies are simply better at dealing with any foreign threats when subjected to regular exercise. Recommended:  Getting Healthier By Eating Sustainable Food And Taking Exercise Tips & Tricks To Ease Flu Symptoms Still managed to contract a nasty flu? Then rest assured that you are not alone, as millions and millions of people are hit by this disease each year. And while there really is not much that you can do to prevent or cure it, there are some natural ways of relieving its worst symptoms. How long does it take to get over the flu? In general, healthy people usually get over a cold in 7 to 10 days. Flu symptoms, including fever, should go away after about 5 days, but you may still have a cough and feel weak a few days longer. All your symptoms should be gone within 1 to 2 weeks. Rest at home The healing power of a good nap in your own bed might even outshine that of the commonly prescribed medicines. Make sure that you cancel all and any plans that you may have, preferably for the next few days - as you are now contagious and pretty sick. Make good use of those extra hours in bed to give your ailing body some rest. Drink, drink, and drink some more! Drinking is important in preventing infections, but even if you already find yourself the unfortunate owner of a brand new strain of the flu, drinking is a great way of getting rid of it as soon as possible. It does not necessarily have to be water. If you prefer fruit juices, sports drinks or broth-based soups, they will do the trick as well. Staying hydrated does wonders for your respiratory system and will flush that bug out of your system before you know it. Fight the fever Running a fever means that your body is busy fighting this nasty invader. The best thing for you to do is help it by getting your hands on appropriate over-the-counter medicines like acetaminophen, ibuprofen or naproxen, which will both lower your fever and fight the associated aches. Fight the cough While you are already in the pharmacy, you might want to pick up something for that nasty cough that has accompanied the infection. Other ways of clearing your airways and unclogging that runny nose include sitting in a hot, steamy bathroom, using a humidifier, sucking on a lozenge, or trying out a salt-based nose spray. Fighting The Flu Whether you are simply suffering from the ‘sniffles’ or a climate change activist warning against the effect that global warming will have on the flu, it is important to realise that we can do quite a bit in preventing the disease from grabbing a hold of us in the first place. The earlier tips on preventing the flu are vital in staying healthy, although the question remains whether this will sustainable in the long run. With climate change drastically changing the world as we know it, it is likely to also change the way in which we get sick. This might mean that the flu will change from something relatively innocent into something looming and potentially dangerous. New mutations and variations might spread across the world faster than ever before and create more havoc as winters get warmer and flu seasons intensify. Up to us to avoid a future where the simple common cold might actually turn into a killer epidemic. Before you go! Recommended:  Smart Sustainable Lifestyle Changing Tips & Tricks For 2019 Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
No one will be surprised to hear that there is a worryingly wide range of problems associated with climate change. From extreme weather events to melting ice caps and the extinction of animal species - these have all been well-researched to fall somewhere in the range of ‘likely’ to ‘highly probable’. Perhaps not as obvious is the suddenly rise of the Corona virus and the flu, as a direct result of climate change. How does that even work? Let’s try to find out in this article and read the Tips & Tricks to avoid or treat Flu! Corona Virus And Climate Change: Winter And Traveling Makes People More Vurnerable New Coronavirus Can Spread Person-to-Person A new coronavirus that began sickening people in China late in 2019 can be transmitted from human to human, China’s health ministry announced last Monday. The mysterious respiratory illness emerged last month in a fish market in the central Chinese city of Wuhan, and officials thought it was mostly passed from animals to humans. However, Zhong Nanshan of China's National Health Commission said two people who lived hundreds of miles away caught the virus from a family member who had visited Wuhan. Corona Virus What is the coronavirus in humans? Coronaviruses are types of viruses that typically affect the respiratory tract of mammals, including humans. They are associated with the common cold, pneumonia  and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and can also affect the gut. The current cases show there is definitely human-to-human transmission. Officials on Tuesday 21-01-2020 also announced that the virus had killed six people. The illness can cause fever, cough, difficulty breathing and pneumonia. As of late Monday, it had sickened at least 291 people, 258 in Wuhan. Fifteen health workers have also been infected, and it has now spread to various places in China, including Beijing and Shanghai. Public Health Minister Anutin Charnvirakul, second right, shows visitors from Wuhan receiving health screening at Suvarnabhumi airport in Samut Prakan province on Jan 5. He said on Monday that a Chinese woman found infected with a new strain of coronavirus was in quarantine and being treated in Nonthaburi province. How do you catch coronavirus? Sometimes, but not often, a coronavirus can infect both animals and humans. Most coronaviruses spread the same way other cold-causing viruses do, through infected people coughing and sneezing, by touching an infected person's hands or face, or by touching things such as doorknobs that infected people have touched. The disease has also spread outside China: Two cases were diagnosed in Thailand, one in Japan, one in South Korea and one in Taiwan. The Philippines also reported a suspected case Tuesday. There are fears the disease could spread further as millions are expected to travel throughout Asia Tuesday for the Lunar New Year. Airports in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco will begin screening passengers coming from Wuhan. The new virus has raised the specter of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), another coronavirus that killed almost 800 people in 2002 and 2003. Zhong, who also helped discover SARS, said the new disease was not as infectious, but was ‘climbing’. How long does the coronavirus live? How long does the virus survive in the environment? Outdoors, the virus can usually only survive for hours or days. Indoors, in dried-up cat litter, it can survive for up to seven weeks. Corona Virus, Flu And Climate: The Corona Virus Has Been Underreported Researchers at Imperial College London also think the new virus has been severely underreported. Officials are also concerned that they do not yet know the exact source of the disease. What concerns me is the source of infection. They have no idea. That's the most important thing. At the moment, it is a bad flu. Yes, it is something to be concerned about and it is probably going to get worse in terms of infections and mortality, because it's winter. Climate Change And Flu Ironically, initial research seemed to point towards climate change actually benefitting our health. It was thought to be one of the few positives to a very negative, with fewer deaths to mourn as a result of respiratory illnesses. After all, those are common in colder areas, where flu gets to spread like a wildfire as the result of harsh winter days and poor ventilation. Warmer weather would, logically speaking, counteract this. Unfortunately, new research has cast doubt over this hypothesis. In a worrisome twist, some are now concerned that climate change could actually worsen pandemics. This has to do with the way in which viruses, including influenza and HIV, develop and spread. It has already been proven that certain strains of influenza, usually occurring in the winter, are now able to survive in warmer temperatures. Recommended:  Climate Change Causes Nature To Change: The World Affected What has also been found is that seasonal diseases like the influenza are rearing their ugly heads earlier in the year - all while being more powerful. There appears to be a strong link between warm winters and the consequent flu breakouts immediately after. Meaning, a warm winter with a mild flu season will usually trigger an earlier and more severe flu outbreak in the following year. This explains why these viruses have been found in Asia during their summer months, having been brought over by birds, who have been pushed further north by climate change and warmer winters. This allows them to come in contact with other bird species and, consequently, other forms of influenza. Together, this leads to poultry interchanging flu types and incubating new and potentially dangerous new strains. These feathered migrating creatures then hold the power of spreading these diseases over the world, with our regular influenza seeding in Southeast Asia before taking over the rest of the world in a miserable swoop during our winters. Older adults (above 65 years) According to the CDC , people aged 65 and older are at a greater risk for serious complications from the flu. This is because the immune system typically weakens with age. Flu infection can also worsen long-term health conditions, like heart disease, lung disease, and asthma. Some of this has been contributed to the changing La Niña, an increase in the intensity and frequency of this weather phenomenon, causing different flu types to converge as a result of birds and animals that are normally not found together mixing. Not only does this lead to more creatures being infected, it also moulds influenza genetic material in new combinations. We Can’t Predict How Bad 2019th Year’s Flu Season Will Be The outlook for 2019’s flu season is not particularly rosy, based on the relatively mild 2018 season and warm winters. Yet it is nearly impossible to predict until we find ourselves in the midst of the epidemic - at which point there is not much to do but sit it out. And ‘sitting it out’ can be anything from a mild nuisance to a life-threatening event. The influenza illness, or the flu in short, is characterised by a sudden onset of a high fever, chills, muscle aches, tiredness and a dry cough - symptoms that get progressively worse over the first few days. Although most people infected will not require any medical attention, there are instances where high-risk groups, including the pregnant and elderly, could suffer from very dangerous complications. {youtube}                                                                      Flu Virus 101 | National Geographic                                                            Climate Change And Flu: Is there A Connection?   In 2018, the World Health Organisation characterised that year’s flu season as pretty mild. This characterisation is made based on the speed of circulation, the seriousness, and the impact of the  disease. So, in short, how fast it spreads, how many people are hospitalised or even die, and the strain it puts on hospitals and doctors. In 2017, on the other hand, there was a pretty serious outbreak, that started early and had a serious impact on society. And it looks as if 2019 is going to follow in its footsteps. Flu, Why Is It So Hard To Predict? The problem with making predictions regarding the severity of the flu season is the fact that there are actually four different types of viruses to consider, that can be categorised in influenza types A, with subtypes H1N1pdm09 and H3N2, and B, with lineages B/Victoria and B/Yamagata. Although those at higher risk may choose to get vaccinated, these vaccinations only protect against certain of those (sub)types. What this means is that those vaccinated will not be fully covered against all types - nor will a previous infection with one type protect you against other types. Add to this that influenza viruses are in constant flux, meaning that a certain vaccine or previous infection will not grant immunity for next season’s slightly altered viruses, and it is not hard to see why flu can be such a tough opponent. Additionally, it poses a problem for tracking the specific (sub)types: hospitals and doctors generally do not collect information on the specific viruses that they come across in their practice. Not only is this process time-consuming and costly, it does not add anything of value to the treatment plan either. An unfortunate side effect is that it makes it that much harder to observe the circulation pattern of a specific virus, in turn making general flu patterns across seasons hard to predict. Flu, What’s Happening Elsewhere In The World? Not only is it hard to predict flu trends over time, it is equally hard to find trends over space. Even though increased (air) travel has made it easier for viruses to mutate and find their way across the globe, there is no consistent pattern of flu viruses travelling the globe. During the same flu season, very different viruses can dominate on different continents. Where is influenza most common? A study in 2015 looked into where influenza is most common, alongside how it spreads around the globe. While there are cases of it appearing all around the world, scientists found that it is far more prominent in the east than in the west, particularly in Southeast Asia. Even the timing can differ. Particularly in (sub)tropical areas, where there are no real winters, there can be multiple flu seasons each year, circulating at vastly different times. Some have pointed at climate or even tourism as the reason for this variation, although a causal relationship is yet to be established. It is notoriously hard to predict those kind of patterns as well, although we are slowly getting to a place where modern technologies and an increased understanding of the flu are allowing for better analysis and tracking. Yet there is still a long way to go. Definite History Of The Flu Looking back in time, though, we are certainly much more on the ball than we ever were before. We are documenting and analysing far more than our ancestors. The very first reported instances of the flu might date back to 500 BCE, with Greek historians reporting on a so-called ‘three-year plague’, that boasted symptoms much like our flu. However, descriptions were so scarce that many historians are not convinced that it actually was. What we do know is that the disease did not get its name until well in the 14th century, when the term ‘influenza’, the Italian word for ‘influence’, was coined to describe it. This ‘influence’ was contributed to either cold weather or a misalignment of stars and planets. And although many different terms have been used to describe it since, this is the one that stuck. Although the beast had been given a name, it was not until some 80 years ago that scientists actually managed to debunk the flu virus, thanks to the invention of the electron microscope. Pictures of the flu could now be made and shared, with distinctions finally made between the most prominent types. Soon after, the first influenza vaccines hit the market, including those that were capable of preventing more than one strain. As the world evolved, so did the flu and our ways of dealing with it. Unfortunately, with climate change ramping up, we are about to enter a new phase of epidemics, pandemics and the spread of diseases like the flu. Climate change might even amplify its causes and effects and lead to the creation of mutated, vaccine-resistant strains that can be equally hard to control and contain. Tips & Tricks to Avoid Colds And Flu This Winter That sounds like doom and gloom. Yet it is important to realise that there is always something that we can do about it. What is the best way of staying ahead of the flu, even in this time of climate change possibly amplifying its spread and severity? There are a few tips and tricks that will minimise your chances of contracting it. Wash hands For most of us, washing our hands is a totally normal thing to do. During flu season, you might consider doing so a bit more often. Most viruses are transmitted by air, although they can just as easily be transferred through physical contact. Once we get the disease-spreading germs on our hands, they can easily invade our bodies when we touch our eyes, mouths or noses. By frequently washing our hands with soap and drying them using clean hand towels or paper towels, it will be much harder for a virus to get a hold of us. Dress appropriately Although the concept of ‘having caught a cold’ by standing out in the literal cold has been somewhat debunked, it is still imperative to stay warm and dress appropriately during the colder seasons. Once we are cold, we tend to shiver - an action that affects our immune system, making us more susceptible to lurking viruses. Get yourself a decent sweater and coat, and don’t forget your hat, as we lose quite a bit of our body heat through our head. Avoid crowded spaces One of the preferred breeding grounds for viruses is public transportation, alongside crowded stores and poorly ventilated office buildings. Basically, small and cramped spaces in which a lot of people crowd together. Here, infections spread easily, jumping from one person to the next. The fact that central heating is blasting in most of those spaces does not help either, as this tends to weaken our natural defences and negatively affect our respiratory system. Take vitamins Vitamins are a great way of boosting your immune system. Various minerals and herbs have been proven to help us kick nasty viruses to the curb. Zinc, vitamin C and garlic have been found to reduce the frequency of colds and flu. Echinacea, a plant used by the native Americans to combat infections, is another great booster of our immune system. Taking some kind of multivitamin that includes those minerals and herbs can really do wonders in avoiding the next round of flu going around. Keep an eye on the weather Certain weather conditions have been found to be a real breeding ground for nasty germs. Especially when there are low cloud, dull and misty conditions, so when there is a lot of moist in the air, viruses tend to survive (much) longer. They will attach themselves to the water droplets, while a lack of wind will keep them around, instead of being blown away. So be wary of going outside when this kind of weather is forecast. Sleep well One of the hardest things to do in our busy lives is to ensure that we get a decent night’s sleep. Unfortunately, it is extremely important for our health: a lack of sleep has been found to be a risk factor for contracting the flu or other infections. Yet it is not just getting enough hours of sleep that matters, your state of mind also helps. If you are happy and content, this will reflect positively on your immune system. Being stressed and overworked, on the other hand, will be a sure way of catching that nasty bug going around at work. Drink plenty Drinking plenty of water is one of the most commonly given pieces of advice by doctors and medical professionals worldwide. Water will quite literally flush out all toxins and bad elements from our bodies, making it harder for any viruses to gain a foothold. And even if you find yourself having caught an infection, water will once again be your best friend, helping you to get it out of your system again as soon as possible. Exercise frequently Did you know that regular exercising will summon the so-called natural killer cells in our bodies? These little soldiers are tasked with finding and fighting all kind of invaders, making us more resistant against infections. At the same time, going on a jog or hitting the gym will be a great way of keeping our circulation going. Our bodies are simply better at dealing with any foreign threats when subjected to regular exercise. Recommended:  Getting Healthier By Eating Sustainable Food And Taking Exercise Tips & Tricks To Ease Flu Symptoms Still managed to contract a nasty flu? Then rest assured that you are not alone, as millions and millions of people are hit by this disease each year. And while there really is not much that you can do to prevent or cure it, there are some natural ways of relieving its worst symptoms. How long does it take to get over the flu? In general, healthy people usually get over a cold in 7 to 10 days. Flu symptoms, including fever, should go away after about 5 days, but you may still have a cough and feel weak a few days longer. All your symptoms should be gone within 1 to 2 weeks. Rest at home The healing power of a good nap in your own bed might even outshine that of the commonly prescribed medicines. Make sure that you cancel all and any plans that you may have, preferably for the next few days - as you are now contagious and pretty sick. Make good use of those extra hours in bed to give your ailing body some rest. Drink, drink, and drink some more! Drinking is important in preventing infections, but even if you already find yourself the unfortunate owner of a brand new strain of the flu, drinking is a great way of getting rid of it as soon as possible. It does not necessarily have to be water. If you prefer fruit juices, sports drinks or broth-based soups, they will do the trick as well. Staying hydrated does wonders for your respiratory system and will flush that bug out of your system before you know it. Fight the fever Running a fever means that your body is busy fighting this nasty invader. The best thing for you to do is help it by getting your hands on appropriate over-the-counter medicines like acetaminophen, ibuprofen or naproxen, which will both lower your fever and fight the associated aches. Fight the cough While you are already in the pharmacy, you might want to pick up something for that nasty cough that has accompanied the infection. Other ways of clearing your airways and unclogging that runny nose include sitting in a hot, steamy bathroom, using a humidifier, sucking on a lozenge, or trying out a salt-based nose spray. Fighting The Flu Whether you are simply suffering from the ‘sniffles’ or a climate change activist warning against the effect that global warming will have on the flu, it is important to realise that we can do quite a bit in preventing the disease from grabbing a hold of us in the first place. The earlier tips on preventing the flu are vital in staying healthy, although the question remains whether this will sustainable in the long run. With climate change drastically changing the world as we know it, it is likely to also change the way in which we get sick. This might mean that the flu will change from something relatively innocent into something looming and potentially dangerous. New mutations and variations might spread across the world faster than ever before and create more havoc as winters get warmer and flu seasons intensify. Up to us to avoid a future where the simple common cold might actually turn into a killer epidemic. Before you go! Recommended:  Smart Sustainable Lifestyle Changing Tips & Tricks For 2019 Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Corona Virus, Flu And Climate Change: Is There A Connection?
Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marine One In Singapore
With a larger share of green spaces than the lot area, Marina One is a role model for megacities. In the high-rise project, homes, offices and public facilities are connected in high density, in a sustainable manner that leads to a pleasant microclimate. Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marina One Is A Role Model For Megacities Photo by: Darren Soh. On the lower layers there is a publicly accessible park that gradually passes into the towers.  Marina One by Ingenhoven Architects can rightly be called an impressive project. In terms of size it looks a bit like a small city. The complex is part of the new Central Business District of Singapore and offers space for 20,000 workplaces and 3,000 residents. As a 'hub project' for green urban development, it presents a strong example of sustainable architecture. In the design not only attention was paid to the creation of sufficient commercial floor space, but also valuable green urban space was integrated. In this case, instead of four obvious separate buildings, a neighborhood that was accessible to everyone around a green heart arose here. A vertical park that extends over several floors. Is Singapore a city or country? The Republic of Singapore is a sovereign island nation located just off the southern tip of Peninsular Malaysia in Southeast Asia. Singapore is an anomaly, and they're quite proud of it. The country is currently the only city-island-nation in the world. Singapore has grown since 1990 mainly thanks to artificial land reclamation with 8.9 percent. With the development of Marina One and many other new construction projects, it is currently undergoing a radical transformation from a 'Garden City' to a 'City in a Garden'. The city state, which in the sixties was still regarded as one of the most unhealthiest places in the world, has since grown into an international economic hotspot. To ensure that Singapore remains attractive for living and working in the future, there is now also a lot of attention for improving the quality of life. Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marina Bay, West Of The Old City Center From Singapore Marina Bay is located directly to the west of the old city center and is without doubt one of the largest and most prominent new neighborhoods in the area. Where empty yards and railroads still existed in the 1990s, the new Central Business District has been realized since 2006 under the watchful eye of government agency Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA). {youtube}                                                   Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marine One In Singapore                                                                            Marina Bay, Singapore And ambitious goals are envisaged for this new business district. Strict energy guidelines and higher requirements for public and green spaces apply to all new building projects. The publicly accessible areas must occupy at least 25 percent of the plot surface, the green spaces at least one hundred percent. For the energy requirements even a national standard, the 'Green Mark Standard', has been created. With its unlimited authority, the URA is a unique planning body that investors have the opportunity to join and which, unlike many other countries, is also much more active in establishing and maintaining development goals. Recommended:  Solar Canopies Supply Shade Electricity And Filter Rainwater Marine One In Singapore: The wavy facade is continued on all sides Green Urban Sustainable Project: Rice Terraces And 'Gardens By The Bay' Here, the URA uses so-called 'studies', for which architects are asked without knowledge of the concrete location, but on the basis of very concrete planning guidelines to develop interesting ideas and to submit them to a committee. Marina One also resulted from such a study. Christoph Ingenhoven, who together with local architect Michael Ngu of architects a61 on the Robinson Road created a remarkable office building, initially received only basic information about a plot that provided space for four blocks of one hundred by one hundred meters and was split up. through two streets of twenty to twenty-five meters wide. Singapore is a great nation with some strict rules? 7 Things Tourists Should Avoid Doing in Singapore Throw Your Litter Into The Bin Avoid Chewing Gum Ask For Food Prices Before Ordering Avoid Vandalism at Any Cost Smoke Only at Designated Smoking Areas Be Sensitive to Singapore's Multi-Cultural Society Avoid Eating In Public Trains and Buses. Instead of an obvious idea with a separate building on each corner, he suggested giving up the intersection and creating a neighborhood around a vertical park. In doing so, he aroused the interest of the URA, who soon invited him to further develop his green concept in the context of a small-scale architectural competition. Recommended:  Sustainable University Hanoi: By Vo Trong Nghia Architects The plot is located northwest of the famous 'Gardens by the Bay' by architects WilkinsonEyre and directly between two small city parks. For this, the architects came up with a complex with space for offices (half) and houses (a third), which would go down in height from two hundred to 139 meters in the direction of one of the two parks. For their project, Christoph Ingenhoven and Michael Ngu took the idea of ​​park C in the middle of park A and B in 2010. Marine One In Singapore: Large frames in the façade provide shade effects in the residential towers Green Urban Sustainable Project: Green Heart Park, Singapore In order to create the large 'Green Heart Park' in the middle of the complex, all buildings have been shifted cartesian and strictly orthogonal to the outer boundaries of the plot, following the example of the New York city map. Around the green heart, for example, two blocks of two buildings were realized, with sloping galleries and vertical, step-by-step lamella constructions that do not entirely reminiscent of the well-known Southeast Asian rice terraces. Thanks to the cascading, undulating floors that come closer and closer together, natural air flows are created which ensure that even in the outdoor areas, despite the subtropical climate, it is pleasant to stay here. Recommended:  The Bicycle Metropolis: Why Still Investing In Car Parking? On the outside, highly efficient, perforated sun protection elements adorn the sleek façade. For the inside, the architects and engineers developed extensive slats with a depth of 1.2 to 2 meters, based on extensive climate and design studies. This created a unique dynamic space in the heart of the complex, which, consciously not as a European city square but as a 'city room', a Singaporean version of a city garden, should be seen as a relaxing place to relax, move and to meet each other. The British landscape architects Gustafson Porter + Bowman created here a green oasis with great biodiversity that invites haptic (soil material) as well as acoustic (birds and insects) to explore. Marine One In Singapore: Earth tones However, it did not stay with the creation of this green heart. This only covers part of the very complex building concept with a total of 175,000 square meters of gross floor area for offices, 115,000 square meters for living, 18,000 square meters for trade / gastronomy and 37,000 square meters of green space. In addition to the green heart on the first four floors, in the office buildings on floor 28 and 29 'sky gardens' are integrated, which are publicly accessible and where restaurants are located just below. The green spaces now cover up to 125 percent of the plot surface. Recommended:  Sustainable Architecture Today: How Does It Feel For You? Most are accessible to the general public - apart from the roof gardens, which serve as exclusive outdoor spaces for businesses and penthouses. The vegetation of the 'strata terraces', 'cloud garden', 'green screens' and 'rooftop gardens' varies greatly from floor to floor and with the different shades of color and plant structures it is a real enrichment of the otherwise rather strict high-tech façade. Incidentally, for the façade, Ingenhoven consciously took dark earth tones in order to contrast them nicely with the white of the former colonial buildings. Is Singapore visa free? Most visitors to Singapore can enter the country without a visa; however some visitors must first obtain a visa in advance before being allowed to enter Singapore. Citizens of almost 80% of the world's countries may travel to Singapore for a period of 30 days or 90 days without a visa, depending on their nationality. Marine One In Singapore: Hybrid Construction For Marina One, first a reinforced concrete skeleton was planned, but in the end the choice fell on a more advantageous option. In order to place the alternative hybrid construction from reinforced concrete and steel firmly on the soft surface of the newly reclaimed land, a very complex pile foundation was required. Another impressive element, both spatially and constructively, are the three 'suspended' floors of 10,000 square meters each connecting the two office buildings. And do not underestimate the great functionality of Marina One. For the mediated clientele, consisting mainly of financial companies and professionals who can pay an average of 14,762 euros per square meter, there is virtually nothing to be desired: three underground shop floors and direct access to two metro stations, a 2,400-square-meter gym with a ten-meter high climbing wall and a fifty meter long outdoor swimming pool, several 'signature' restaurants, a party zone, lounges, a 'resident clubhouse' and special teppanyaki and BBQ terraces. Marine One In Singapore: New Urban Exploration Is Singapore cheap for shopping? Situated between Little India in the north and Marina Bay in the south, the Bugis Street Market is one of the top shopping places in Singapore . It is known for being the cheapest market in the country for buying souvenirs, accessories, clothes, electronics, houseware, and cosmetics. The smart spatial and sustainable architectural solutions of Marina One can serve as a model for urban compaction projects at other locations. But the significance of this special project goes further. In Singapore, Marina One is part of a complete generation of new, green high-rise projects for an urban transformation and a change in the use wishes that they had not previously thought possible. It represents the desire for more and qualitative green spaces and outdoor spaces, the use of which actually increases despite the sometimes murderous subtropical climate. Recommended:  Climate Change And Its Effects Like Droughts: The Heat Is On Although Ingenhoven Architects and the supporting engineering firms Werner Sobek, DS-Plan and Arup Singapore with their complex design solutions managed to lower the temperature in the microclimate of Marina One compared to 'normal' with only a few degrees, the architecture entices many people to trust their familiar to leave the inner world more often. This new urban exploration is, in addition to the great energy values, the most impressive one at Marina One. Marine One In Singapore: Ground floor with park, public functions and entrances to homes, offices and parking Marine One: Microclimate In addition to the large green spaces, more surprising openings have been created, some of which are only visible from close by or even only on the floors in question. For example, vertical slits in which two air shafts are housed in different places run through different residential buildings in order to achieve a completely natural ventilation and thus a more pleasant outdoor climate. This effect is further enhanced by the smartly chosen dimensions and positioning of the slats on the park side. What is the coolest month in Singapore? Relative humidity is in the range of 70% – 80%. April is the warmest month, January is the coolest month and November is the wettest month. For the architects it still took a lot of steps to convince their client M + S, owned by the Singaporean investment company Temasek and the Malaysian state fund Khazanah, of these slots and slats. Both meant a significant investment and loss of useful floor space. Sustainability played a crucial role not only in the design of the inside, but also in the exterior of both buildings. For example, the different blocks with staggered frames and deeper loggias act as a kind of natural sunblind that helps to reduce the subtropical heat load on the 1,042 dwellings.                                                                     Multi story three demensial garden                                                     Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marine One In Singapore The fact that the plot is positioned slightly tilted in relation to the wind points was certainly also useful here. None of the facades is in fact oriented towards the very warm west. Thanks to a system for heat recovery, a rainwater collection system (for greywater and irrigation of the gardens), the greater heat tolerance to office temperatures of 24-26 degrees and the use of state-of-the-art glazing that prevents heat, the energy consumption is up to 35 percent lower than for this kind of complexes is common. This gave the project the Pre-Certification LEED Platinum and the Green Mark Platinum. Before you go! Recommended:  Greenest Buildings In The World: Sustainable Highlights Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about green sustainable architecture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
With a larger share of green spaces than the lot area, Marina One is a role model for megacities. In the high-rise project, homes, offices and public facilities are connected in high density, in a sustainable manner that leads to a pleasant microclimate. Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marina One Is A Role Model For Megacities Photo by: Darren Soh. On the lower layers there is a publicly accessible park that gradually passes into the towers.  Marina One by Ingenhoven Architects can rightly be called an impressive project. In terms of size it looks a bit like a small city. The complex is part of the new Central Business District of Singapore and offers space for 20,000 workplaces and 3,000 residents. As a 'hub project' for green urban development, it presents a strong example of sustainable architecture. In the design not only attention was paid to the creation of sufficient commercial floor space, but also valuable green urban space was integrated. In this case, instead of four obvious separate buildings, a neighborhood that was accessible to everyone around a green heart arose here. A vertical park that extends over several floors. Is Singapore a city or country? The Republic of Singapore is a sovereign island nation located just off the southern tip of Peninsular Malaysia in Southeast Asia. Singapore is an anomaly, and they're quite proud of it. The country is currently the only city-island-nation in the world. Singapore has grown since 1990 mainly thanks to artificial land reclamation with 8.9 percent. With the development of Marina One and many other new construction projects, it is currently undergoing a radical transformation from a 'Garden City' to a 'City in a Garden'. The city state, which in the sixties was still regarded as one of the most unhealthiest places in the world, has since grown into an international economic hotspot. To ensure that Singapore remains attractive for living and working in the future, there is now also a lot of attention for improving the quality of life. Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marina Bay, West Of The Old City Center From Singapore Marina Bay is located directly to the west of the old city center and is without doubt one of the largest and most prominent new neighborhoods in the area. Where empty yards and railroads still existed in the 1990s, the new Central Business District has been realized since 2006 under the watchful eye of government agency Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA). {youtube}                                                   Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marine One In Singapore                                                                            Marina Bay, Singapore And ambitious goals are envisaged for this new business district. Strict energy guidelines and higher requirements for public and green spaces apply to all new building projects. The publicly accessible areas must occupy at least 25 percent of the plot surface, the green spaces at least one hundred percent. For the energy requirements even a national standard, the 'Green Mark Standard', has been created. With its unlimited authority, the URA is a unique planning body that investors have the opportunity to join and which, unlike many other countries, is also much more active in establishing and maintaining development goals. Recommended:  Solar Canopies Supply Shade Electricity And Filter Rainwater Marine One In Singapore: The wavy facade is continued on all sides Green Urban Sustainable Project: Rice Terraces And 'Gardens By The Bay' Here, the URA uses so-called 'studies', for which architects are asked without knowledge of the concrete location, but on the basis of very concrete planning guidelines to develop interesting ideas and to submit them to a committee. Marina One also resulted from such a study. Christoph Ingenhoven, who together with local architect Michael Ngu of architects a61 on the Robinson Road created a remarkable office building, initially received only basic information about a plot that provided space for four blocks of one hundred by one hundred meters and was split up. through two streets of twenty to twenty-five meters wide. Singapore is a great nation with some strict rules? 7 Things Tourists Should Avoid Doing in Singapore Throw Your Litter Into The Bin Avoid Chewing Gum Ask For Food Prices Before Ordering Avoid Vandalism at Any Cost Smoke Only at Designated Smoking Areas Be Sensitive to Singapore's Multi-Cultural Society Avoid Eating In Public Trains and Buses. Instead of an obvious idea with a separate building on each corner, he suggested giving up the intersection and creating a neighborhood around a vertical park. In doing so, he aroused the interest of the URA, who soon invited him to further develop his green concept in the context of a small-scale architectural competition. Recommended:  Sustainable University Hanoi: By Vo Trong Nghia Architects The plot is located northwest of the famous 'Gardens by the Bay' by architects WilkinsonEyre and directly between two small city parks. For this, the architects came up with a complex with space for offices (half) and houses (a third), which would go down in height from two hundred to 139 meters in the direction of one of the two parks. For their project, Christoph Ingenhoven and Michael Ngu took the idea of ​​park C in the middle of park A and B in 2010. Marine One In Singapore: Large frames in the façade provide shade effects in the residential towers Green Urban Sustainable Project: Green Heart Park, Singapore In order to create the large 'Green Heart Park' in the middle of the complex, all buildings have been shifted cartesian and strictly orthogonal to the outer boundaries of the plot, following the example of the New York city map. Around the green heart, for example, two blocks of two buildings were realized, with sloping galleries and vertical, step-by-step lamella constructions that do not entirely reminiscent of the well-known Southeast Asian rice terraces. Thanks to the cascading, undulating floors that come closer and closer together, natural air flows are created which ensure that even in the outdoor areas, despite the subtropical climate, it is pleasant to stay here. Recommended:  The Bicycle Metropolis: Why Still Investing In Car Parking? On the outside, highly efficient, perforated sun protection elements adorn the sleek façade. For the inside, the architects and engineers developed extensive slats with a depth of 1.2 to 2 meters, based on extensive climate and design studies. This created a unique dynamic space in the heart of the complex, which, consciously not as a European city square but as a 'city room', a Singaporean version of a city garden, should be seen as a relaxing place to relax, move and to meet each other. The British landscape architects Gustafson Porter + Bowman created here a green oasis with great biodiversity that invites haptic (soil material) as well as acoustic (birds and insects) to explore. Marine One In Singapore: Earth tones However, it did not stay with the creation of this green heart. This only covers part of the very complex building concept with a total of 175,000 square meters of gross floor area for offices, 115,000 square meters for living, 18,000 square meters for trade / gastronomy and 37,000 square meters of green space. In addition to the green heart on the first four floors, in the office buildings on floor 28 and 29 'sky gardens' are integrated, which are publicly accessible and where restaurants are located just below. The green spaces now cover up to 125 percent of the plot surface. Recommended:  Sustainable Architecture Today: How Does It Feel For You? Most are accessible to the general public - apart from the roof gardens, which serve as exclusive outdoor spaces for businesses and penthouses. The vegetation of the 'strata terraces', 'cloud garden', 'green screens' and 'rooftop gardens' varies greatly from floor to floor and with the different shades of color and plant structures it is a real enrichment of the otherwise rather strict high-tech façade. Incidentally, for the façade, Ingenhoven consciously took dark earth tones in order to contrast them nicely with the white of the former colonial buildings. Is Singapore visa free? Most visitors to Singapore can enter the country without a visa; however some visitors must first obtain a visa in advance before being allowed to enter Singapore. Citizens of almost 80% of the world's countries may travel to Singapore for a period of 30 days or 90 days without a visa, depending on their nationality. Marine One In Singapore: Hybrid Construction For Marina One, first a reinforced concrete skeleton was planned, but in the end the choice fell on a more advantageous option. In order to place the alternative hybrid construction from reinforced concrete and steel firmly on the soft surface of the newly reclaimed land, a very complex pile foundation was required. Another impressive element, both spatially and constructively, are the three 'suspended' floors of 10,000 square meters each connecting the two office buildings. And do not underestimate the great functionality of Marina One. For the mediated clientele, consisting mainly of financial companies and professionals who can pay an average of 14,762 euros per square meter, there is virtually nothing to be desired: three underground shop floors and direct access to two metro stations, a 2,400-square-meter gym with a ten-meter high climbing wall and a fifty meter long outdoor swimming pool, several 'signature' restaurants, a party zone, lounges, a 'resident clubhouse' and special teppanyaki and BBQ terraces. Marine One In Singapore: New Urban Exploration Is Singapore cheap for shopping? Situated between Little India in the north and Marina Bay in the south, the Bugis Street Market is one of the top shopping places in Singapore . It is known for being the cheapest market in the country for buying souvenirs, accessories, clothes, electronics, houseware, and cosmetics. The smart spatial and sustainable architectural solutions of Marina One can serve as a model for urban compaction projects at other locations. But the significance of this special project goes further. In Singapore, Marina One is part of a complete generation of new, green high-rise projects for an urban transformation and a change in the use wishes that they had not previously thought possible. It represents the desire for more and qualitative green spaces and outdoor spaces, the use of which actually increases despite the sometimes murderous subtropical climate. Recommended:  Climate Change And Its Effects Like Droughts: The Heat Is On Although Ingenhoven Architects and the supporting engineering firms Werner Sobek, DS-Plan and Arup Singapore with their complex design solutions managed to lower the temperature in the microclimate of Marina One compared to 'normal' with only a few degrees, the architecture entices many people to trust their familiar to leave the inner world more often. This new urban exploration is, in addition to the great energy values, the most impressive one at Marina One. Marine One In Singapore: Ground floor with park, public functions and entrances to homes, offices and parking Marine One: Microclimate In addition to the large green spaces, more surprising openings have been created, some of which are only visible from close by or even only on the floors in question. For example, vertical slits in which two air shafts are housed in different places run through different residential buildings in order to achieve a completely natural ventilation and thus a more pleasant outdoor climate. This effect is further enhanced by the smartly chosen dimensions and positioning of the slats on the park side. What is the coolest month in Singapore? Relative humidity is in the range of 70% – 80%. April is the warmest month, January is the coolest month and November is the wettest month. For the architects it still took a lot of steps to convince their client M + S, owned by the Singaporean investment company Temasek and the Malaysian state fund Khazanah, of these slots and slats. Both meant a significant investment and loss of useful floor space. Sustainability played a crucial role not only in the design of the inside, but also in the exterior of both buildings. For example, the different blocks with staggered frames and deeper loggias act as a kind of natural sunblind that helps to reduce the subtropical heat load on the 1,042 dwellings.                                                                     Multi story three demensial garden                                                     Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marine One In Singapore The fact that the plot is positioned slightly tilted in relation to the wind points was certainly also useful here. None of the facades is in fact oriented towards the very warm west. Thanks to a system for heat recovery, a rainwater collection system (for greywater and irrigation of the gardens), the greater heat tolerance to office temperatures of 24-26 degrees and the use of state-of-the-art glazing that prevents heat, the energy consumption is up to 35 percent lower than for this kind of complexes is common. This gave the project the Pre-Certification LEED Platinum and the Green Mark Platinum. Before you go! Recommended:  Greenest Buildings In The World: Sustainable Highlights Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about green sustainable architecture? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marine One In Singapore
Green Urban Sustainable Project: Marine One In Singapore
Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say And Resale Expect?
'I won't buy any clothes from fast fashion stores for a year... and hopefully for ever more'. Could you commit to not buying a single item of clothing from fast fashion outlets for an entire year? To only buying clothes from charity shops, second hand shops, or swapping or borrowing items? Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers The seven student in this article say they love fashion and insist their boycott of fast fashion won’t be about them turning their back on clothes. Instead, it will be about getting creative and finding sustainable alternatives. Let's read their motivation to buy only vintage fashion. Recommended:  Circular Sustainable Fashion: Biggest Trend Of The Century Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Niamh Guiry Age: 22 From: Bishopstown Studying: Microbiology (fourth year) Are vintage clothes second hand? On the other hand, vintage refers to a category contained within the second hand category, which is the category of clothes that, even though have been produced a while ago, still have a good quality and can be worn. Clothing has, generally speaking, a very short life span “I’ve decided to boycott fast fashion because no one should suffer so you can look ‘trendy’. I’m always trying to think of new ways that our society can promote sustainability and the issue of fast fashion has been on my mind for a while. “I had been reading about the atrocious human rights violations that occur in this industry and the amount of pollution and waste it creates and I decided that I wanted to try to make a difference. “I thought that pledging to only buy sustainable and second hand clothes for a year could be a good way to do that. I went into one of our weekly committee meeting and asked if anyone wanted to boycott with me. I was beyond thrilled when six hands shot up in the air. {youtube}                                                     Vintage Shopping In London + Trying On What I Got                                              Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say And Resale Expect? “Over the coming year, I’m going to buy as few clothes as possible. If I want to get ‘new’ clothes I’ll go to charity shops, to swap shops, I’ll ask my friends if they have anything I can borrow. “I have plenty clothes (the same as the vast majority of people) I don’t need any more. “I will admit that I absolutely love clothes and I love expressing myself through the clothes I wear. “Over the next year, I’m going to continue doing just that. You can live and shop sustainably and look good at the same time.” Recommended:  Sustainable Fashion From Bio-Materials Good For The World Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say.Caoimhe Flynn. Age: 22 From: Carrigtwohill Studying: BA International in English and German (final year) “Reports and news coverage have exposed time and time again the human rights abuses on which the fast fashion industry is built. “In the midst of the climate crisis, the mass production of ‘disposable’ clothing is also not sustainable. It results in the use of vast quantities of water, burning of fossil fuels and strain on already limited resources. “I aim to avoid increasing the amount of clothing I currently own. I will, however, replace items which are no longer wearable, particularly those that are necessary.  “In the last two years, I had already begun to shop more in the many second hand and charity shops in Cork.  “If I still cannot find what I am looking for, I will allow myself to buy from brands and companies who are dedicated to sustainable practices. “I do not envisage encountering many difficulties along the way, though I have to change my habit of taking the easy way out when something breaks suddenly. “Not popping into fast fashion retailers to buy little things like socks will probably be more difficult than I imagine! In the end however, I know that what I own is already more than enough.” What are the best online thrift stores? 8 Amazing Online Thrift Stores for the Coolest Vintage Clothes Ever ASOS MARKETPLACE. That's right, ASOS has a vintage website too! The Vintage Twin THREDUP Tradesy Maeven Refashioner LePrix Depop Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Isobel O’Connor Sealy Age: 19 From: Tallow, Co. Waterford Studying: Arts International (first year) “I’m boycotting fast fashion because I find it sickening that people work in slave-like conditions making clothes for people like me in developed countries just so we can look fashionable. “I’ll be buying from charity shops, taking hand-me-downs from family, exchanging clothes with friends, and going to swap-shops or kilo-sales to get myself new clothes during this boycott (and hopefully forever more!). “I enjoy knitting and sewing so perhaps I’ll make a few things or spice up some old pieces I have lying around. “I’ve always loved fashion and I find it’s a way for me to express myself. “I’ve also been a big shopper but recently, as I’ve become more aware of the negative impact the fashion industry has on both people and planet, I’ve mainly stuck to charity shops or swapped clothes with friends. “I imagine the allure of online shopping will be a challenge for me, but the knowledge I have now definitely outweighs the convenience of cheap clothing. “Basics, like underwear and socks, could potentially be a challenge too, but sustainable brands do exist should I need anything like that.” Recommended:  Fashion Minimalism, A Capsule Wardrobe: Dream Or Nightmare? Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Síofra Richardson Age: 21 From: Cobh Studying: World Languages (second year). “I’ve long been aware of the ethical and environmental violations of the fast fashion industry — I started a boycott myself when I was about 15, though I have since on and off allowed myself to buy various items from high street stores for different reasons. “It felt like the right time to start a proper boycott again, as there is massive momentum for climate action at the moment, and as a group we have the opportunity to have a bigger impact, using the Environmental Society platform where we are a little more visible to our university community. “I absolutely love clothes, though for years I’ve tried not to buy fast fashion. I prefer vintage pieces. I like to think of buying clothes as investments. I use Eco Age’s & wears challenge as a kind of a decision maker as to whether or not I should invest — is it something I will wear 30 or more times? Can I dress the piece up or down, and can it be worn year round? What is difference between vintage and antique? Here is the general rule to remember: Something antique is also vintage, but something vintage isn't necessarily antique. Vintage refers to something that is from an earlier generation. Antique refers to something that is over 100 years old “For my boycott I am going to attempt to buy no new clothes for the year. If I just feel like jazzing up my wardrobe, I’ll take part in a swap shop: bring clothes along to an event where I’ll leave them for someone else to pick up and love hopefully, and find something that was pre-loved. “If it comes to it, I will buy from second hand stores or from ethical companies that are 100% transparent and traceable — this means before investing in a piece researching the company, where it’s based, their human rights record. There are plenty of ethical companies out there though, a little pricier but personally I think it’s worth it. “The challenge I predict right now is formal wear — it’s not impossible to pick out formal dresses from second hand shops but it’s a bit more of a process! “Obviously, if something doesn’t fit you can’t just move up or down a size, so it’s either start all over or if it’s not far off you can get it altered. I have a few formal occasions this year so I’m looking forward to getting creative!” Recommended:  State Of Fashion: Searching For The New Luxury Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Rebecca Doocey Age: 20 From: Conna Studying: International Development and Food Policy (second year) “Being able to express myself through what I wear is inherently important to me — but I realised I couldn’t keep doing it at the expense of the planet and the people who worked to make the clothes, so I decided to boycott fast fashion. “Personally, for the next 52 weeks, I want to challenge myself to avoid buying clothes at all, and if I do need something I will only try buying second hand or from a sustainable source (Lucy & Yak are a great online producer of sustainably made clothes in a non-exploitative way). “I used to be a blind consumer, buying whatever I wanted just for the sake of it, until I ended up with a mountain of clothes I neither liked nor needed. “Though we’ve only pledged to give up fast fashion for a year, I plan on changing my consumer habits considerably for the future, buying only the necessities as I’m becoming more interested in a minimalistic lifestyle.” What is a vintage theme? What is a vintage theme? A vintage theme is one that uses items and decor that depicts a certain period in time, or the items themselves are aged Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Asha Woodhouse Age: 22 From: Gurranabraher Studying: Environmental Science (4th year) “I’m boycotting fast fashion in solidarity with people that suffer at the hands of mass producing unnecessary clothing for Western society. “The fashion industry must switch to a circular economic model, be transparent and take responsibility in ensuring compliance with workers’ rights and in having minimal environmental impact in its production processes. “If I need to buy something, I usually shop in a second hand store first. “There are some items I prefer to buy new such as sportswear and shoes, but there are plenty of brands that are transparent and sustainable in their production processes. “However, a lot of these brands are pricey, but I think this will help me in putting more thought into it before buying something — although I know I am privileged to be able to do this. “I don’t think I’ll find it too challenging, to be honest, I’ve been conscious of this and shopping in second hand stores since I was about 15. “Most of my favourite clothing is second hand. “The majority of fast fashion items I have bought recently have been with vouchers that I was gifted for birthdays and Christmas. “I think what I will find hard is buying basic items like vest tops, underwear, socks, and clothes for work.” Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Nevena Stoya Age: 24 From: Bulgaria, grew up in Spain Studying: Nutritional and Food sciences “I’ve been invested in a fast fashion boycott for over five years now, during which time I’ve been learning how to to minimise generic consumption. “I was brought up in an entrepreneurial family, my father a carpenter and mother a tailor, so producing necessities for myself is not unfamiliar to me. “Avoiding waste is part of the Slavic culture. I always had handmade and unique designs to wear as a kid. I grew to love fashion, but endurance and quality were things I struggled to find in many brands and fashion-houses. “My advice to anyone thinking of following us would be to start from the community education perspective of re-building our habits and lifestyle: use, re-style customise and recycle. Borrow from friends and family, swap in pop-up events locally, learn to fix and sew at Vibes and Scribes workshops and lessons (not only handy but great craic as well) or find your city’s professional tailors (Zipyard, or others). If you really do need to buy something, make it a last resort and do so in a more conscious and aware manner. Buy from charity and second hand shops, donating to meaningful causes or from NGOs such as Oxfam who work preventing clothing ending up in landfill. Buy from small and local outlets, choose organic cotton or recycled and sustainable fibres. “And for more advice, follow the Society’s Instagram page where I’ll feature a Cork guide to sustainable fashion.” Recommended:  Israeli 3D Printed Fashion As Sustainable Works Of Art Vintage Fashion: What Does the Resail Market Expect Reselling platforms are having a moment. This year, Nike took a pair of Air Max 1s off shelves because the shoes showcased an embroidered Betsy Ross. Like clockwork, interest in the kicks exploded. Nike ordered a recall of its new July Fourth-themed Air Max 1 sneakers over concerns about its Betsy Ross flag logo. Prices for the shoes rocketed on the website StockX Currently, on the sneaker resale site StockX, people have bid upwards of $2,700 to nab a pair of the Air Max 1s. And high-end fashion reseller The RealReal debuted on the Nasdaq with much fanfare. StockX, which just raised $110 million in new funding, and The RealReal represent a growing group of retailers once considered niche. Over the last few years, they’ve begun garnering more mainstream attention, causing some proponents to believe resale to be the next big wave in retail. In the U.S. alone, retail sales are expected to hit $3.8 trillion, according to the National Retail Federation. These new platforms exhibit a burgeoning industry, yet challenges lay ahead before they can truly compete with big retail brands. Reselling isn’t new: For decades, people have hawked their already-bought goods via sidewalk sales and thrift and vintage stores. Sites like eBay too provided way for individual sellers to cash in on used goods. Goodwill has been around since 1902. The latest wave of startups for second hand fashion is named; ‘modernized vintage’.” Resale has had a facelift! Vintage Fashion: The State Of Resale Platforms Flashy new resell platforms are catching people’s eyes. There are more consumers who are entering the resale market—both as sellers and as buyers. It is most certainly growing at a very rapid clip. The numbers forecast that the market for resold clothing, accessories, and footwear in the U.S. will hit $51 billion in 2023, more than double what it was last year. Meanwhile, older companies are dabbling with it as well. resale site Fashionphile has begun building out a program for shoppers to sell back their old clothes. H&M is reportedly making similar moves too. Both the startups and the older players tout these programs as moves toward better sustainability; instead of buying something cheap and throwing it out some months later, people can recycle their own fashion. This is the new consumer trend. What types of trends are there? Trend analysis is based on the idea that what has happened in the past gives traders an idea of what will happen in the future. There are three main types of trends: short-, intermediate- and long-term. Beyond the RealReal and StockX there are myriad other online resellers that use a variety of models. ThredUp, for instance, offers a website quite similar to other fashion retailers and department stores. All the clothing it sells, however, is used. People can send ThredUp their own unwanted pieces, for which they can received a small amount of cash or store credit. ThredUp has raised over $130 million in funding and business intelligence platform Owler estimates that the company brings in around nearly $40 million in revenue. Poshmark uses a more direct route, having sellers take pictures and ship their own products to buyers. In 2018, the company reportedly brought in nearly $150 million, and it’s been allegedly working toward going public later this year. Poshmark said it has over 50 million users and over $100 million of inventory is uploaded to its platform every week. Thus far, the company has raised nearly $160 million in venture capital. Modern Retail reached out to Poshmark and ThredUp for comment about the reselling market and their future plans, and they both provided statistics about growth and scale. Still, the overall impact is contested. ThredUp, in fact, commissioned a study (performed by GlobalData) that said the secondhand fashion resale market will eclipse fast fashion by 2028. Vintage Fashion: Challenges Ahead It’s unclear how many people are participating in this new digital resale industry. Only 21% of consumers had ever purchased anything second-hand. While many of these businesses are reporting growing numbers, their sales have yet come close to the billions of dollars in sales that even the ailing retailers are doing. Gap, for instance, reported over $16 billion in sales in 2018. The truth is, that it is hard to believe any of these niche companies getting to that level in the near future.” Still, if ever there were a time to make a splash in the resell market, now would be it. Given the RealReal’s debut and StockX’s massive money raise it inevitable for others to go public soon. There’s growing investors interest at this current juncture. There’s a window of opportunity now. Before you go! Recommended:  Black Friday Not Sustainable At All Especially For Fashion Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about 'buying and wearing vintage fashion'? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
'I won't buy any clothes from fast fashion stores for a year... and hopefully for ever more'. Could you commit to not buying a single item of clothing from fast fashion outlets for an entire year? To only buying clothes from charity shops, second hand shops, or swapping or borrowing items? Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers The seven student in this article say they love fashion and insist their boycott of fast fashion won’t be about them turning their back on clothes. Instead, it will be about getting creative and finding sustainable alternatives. Let's read their motivation to buy only vintage fashion. Recommended:  Circular Sustainable Fashion: Biggest Trend Of The Century Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Niamh Guiry Age: 22 From: Bishopstown Studying: Microbiology (fourth year) Are vintage clothes second hand? On the other hand, vintage refers to a category contained within the second hand category, which is the category of clothes that, even though have been produced a while ago, still have a good quality and can be worn. Clothing has, generally speaking, a very short life span “I’ve decided to boycott fast fashion because no one should suffer so you can look ‘trendy’. I’m always trying to think of new ways that our society can promote sustainability and the issue of fast fashion has been on my mind for a while. “I had been reading about the atrocious human rights violations that occur in this industry and the amount of pollution and waste it creates and I decided that I wanted to try to make a difference. “I thought that pledging to only buy sustainable and second hand clothes for a year could be a good way to do that. I went into one of our weekly committee meeting and asked if anyone wanted to boycott with me. I was beyond thrilled when six hands shot up in the air. {youtube}                                                     Vintage Shopping In London + Trying On What I Got                                              Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say And Resale Expect? “Over the coming year, I’m going to buy as few clothes as possible. If I want to get ‘new’ clothes I’ll go to charity shops, to swap shops, I’ll ask my friends if they have anything I can borrow. “I have plenty clothes (the same as the vast majority of people) I don’t need any more. “I will admit that I absolutely love clothes and I love expressing myself through the clothes I wear. “Over the next year, I’m going to continue doing just that. You can live and shop sustainably and look good at the same time.” Recommended:  Sustainable Fashion From Bio-Materials Good For The World Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say.Caoimhe Flynn. Age: 22 From: Carrigtwohill Studying: BA International in English and German (final year) “Reports and news coverage have exposed time and time again the human rights abuses on which the fast fashion industry is built. “In the midst of the climate crisis, the mass production of ‘disposable’ clothing is also not sustainable. It results in the use of vast quantities of water, burning of fossil fuels and strain on already limited resources. “I aim to avoid increasing the amount of clothing I currently own. I will, however, replace items which are no longer wearable, particularly those that are necessary.  “In the last two years, I had already begun to shop more in the many second hand and charity shops in Cork.  “If I still cannot find what I am looking for, I will allow myself to buy from brands and companies who are dedicated to sustainable practices. “I do not envisage encountering many difficulties along the way, though I have to change my habit of taking the easy way out when something breaks suddenly. “Not popping into fast fashion retailers to buy little things like socks will probably be more difficult than I imagine! In the end however, I know that what I own is already more than enough.” What are the best online thrift stores? 8 Amazing Online Thrift Stores for the Coolest Vintage Clothes Ever ASOS MARKETPLACE. That's right, ASOS has a vintage website too! The Vintage Twin THREDUP Tradesy Maeven Refashioner LePrix Depop Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Isobel O’Connor Sealy Age: 19 From: Tallow, Co. Waterford Studying: Arts International (first year) “I’m boycotting fast fashion because I find it sickening that people work in slave-like conditions making clothes for people like me in developed countries just so we can look fashionable. “I’ll be buying from charity shops, taking hand-me-downs from family, exchanging clothes with friends, and going to swap-shops or kilo-sales to get myself new clothes during this boycott (and hopefully forever more!). “I enjoy knitting and sewing so perhaps I’ll make a few things or spice up some old pieces I have lying around. “I’ve always loved fashion and I find it’s a way for me to express myself. “I’ve also been a big shopper but recently, as I’ve become more aware of the negative impact the fashion industry has on both people and planet, I’ve mainly stuck to charity shops or swapped clothes with friends. “I imagine the allure of online shopping will be a challenge for me, but the knowledge I have now definitely outweighs the convenience of cheap clothing. “Basics, like underwear and socks, could potentially be a challenge too, but sustainable brands do exist should I need anything like that.” Recommended:  Fashion Minimalism, A Capsule Wardrobe: Dream Or Nightmare? Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Síofra Richardson Age: 21 From: Cobh Studying: World Languages (second year). “I’ve long been aware of the ethical and environmental violations of the fast fashion industry — I started a boycott myself when I was about 15, though I have since on and off allowed myself to buy various items from high street stores for different reasons. “It felt like the right time to start a proper boycott again, as there is massive momentum for climate action at the moment, and as a group we have the opportunity to have a bigger impact, using the Environmental Society platform where we are a little more visible to our university community. “I absolutely love clothes, though for years I’ve tried not to buy fast fashion. I prefer vintage pieces. I like to think of buying clothes as investments. I use Eco Age’s & wears challenge as a kind of a decision maker as to whether or not I should invest — is it something I will wear 30 or more times? Can I dress the piece up or down, and can it be worn year round? What is difference between vintage and antique? Here is the general rule to remember: Something antique is also vintage, but something vintage isn't necessarily antique. Vintage refers to something that is from an earlier generation. Antique refers to something that is over 100 years old “For my boycott I am going to attempt to buy no new clothes for the year. If I just feel like jazzing up my wardrobe, I’ll take part in a swap shop: bring clothes along to an event where I’ll leave them for someone else to pick up and love hopefully, and find something that was pre-loved. “If it comes to it, I will buy from second hand stores or from ethical companies that are 100% transparent and traceable — this means before investing in a piece researching the company, where it’s based, their human rights record. There are plenty of ethical companies out there though, a little pricier but personally I think it’s worth it. “The challenge I predict right now is formal wear — it’s not impossible to pick out formal dresses from second hand shops but it’s a bit more of a process! “Obviously, if something doesn’t fit you can’t just move up or down a size, so it’s either start all over or if it’s not far off you can get it altered. I have a few formal occasions this year so I’m looking forward to getting creative!” Recommended:  State Of Fashion: Searching For The New Luxury Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Rebecca Doocey Age: 20 From: Conna Studying: International Development and Food Policy (second year) “Being able to express myself through what I wear is inherently important to me — but I realised I couldn’t keep doing it at the expense of the planet and the people who worked to make the clothes, so I decided to boycott fast fashion. “Personally, for the next 52 weeks, I want to challenge myself to avoid buying clothes at all, and if I do need something I will only try buying second hand or from a sustainable source (Lucy & Yak are a great online producer of sustainably made clothes in a non-exploitative way). “I used to be a blind consumer, buying whatever I wanted just for the sake of it, until I ended up with a mountain of clothes I neither liked nor needed. “Though we’ve only pledged to give up fast fashion for a year, I plan on changing my consumer habits considerably for the future, buying only the necessities as I’m becoming more interested in a minimalistic lifestyle.” What is a vintage theme? What is a vintage theme? A vintage theme is one that uses items and decor that depicts a certain period in time, or the items themselves are aged Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Asha Woodhouse Age: 22 From: Gurranabraher Studying: Environmental Science (4th year) “I’m boycotting fast fashion in solidarity with people that suffer at the hands of mass producing unnecessary clothing for Western society. “The fashion industry must switch to a circular economic model, be transparent and take responsibility in ensuring compliance with workers’ rights and in having minimal environmental impact in its production processes. “If I need to buy something, I usually shop in a second hand store first. “There are some items I prefer to buy new such as sportswear and shoes, but there are plenty of brands that are transparent and sustainable in their production processes. “However, a lot of these brands are pricey, but I think this will help me in putting more thought into it before buying something — although I know I am privileged to be able to do this. “I don’t think I’ll find it too challenging, to be honest, I’ve been conscious of this and shopping in second hand stores since I was about 15. “Most of my favourite clothing is second hand. “The majority of fast fashion items I have bought recently have been with vouchers that I was gifted for birthdays and Christmas. “I think what I will find hard is buying basic items like vest tops, underwear, socks, and clothes for work.” Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say. Nevena Stoya Age: 24 From: Bulgaria, grew up in Spain Studying: Nutritional and Food sciences “I’ve been invested in a fast fashion boycott for over five years now, during which time I’ve been learning how to to minimise generic consumption. “I was brought up in an entrepreneurial family, my father a carpenter and mother a tailor, so producing necessities for myself is not unfamiliar to me. “Avoiding waste is part of the Slavic culture. I always had handmade and unique designs to wear as a kid. I grew to love fashion, but endurance and quality were things I struggled to find in many brands and fashion-houses. “My advice to anyone thinking of following us would be to start from the community education perspective of re-building our habits and lifestyle: use, re-style customise and recycle. Borrow from friends and family, swap in pop-up events locally, learn to fix and sew at Vibes and Scribes workshops and lessons (not only handy but great craic as well) or find your city’s professional tailors (Zipyard, or others). If you really do need to buy something, make it a last resort and do so in a more conscious and aware manner. Buy from charity and second hand shops, donating to meaningful causes or from NGOs such as Oxfam who work preventing clothing ending up in landfill. Buy from small and local outlets, choose organic cotton or recycled and sustainable fibres. “And for more advice, follow the Society’s Instagram page where I’ll feature a Cork guide to sustainable fashion.” Recommended:  Israeli 3D Printed Fashion As Sustainable Works Of Art Vintage Fashion: What Does the Resail Market Expect Reselling platforms are having a moment. This year, Nike took a pair of Air Max 1s off shelves because the shoes showcased an embroidered Betsy Ross. Like clockwork, interest in the kicks exploded. Nike ordered a recall of its new July Fourth-themed Air Max 1 sneakers over concerns about its Betsy Ross flag logo. Prices for the shoes rocketed on the website StockX Currently, on the sneaker resale site StockX, people have bid upwards of $2,700 to nab a pair of the Air Max 1s. And high-end fashion reseller The RealReal debuted on the Nasdaq with much fanfare. StockX, which just raised $110 million in new funding, and The RealReal represent a growing group of retailers once considered niche. Over the last few years, they’ve begun garnering more mainstream attention, causing some proponents to believe resale to be the next big wave in retail. In the U.S. alone, retail sales are expected to hit $3.8 trillion, according to the National Retail Federation. These new platforms exhibit a burgeoning industry, yet challenges lay ahead before they can truly compete with big retail brands. Reselling isn’t new: For decades, people have hawked their already-bought goods via sidewalk sales and thrift and vintage stores. Sites like eBay too provided way for individual sellers to cash in on used goods. Goodwill has been around since 1902. The latest wave of startups for second hand fashion is named; ‘modernized vintage’.” Resale has had a facelift! Vintage Fashion: The State Of Resale Platforms Flashy new resell platforms are catching people’s eyes. There are more consumers who are entering the resale market—both as sellers and as buyers. It is most certainly growing at a very rapid clip. The numbers forecast that the market for resold clothing, accessories, and footwear in the U.S. will hit $51 billion in 2023, more than double what it was last year. Meanwhile, older companies are dabbling with it as well. resale site Fashionphile has begun building out a program for shoppers to sell back their old clothes. H&M is reportedly making similar moves too. Both the startups and the older players tout these programs as moves toward better sustainability; instead of buying something cheap and throwing it out some months later, people can recycle their own fashion. This is the new consumer trend. What types of trends are there? Trend analysis is based on the idea that what has happened in the past gives traders an idea of what will happen in the future. There are three main types of trends: short-, intermediate- and long-term. Beyond the RealReal and StockX there are myriad other online resellers that use a variety of models. ThredUp, for instance, offers a website quite similar to other fashion retailers and department stores. All the clothing it sells, however, is used. People can send ThredUp their own unwanted pieces, for which they can received a small amount of cash or store credit. ThredUp has raised over $130 million in funding and business intelligence platform Owler estimates that the company brings in around nearly $40 million in revenue. Poshmark uses a more direct route, having sellers take pictures and ship their own products to buyers. In 2018, the company reportedly brought in nearly $150 million, and it’s been allegedly working toward going public later this year. Poshmark said it has over 50 million users and over $100 million of inventory is uploaded to its platform every week. Thus far, the company has raised nearly $160 million in venture capital. Modern Retail reached out to Poshmark and ThredUp for comment about the reselling market and their future plans, and they both provided statistics about growth and scale. Still, the overall impact is contested. ThredUp, in fact, commissioned a study (performed by GlobalData) that said the secondhand fashion resale market will eclipse fast fashion by 2028. Vintage Fashion: Challenges Ahead It’s unclear how many people are participating in this new digital resale industry. Only 21% of consumers had ever purchased anything second-hand. While many of these businesses are reporting growing numbers, their sales have yet come close to the billions of dollars in sales that even the ailing retailers are doing. Gap, for instance, reported over $16 billion in sales in 2018. The truth is, that it is hard to believe any of these niche companies getting to that level in the near future.” Still, if ever there were a time to make a splash in the resell market, now would be it. Given the RealReal’s debut and StockX’s massive money raise it inevitable for others to go public soon. There’s growing investors interest at this current juncture. There’s a window of opportunity now. Before you go! Recommended:  Black Friday Not Sustainable At All Especially For Fashion Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about 'buying and wearing vintage fashion'? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Vintage Fashion: What Do Consumers Say And Resale Expect?
Digital Economy: Is Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet?
At a first glance, it seems as if the digital economy is benefitting our planet. After all, it does require a lot less (air) travel and production of physical goods, with meetings now being conducted in a virtual environment instead of in a remote city attendees will have to fly in to.   Digital Economy Similarly, we can now listen to our music or watch our movies online, instead of purchasing a physical object that requires a lot of energy and resources to make - not to mention the amount of plastic. We now trade, meet, consume, produce and work online, allowing us to get in touch with people across the world in near real-time. Boundaries are fading and so are restraints on time and place. Seems like a win for the environment. Unfortunately, there’s a dark side to most things - including the digital’s economy footprint on our planet.   Recommended:  Why Smart Phones Are Killing Our Planet One could look at the vehicles that we use for tuning in to the digital economy. Our smartphones, tablets and laptops are notorious sources of pollution and resource exhaustion through its production and operation processes. While rare earth elements are wasted for their manufacturing, the energy requirements of production factories, cloud computing and data centers are excessive. The world’s data centres produce about the same amount of carbon dioxide as global air travel.  Most of the energy that drives the digital economy is still generated using coal. One of the dirtiest energy generators is powering the movement that has promised to cut down on our emissions. As we stand today, this is preventing our digital economy from being compatible with the green economy the world is desperately trying to make a reality. {youtube}                                                Digital Economy: Is Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet?                                                              Datacenter, the hidden face of the web Digital Economy And Its Footprint. Coal Is Still King For The Internet So, in order to fuel the digital economy, we exploit the earth’s rare elements at an alarming rate. After all, our electric cars and iPhones 10 heavily rely on heavy metals and minerals that we are not only quickly running out of, but that are also dependant upon a very polluting production process. Add to this the disposable nature of the created goods and the lack of proper recycling, and it is not hard to see why our modern goodies have left such a dent in the earth’s wellbeing. Preliminary data (p) on the global production of rare earth elements, 1988-2018.   In China, for instance, one of the world’s largest producers of such metals and minerals, concerned voices are being raised about the effect that these heavy metals and radioactive materials have when released in water bodies, soil and air. These metals require immense amounts of energy to be processed and produced, while it leaves companies with alarming amounts of (radioactive) waste. Recommended:  Your Smartphone Is Polluting And Generating Massive Waste Satellite image of the Bayan Obo mine in China, taken on June 30, 2006. Vegetation appears in red, grassland is light brown, rocks are black and the water surfaces are green To power this production process, coal is still the preferred source. Unfortunately, this is also the largest contributor to climate change. This leads to the digital economy speeding up global warming, instead of tapping in its potential for reducing it. Digital Economy: Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet. Energy Hogs The energy hogging already starts at the production stage. From there, it keeps on going - with the immense amounts of energy required to keep our digital economy going. Just look at data centers, which are essentially warehouses for the transmitted data. These bad boys have been credited with emitting a massive 2% of the total global greenhouse gas emissions. This places them in the same league as global air travel.   So we might travel less because of the digital economy, but this alternative has an eerily similar effect on our environment. A recent report in Asia pointed out that the Chinese data centers alone have produced about 100 million tonnes of carbon dioxide in 2018. This roughly correlates with 21 million cars driven for one year. Speaking of cars versus the digital economy. Artificial intelligence is on the rise, yet at a pretty large cost. The feeding of data into a single computer and asking it to make predictions based on it requires the same amount of energy as the average American car in its lifetime.   Another popular digital trend is that of blockchain technologies, powering cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. Unfortunately, the energy that is required to create one dollar worth of Bitcoin is about twice the amount of energy it costs to produce one dollar worth of gold, platinum of copper. Recommended:  Bitcoin Mining: Why Would You Waste Energy All of this is not to mention the so-called ‘e-waste’, or the waste generated by data centers and other products of the digital economy. Often toxic and even more often impossible to recycle, this poses yet another risk. Digital Economy: It’s Footprint Threatening Our Planet? Thinking Differently There are two major things changing in the world right now. First, the trend of sustainability and the creation of a green economy. Second, the growing digitisation. While these two are largely incompatible today, there definitely is room to marry the two and move forward towards a greener digital economy.   We will have to start thinking differently. About recycling and disposing waste. About using greener energy sources to power our data centers. About alternative metals and materials that can be used in our smart phones. The digital economy has brought us a lot, that is undeniable. Now it is time for us to figure out what we can do for the digital economy to make it healthier for all of us. Before you go! Recommended:  Digital Ecosystem For The Environment: Big Data Worldwide Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the effect of smart phones in your neighborhood? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
At a first glance, it seems as if the digital economy is benefitting our planet. After all, it does require a lot less (air) travel and production of physical goods, with meetings now being conducted in a virtual environment instead of in a remote city attendees will have to fly in to.   Digital Economy Similarly, we can now listen to our music or watch our movies online, instead of purchasing a physical object that requires a lot of energy and resources to make - not to mention the amount of plastic. We now trade, meet, consume, produce and work online, allowing us to get in touch with people across the world in near real-time. Boundaries are fading and so are restraints on time and place. Seems like a win for the environment. Unfortunately, there’s a dark side to most things - including the digital’s economy footprint on our planet.   Recommended:  Why Smart Phones Are Killing Our Planet One could look at the vehicles that we use for tuning in to the digital economy. Our smartphones, tablets and laptops are notorious sources of pollution and resource exhaustion through its production and operation processes. While rare earth elements are wasted for their manufacturing, the energy requirements of production factories, cloud computing and data centers are excessive. The world’s data centres produce about the same amount of carbon dioxide as global air travel.  Most of the energy that drives the digital economy is still generated using coal. One of the dirtiest energy generators is powering the movement that has promised to cut down on our emissions. As we stand today, this is preventing our digital economy from being compatible with the green economy the world is desperately trying to make a reality. {youtube}                                                Digital Economy: Is Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet?                                                              Datacenter, the hidden face of the web Digital Economy And Its Footprint. Coal Is Still King For The Internet So, in order to fuel the digital economy, we exploit the earth’s rare elements at an alarming rate. After all, our electric cars and iPhones 10 heavily rely on heavy metals and minerals that we are not only quickly running out of, but that are also dependant upon a very polluting production process. Add to this the disposable nature of the created goods and the lack of proper recycling, and it is not hard to see why our modern goodies have left such a dent in the earth’s wellbeing. Preliminary data (p) on the global production of rare earth elements, 1988-2018.   In China, for instance, one of the world’s largest producers of such metals and minerals, concerned voices are being raised about the effect that these heavy metals and radioactive materials have when released in water bodies, soil and air. These metals require immense amounts of energy to be processed and produced, while it leaves companies with alarming amounts of (radioactive) waste. Recommended:  Your Smartphone Is Polluting And Generating Massive Waste Satellite image of the Bayan Obo mine in China, taken on June 30, 2006. Vegetation appears in red, grassland is light brown, rocks are black and the water surfaces are green To power this production process, coal is still the preferred source. Unfortunately, this is also the largest contributor to climate change. This leads to the digital economy speeding up global warming, instead of tapping in its potential for reducing it. Digital Economy: Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet. Energy Hogs The energy hogging already starts at the production stage. From there, it keeps on going - with the immense amounts of energy required to keep our digital economy going. Just look at data centers, which are essentially warehouses for the transmitted data. These bad boys have been credited with emitting a massive 2% of the total global greenhouse gas emissions. This places them in the same league as global air travel.   So we might travel less because of the digital economy, but this alternative has an eerily similar effect on our environment. A recent report in Asia pointed out that the Chinese data centers alone have produced about 100 million tonnes of carbon dioxide in 2018. This roughly correlates with 21 million cars driven for one year. Speaking of cars versus the digital economy. Artificial intelligence is on the rise, yet at a pretty large cost. The feeding of data into a single computer and asking it to make predictions based on it requires the same amount of energy as the average American car in its lifetime.   Another popular digital trend is that of blockchain technologies, powering cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. Unfortunately, the energy that is required to create one dollar worth of Bitcoin is about twice the amount of energy it costs to produce one dollar worth of gold, platinum of copper. Recommended:  Bitcoin Mining: Why Would You Waste Energy All of this is not to mention the so-called ‘e-waste’, or the waste generated by data centers and other products of the digital economy. Often toxic and even more often impossible to recycle, this poses yet another risk. Digital Economy: It’s Footprint Threatening Our Planet? Thinking Differently There are two major things changing in the world right now. First, the trend of sustainability and the creation of a green economy. Second, the growing digitisation. While these two are largely incompatible today, there definitely is room to marry the two and move forward towards a greener digital economy.   We will have to start thinking differently. About recycling and disposing waste. About using greener energy sources to power our data centers. About alternative metals and materials that can be used in our smart phones. The digital economy has brought us a lot, that is undeniable. Now it is time for us to figure out what we can do for the digital economy to make it healthier for all of us. Before you go! Recommended:  Digital Ecosystem For The Environment: Big Data Worldwide Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the effect of smart phones in your neighborhood? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Digital Economy: Is Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet?
Digital Economy: Is Its Footprint Threatening Our Planet?
Community

A community is you and me. A network of social, economic, ecological and many other relationships. We all work together and live in urban, suburban and rural areas. Social sustainability is becoming increasingly important on our small planet. We define: support, quality of life, development, adaptation, rights and labour.

We belong to a group of individuals - our society - in which we belong geographically. Certain environmental issues play an important role in our society. Here, sustainable solutions are sought, developed and implemented. This may differ from societies in other countries, but because of our global environmental issues and dependence, we must learn to work more together so that we can all benefit from sharing sustainable knowledge to tackle, for example, climate change.

Green architecture is important. Building with local materials that can be recycled and reused brings us a big step forward to have less impact on the environment. With green architecture we can build smart cities where resources can be used more efficiently and information can be shared, thus improving our society, your community.

Lifestyle is the way we live, the dynamics of personality. Fashion defines our self and together with food it is getting - at present - an even more important role in our society. It's not just about taste, but especially about the burden that the fashion industry, agriculture and the meat industry have on our resources, especially water.

If there was an urge to come up with a sustainable way of living solutions and share these topics globally it’s now! WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-change Platform is for you, storytellers and influencers to write about tiny houses, your experiences and expectations for the future at home and globally. 

Global Sustainability X-change, that’s what you can do together with WhatsOrb. What's in for me?

 

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