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Climate Change: Groundwater An Out-Of-Sight Crisis
Attention for climate change worldwide? Fortunately, yes. However, the groundwater challenge's effects are still underexposed — time to tackle this out-of-sight, growing crisis. Climate Change: Groundwater An out-of-sight Crisis Groundwater Is A Valuable Resource Groundwater is a valuable resource that meets many of the hydrological needs of people and habitats worldwide. Groundwater provides a safety net against climate change; it contributes to streams in rivers and lakes, supports aquifers' proper functioning, and promotes economic activity. A durable and flourishing future depends on surface water. The quality and also the quantity of groundwater are affected by long periods of drought and flooding. This is a consequence of the extreme events and variations in precipitation caused by climate change. {youtube}                     War For Water: What Happens When Asia's Rivers Dry Up? | The Longest Day | Climate Change 6 Million People Rely On California's Groundwater More than 6 million people in California depend on groundwater for water supply. In times of drought, this amounts to almost 60% of the freshwater used throughout California. In agricultural areas, such as Central Valley, this is even higher. If less groundwater is available, this harms infrastructure, agricultural productivity, and ecosystems. Besides, rising sea levels can penetrate coastal aquifers, polluting drinking water sources. Photo by Rolf Schulten. The California Aqueduct moves water from the state’s wetter north to the drier south. But it can’t carry enough water to prevent overpumping of groundwater.   Recommended:  Blue Planet Earth: The Amount Of Water You Use Indirect Effects Caused By Humans Worldwide Because we initiate environmental changes worldwide, the groundwater supply also is under pressure. There are more intensive land use and domestic activities. In India, there was a "silent revolution" as a result of undifferentiated extraction. This has resulted in an annual groundwater use that is more than that of both the U.S. and China combined. Photo by Vietnam News/ANN. Canals severely polluted for years and have been affecting local people’s health (Viet Nam News/ANN) Recommended:  Asia’s Water War: Is The Mekong Still A River? The Role Of Groundwater In Water And Food Supply That groundwater plays an essential role in water supply, and food security is clear. There is an urgent need for up-to-date research, raising awareness, and sharing knowledge about climate change and groundwater. Only then can we make a change, and sustainable use will remain. This will strongly lead to the achievement of SDG 6 (clean water and sanitation) and other SDG's, like poverty eradication (SDG 1), fighting climate change (SDG 13), food security (SDG 2), and gender equality (SDG 5). A True Opportunity in Hand The relationship between groundwater and climate change must be further investigated, with extra focus on the effects of a changing climate on the subsurface. International organizations, academics, policymakers, businesses, and citizens need to approach these interrelations by taking four steps to good decision-making. First, share and inform people about the latest scientific investigation, tools, methodologies, technologies, and policy approaches to climate change and groundwater. It would help if you raised awareness about climate change and groundwater. Secondly, gather practical information, performed on-site, reporting on links between groundwater and climate change. These can be an inspiring source of change that can be reproduced. Third, make it easy for people to participate in political and scientific discussions. Organize collaborative events between established networks, experts, partners, and other key stakeholders, and have exchange knowledge sessions. This will raise the awareness to create solutions. Lastly, promote sharing and exchange scientific studies about the effects of climate change on groundwater. When information is way more approachable, there will be room for discussion. It is our job to circulate these issues through our network. Let's bring these issues up in meetings, governance, and legislative processes. Photo by Rowan Heuvel.  Jaipur, Rajasthan, India Recommended:  Ireland Is Leaking 760 Million Litres Water A day Conclusion The effects of the groundwater challenge are still underexposed. Still, eventually, with more policy and scientific research, decision-making processes should be improved. The sustainable use and management of groundwater globally need an improvement to aim goals, like SDG 6 and other related purposes. Our near future depends on it. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change, Water Scarcity, Hunger: Who Cares Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about worlds water supply? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Attention for climate change worldwide? Fortunately, yes. However, the groundwater challenge's effects are still underexposed — time to tackle this out-of-sight, growing crisis. Climate Change: Groundwater An out-of-sight Crisis Groundwater Is A Valuable Resource Groundwater is a valuable resource that meets many of the hydrological needs of people and habitats worldwide. Groundwater provides a safety net against climate change; it contributes to streams in rivers and lakes, supports aquifers' proper functioning, and promotes economic activity. A durable and flourishing future depends on surface water. The quality and also the quantity of groundwater are affected by long periods of drought and flooding. This is a consequence of the extreme events and variations in precipitation caused by climate change. {youtube}                     War For Water: What Happens When Asia's Rivers Dry Up? | The Longest Day | Climate Change 6 Million People Rely On California's Groundwater More than 6 million people in California depend on groundwater for water supply. In times of drought, this amounts to almost 60% of the freshwater used throughout California. In agricultural areas, such as Central Valley, this is even higher. If less groundwater is available, this harms infrastructure, agricultural productivity, and ecosystems. Besides, rising sea levels can penetrate coastal aquifers, polluting drinking water sources. Photo by Rolf Schulten. The California Aqueduct moves water from the state’s wetter north to the drier south. But it can’t carry enough water to prevent overpumping of groundwater.   Recommended:  Blue Planet Earth: The Amount Of Water You Use Indirect Effects Caused By Humans Worldwide Because we initiate environmental changes worldwide, the groundwater supply also is under pressure. There are more intensive land use and domestic activities. In India, there was a "silent revolution" as a result of undifferentiated extraction. This has resulted in an annual groundwater use that is more than that of both the U.S. and China combined. Photo by Vietnam News/ANN. Canals severely polluted for years and have been affecting local people’s health (Viet Nam News/ANN) Recommended:  Asia’s Water War: Is The Mekong Still A River? The Role Of Groundwater In Water And Food Supply That groundwater plays an essential role in water supply, and food security is clear. There is an urgent need for up-to-date research, raising awareness, and sharing knowledge about climate change and groundwater. Only then can we make a change, and sustainable use will remain. This will strongly lead to the achievement of SDG 6 (clean water and sanitation) and other SDG's, like poverty eradication (SDG 1), fighting climate change (SDG 13), food security (SDG 2), and gender equality (SDG 5). A True Opportunity in Hand The relationship between groundwater and climate change must be further investigated, with extra focus on the effects of a changing climate on the subsurface. International organizations, academics, policymakers, businesses, and citizens need to approach these interrelations by taking four steps to good decision-making. First, share and inform people about the latest scientific investigation, tools, methodologies, technologies, and policy approaches to climate change and groundwater. It would help if you raised awareness about climate change and groundwater. Secondly, gather practical information, performed on-site, reporting on links between groundwater and climate change. These can be an inspiring source of change that can be reproduced. Third, make it easy for people to participate in political and scientific discussions. Organize collaborative events between established networks, experts, partners, and other key stakeholders, and have exchange knowledge sessions. This will raise the awareness to create solutions. Lastly, promote sharing and exchange scientific studies about the effects of climate change on groundwater. When information is way more approachable, there will be room for discussion. It is our job to circulate these issues through our network. Let's bring these issues up in meetings, governance, and legislative processes. Photo by Rowan Heuvel.  Jaipur, Rajasthan, India Recommended:  Ireland Is Leaking 760 Million Litres Water A day Conclusion The effects of the groundwater challenge are still underexposed. Still, eventually, with more policy and scientific research, decision-making processes should be improved. The sustainable use and management of groundwater globally need an improvement to aim goals, like SDG 6 and other related purposes. Our near future depends on it. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change, Water Scarcity, Hunger: Who Cares Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about worlds water supply? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Climate Change: Groundwater An Out-Of-Sight Crisis
Climate Change: Groundwater An Out-Of-Sight Crisis
Climate Change Fought By The Kingdom of Bhutan
Bhutan is one of the most pristine hotspots of biodiversity in the world. About 72 percent of the country is covered with forest, and with the approval of the population, the government has declared 60 percent of the forests as a protected area. Bhutan's glaciers withdraw because they melt, leading to dangerous flooding and water scarcity despite this attention to the environment. Climate Change Fought By The Kingdom of Bhutan This story is from National Geographic to promote natural research and nature conservation. Both organizations are focused on the joint support of experienced naturalists, guiding novice researchers, and protecting natural wonders. Recommended:  Climate Change: China Floods The Arctic On Fire Bhutan is about Switzerland's size and certainly has no less mountainous - although geographically, it is much more isolated. In the south, landlocked Bhutan borders India, while the mighty Himalayas forms the northern border. Before 1974, Bhutan was completely closed to tourists and most foreigners, and even now, only a handful of paying visitors are admitted at a time. The kingdom can boast a lively and ancient culture and beautiful scenery. The Gangkhar Puensum, according to many, the highest mountain that has never been climbed, rises 7570 meters in the clouds. Apart from an outdoor feeling for adventure, it would help if you had a lot of money to visit this unique principality. Silver firs form dense vegetation in this forest in Bhutan. The Bhutan Constitution guarantees that 60% of the forests in the country will remain protected. The Kingdom Of Bhutan Fought Climate Change. The Slovenian photographer Ciril Jazbec is one of the few lucky people who have visited Bhutan. Recently he traveled through this country, past villages and vast forests, and spoke to the people. The result of his journey is a personal look behind the scenes of a mysterious little country that few foreigners ever get to see. His photographs range from traditional rural scenes that may seem surprisingly modern to outsiders. And because we are talking about Bhutan, we also see imposing mountains with dense, green forests in the background. All in all, his photographs give the impression of a special place that shows two sides: of history and change, of old and new, of adaptation and resilience. Both ancient traditions and renewal characterize this predominantly Buddhist country. It is probably best known for its happy people and beautiful forests, which have escaped the threat of environmental degradation. Jazbec discusses this in more detail. Recommended:  Hurting The Environment: The Palm Oil Paradox Bhutan Must Develop New Infrastructure. At the end of the last century, the Bhutanese government introduced a socio-economic indicator, referred to as 'Gross National Happiness.' The indicator functions as a social thermometer and should prevent the country's economic development from supplanting the population's traditional way of life. The idea was praised all over the world as original and humanitarian. During their work on a rice field in Laya, two peasant women take a break. Last year, Laya was connected to the power grid for the first time. The connection was welcomed because the nearest village is several days' walk away.  But of course, with the introduction of the 'BNG,' not all problems of the country are solved. In the recent World Happiness Report of the UN, Bhutan was 97th place, mainly attributed to income inequality and unemployment. Recommended:  Climate Change: Natural Or man Made? Let's See! Another growing problem is that the country's limited and vulnerable ecosystem is being affected by climate change. Bhutan's glaciers are melting, causing sudden flooding, and the rainy season is becoming increasingly irregular, leading to water shortages in dry seasons. But although little Bhutan cannot be held responsible for the greenhouse gases that blow the rest of the world into the atmosphere, the country reacts by sharpening its own environmental rules - which are already very strict. About sixty percent of the Bhutanese forests are protected areas, and new infrastructure must be developed sustainably. More attention is paid to electric public transport and hybrid cars than to the traditional vehicle fleet development. With this kind of measure, Bhutan not only manages to remain CO2-neutral but even acts as a 'storage place' of CO2: thanks to its vast forests, Bhutan absorbs more CO2 from the air than emissions. The Bhutanese attention to the fight against climate change was emphasized once again last year by the country's prime minister. His message about the ambitious measures that the country would take in light of the changing climate was why the photographer Jazbec visited the country and recorded the population's resilience. "Bhutan really has an extraordinary relationship with the environment," says Jazbec. "I've never seen anything like this before." Fighting Climate Change: Taking Care Of The Environment Jazbec has made photographs of communities facing climate change worldwide, but Bhutan, who, because of his non-disabled people, touched a sensitive chord. When Jazbec visited the kingdom last year, he was shown around by a 'fixer' or local guide, who showed him several villages. One day Jazbec tried to drive a moth off the screen of his laptop. According to the photographer, his fixer was so upset about what he saw that he appealed to his foreign guest. "He told me that all living beings have a soul," says Jazbec. "He accepted the fact that animals need space." Recommended:  Environmental Activism Is For Everyone, Not Just Scientists That feeling comes, of course, partly from the main religion in the country, Buddhism. Jazbec saw that many people in Bhutan were trying to take good care of the environment. Whether they were motivated by their religion, their community, or by a less tangible concept, Jazbec noticed how cautiously people dealt with nature and their animals. As an outsider, he wanted to capture the essence of a country that had long been described as a 'Shangri-La,' an idea that Westerners have always addressed but that they have never been able to grasp. Archery is the national sport of Bhutan and is practiced by young and old.  Photos by Of Ciril Jazbec Before you go! Recommended:  Global Cooling Or Warming: Will It Kill Us? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about climate change? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Bhutan is one of the most pristine hotspots of biodiversity in the world. About 72 percent of the country is covered with forest, and with the approval of the population, the government has declared 60 percent of the forests as a protected area. Bhutan's glaciers withdraw because they melt, leading to dangerous flooding and water scarcity despite this attention to the environment. Climate Change Fought By The Kingdom of Bhutan This story is from National Geographic to promote natural research and nature conservation. Both organizations are focused on the joint support of experienced naturalists, guiding novice researchers, and protecting natural wonders. Recommended:  Climate Change: China Floods The Arctic On Fire Bhutan is about Switzerland's size and certainly has no less mountainous - although geographically, it is much more isolated. In the south, landlocked Bhutan borders India, while the mighty Himalayas forms the northern border. Before 1974, Bhutan was completely closed to tourists and most foreigners, and even now, only a handful of paying visitors are admitted at a time. The kingdom can boast a lively and ancient culture and beautiful scenery. The Gangkhar Puensum, according to many, the highest mountain that has never been climbed, rises 7570 meters in the clouds. Apart from an outdoor feeling for adventure, it would help if you had a lot of money to visit this unique principality. Silver firs form dense vegetation in this forest in Bhutan. The Bhutan Constitution guarantees that 60% of the forests in the country will remain protected. The Kingdom Of Bhutan Fought Climate Change. The Slovenian photographer Ciril Jazbec is one of the few lucky people who have visited Bhutan. Recently he traveled through this country, past villages and vast forests, and spoke to the people. The result of his journey is a personal look behind the scenes of a mysterious little country that few foreigners ever get to see. His photographs range from traditional rural scenes that may seem surprisingly modern to outsiders. And because we are talking about Bhutan, we also see imposing mountains with dense, green forests in the background. All in all, his photographs give the impression of a special place that shows two sides: of history and change, of old and new, of adaptation and resilience. Both ancient traditions and renewal characterize this predominantly Buddhist country. It is probably best known for its happy people and beautiful forests, which have escaped the threat of environmental degradation. Jazbec discusses this in more detail. Recommended:  Hurting The Environment: The Palm Oil Paradox Bhutan Must Develop New Infrastructure. At the end of the last century, the Bhutanese government introduced a socio-economic indicator, referred to as 'Gross National Happiness.' The indicator functions as a social thermometer and should prevent the country's economic development from supplanting the population's traditional way of life. The idea was praised all over the world as original and humanitarian. During their work on a rice field in Laya, two peasant women take a break. Last year, Laya was connected to the power grid for the first time. The connection was welcomed because the nearest village is several days' walk away.  But of course, with the introduction of the 'BNG,' not all problems of the country are solved. In the recent World Happiness Report of the UN, Bhutan was 97th place, mainly attributed to income inequality and unemployment. Recommended:  Climate Change: Natural Or man Made? Let's See! Another growing problem is that the country's limited and vulnerable ecosystem is being affected by climate change. Bhutan's glaciers are melting, causing sudden flooding, and the rainy season is becoming increasingly irregular, leading to water shortages in dry seasons. But although little Bhutan cannot be held responsible for the greenhouse gases that blow the rest of the world into the atmosphere, the country reacts by sharpening its own environmental rules - which are already very strict. About sixty percent of the Bhutanese forests are protected areas, and new infrastructure must be developed sustainably. More attention is paid to electric public transport and hybrid cars than to the traditional vehicle fleet development. With this kind of measure, Bhutan not only manages to remain CO2-neutral but even acts as a 'storage place' of CO2: thanks to its vast forests, Bhutan absorbs more CO2 from the air than emissions. The Bhutanese attention to the fight against climate change was emphasized once again last year by the country's prime minister. His message about the ambitious measures that the country would take in light of the changing climate was why the photographer Jazbec visited the country and recorded the population's resilience. "Bhutan really has an extraordinary relationship with the environment," says Jazbec. "I've never seen anything like this before." Fighting Climate Change: Taking Care Of The Environment Jazbec has made photographs of communities facing climate change worldwide, but Bhutan, who, because of his non-disabled people, touched a sensitive chord. When Jazbec visited the kingdom last year, he was shown around by a 'fixer' or local guide, who showed him several villages. One day Jazbec tried to drive a moth off the screen of his laptop. According to the photographer, his fixer was so upset about what he saw that he appealed to his foreign guest. "He told me that all living beings have a soul," says Jazbec. "He accepted the fact that animals need space." Recommended:  Environmental Activism Is For Everyone, Not Just Scientists That feeling comes, of course, partly from the main religion in the country, Buddhism. Jazbec saw that many people in Bhutan were trying to take good care of the environment. Whether they were motivated by their religion, their community, or by a less tangible concept, Jazbec noticed how cautiously people dealt with nature and their animals. As an outsider, he wanted to capture the essence of a country that had long been described as a 'Shangri-La,' an idea that Westerners have always addressed but that they have never been able to grasp. Archery is the national sport of Bhutan and is practiced by young and old.  Photos by Of Ciril Jazbec Before you go! Recommended:  Global Cooling Or Warming: Will It Kill Us? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about climate change? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Climate Change Fought By The Kingdom of Bhutan
Climate Change Fought By The Kingdom of Bhutan
Climate Change By Risky Business: We Are Screwed!
The last thing that you may want to hear right now, is that we are royally screwed. Although those of us with a more fatalistic disposition may already find this thought racing through our minds pretty often lately, we are generally still clinging on to some kind of false hope. A pretense that everything is going to be OK again, that things are not as bad as they may seem. Risky Business: JP Morgan Chase Fires Back Although it is understandable that we are clinging onto whatever positives - or not so negatives - that we may be looking at, perhaps it would help our planet if our species would not suffer from the urge to try and be so irrevocably glass-half-full all the time. {youtube}                                             Leaked JPMorgan Report: 'Cannot Rule Out' Human Extinction Two economists working for JP Morgan Chase surely understood this, when they decided to lash out at conventional climate change beliefs. Funny, as this company is probably one of the world’s leading financiers of fossil fuel projects. And they can no longer feign innocence, as the internal report those two wrote was leaked and now makes a bold claim: the world is seriously underestimating how climate change will affect us. Recommended:  Climate Change: China Floods The Arctic On Fire In a 22-page essay by UK economists David Mackie and Jessica Murray, aptly titled ‘Risky Business: the Climate and the Macroeconomy’, they painted a pretty gloom picture of our future. As it turns out, the consequences of climate change for our economy as a whole can be pretty drastic. The pair even goes so far as stating that, “ We cannot rule out catastrophic outcomes where human life as we know it is threatened .” JP Morgan Chase was quick to retract their claim, saying that it was “wholly independent from the company as a whole” as soon as they realized it had been leaked after it was sent to the bank’s clients. But this does not change the message within, that is looking at the impact of climate change on GDP - and reviews existing literature on this topic. In the end, they conclude that “ these estimates of the income and wealth effects of unmitigated climate change are far too small .”   Climate Impact Will Not Be Linear These estimates include research by Richard Told, who claims that warming of up to 2.5 degrees Celsius might even have a positive impact on GDP; and by Mark Lynas, who said that a 6 degrees Celsius rise in temperature could only impact GDP by some 7%.   Those are at the low end of the spectrum, with other studies putting the impact at up to a 23% hit to the GDP by the year 2100. Yet those numbers are still way too optimistic, or so Mackie and Murray claim. They refute the approach that many scientists before them took to calculate the impact, that largely focuses on the use of climate economy models, in which a linear model is utilized.   Recommended:  Oceans Suffocated: The World According To WhatsOrb This means that climate impacts will be linear, allowing for high discount rates as investments in the short-term will then be more expensive than investments at a later time - as the same amount of money will be less meaningful in the future. Effectively, this puts the burden of action on later generations, an idea that is widely criticized.   As the authors of this paper claim, there is no such thing as a linear evolvement when it comes to global warming. Chances are that there will be much more abrupt effects, such as rapid ice-sheet disintegration. Additionally, the economic effects are largely benchmarked based on the historical data of the last few decades, where we already saw a rise in temperature and precipitation. Unfortunately, there was not enough variability in these sets to even pretend any future projects would be accurate. What all of this means? A gross underestimation of the financial impact of climate change. Courtesy of JP Morgan Chase, one of the multinationals most to blame for the whole phenomenon. You’re welcome. Climate Change: Carbon Pricing Is Not Enough Carbon pricing is our current go-to for trying to save up for any climate-related costs. JP Morgan Chase is one of the biggest supporters of a carbon-tax plan that is based on the models that are now so heavily criticized in a paper from the hand of their own employees. This plan includes a tax of $40 per ton of carbon dioxide. This is grossly inadequate, as many economists were quick to point out. Even analysts of ExxonMobil, the initiator of this tax, claimed that at least $75 per ton would be necessary - for stabilizing our emissions back in 1991 (!). Go figure how much that ought to be today. Recommended:  Our Focus On CO2 Alone: Other Climate Culprits Carbon pricing in and of itself is definitely not bad. It is a decent safeguard for any policies that we will ultimately need to remedy the worst consequences of global warming. We just need to listen to financial economists instead of climate economists if we want to settle on an adequate price. Some leading experts have already stated that, although they would not quote a number, it could not “ in good conscience get lower than $125 ”. The actual pricing is difficult and not even the point. As one expert said, " it could be $200 per ton or $400 per ton. There are so many uncertainties that presenting one number is just insane. It’s uncomfortable for an economist to say, but the grand conclusion is a bit of humility. We can’t tell you about the grand solution. Everything we know about how to price a ton of carbon dioxide tells us that it seems to be much, much worse than the standard climate economy models tell us. ” Translation? We will be royally screwed if we continue to underestimate the economical costs associated with global warming. Passing it on to future generations on some lewd depreciation model just is not fair - nor is it realistic. We should not just find ways of tempering global warming, we also ought to find better ways of buying ourselves proper insurance for it. Before you go! Recommended:  Global Cooling Or Warming: Will It Kill Us? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about rising sea levels and climate change? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
The last thing that you may want to hear right now, is that we are royally screwed. Although those of us with a more fatalistic disposition may already find this thought racing through our minds pretty often lately, we are generally still clinging on to some kind of false hope. A pretense that everything is going to be OK again, that things are not as bad as they may seem. Risky Business: JP Morgan Chase Fires Back Although it is understandable that we are clinging onto whatever positives - or not so negatives - that we may be looking at, perhaps it would help our planet if our species would not suffer from the urge to try and be so irrevocably glass-half-full all the time. {youtube}                                             Leaked JPMorgan Report: 'Cannot Rule Out' Human Extinction Two economists working for JP Morgan Chase surely understood this, when they decided to lash out at conventional climate change beliefs. Funny, as this company is probably one of the world’s leading financiers of fossil fuel projects. And they can no longer feign innocence, as the internal report those two wrote was leaked and now makes a bold claim: the world is seriously underestimating how climate change will affect us. Recommended:  Climate Change: China Floods The Arctic On Fire In a 22-page essay by UK economists David Mackie and Jessica Murray, aptly titled ‘Risky Business: the Climate and the Macroeconomy’, they painted a pretty gloom picture of our future. As it turns out, the consequences of climate change for our economy as a whole can be pretty drastic. The pair even goes so far as stating that, “ We cannot rule out catastrophic outcomes where human life as we know it is threatened .” JP Morgan Chase was quick to retract their claim, saying that it was “wholly independent from the company as a whole” as soon as they realized it had been leaked after it was sent to the bank’s clients. But this does not change the message within, that is looking at the impact of climate change on GDP - and reviews existing literature on this topic. In the end, they conclude that “ these estimates of the income and wealth effects of unmitigated climate change are far too small .”   Climate Impact Will Not Be Linear These estimates include research by Richard Told, who claims that warming of up to 2.5 degrees Celsius might even have a positive impact on GDP; and by Mark Lynas, who said that a 6 degrees Celsius rise in temperature could only impact GDP by some 7%.   Those are at the low end of the spectrum, with other studies putting the impact at up to a 23% hit to the GDP by the year 2100. Yet those numbers are still way too optimistic, or so Mackie and Murray claim. They refute the approach that many scientists before them took to calculate the impact, that largely focuses on the use of climate economy models, in which a linear model is utilized.   Recommended:  Oceans Suffocated: The World According To WhatsOrb This means that climate impacts will be linear, allowing for high discount rates as investments in the short-term will then be more expensive than investments at a later time - as the same amount of money will be less meaningful in the future. Effectively, this puts the burden of action on later generations, an idea that is widely criticized.   As the authors of this paper claim, there is no such thing as a linear evolvement when it comes to global warming. Chances are that there will be much more abrupt effects, such as rapid ice-sheet disintegration. Additionally, the economic effects are largely benchmarked based on the historical data of the last few decades, where we already saw a rise in temperature and precipitation. Unfortunately, there was not enough variability in these sets to even pretend any future projects would be accurate. What all of this means? A gross underestimation of the financial impact of climate change. Courtesy of JP Morgan Chase, one of the multinationals most to blame for the whole phenomenon. You’re welcome. Climate Change: Carbon Pricing Is Not Enough Carbon pricing is our current go-to for trying to save up for any climate-related costs. JP Morgan Chase is one of the biggest supporters of a carbon-tax plan that is based on the models that are now so heavily criticized in a paper from the hand of their own employees. This plan includes a tax of $40 per ton of carbon dioxide. This is grossly inadequate, as many economists were quick to point out. Even analysts of ExxonMobil, the initiator of this tax, claimed that at least $75 per ton would be necessary - for stabilizing our emissions back in 1991 (!). Go figure how much that ought to be today. Recommended:  Our Focus On CO2 Alone: Other Climate Culprits Carbon pricing in and of itself is definitely not bad. It is a decent safeguard for any policies that we will ultimately need to remedy the worst consequences of global warming. We just need to listen to financial economists instead of climate economists if we want to settle on an adequate price. Some leading experts have already stated that, although they would not quote a number, it could not “ in good conscience get lower than $125 ”. The actual pricing is difficult and not even the point. As one expert said, " it could be $200 per ton or $400 per ton. There are so many uncertainties that presenting one number is just insane. It’s uncomfortable for an economist to say, but the grand conclusion is a bit of humility. We can’t tell you about the grand solution. Everything we know about how to price a ton of carbon dioxide tells us that it seems to be much, much worse than the standard climate economy models tell us. ” Translation? We will be royally screwed if we continue to underestimate the economical costs associated with global warming. Passing it on to future generations on some lewd depreciation model just is not fair - nor is it realistic. We should not just find ways of tempering global warming, we also ought to find better ways of buying ourselves proper insurance for it. Before you go! Recommended:  Global Cooling Or Warming: Will It Kill Us? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about rising sea levels and climate change? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Climate Change By Risky Business: We Are Screwed!
Climate Change By Risky Business: We Are Screwed!
Arctics Pop As A Bottle Of Campagne. What’s Up?
The Arctics would not usually be associated with liveliness. Dark, sullen ice caps as far as the eye can see. Rustic tundra landscapes, cold weather. Nothing too exciting - unless you look under the surface, as a team of Russian scientists did. And what they found, was nothing short of alarming. Arctics Pop As A Bottle Of Campagne. Back in 2014, this team located a suspicious crater. Curious as to how this got here, they continued to monitor the area. Now they documented another 16 explosions, the result of trapped gas in the thawing permafrost. So, a natural phenomenon was only first observed some six years ago, is becoming something of a commonplace in Siberia. It includes random and unpredictable explosions of the ground, blasting craters of more than 100 feet deep in the surface. Photo from July 2020 by Vesti Yamal. The new funnel filmed from air by the team of Yamal-based TV station.  Recommended:  Climate Change: China Floods The Arctic On Fire Crater 17 Sounds Alive The latest crater, that has fittingly been named ‘Crater 17’, has made quite the literal and figurative impression. It is a large pit, dark and ominous, that has all the appearances of being really, really active. The sound of dirt and ice peeling off the permafrost crater wall and falling in the hole is nothing short of eery. One of the lead scientists even dubbed it as something that was “ making noises, like something alive ”.   Over the examinations of the now 17 craters, the scientists managed to find out more about the how and why. These craters, all of them in the far north of western Siberia, were blasted by exploding subterranean gases. And why there are suddenly so many of them? I will let you guess first. You’ve got it: global warming. Recommended:  Arctic Sea Cooks Methane. Extremely Alarming Much Is Unknown About The Craters Although more is now known about this phenomenon, there is still as much - or probably even more - unknown. What we do know is that their occurrence is limited to the specific region in Siberia, so they are probably related to the geology of that area. Then, they occur under small hills on the tundra, typically places trapping large amounts of gas.   As these ‘gas bubbles’ are surrounded by ice sheets above it and permafrost all around it, they have no way of escaping. That is, until the pressure gets too high and the ice layer thaws. Boom. Photo by Vasily Bogoyavlensky. The Siberian Times, Vladimir Epifanov. Gas craters found in 2014 - 2015 years on Yamal and Taimyr peninsula.  Where The Gas Comes From The origin of the gas is still somewhat fuzzy. Scientists do think it has something to do with decaying animals and plants in the permafrost. This layer is technically a mix of soil, ice, prehistoric plants, and some frozen ancient mammals. Think deep-frozen mammoths, musk ox, woolly rhinoceroses, prehistoric horses, wolves, and other beasts; all mixed up with bits of plant, soil and ice. How’s that for a milkshake? While the theory of gas building up by the decomposing in this layer is sound, it has not been proven. Scientists have been unsuccessful in retrieving animal parts in the debris field of the exploded land. Yet the theory is the best one they got, so far. The permafrost is usually a few hundred yards up to a mile thick, hiding a lot of secrets - and dead matter. As time goes on, the top layers thaw. Especially in warmer summers, this process speeds up. As this top layer was the ‘safeguard’ for layers underneath, these are now susceptible to melting and weakening as well. And as some deeper layers might have a pretty spectacular gas build-up, a result of centuries-long processes of decaying and freezing organic materials, it is the literal match setting everything ablaze. Recommended:  Antarctic: Our Growing Footprint On This Pristine Continent Exploding From Combustion Or Weakening There is another theory, though. The methane in the deeper layers of the permafrost used to be crystallized, but is now becoming gaseous again as the Earth warms up. This means that the rising pressure under the surface is more to blame for the explosions than the weakening of the ice, as the earlier theory advocates. This would be like a bottle of champagne going off. This real-life minefield is pretty dangerous, needless to say. Thankfully, the area in question is very scarcely populated - with only some reindeer herders and Russian oil-workers present in the area. This might explain why we did not take notice until recently, although there are stories in reindeer communities of such explosions having happened before.   Regardless, it is pretty obvious that these rare occurrences are now becoming more commonplace - and that it has something to do with global warming. The Arctic is hit harder than the rest of the Earth, and this is just another way of her letting us know that she is about done with it. If the loud ‘boom’ does not get her message across, it is hard to say what will. Before you go! Recommended:  Global Cooling Or Warming: Will It Kill Us? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about rising sea levels and climate change? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
The Arctics would not usually be associated with liveliness. Dark, sullen ice caps as far as the eye can see. Rustic tundra landscapes, cold weather. Nothing too exciting - unless you look under the surface, as a team of Russian scientists did. And what they found, was nothing short of alarming. Arctics Pop As A Bottle Of Campagne. Back in 2014, this team located a suspicious crater. Curious as to how this got here, they continued to monitor the area. Now they documented another 16 explosions, the result of trapped gas in the thawing permafrost. So, a natural phenomenon was only first observed some six years ago, is becoming something of a commonplace in Siberia. It includes random and unpredictable explosions of the ground, blasting craters of more than 100 feet deep in the surface. Photo from July 2020 by Vesti Yamal. The new funnel filmed from air by the team of Yamal-based TV station.  Recommended:  Climate Change: China Floods The Arctic On Fire Crater 17 Sounds Alive The latest crater, that has fittingly been named ‘Crater 17’, has made quite the literal and figurative impression. It is a large pit, dark and ominous, that has all the appearances of being really, really active. The sound of dirt and ice peeling off the permafrost crater wall and falling in the hole is nothing short of eery. One of the lead scientists even dubbed it as something that was “ making noises, like something alive ”.   Over the examinations of the now 17 craters, the scientists managed to find out more about the how and why. These craters, all of them in the far north of western Siberia, were blasted by exploding subterranean gases. And why there are suddenly so many of them? I will let you guess first. You’ve got it: global warming. Recommended:  Arctic Sea Cooks Methane. Extremely Alarming Much Is Unknown About The Craters Although more is now known about this phenomenon, there is still as much - or probably even more - unknown. What we do know is that their occurrence is limited to the specific region in Siberia, so they are probably related to the geology of that area. Then, they occur under small hills on the tundra, typically places trapping large amounts of gas.   As these ‘gas bubbles’ are surrounded by ice sheets above it and permafrost all around it, they have no way of escaping. That is, until the pressure gets too high and the ice layer thaws. Boom. Photo by Vasily Bogoyavlensky. The Siberian Times, Vladimir Epifanov. Gas craters found in 2014 - 2015 years on Yamal and Taimyr peninsula.  Where The Gas Comes From The origin of the gas is still somewhat fuzzy. Scientists do think it has something to do with decaying animals and plants in the permafrost. This layer is technically a mix of soil, ice, prehistoric plants, and some frozen ancient mammals. Think deep-frozen mammoths, musk ox, woolly rhinoceroses, prehistoric horses, wolves, and other beasts; all mixed up with bits of plant, soil and ice. How’s that for a milkshake? While the theory of gas building up by the decomposing in this layer is sound, it has not been proven. Scientists have been unsuccessful in retrieving animal parts in the debris field of the exploded land. Yet the theory is the best one they got, so far. The permafrost is usually a few hundred yards up to a mile thick, hiding a lot of secrets - and dead matter. As time goes on, the top layers thaw. Especially in warmer summers, this process speeds up. As this top layer was the ‘safeguard’ for layers underneath, these are now susceptible to melting and weakening as well. And as some deeper layers might have a pretty spectacular gas build-up, a result of centuries-long processes of decaying and freezing organic materials, it is the literal match setting everything ablaze. Recommended:  Antarctic: Our Growing Footprint On This Pristine Continent Exploding From Combustion Or Weakening There is another theory, though. The methane in the deeper layers of the permafrost used to be crystallized, but is now becoming gaseous again as the Earth warms up. This means that the rising pressure under the surface is more to blame for the explosions than the weakening of the ice, as the earlier theory advocates. This would be like a bottle of champagne going off. This real-life minefield is pretty dangerous, needless to say. Thankfully, the area in question is very scarcely populated - with only some reindeer herders and Russian oil-workers present in the area. This might explain why we did not take notice until recently, although there are stories in reindeer communities of such explosions having happened before.   Regardless, it is pretty obvious that these rare occurrences are now becoming more commonplace - and that it has something to do with global warming. The Arctic is hit harder than the rest of the Earth, and this is just another way of her letting us know that she is about done with it. If the loud ‘boom’ does not get her message across, it is hard to say what will. Before you go! Recommended:  Global Cooling Or Warming: Will It Kill Us? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about rising sea levels and climate change? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Arctics Pop As A Bottle Of Campagne. What’s Up?
Arctics Pop As A Bottle Of Campagne. What’s Up?
Sea Level Rise Limited By Hydro Dams. Strange!
According to scientists, the role of the construction of large-scale hydro dames is surprising in limiting rising seas. Strange Statement Melting glaciers, due to climate change, and the thermal expansion of seawater has caused that ocean level rise over the past century. In new research, scientists show that hydro dams almost stopped sea level rise in the 1970s. They prevented the amount of water from coming into the oceans. Without the hydro dams, the annual surge of water would be 12 percent higher. Recommended:  Sea  Level Rise Due To Climate Change: So What? Hydro Dams Limit Sea Level Rise It is difficult for researchers to measure how much seas have risen in the last century. Researchers discovered that there is a difference between how much water came into the ocean and how many of these oceans actually had increased. In this new study, scientists wanted to have a more accurate estimation, so they have revisited all the information known about rising seas. Melting glaciers and thermal expansion of seas had an influence on the rising sea level, but they also discovered the role of storage facilities, like dams and reservoirs, on sea level. Recommended:  Stop Rising Seas With Manmade Snowstorms Hydro Dams: A Building Boom There are around 58,000 enormous dams in the world but mostly build in the last 60 years. A building boom of these dams was constructed in the 1950s to 1970s, such as the ones in Zimbabwe, Siberia, and Egypt. These giant dams are the reason sea level did not rise as much as expected. By building dams, sea level stopped from rising for almost a decade. The enormous rise of water is due to the melting glaciers. They reacted faster to a warmer earth. The authors of the study believe sea level would be around 12 percent higher without these reservoirs and dams. People were concerned that building hydro dams could be a significant impact on the environment, so the number of projects began to decline. But at the same time, climate change ensured sea level rising and thermal expansion of water because more heat energy going into the oceans. All these elements have contributed to an acceleration in sea-level rise over the past 30 years, which is now 3.35 mm per year. Recommended:  Agriculture Under Water: Farming At Sea In Italy Sea Level Rise Limited By Hydro Dams Is there a possibility to do a project on dams in the world to save the rising sea levels? Earlier this year, a team of researchers presented a document that shows how to prevent the worse impacts of rising seas by building enormous hydro dams across the North Sea. But not everybody thinks this would help. According to Dr. Thomas Frederikse says sea level still rises. "We can slow it down with 0.8 mm per year." Frederikse says that we have to build too many dams to stop the current rise of sea level. "I think that is impossible." According to him, it is better to concentrate on reducing CO2-emissions. Cover photo by Jani Brumat Before you go! Recommended:  A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about sea-level rise? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
According to scientists, the role of the construction of large-scale hydro dames is surprising in limiting rising seas. Strange Statement Melting glaciers, due to climate change, and the thermal expansion of seawater has caused that ocean level rise over the past century. In new research, scientists show that hydro dams almost stopped sea level rise in the 1970s. They prevented the amount of water from coming into the oceans. Without the hydro dams, the annual surge of water would be 12 percent higher. Recommended:  Sea  Level Rise Due To Climate Change: So What? Hydro Dams Limit Sea Level Rise It is difficult for researchers to measure how much seas have risen in the last century. Researchers discovered that there is a difference between how much water came into the ocean and how many of these oceans actually had increased. In this new study, scientists wanted to have a more accurate estimation, so they have revisited all the information known about rising seas. Melting glaciers and thermal expansion of seas had an influence on the rising sea level, but they also discovered the role of storage facilities, like dams and reservoirs, on sea level. Recommended:  Stop Rising Seas With Manmade Snowstorms Hydro Dams: A Building Boom There are around 58,000 enormous dams in the world but mostly build in the last 60 years. A building boom of these dams was constructed in the 1950s to 1970s, such as the ones in Zimbabwe, Siberia, and Egypt. These giant dams are the reason sea level did not rise as much as expected. By building dams, sea level stopped from rising for almost a decade. The enormous rise of water is due to the melting glaciers. They reacted faster to a warmer earth. The authors of the study believe sea level would be around 12 percent higher without these reservoirs and dams. People were concerned that building hydro dams could be a significant impact on the environment, so the number of projects began to decline. But at the same time, climate change ensured sea level rising and thermal expansion of water because more heat energy going into the oceans. All these elements have contributed to an acceleration in sea-level rise over the past 30 years, which is now 3.35 mm per year. Recommended:  Agriculture Under Water: Farming At Sea In Italy Sea Level Rise Limited By Hydro Dams Is there a possibility to do a project on dams in the world to save the rising sea levels? Earlier this year, a team of researchers presented a document that shows how to prevent the worse impacts of rising seas by building enormous hydro dams across the North Sea. But not everybody thinks this would help. According to Dr. Thomas Frederikse says sea level still rises. "We can slow it down with 0.8 mm per year." Frederikse says that we have to build too many dams to stop the current rise of sea level. "I think that is impossible." According to him, it is better to concentrate on reducing CO2-emissions. Cover photo by Jani Brumat Before you go! Recommended:  A Floating Airport Cutting Edge Madness Or Visionary? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about sea-level rise? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Sea Level Rise Limited By Hydro Dams. Strange!
Sea Level Rise Limited By Hydro Dams. Strange!
Climate

Climate change! Currently, the most discussed topic in the world. Climate change occurs when changes in Earth's climate system result in new weather patterns that last for at least a few decades, and maybe for millions of years. Climate change can also result from ‘external forcing’ and include changes in solar output and volcanism.

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