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Climate Change Africa: Largest Locust Swarm In 25 Years
Locust swarm 37 miles long and 25 miles wide threatens crops across swathes of east Africa. A swarm of locusts measured at 37 miles long and 25 miles wide has been tracked in Kenya - and the insects are now threatening to decimate crops across swatches of east Africa. Climate Change Africa: Locust Swarm The most serious outbreak of desert locusts in 25 years is posing an unprecedented threat to food security in some of the world’s most vulnerable countries, authorities say. Unusual climate conditions are partly to blame. Recommended:  Water War Brewing Over New River Nile Dam: Egypt, Ethiopia Locusts swarm near the village of Sissia, in Samburu county, Kenya Locust, what are they do? Locusts are sometimes solitary insects with lifestyles much like grasshoppers. But locusts have another behavioral phase called the gregarious phase. When environmental conditions produce many green plants and promote breeding, locusts can congregate into thick, mobile, ravenous swarms Kenya's Intergovernmental Authority on Development said: "A typical desert locust swarm can contain up to 150 million locusts per square kilometre. "Swarms migrate with the wind and can cover 100 to 150 kilometres in a day. An average swarm can destroy as much food crops in a day as is sufficient to feed 2,500 people." {youtube}                                                 Climate Change Africa: Largest Locust Swarm In 25 Years                                                 Locust swarm threatens food security in several countries Roughly the length of a finger, the insects fly together by the millions and are devouring crops and forcing people in some areas to bodily wade through them. The outbreak of desert locusts, considered the most dangerous locust species, also has affected parts of Somalia, Ethiopia, Sudan, Djibouti and Eritrea and IGAD warns that parts of South Sudan and Uganda could be next. Are Locusts harmful to humans? Locusts do not attack people or animals. There is no evidence that suggests that locusts carry diseases that could harm humans. Recommended:  African Agricultural Revolution Falters: Food Grow Is Low The "extremely dangerous" outbreak is making the region's bad food security situation worse, the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organisation has warned. Hundreds of thousands of acres of crops have been destroyed. How long do locusts live for? It takes approximately two weeks for the fledgling locust to reach sexual maturity. Adults often group together into swarms containing thousands of locusts. Adult locusts typically live about 10 weeks. The further increase in locust swarms could last until June as favorable breeding conditions continue, IGAD said, helped along by unusually heavy flooding in parts of the region in recent weeks. Recommended:  Climate Change Causes Nature To Change: The World Affected A man holds a desert locust, considered to be the most dangerous of the locust species Climate Change Africa: Major Locust Outbreaks Can Be Devastating A major one between 2003 and 2005 cost more than $500 million to control across 20 countries in northern Africa, the FAO has said, with more than $2.5billion in harvest losses. To help prevent and control outbreaks, authorities analyse satellite images, stockpile pesticides and conduct aerial spraying. In Ethiopia, officials said they have deployed four small planes to help fight the invasion. Before you go! Recommended:  Hunger, Not Global Warming Will Impact Our Future Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about vegan food? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Locust swarm 37 miles long and 25 miles wide threatens crops across swathes of east Africa. A swarm of locusts measured at 37 miles long and 25 miles wide has been tracked in Kenya - and the insects are now threatening to decimate crops across swatches of east Africa. Climate Change Africa: Locust Swarm The most serious outbreak of desert locusts in 25 years is posing an unprecedented threat to food security in some of the world’s most vulnerable countries, authorities say. Unusual climate conditions are partly to blame. Recommended:  Water War Brewing Over New River Nile Dam: Egypt, Ethiopia Locusts swarm near the village of Sissia, in Samburu county, Kenya Locust, what are they do? Locusts are sometimes solitary insects with lifestyles much like grasshoppers. But locusts have another behavioral phase called the gregarious phase. When environmental conditions produce many green plants and promote breeding, locusts can congregate into thick, mobile, ravenous swarms Kenya's Intergovernmental Authority on Development said: "A typical desert locust swarm can contain up to 150 million locusts per square kilometre. "Swarms migrate with the wind and can cover 100 to 150 kilometres in a day. An average swarm can destroy as much food crops in a day as is sufficient to feed 2,500 people." {youtube}                                                 Climate Change Africa: Largest Locust Swarm In 25 Years                                                 Locust swarm threatens food security in several countries Roughly the length of a finger, the insects fly together by the millions and are devouring crops and forcing people in some areas to bodily wade through them. The outbreak of desert locusts, considered the most dangerous locust species, also has affected parts of Somalia, Ethiopia, Sudan, Djibouti and Eritrea and IGAD warns that parts of South Sudan and Uganda could be next. Are Locusts harmful to humans? Locusts do not attack people or animals. There is no evidence that suggests that locusts carry diseases that could harm humans. Recommended:  African Agricultural Revolution Falters: Food Grow Is Low The "extremely dangerous" outbreak is making the region's bad food security situation worse, the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organisation has warned. Hundreds of thousands of acres of crops have been destroyed. How long do locusts live for? It takes approximately two weeks for the fledgling locust to reach sexual maturity. Adults often group together into swarms containing thousands of locusts. Adult locusts typically live about 10 weeks. The further increase in locust swarms could last until June as favorable breeding conditions continue, IGAD said, helped along by unusually heavy flooding in parts of the region in recent weeks. Recommended:  Climate Change Causes Nature To Change: The World Affected A man holds a desert locust, considered to be the most dangerous of the locust species Climate Change Africa: Major Locust Outbreaks Can Be Devastating A major one between 2003 and 2005 cost more than $500 million to control across 20 countries in northern Africa, the FAO has said, with more than $2.5billion in harvest losses. To help prevent and control outbreaks, authorities analyse satellite images, stockpile pesticides and conduct aerial spraying. In Ethiopia, officials said they have deployed four small planes to help fight the invasion. Before you go! Recommended:  Hunger, Not Global Warming Will Impact Our Future Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about vegan food? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Climate Change Africa: Largest Locust Swarm In 25 Years
Taal Volcano: Hazardous Eruption Feared. What Is The Future?
Taal volcano in the Philippines has begun spewing lava. A 'hazardous eruption' is possible 'within days'. In just a span of three days, three volcanic eruptions had occurred in volcanoes found in the Japan, Mexico and the Philippines. In Japan, Mt. Shintake Erupted on Jan. 11, and Mexico’s Popocatepetl on January 9. On Sunday, January 12, Taal Volcano became active and is feared to have a hazardous explosive eruption. Meanwhile, Rocks were spewed about 300 meters from the crater of Mount Shintake on the Kuhinoerabu Island in the Kagoshima Prefecture. Japan’s Mount Shintake’s alert level was raised to 3. In Mexico, the active Popocatepetl Volcano sent 3 kilometers of smoke with moderate ash in the air. In the Philippines, Taal Volcano’s activity had already been raised to alert level 4. The volcano showed hazardous and explosive eruption(s). Mexico’s Popocatepetl Volcano, on the other hand, had authorities issue a yellow alert. The volcano showed signs of elevated unrest. But, are the eruptions of these volcanoes connected? According to USGS, most earthquakes and volcanic eruptions do not happen randomly. Instead, it occurs in specific areas, such as along plate boundaries. One such area is the circum-Pacific “Ring Of Fire” where the Pacific Plate meets several surrounding plates. There are no reports yet that the eruptions are connected. But, all three of the recently erupted volcanoes lie within the Pacific Ring of Fire. Taal Volcano: Hazardous Eruption Feared In the early hours of Monday, a weak flow of lava began seeping out of Taal volcano - located some 70km (45 miles) south of the capital Manila. It comes after it emitted a huge plume of ash, triggering the mass evacuation of 8,000 people from the area. Taal Volcano Taal is the Philippines' second most active volcano. Situated on an island in the middle of a lake, it is one of the world's smallest volcanoes and has recorded at least 34 eruptions in the past 450 years. Authorities in the surrounding province, Batangas, have declared a ‘state of calamity’, signifying major disruption. "Taal volcano entered a period of intense unrest... that progressed into magmatic eruption at 02:49 to 04:28... this is characterised by weak lava fountaining accompanied by thunder and flashes of lightning," the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs) said in a statement. Recommended:  Society Collapse: Climate Change, The Environment Or Us? But Phivolcs director Renato Solidum said that signs of a hazardous eruption, including ‘flows of ashes, rocks, gas at speeds of more than 60 kph horizontally’ had not yet occurred, according to CNN Philippines. Phivolcs has now raised the alert level from 3 to 4, out of a maximum of 5. {youtube}                                           Mass evacuation as Philippines’ Taal volcano spews lava and ash                                            Taal Volcano: Hazardous Eruption Feared. What Is The Future? Authorities have also warned of a possible ‘volcanic tsunami’, which can be trigged by falling debris after an eruption, pushing the water and generating waves. Volcanic alert levels 0 - Quiet 1 - Some disturbance but no eruption soon 2 - Low to moderate seismicity - could eventually lead to eruption 3 - Relative high unrest - eruption possible within days or weeks, or it could die down 4 - Intense unrest - hazardous eruption possible within days 5 - Hazardous eruption - lava flowing or fountaining, ashfall, dangers to nearby communities Source: Phivolcs Taal Volcano: Hazardous Eruption 'Covered in ash' On Sunday, 12-01-2020, the volcano emitted a giant plume of ash, with rumbling sounds and tremors also reported. A total of 75 earthquakes have occurred in the Taal region, with 32 of these earthquakes ranking 2 and higher on the earthquake intensity scale, said Phivolcs. The Official United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) said more than 450,000 people are estimated to live within the 14km danger zone of the Taal volcano. Ash fell on several areas nearby with residents advised to wear masks. One resident in metro Manila said shops had begun to run out of masks. "When I went to my car, I saw it was covered in ash. I hurriedly went to buy a mask from a drugstore but they had run out," Angel Bautista said. The government has warned retailers not to hike mask prices amid the surging demand. Taal Volcano: Hazardous Eruption 'Grey And Lifeless' As we approached the Taal volcano area this morning we saw local residents shovelling thick wet ash from the roads. Pineapple groves, normally verdant and luscious, now looked grey and lifeless. In the distance Taal continued to billow ash and smoke miles into the sky. As the morning went on the ash clouds became darker. The area around the Taal volcano has been cloaked in volcanic ash, which also forced the closure of Manila's international airport to shut down  Police manning a 14km exclusion zone stopped people from travelling into the area close to the volcano, but there was a steady flow of cars and trucks moving out. On the back of one pick-up truck, I saw a large family with their treasured household possessions. They were moving in the direction of the Philippine capital Manila, where many people are choosing to stay with relatives. The volcanic ash also forced Manila's international airport to suspend all flights on Sunday. Phivolcs had warned that the 'airborne ash and ballistic fragments from the eruption... posed hazards to aircrafts'. Earthquakes and volcanic activity are not uncommon in the Philippines, which lies along the Ring of Fire - a zone of major seismic activity, which has one of the world's most active fault lines. What is the ring of fire and where is it located? The Ring of Fire is a ring of volcanoes around the Pacific Ocean that result from subduction of oceanic plates beneath lighter continental plates. Most of the Earth's volcanoes are located around the Pacific Ring of Fire because that the location of most of the Earth's subduction zones Taal Volcano: 'A Very Dangerous Volcano' The active volcano is at the centre of the 230 sq km Lake Taal, formed by prehistoric eruptions. Taal is a 'complex volcano', which means it doesn't have one vent or cone but several eruption points that have changed over time. The head of Phivolcs calls Taal 'a volcano within a volcano' and says as such it is "very dangerous" Taal has erupted in different ways more than 30 times in the past 500 years - most recently in 1977. A 1911 eruption killed about 1,500 people. A 1974 eruption lasted several months Hazardous Eruption Feared. What Is The Future From Other Vulcanoes? Get Ready for More Volcanic Eruptions as the Planet Warms A new study shows that even relatively small-scale climatic changes affect volcanic activity. Scientists have found that climate change affects the frequency of eruptions. Now a new study shows even relatively minor climate variations may have such an influence. If they are right, today’s global warming could mean more and bigger volcanic eruptions in the future. Throughout its history Earth has gone through periods of massive natural climate change such as entering and leaving ice ages. Scientists have noted volcanic eruptions tended to increase as glaciers melted. In a recent study published in Geology researchers looked at smaller-scale changes in glacial coverage to see if these incremental differences had any effect. These incredible, apocalyptic-looking photos, taken by Axel Sigurðarson, show the scenes that occurred during the eruptions in Iceland between August 29, 2014 and February 27, 2015. The scientists focused on eruptions in Iceland about 5,500 to 4,500 years ago. During that period Earth’s climate cooled and glaciers grew, but there was no full-blown ice age. To reconstruct a timeline of volcanic activity, the researchers examined the Icelandic eruption record as well as a record of the ash that fell in Europe during those Icelandic eruptions, which ultimately settled into microscopic layers in the continent’s peat bogs and lakes, study author Graeme Swindles says. He and his colleagues matched these layers to specific Icelandic volcanoes then developed a detailed timeline of increases and decreases in eruptions. When the scientists compared the volcanic record with glacial coverage, they found the number of eruptions indeed dropped significantly as the climate cooled and ice expanded. “There’s a big change in the record in the mid-Holocene (epoch), where we see no volcanic ash in Europe and very little in Iceland,” says Swindles, an associate professor of Earth system dynamics at the University of Leeds. “This seems to overlap with a time where there’s cold climate conditions, which would have favored glacial advance in Iceland.” He says his team observed an approximately 600-year lag between when glaciers advanced and volcanic activity diminished. “That’s because it takes a long time to grow ice masses,” he explains. Recommended:  Climate Change: Antarctica Is Melting Says NASA The new study is “looking at maybe the smallest-magnitude climate change yet to show it has influence on volcanic activity,” says Ben Edwards, an associate professor of geology at Dickinson College. “To see this change in an interglacial period indicates that there’s an even more subtle relationship between climate change and volcanism” than scientists previously thought. Julie Schindlbeck, a volcanologist at Heidelberg University in Germany, says the work shows “maybe even small changes in ice volume can really affect volcanism.” Although scientists do not fully understand why glaciers appear to weaken volcanic eruptions, they believe the mechanics may be fairly straightforward. When glaciers expand, all that ice puts immense pressure on Earth’s surface. “It can affect magma flow and the voids and gaps in the Earth where magma flows to the surface as well as how much magma the crust can actually hold,” Swindles says. When glaciers retreat, the pressure lifts and volcanic activity surges. “After glaciers are removed the surface pressure decreases, and the magmas more easily propagate to the surface and thus erupt,” Swindles wrote in an e-mail to Scientific American. Recommended:  CO2 At Current Levels Will Cause A High Sea Rise: 16 Meters This is exactly what he and his team found when they looked at what happened as Earth warmed up again and glaciers melted—they counted more eruptions. Again they saw a time lag, this time between ice melt and the rise in eruptions. But this gap was shorter. “It takes relatively less time to melt ice if the temperature goes up,” compared with growing ice when it gets colder, Swindles says. “So if you’re looking at a period of [warming and subsequent] volcanic flare-up, the lag might be a lot shorter.” He also notes that when volcanic eruptions occur during cooler, ice-covered times, they appear to be smaller in magnitude. As the climate warms, eruptions seem to get bigger. Edwards notes Iceland’s unique geology makes it a very volcanically active compared with many other places, however—and also perhaps more vulnerable to the ice effect than other regions. “It’s probably a place that’s extra-sensitive to [glaciers growing and melting],” he says. Sarychev Volcano: This image of Sarychev Volcano in the early moments of an eruption was captured with a hand-held camera by an astronaut on NASA's International Space Station on June 12, 2009. Sarychev is one of the most active volcanoes in the Kuril Islands of Japan Whether this phenomenon will occur with modern-day climate change is not yet known. But Swindles says the glacier coverage changes his team studied are similar in magnitude to what Earth will likely experience due to human-influenced warming. “I think we can predict we’re probably going to see a lot more volcanic activity in areas of the world where glaciers and volcanoes interact,” he says, listing the U.S. Pacific Northwest, southern South America and even Antarctica. That, he says, is cause for grave concern—for businesses such as airlines as well as for general human and environmental health. “Volcanic ash and emissions can be deadly,” he says. “If not at least very damaging.” Hazardous Eruption Feared. What Is The Future? Five Facts About The Mix Of Beauty And Terror:  Lightning  Large eruptions sometimes put on a stunning display of lightning strikes that illuminate the massive cloud of ash surrounding them. This has happened repeatedly above the Taal volcano and been captured in videos shared widely across social media. It is a relatively unusual and difficult to study phenomenon, so there is some scientific dispute about how and why it happens. One theory posits that particles bashed together in the chaos of the eruption create static electricity which eventually results in lightning. However, according to volcanologist and geologist, Indriati Retno Palupi, lightning can be created when ashes containing chemical elements react with gasses in the surrounding air. Tsunamis  A violent eruption could trigger a deadly rush of waves by displacing water with rising magma or an avalanche of debris, according to the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs). In fact, the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens in the US state of Washington produced a 780-foot (235-metre) tsunami, according to the International Tsunami Information Center. The wall of water was unleashed by the partial collapse of the volcano's flank and a fast-moving avalanche of debris. Thirty years after Mount St. Helens blew its top, the peak is still the second most dangerous volcano in the United States Million volcanoes?  Around 1,500 potentially active volcanoes are present around the world, many of which are found on the Pacific 'Ring of Fire', where tectonic plates collide deep below the earth's surface. However, around 75 percent of volcanic activity on Earth occurs underwater. Undersea eruptions, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration say, are "a constant process that shapes the features of the ocean". Oregon State University geologists estimate there could be as many as a million of these "submarine volcanoes".  Global cooling The 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo, about 100 kilometres (60 miles) northwest of Manila, was the Philippines' most powerful in recent years and killed more than 800 people. However, the eruption had worldwide impact. Nearly 20 million tons of sulphur dioxide were shot skyward by Pinatubo, which then drifted globally. "This gas cloud... caused global temperatures to drop temporarily (1991 through 1993) by about 1°F (0.5°C)," according to a US Geological Survey (USGS) account of the eruption. On top of the cooler temperatures, the gases and ash sent high in the sky by Pinatubo also caused "brilliant sunsets and sunrises", USGS said.   Recommended:  Global Warming By CO2 Or Cooling By A Grand Solar Minimum Indonesia's killer volcanoes Indonesia is the world's most volcanic area. The Southeast Asian archipelago of more than 17,000 islands and islets - and nearly 130 active volcanoes - is situated on the Pacific 'Ring of Fire'. In 1816, Mount Tambora on the island of Sumbawa exploded in one of the most violent eruptions in recorded history. Mount Tambora changed the probability of the cold and wet European ‘year without a summer’ of 1816. An estimated 12,000 people died, while a resulting famine killed another 80,000. The island of Krakatoa was practically wiped off the map in 1883 by a volcanic explosion so powerful that it was heard some 4,500 kilometres (2,800 miles) away. Around 36,000 people were killed in the eruption and the resulting tsunami. A new volcano emerged in 1928 on the same site.  Before you go! Recommended:  Wildfires Globally: Australia, America, Africa, The Arctic, Siberia Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about your vulcanoss?  What you gain?  Extra:  Global exposure, a valuable backlink! Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Taal volcano in the Philippines has begun spewing lava. A 'hazardous eruption' is possible 'within days'. In just a span of three days, three volcanic eruptions had occurred in volcanoes found in the Japan, Mexico and the Philippines. In Japan, Mt. Shintake Erupted on Jan. 11, and Mexico’s Popocatepetl on January 9. On Sunday, January 12, Taal Volcano became active and is feared to have a hazardous explosive eruption. Meanwhile, Rocks were spewed about 300 meters from the crater of Mount Shintake on the Kuhinoerabu Island in the Kagoshima Prefecture. Japan’s Mount Shintake’s alert level was raised to 3. In Mexico, the active Popocatepetl Volcano sent 3 kilometers of smoke with moderate ash in the air. In the Philippines, Taal Volcano’s activity had already been raised to alert level 4. The volcano showed hazardous and explosive eruption(s). Mexico’s Popocatepetl Volcano, on the other hand, had authorities issue a yellow alert. The volcano showed signs of elevated unrest. But, are the eruptions of these volcanoes connected? According to USGS, most earthquakes and volcanic eruptions do not happen randomly. Instead, it occurs in specific areas, such as along plate boundaries. One such area is the circum-Pacific “Ring Of Fire” where the Pacific Plate meets several surrounding plates. There are no reports yet that the eruptions are connected. But, all three of the recently erupted volcanoes lie within the Pacific Ring of Fire. Taal Volcano: Hazardous Eruption Feared In the early hours of Monday, a weak flow of lava began seeping out of Taal volcano - located some 70km (45 miles) south of the capital Manila. It comes after it emitted a huge plume of ash, triggering the mass evacuation of 8,000 people from the area. Taal Volcano Taal is the Philippines' second most active volcano. Situated on an island in the middle of a lake, it is one of the world's smallest volcanoes and has recorded at least 34 eruptions in the past 450 years. Authorities in the surrounding province, Batangas, have declared a ‘state of calamity’, signifying major disruption. "Taal volcano entered a period of intense unrest... that progressed into magmatic eruption at 02:49 to 04:28... this is characterised by weak lava fountaining accompanied by thunder and flashes of lightning," the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs) said in a statement. Recommended:  Society Collapse: Climate Change, The Environment Or Us? But Phivolcs director Renato Solidum said that signs of a hazardous eruption, including ‘flows of ashes, rocks, gas at speeds of more than 60 kph horizontally’ had not yet occurred, according to CNN Philippines. Phivolcs has now raised the alert level from 3 to 4, out of a maximum of 5. {youtube}                                           Mass evacuation as Philippines’ Taal volcano spews lava and ash                                            Taal Volcano: Hazardous Eruption Feared. What Is The Future? Authorities have also warned of a possible ‘volcanic tsunami’, which can be trigged by falling debris after an eruption, pushing the water and generating waves. Volcanic alert levels 0 - Quiet 1 - Some disturbance but no eruption soon 2 - Low to moderate seismicity - could eventually lead to eruption 3 - Relative high unrest - eruption possible within days or weeks, or it could die down 4 - Intense unrest - hazardous eruption possible within days 5 - Hazardous eruption - lava flowing or fountaining, ashfall, dangers to nearby communities Source: Phivolcs Taal Volcano: Hazardous Eruption 'Covered in ash' On Sunday, 12-01-2020, the volcano emitted a giant plume of ash, with rumbling sounds and tremors also reported. A total of 75 earthquakes have occurred in the Taal region, with 32 of these earthquakes ranking 2 and higher on the earthquake intensity scale, said Phivolcs. The Official United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) said more than 450,000 people are estimated to live within the 14km danger zone of the Taal volcano. Ash fell on several areas nearby with residents advised to wear masks. One resident in metro Manila said shops had begun to run out of masks. "When I went to my car, I saw it was covered in ash. I hurriedly went to buy a mask from a drugstore but they had run out," Angel Bautista said. The government has warned retailers not to hike mask prices amid the surging demand. Taal Volcano: Hazardous Eruption 'Grey And Lifeless' As we approached the Taal volcano area this morning we saw local residents shovelling thick wet ash from the roads. Pineapple groves, normally verdant and luscious, now looked grey and lifeless. In the distance Taal continued to billow ash and smoke miles into the sky. As the morning went on the ash clouds became darker. The area around the Taal volcano has been cloaked in volcanic ash, which also forced the closure of Manila's international airport to shut down  Police manning a 14km exclusion zone stopped people from travelling into the area close to the volcano, but there was a steady flow of cars and trucks moving out. On the back of one pick-up truck, I saw a large family with their treasured household possessions. They were moving in the direction of the Philippine capital Manila, where many people are choosing to stay with relatives. The volcanic ash also forced Manila's international airport to suspend all flights on Sunday. Phivolcs had warned that the 'airborne ash and ballistic fragments from the eruption... posed hazards to aircrafts'. Earthquakes and volcanic activity are not uncommon in the Philippines, which lies along the Ring of Fire - a zone of major seismic activity, which has one of the world's most active fault lines. What is the ring of fire and where is it located? The Ring of Fire is a ring of volcanoes around the Pacific Ocean that result from subduction of oceanic plates beneath lighter continental plates. Most of the Earth's volcanoes are located around the Pacific Ring of Fire because that the location of most of the Earth's subduction zones Taal Volcano: 'A Very Dangerous Volcano' The active volcano is at the centre of the 230 sq km Lake Taal, formed by prehistoric eruptions. Taal is a 'complex volcano', which means it doesn't have one vent or cone but several eruption points that have changed over time. The head of Phivolcs calls Taal 'a volcano within a volcano' and says as such it is "very dangerous" Taal has erupted in different ways more than 30 times in the past 500 years - most recently in 1977. A 1911 eruption killed about 1,500 people. A 1974 eruption lasted several months Hazardous Eruption Feared. What Is The Future From Other Vulcanoes? Get Ready for More Volcanic Eruptions as the Planet Warms A new study shows that even relatively small-scale climatic changes affect volcanic activity. Scientists have found that climate change affects the frequency of eruptions. Now a new study shows even relatively minor climate variations may have such an influence. If they are right, today’s global warming could mean more and bigger volcanic eruptions in the future. Throughout its history Earth has gone through periods of massive natural climate change such as entering and leaving ice ages. Scientists have noted volcanic eruptions tended to increase as glaciers melted. In a recent study published in Geology researchers looked at smaller-scale changes in glacial coverage to see if these incremental differences had any effect. These incredible, apocalyptic-looking photos, taken by Axel Sigurðarson, show the scenes that occurred during the eruptions in Iceland between August 29, 2014 and February 27, 2015. The scientists focused on eruptions in Iceland about 5,500 to 4,500 years ago. During that period Earth’s climate cooled and glaciers grew, but there was no full-blown ice age. To reconstruct a timeline of volcanic activity, the researchers examined the Icelandic eruption record as well as a record of the ash that fell in Europe during those Icelandic eruptions, which ultimately settled into microscopic layers in the continent’s peat bogs and lakes, study author Graeme Swindles says. He and his colleagues matched these layers to specific Icelandic volcanoes then developed a detailed timeline of increases and decreases in eruptions. When the scientists compared the volcanic record with glacial coverage, they found the number of eruptions indeed dropped significantly as the climate cooled and ice expanded. “There’s a big change in the record in the mid-Holocene (epoch), where we see no volcanic ash in Europe and very little in Iceland,” says Swindles, an associate professor of Earth system dynamics at the University of Leeds. “This seems to overlap with a time where there’s cold climate conditions, which would have favored glacial advance in Iceland.” He says his team observed an approximately 600-year lag between when glaciers advanced and volcanic activity diminished. “That’s because it takes a long time to grow ice masses,” he explains. Recommended:  Climate Change: Antarctica Is Melting Says NASA The new study is “looking at maybe the smallest-magnitude climate change yet to show it has influence on volcanic activity,” says Ben Edwards, an associate professor of geology at Dickinson College. “To see this change in an interglacial period indicates that there’s an even more subtle relationship between climate change and volcanism” than scientists previously thought. Julie Schindlbeck, a volcanologist at Heidelberg University in Germany, says the work shows “maybe even small changes in ice volume can really affect volcanism.” Although scientists do not fully understand why glaciers appear to weaken volcanic eruptions, they believe the mechanics may be fairly straightforward. When glaciers expand, all that ice puts immense pressure on Earth’s surface. “It can affect magma flow and the voids and gaps in the Earth where magma flows to the surface as well as how much magma the crust can actually hold,” Swindles says. When glaciers retreat, the pressure lifts and volcanic activity surges. “After glaciers are removed the surface pressure decreases, and the magmas more easily propagate to the surface and thus erupt,” Swindles wrote in an e-mail to Scientific American. Recommended:  CO2 At Current Levels Will Cause A High Sea Rise: 16 Meters This is exactly what he and his team found when they looked at what happened as Earth warmed up again and glaciers melted—they counted more eruptions. Again they saw a time lag, this time between ice melt and the rise in eruptions. But this gap was shorter. “It takes relatively less time to melt ice if the temperature goes up,” compared with growing ice when it gets colder, Swindles says. “So if you’re looking at a period of [warming and subsequent] volcanic flare-up, the lag might be a lot shorter.” He also notes that when volcanic eruptions occur during cooler, ice-covered times, they appear to be smaller in magnitude. As the climate warms, eruptions seem to get bigger. Edwards notes Iceland’s unique geology makes it a very volcanically active compared with many other places, however—and also perhaps more vulnerable to the ice effect than other regions. “It’s probably a place that’s extra-sensitive to [glaciers growing and melting],” he says. Sarychev Volcano: This image of Sarychev Volcano in the early moments of an eruption was captured with a hand-held camera by an astronaut on NASA's International Space Station on June 12, 2009. Sarychev is one of the most active volcanoes in the Kuril Islands of Japan Whether this phenomenon will occur with modern-day climate change is not yet known. But Swindles says the glacier coverage changes his team studied are similar in magnitude to what Earth will likely experience due to human-influenced warming. “I think we can predict we’re probably going to see a lot more volcanic activity in areas of the world where glaciers and volcanoes interact,” he says, listing the U.S. Pacific Northwest, southern South America and even Antarctica. That, he says, is cause for grave concern—for businesses such as airlines as well as for general human and environmental health. “Volcanic ash and emissions can be deadly,” he says. “If not at least very damaging.” Hazardous Eruption Feared. What Is The Future? Five Facts About The Mix Of Beauty And Terror:  Lightning  Large eruptions sometimes put on a stunning display of lightning strikes that illuminate the massive cloud of ash surrounding them. This has happened repeatedly above the Taal volcano and been captured in videos shared widely across social media. It is a relatively unusual and difficult to study phenomenon, so there is some scientific dispute about how and why it happens. One theory posits that particles bashed together in the chaos of the eruption create static electricity which eventually results in lightning. However, according to volcanologist and geologist, Indriati Retno Palupi, lightning can be created when ashes containing chemical elements react with gasses in the surrounding air. Tsunamis  A violent eruption could trigger a deadly rush of waves by displacing water with rising magma or an avalanche of debris, according to the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs). In fact, the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens in the US state of Washington produced a 780-foot (235-metre) tsunami, according to the International Tsunami Information Center. The wall of water was unleashed by the partial collapse of the volcano's flank and a fast-moving avalanche of debris. Thirty years after Mount St. Helens blew its top, the peak is still the second most dangerous volcano in the United States Million volcanoes?  Around 1,500 potentially active volcanoes are present around the world, many of which are found on the Pacific 'Ring of Fire', where tectonic plates collide deep below the earth's surface. However, around 75 percent of volcanic activity on Earth occurs underwater. Undersea eruptions, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration say, are "a constant process that shapes the features of the ocean". Oregon State University geologists estimate there could be as many as a million of these "submarine volcanoes".  Global cooling The 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo, about 100 kilometres (60 miles) northwest of Manila, was the Philippines' most powerful in recent years and killed more than 800 people. However, the eruption had worldwide impact. Nearly 20 million tons of sulphur dioxide were shot skyward by Pinatubo, which then drifted globally. "This gas cloud... caused global temperatures to drop temporarily (1991 through 1993) by about 1°F (0.5°C)," according to a US Geological Survey (USGS) account of the eruption. On top of the cooler temperatures, the gases and ash sent high in the sky by Pinatubo also caused "brilliant sunsets and sunrises", USGS said.   Recommended:  Global Warming By CO2 Or Cooling By A Grand Solar Minimum Indonesia's killer volcanoes Indonesia is the world's most volcanic area. The Southeast Asian archipelago of more than 17,000 islands and islets - and nearly 130 active volcanoes - is situated on the Pacific 'Ring of Fire'. In 1816, Mount Tambora on the island of Sumbawa exploded in one of the most violent eruptions in recorded history. Mount Tambora changed the probability of the cold and wet European ‘year without a summer’ of 1816. An estimated 12,000 people died, while a resulting famine killed another 80,000. The island of Krakatoa was practically wiped off the map in 1883 by a volcanic explosion so powerful that it was heard some 4,500 kilometres (2,800 miles) away. Around 36,000 people were killed in the eruption and the resulting tsunami. A new volcano emerged in 1928 on the same site.  Before you go! Recommended:  Wildfires Globally: Australia, America, Africa, The Arctic, Siberia Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about your vulcanoss?  What you gain?  Extra:  Global exposure, a valuable backlink! Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Taal Volcano: Hazardous Eruption Feared. What Is The Future?
Oceans Die, We Die: Oceans Life Last Warning To Us!
Paul Watson, the founder of Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, is best known for using direct action to protect whales from Japanese whaling vessels, but he’s also a world-renowned advocate for the oceans and all of its other inhabitants. Oceans Life Last Warning To Us! Recommended:  Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth During an interview with TheirTurn in New York City, Watson explained why protecting the oceans is not only vital to sea animals but also to the very survival of the human species. 'If the oceans die, we die'. Watson explains that oceans, which he describes as the 'blue lungs' of the Earth, produce 70% of the oxygen that we breathe and that the source of the oxygen are phytoplankton. Since 1950, the amount of phytoplankton in the oceans has dropped by 40% due to whaling, commercial fishing, animal agriculture and other forms of pollution. What is killing the oceans? Global warming is causing sea levels to rise, threatening coastal population centers. Many pesticides and nutrients used in agriculture end up in the coastal waters, resulting in oxygen depletion that kills marine plants and shellfish. Factories and industrial plants discharge sewage and other runoff into the oceans Watson is the subject of new award-winning documentary film, Watson, that chronicles his career as an eco-warrior on the high seas. Watson is available on Animal Planet.   {youtube}                                                      Oceans Die, We Die: Oceans Life Last Warning To Us!                                                              Paul Watson: "If the Oceans Die, We Die" Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change Stop, Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about our oceans?  What you gain?  Extra:  Global exposure, a valuable backlink! Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Paul Watson, the founder of Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, is best known for using direct action to protect whales from Japanese whaling vessels, but he’s also a world-renowned advocate for the oceans and all of its other inhabitants. Oceans Life Last Warning To Us! Recommended:  Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth During an interview with TheirTurn in New York City, Watson explained why protecting the oceans is not only vital to sea animals but also to the very survival of the human species. 'If the oceans die, we die'. Watson explains that oceans, which he describes as the 'blue lungs' of the Earth, produce 70% of the oxygen that we breathe and that the source of the oxygen are phytoplankton. Since 1950, the amount of phytoplankton in the oceans has dropped by 40% due to whaling, commercial fishing, animal agriculture and other forms of pollution. What is killing the oceans? Global warming is causing sea levels to rise, threatening coastal population centers. Many pesticides and nutrients used in agriculture end up in the coastal waters, resulting in oxygen depletion that kills marine plants and shellfish. Factories and industrial plants discharge sewage and other runoff into the oceans Watson is the subject of new award-winning documentary film, Watson, that chronicles his career as an eco-warrior on the high seas. Watson is available on Animal Planet.   {youtube}                                                      Oceans Die, We Die: Oceans Life Last Warning To Us!                                                              Paul Watson: "If the Oceans Die, We Die" Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change Stop, Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about our oceans?  What you gain?  Extra:  Global exposure, a valuable backlink! Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Oceans Die, We Die: Oceans Life Last Warning To Us!
India’s CO2, Pollution, Artificial Rain: How To Survive?
India is home to 15 of the 20 most polluted cities in the world, with New Delhi named as the capital with the dirtiest air, according to IQ AirVisual, a Swiss-based group that gathers air-quality data globally, and Greenpeace. Oxygen Bar To Fake Rain: 10 Ways India Tried To Beat Its 'Airpocalypse' Large swathes of north India, including Delhi - a metropolis of about 20 million - are covered under a thick blanket of toxic air at the onset of winter. Vehicle and industrial emissions, dust from building sites, smoke from the burning of rubbish and burning of crop fields contribute to what is locally dubbed as the 'airpocalypse'. {youtube}                                                       India’s CO2, Pollution, Artificial Rain: How To Survive?                                                                      What makes Delhi's air so deadly Here are some ways authorities, engineers and companies tried to help Indians breathe easy: India CO2, Pollution: Solution 1.Delhi's Oxygen Bar Delhi residents gasping for fresh air could head to Oxy Pure, a bar that offers 15 minutes of "oxygen enriched air" for about $7 in seven different flavours ranging from lavender and lemongrass to cinnamon and spearmint. But it may be a costly affair in a country where the average person spends $1.80 a day, according to research by Goldman Sachs and news website IndiaSpend. Recommended:  Climate Change Stop, Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales? India CO2, Pollution: Solution 2. Fresh Air In A Can When pollution spiked to 'hazardous' levels, Indians could go online and order themselves cans of fresh air. Several companies, like Vitality Air in Canada and Indian brand Pure Himalayan Air, sell 'pure air' in 10-litre cans for anywhere between 550 rupees and 5,400 rupees ($75). Estimates suggest that the average adult inhales and exhales about 8 litres of air per minute. India CO2, Pollution: Solution 3. Wearable air purifier For those who did not want to be cooped up inside on smoggy days, a wearable air purifier called AirTamer was the answer. The 50 gram gadget, which can be worn as a necklace, emits negative ions that push pollutants away. It sells for nearly 10,000 rupees in Delhi, a city described as a "gas chamber" by its own chief minister and where doctors say the air is as bad as smoking up to 20 cigarettes a day. India CO2, Pollution: Solution 4. Anti-smog gun Delhi residents craving clear skies could turn to an anti-smog gun, which ejects fine droplets of water at high speeds to flush out air pollutants. Shaped like a hair dryer and mounted on a flatbed truck, the cannon can blast up to 100 litres of water per minute and get rid of 95% of tiny particulate matter. Critics, however, called it a quick-fix solution that could do little to combat the noxious air. Recommended:  CO2 Absorption: Does A Dutch Professor Have The Answer? India CO2, Pollution: Solution 5. Odd-Even Car scheme New Delhi's authorities restricted the use of private cars for two weeks in November with the so-called "odd-even" system - allowing cars on alternate days, depending on whether their licence plate ended in an odd or even number. The scheme helped little, prompting environmentalists to call for urgent action to combat air pollution. India CO2, Pollution: Solution 6. Artificial Rain Authorities in the Indian capital considered cloud seeding developed by the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) in an effort to trigger rainfall and bring pollution levels down. But the plan was stalled as there were no planes or the technical support available to spray the seeds. Recommended:  Solar Geo-Engineering As The Ultimate Answer To Climate Change India CO2, Pollution: Solution 7. Roadside Air Purifiers Dozens of giant air purifiers were installed at busy intersections of Delhi to combat roadside dust and vehicular pollution. India's top court in November ordered the federal and Delhi governments to install "smog towers" like those in China that can act as pollution vacuum cleaners. Environmentalists, however, termed them as 'band-aid fixes' that did not bring down small particulate matter that can penetrate the lungs and enter the blood system. India CO2, Pollution: Solution 8. Purifiers At Taj Mahal Two mobile air purifiers were fitted at the iconic Taj Mahal in November as a toxic haze shrouded the 17th century mausoleum, whose white marble is turning yellow and green weathering filthy air in the world's eighth-most polluted city of Agra. India CO2, Pollution: Solution 9. Bus Stop Shelters Providing a small breather for commuters, several bus stops in Delhi were curtained with thick plastic sheets, creating a what local media called a 'fresh air chamber'. But many said it was gimmickry as people had to step out within minutes and expose themselves to smog. India CO2, Pollution: Solution 10. Ink From Pollution Chakr Innovations, started by IIT engineers, capitalised on fumes from smoke-belching back-up diesel generators by turning the soot into ink and paint. The technology can capture 90% of dangerous pollutants. The company has installed more than 50 such devices in government firms and offices as well as real estate developers. Before you go! Recommended:  How An Artificial Leaf Sucks CO2 And Makes Fuel. Amazing! Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about 'air pollution'? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
India is home to 15 of the 20 most polluted cities in the world, with New Delhi named as the capital with the dirtiest air, according to IQ AirVisual, a Swiss-based group that gathers air-quality data globally, and Greenpeace. Oxygen Bar To Fake Rain: 10 Ways India Tried To Beat Its 'Airpocalypse' Large swathes of north India, including Delhi - a metropolis of about 20 million - are covered under a thick blanket of toxic air at the onset of winter. Vehicle and industrial emissions, dust from building sites, smoke from the burning of rubbish and burning of crop fields contribute to what is locally dubbed as the 'airpocalypse'. {youtube}                                                       India’s CO2, Pollution, Artificial Rain: How To Survive?                                                                      What makes Delhi's air so deadly Here are some ways authorities, engineers and companies tried to help Indians breathe easy: India CO2, Pollution: Solution 1.Delhi's Oxygen Bar Delhi residents gasping for fresh air could head to Oxy Pure, a bar that offers 15 minutes of "oxygen enriched air" for about $7 in seven different flavours ranging from lavender and lemongrass to cinnamon and spearmint. But it may be a costly affair in a country where the average person spends $1.80 a day, according to research by Goldman Sachs and news website IndiaSpend. Recommended:  Climate Change Stop, Store CO2, Add Phytoplankton By Whales? India CO2, Pollution: Solution 2. Fresh Air In A Can When pollution spiked to 'hazardous' levels, Indians could go online and order themselves cans of fresh air. Several companies, like Vitality Air in Canada and Indian brand Pure Himalayan Air, sell 'pure air' in 10-litre cans for anywhere between 550 rupees and 5,400 rupees ($75). Estimates suggest that the average adult inhales and exhales about 8 litres of air per minute. India CO2, Pollution: Solution 3. Wearable air purifier For those who did not want to be cooped up inside on smoggy days, a wearable air purifier called AirTamer was the answer. The 50 gram gadget, which can be worn as a necklace, emits negative ions that push pollutants away. It sells for nearly 10,000 rupees in Delhi, a city described as a "gas chamber" by its own chief minister and where doctors say the air is as bad as smoking up to 20 cigarettes a day. India CO2, Pollution: Solution 4. Anti-smog gun Delhi residents craving clear skies could turn to an anti-smog gun, which ejects fine droplets of water at high speeds to flush out air pollutants. Shaped like a hair dryer and mounted on a flatbed truck, the cannon can blast up to 100 litres of water per minute and get rid of 95% of tiny particulate matter. Critics, however, called it a quick-fix solution that could do little to combat the noxious air. Recommended:  CO2 Absorption: Does A Dutch Professor Have The Answer? India CO2, Pollution: Solution 5. Odd-Even Car scheme New Delhi's authorities restricted the use of private cars for two weeks in November with the so-called "odd-even" system - allowing cars on alternate days, depending on whether their licence plate ended in an odd or even number. The scheme helped little, prompting environmentalists to call for urgent action to combat air pollution. India CO2, Pollution: Solution 6. Artificial Rain Authorities in the Indian capital considered cloud seeding developed by the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) in an effort to trigger rainfall and bring pollution levels down. But the plan was stalled as there were no planes or the technical support available to spray the seeds. Recommended:  Solar Geo-Engineering As The Ultimate Answer To Climate Change India CO2, Pollution: Solution 7. Roadside Air Purifiers Dozens of giant air purifiers were installed at busy intersections of Delhi to combat roadside dust and vehicular pollution. India's top court in November ordered the federal and Delhi governments to install "smog towers" like those in China that can act as pollution vacuum cleaners. Environmentalists, however, termed them as 'band-aid fixes' that did not bring down small particulate matter that can penetrate the lungs and enter the blood system. India CO2, Pollution: Solution 8. Purifiers At Taj Mahal Two mobile air purifiers were fitted at the iconic Taj Mahal in November as a toxic haze shrouded the 17th century mausoleum, whose white marble is turning yellow and green weathering filthy air in the world's eighth-most polluted city of Agra. India CO2, Pollution: Solution 9. Bus Stop Shelters Providing a small breather for commuters, several bus stops in Delhi were curtained with thick plastic sheets, creating a what local media called a 'fresh air chamber'. But many said it was gimmickry as people had to step out within minutes and expose themselves to smog. India CO2, Pollution: Solution 10. Ink From Pollution Chakr Innovations, started by IIT engineers, capitalised on fumes from smoke-belching back-up diesel generators by turning the soot into ink and paint. The technology can capture 90% of dangerous pollutants. The company has installed more than 50 such devices in government firms and offices as well as real estate developers. Before you go! Recommended:  How An Artificial Leaf Sucks CO2 And Makes Fuel. Amazing! Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about 'air pollution'? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
India’s CO2, Pollution, Artificial Rain: How To Survive?
Who’s Greta Thunberg’s Rival On Climate Facts, Naomi Seibt?
It seems that politicians have finally been ‘pushed aside’, and today teenagers have been at the forefront of the debate on climate change - at least on the surface.  Greta Thunberg’s Rival Greta Thunberg is a Swedish primary school student (In the Swedish school system age 7 to 16. See reply down the post) who led the fight against global warming, gained world fame; She mobilizes young people to the streets of the world. However, not everyone agrees with the 16-year-old. Greta Thunberg is made by politics and the media a ‘climate saint’. Whoever has a different opinion will hide. But not all young people fall for propaganda, the German MM News site reports. In Germany, an 18-year-old girl is named ‘counter-Greta’ who shared the results of her own research in a ten-minute video, revealing "what's behind the climate ‘discussion’. Recommended:  Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth Greta Thunberg And Climate Panic: Naomi Seibt And Climate Change Naomi Seibt, a German gymnast who is surprisingly mature compared to her age, explains the factors and interests behind the climate change lobby, the role the United Nations, and how politicians want to take control of all areas of citizens lives. The video started to spread right away, but after 75,000 views, YouTube temporarily deleted it. R ecommended:  Climate Change Natural Man Made: Causes And Facts In a video interview, she says she started to deal with politics in 2015 in the wake of the migration crisis. She does not think it is easy to take a stand in Germany, but she encourages other young people to take the risk. She said “climate change is the new religion, which is very dangerous.” {youtube}                                                  Growing up in Merkel's Germany | Naomi Seibt Interview                                             Who’s Greta Thunberg’s Rival On Climate Facts, Naomi Seibt? Naomi Seibt adds, she understands and empathizes with those who are afraid, and that this affects them in their decisions, such as not wanting to vote for a party that does not want to deal with climate change.  Recommended:  Naomi Seibt And Her Many Opponents On Climate Change Before the EU elections, Naomi Seibt campaigned on ‘Climate Change’ and ‘Climate Panic’. There are several young influenza (opinion-forming) advocates on the skeptical side, and even those who respond to videos of climate fighters.  One example is German Jason HD, who refutes the point-by-point argument of the German producer Razon, which has exploded in German social media. Recommended:  To Severn Cullis-Suzuki Greta Thunberg Versus Naomi Seibt Great Thunberg 'talks' with Jean-Claude Juncker Young people, by the way, complain that politicians have their voice down and say they do not understand these issues. As activists on both sides, either directly or politically, take a stand, the question arises whether an organization or a political party is in the background. However, this is only dealt with by blogs, and mainstream media mostly avoids the issue. Before you go! Recommended:  Global Warming By CO2 Or Cooling By A Grand Solar Minimum Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about climate change? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
It seems that politicians have finally been ‘pushed aside’, and today teenagers have been at the forefront of the debate on climate change - at least on the surface.  Greta Thunberg’s Rival Greta Thunberg is a Swedish primary school student (In the Swedish school system age 7 to 16. See reply down the post) who led the fight against global warming, gained world fame; She mobilizes young people to the streets of the world. However, not everyone agrees with the 16-year-old. Greta Thunberg is made by politics and the media a ‘climate saint’. Whoever has a different opinion will hide. But not all young people fall for propaganda, the German MM News site reports. In Germany, an 18-year-old girl is named ‘counter-Greta’ who shared the results of her own research in a ten-minute video, revealing "what's behind the climate ‘discussion’. Recommended:  Breaking: Did You Know, All You Read About CO2 Rise Is Half The Truth Greta Thunberg And Climate Panic: Naomi Seibt And Climate Change Naomi Seibt, a German gymnast who is surprisingly mature compared to her age, explains the factors and interests behind the climate change lobby, the role the United Nations, and how politicians want to take control of all areas of citizens lives. The video started to spread right away, but after 75,000 views, YouTube temporarily deleted it. R ecommended:  Climate Change Natural Man Made: Causes And Facts In a video interview, she says she started to deal with politics in 2015 in the wake of the migration crisis. She does not think it is easy to take a stand in Germany, but she encourages other young people to take the risk. She said “climate change is the new religion, which is very dangerous.” {youtube}                                                  Growing up in Merkel's Germany | Naomi Seibt Interview                                             Who’s Greta Thunberg’s Rival On Climate Facts, Naomi Seibt? Naomi Seibt adds, she understands and empathizes with those who are afraid, and that this affects them in their decisions, such as not wanting to vote for a party that does not want to deal with climate change.  Recommended:  Naomi Seibt And Her Many Opponents On Climate Change Before the EU elections, Naomi Seibt campaigned on ‘Climate Change’ and ‘Climate Panic’. There are several young influenza (opinion-forming) advocates on the skeptical side, and even those who respond to videos of climate fighters.  One example is German Jason HD, who refutes the point-by-point argument of the German producer Razon, which has exploded in German social media. Recommended:  To Severn Cullis-Suzuki Greta Thunberg Versus Naomi Seibt Great Thunberg 'talks' with Jean-Claude Juncker Young people, by the way, complain that politicians have their voice down and say they do not understand these issues. As activists on both sides, either directly or politically, take a stand, the question arises whether an organization or a political party is in the background. However, this is only dealt with by blogs, and mainstream media mostly avoids the issue. Before you go! Recommended:  Global Warming By CO2 Or Cooling By A Grand Solar Minimum Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about climate change? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Who’s Greta Thunberg’s Rival On Climate Facts, Naomi Seibt?
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