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Solar And Hydrogen Boats Win The Future: France, Monaco
The dozens of tiny, handmade boats looked out of place among the super yachts moored at the Monaco Yacht Club. It wasn’t a mistake that the little ships were in this particular harbor at this particular time. No, these little watercraft were slipping silently between the billionaire boats to promote cleaner water transportation under the idea that our green mobility future includes common technologies between cars, bikes, airplanes and boats. The fleet had gathered from around the world to participate in the Monaco Solar & Energy Boat Challenge. There were over 200 students representing 34 teams from 14 nations, mostly within Europe. Holland was represented by more teams than any other country, with 12. All of the boats were powered by green energy (i.e., solar, batteries or hydrogen fuel cells) and competed in one of three classes - Solar, Offshore or Energy - over five days.  The most popular category is the Solar class, which attracted 19 teams. This class allowed the teams to design their own ship, strap it full of solar panels and then participate in slalom and endurance races to see which performed the best. The eight teams participating in the Energy class were each given the same hull and had to design a durable and powerful propulsion system using whatever clean energy they choose. The Offshore class was made up of 7 teams this year, mostly by companies that are already selling their green-energy boats or are about to. The challenge was two different long-distance races (around 30 and then 60 kilometers, or 16 and 36 nautical miles, respectively) between Monaco and Ventimiglia, Italy. Monaco Yacht Club {youtube} The 2019 edition was the sixth annual Challenge and was organized by the International Powerboating Federation (UIM) and the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation. To make the teams feel at home, the exclusive Monaco Yacht Club was opened up to young people wearing board shorts and flip-flops, discussing hydrodynamics and green propulsion with the energy of friendly competition. It’s cliche to say that everyone can be a winner at an event like this, but that’s exactly what it felt like on the docks.  Take Team Indonesia as an example. As the only representatives from outside of Europe, the 14-member team faced unusual challenges as they traveled to the Mediterranean Sea. Just getting their boat to Monaco was a 15,000-plus-euro endeavor. Also, even though Indonesia has over 30,000 miles of coastline, the team is based out of the University of Indonesia, which is located south of Jakarta, many miles from the ocean. That’s why the team had to test their prototypes in an artificial lake, team member Fadhil Nuffohman told me.  The team’s problems didn’t end when the 13 members arrived in Monaco (one stayed home). The boat’s steering system had to be changed on site, and their battery management system blew up, Nuffohman said, so the students started scrambling for a replacement. They mentioned their problem to one or two other teams, and word quickly spread throughout the whole community until HEIG-VD-1, one of the two Swiss teams, heard about it and gave them an extra BMS. The distance, lack of ocean access at home and last-minute fixes meant that the complete boat wasn’t tested until the team arrived in Monaco. 'It's like Mission Impossible', Nuffohman said.  Mission Impossible Even so, the education that the students got during the race were not limited to the engineering questions. Team member Narendra Dipta said that one of the big lessons was to function under pressure. "We tried to work with no stress,” Dipta said. “We wanted to work more efficiently.” While the team didn’t win any actual races, it was awarded the Spirit Prize.  This sort of can-do attitude was prevalent throughout the competition. Taking a water-based approach to watercraft, the SBM Offshore E-Racing Team, located in Monaco, thinks that hydrogen fuel cell boats are the future. SBM Offshore is a company that provides floating production solutions to the offshore energy industry and had a boat in the Monaco Energy Class. SBM Offshore was also a sponsor of the event.  Caroline Epp, a hydrodynamics engineer for the SBM Offshore team, said that putting a fuel cell on a boat meant finding a compromise between protecting the fuel cell stack from water entry and overheating. The solution the team came up with in a hurry - they only started working on the boat four months ago - was a splash-proof box that wasn’t waterproof but met all of the requirements the engineers needed. Epp said it was a challenge to find the right parts for their boat, and the team’s first full boat test was the Sunday before the race began. Things worked out well for the team, which won the Innovation Prize at last Saturday’s closing night gala event.  Cleaner water mobility efforts took place outside of the competition as well. Companies like FinX and the group AA/ROK were on hand to show off their products. FinX’s tech replaces boat’s propellor with undulating membranes - basically fish-like fins - that are easy to maintain and 30 percent more efficient, a representative told me. The technology has been used in the medical field in heart pump assisting devices and FinX has been investigating using the membranes for water propulsion, under license, since 2018. AA/ROK, on the other hand, was offering rides in its solar-powered autonomous boat, the SunWave S2, which it hopes to develop into a solar-hybrid passenger shuttle.  Electric Boat  Anvera Elab Or take the Anvera Elab prototype, which was brought to Monaco by a team based in Italy that wanted to show off its carbon fiber, all-electric speed boat. The main focus of the concept vehicle is to remove as much weight as possible through advanced composite materials and a specially designed propellor.  The lessons learned in the races were meant to be taken far beyond the horizon. The public was invited to daily tech talks by the various teams as they described their technological challenges and successes and there was also a networking job fair set up to introduce the students to potential employers.  In the end, there were indeed actual winners in the three classes. Vita Yachts won the shorter Offshore race, but they were bested by the TU Delft Solar Boat Team in the longer challenge.  Wave Estaca won the Energy Class, and there were two winners in the solar categories. The Sunflare Solar team won the A Class Solar category while the New Nexus Solar Boat Racing Team won the Open Solar Class. At the awards gala, these teams were somewhat more happy than the rest, posing with their trophies and giant award checks against the backdrop of those huge yachts in the harbor, but I didn’t see anyone not having a good time. It just felt like the actual event winners were not the only ones who were, well, winning that night. Cliches do work. By: Sebastian Blanco https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/transportation/solar
The dozens of tiny, handmade boats looked out of place among the super yachts moored at the Monaco Yacht Club. It wasn’t a mistake that the little ships were in this particular harbor at this particular time. No, these little watercraft were slipping silently between the billionaire boats to promote cleaner water transportation under the idea that our green mobility future includes common technologies between cars, bikes, airplanes and boats. The fleet had gathered from around the world to participate in the Monaco Solar & Energy Boat Challenge. There were over 200 students representing 34 teams from 14 nations, mostly within Europe. Holland was represented by more teams than any other country, with 12. All of the boats were powered by green energy (i.e., solar, batteries or hydrogen fuel cells) and competed in one of three classes - Solar, Offshore or Energy - over five days.  The most popular category is the Solar class, which attracted 19 teams. This class allowed the teams to design their own ship, strap it full of solar panels and then participate in slalom and endurance races to see which performed the best. The eight teams participating in the Energy class were each given the same hull and had to design a durable and powerful propulsion system using whatever clean energy they choose. The Offshore class was made up of 7 teams this year, mostly by companies that are already selling their green-energy boats or are about to. The challenge was two different long-distance races (around 30 and then 60 kilometers, or 16 and 36 nautical miles, respectively) between Monaco and Ventimiglia, Italy. Monaco Yacht Club {youtube} The 2019 edition was the sixth annual Challenge and was organized by the International Powerboating Federation (UIM) and the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation. To make the teams feel at home, the exclusive Monaco Yacht Club was opened up to young people wearing board shorts and flip-flops, discussing hydrodynamics and green propulsion with the energy of friendly competition. It’s cliche to say that everyone can be a winner at an event like this, but that’s exactly what it felt like on the docks.  Take Team Indonesia as an example. As the only representatives from outside of Europe, the 14-member team faced unusual challenges as they traveled to the Mediterranean Sea. Just getting their boat to Monaco was a 15,000-plus-euro endeavor. Also, even though Indonesia has over 30,000 miles of coastline, the team is based out of the University of Indonesia, which is located south of Jakarta, many miles from the ocean. That’s why the team had to test their prototypes in an artificial lake, team member Fadhil Nuffohman told me.  The team’s problems didn’t end when the 13 members arrived in Monaco (one stayed home). The boat’s steering system had to be changed on site, and their battery management system blew up, Nuffohman said, so the students started scrambling for a replacement. They mentioned their problem to one or two other teams, and word quickly spread throughout the whole community until HEIG-VD-1, one of the two Swiss teams, heard about it and gave them an extra BMS. The distance, lack of ocean access at home and last-minute fixes meant that the complete boat wasn’t tested until the team arrived in Monaco. 'It's like Mission Impossible', Nuffohman said.  Mission Impossible Even so, the education that the students got during the race were not limited to the engineering questions. Team member Narendra Dipta said that one of the big lessons was to function under pressure. "We tried to work with no stress,” Dipta said. “We wanted to work more efficiently.” While the team didn’t win any actual races, it was awarded the Spirit Prize.  This sort of can-do attitude was prevalent throughout the competition. Taking a water-based approach to watercraft, the SBM Offshore E-Racing Team, located in Monaco, thinks that hydrogen fuel cell boats are the future. SBM Offshore is a company that provides floating production solutions to the offshore energy industry and had a boat in the Monaco Energy Class. SBM Offshore was also a sponsor of the event.  Caroline Epp, a hydrodynamics engineer for the SBM Offshore team, said that putting a fuel cell on a boat meant finding a compromise between protecting the fuel cell stack from water entry and overheating. The solution the team came up with in a hurry - they only started working on the boat four months ago - was a splash-proof box that wasn’t waterproof but met all of the requirements the engineers needed. Epp said it was a challenge to find the right parts for their boat, and the team’s first full boat test was the Sunday before the race began. Things worked out well for the team, which won the Innovation Prize at last Saturday’s closing night gala event.  Cleaner water mobility efforts took place outside of the competition as well. Companies like FinX and the group AA/ROK were on hand to show off their products. FinX’s tech replaces boat’s propellor with undulating membranes - basically fish-like fins - that are easy to maintain and 30 percent more efficient, a representative told me. The technology has been used in the medical field in heart pump assisting devices and FinX has been investigating using the membranes for water propulsion, under license, since 2018. AA/ROK, on the other hand, was offering rides in its solar-powered autonomous boat, the SunWave S2, which it hopes to develop into a solar-hybrid passenger shuttle.  Electric Boat  Anvera Elab Or take the Anvera Elab prototype, which was brought to Monaco by a team based in Italy that wanted to show off its carbon fiber, all-electric speed boat. The main focus of the concept vehicle is to remove as much weight as possible through advanced composite materials and a specially designed propellor.  The lessons learned in the races were meant to be taken far beyond the horizon. The public was invited to daily tech talks by the various teams as they described their technological challenges and successes and there was also a networking job fair set up to introduce the students to potential employers.  In the end, there were indeed actual winners in the three classes. Vita Yachts won the shorter Offshore race, but they were bested by the TU Delft Solar Boat Team in the longer challenge.  Wave Estaca won the Energy Class, and there were two winners in the solar categories. The Sunflare Solar team won the A Class Solar category while the New Nexus Solar Boat Racing Team won the Open Solar Class. At the awards gala, these teams were somewhat more happy than the rest, posing with their trophies and giant award checks against the backdrop of those huge yachts in the harbor, but I didn’t see anyone not having a good time. It just felt like the actual event winners were not the only ones who were, well, winning that night. Cliches do work. By: Sebastian Blanco https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/transportation/solar
Solar And Hydrogen Boats Win The Future: France, Monaco
Global Warming By CO2 Or Cooling By A Grand Solar Minimum
An approaching Grand Solar Minimum is gaining ever more support. Even NASA appears to be on-board, with their recent SC25 (solar cycle every 11 years) prediction. NASA’s forecast for the next solar cycle (25) reveals it will be the weakest of the last 200 years. The maximum of this next cycle measured in terms of sunspot number, a standard measure of solar activity level could be 30 to 50% lower than the most recent one. The agency’s results show that the next cycle will start in 2020 and reach its maximum in 2025. Three sources of sun observations The new research was led by Irina Kitiashvili, a researcher with the Bay Area Environmental Research Institute at NASA’s Ames Research Centre, in California’s Silicon Valley. It combined observations from two NASA space missions the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the Solar Dynamics Observatory with data collected since 1976 from the ground-based National Solar Observatory. Kitiashvili’s method differs from other prediction tools in terms of the raw material for its forecast. Previously, researchers used the number of sunspots to represent indirectly the activity of the solar magnetic field. The new approach takes advantage of direct observations of magnetic fields emerging on the surface of the Sun data which has only existed for the last four solar cycles. According to the Actuaries Institute, in a solar minimum, when solar flares hit Earth, they have the ability to temporarily significantly change climatic conditions, earthquake and volcanic risks Mathematically combining the data from the three sources of Sun observations with the estimates of its interior activity generated a forecast designed to be more reliable than using any of those sources alone. In 2008 the researchers used this method to make their prediction, which was then put to the test as the current solar cycle unfolded over the last decade. It has performed well , with the forecast strength and timing of the solar maximum aligning closely with reality. Implications fort the earth and humanity NASA is effectively forecasting a return to the Dalton Minimum (1790-1830) but gives no mention of the brutal cold, crop loss, famine, war and powerful Volcanic eruptions associated with it. Like the deeper Maunder and Spörer Minimums preceding it, the Dalton brought on a period of lower-than-average global temperatures. The Oberlach Station in Germany, for example, experienced a 2C decline over 20 years, which devastated the country’s food production. The Year Without a Summer also occurred during the Dalton Minimum, in 1816. It was caused by a combination of already low temperatures plus the aftereffects of the second largest volcanic eruption in 2000 years: Mount Tambora’s VEI 7 on April 10, 1815. {youtube} https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate
An approaching Grand Solar Minimum is gaining ever more support. Even NASA appears to be on-board, with their recent SC25 (solar cycle every 11 years) prediction. NASA’s forecast for the next solar cycle (25) reveals it will be the weakest of the last 200 years. The maximum of this next cycle measured in terms of sunspot number, a standard measure of solar activity level could be 30 to 50% lower than the most recent one. The agency’s results show that the next cycle will start in 2020 and reach its maximum in 2025. Three sources of sun observations The new research was led by Irina Kitiashvili, a researcher with the Bay Area Environmental Research Institute at NASA’s Ames Research Centre, in California’s Silicon Valley. It combined observations from two NASA space missions the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the Solar Dynamics Observatory with data collected since 1976 from the ground-based National Solar Observatory. Kitiashvili’s method differs from other prediction tools in terms of the raw material for its forecast. Previously, researchers used the number of sunspots to represent indirectly the activity of the solar magnetic field. The new approach takes advantage of direct observations of magnetic fields emerging on the surface of the Sun data which has only existed for the last four solar cycles. According to the Actuaries Institute, in a solar minimum, when solar flares hit Earth, they have the ability to temporarily significantly change climatic conditions, earthquake and volcanic risks Mathematically combining the data from the three sources of Sun observations with the estimates of its interior activity generated a forecast designed to be more reliable than using any of those sources alone. In 2008 the researchers used this method to make their prediction, which was then put to the test as the current solar cycle unfolded over the last decade. It has performed well , with the forecast strength and timing of the solar maximum aligning closely with reality. Implications fort the earth and humanity NASA is effectively forecasting a return to the Dalton Minimum (1790-1830) but gives no mention of the brutal cold, crop loss, famine, war and powerful Volcanic eruptions associated with it. Like the deeper Maunder and Spörer Minimums preceding it, the Dalton brought on a period of lower-than-average global temperatures. The Oberlach Station in Germany, for example, experienced a 2C decline over 20 years, which devastated the country’s food production. The Year Without a Summer also occurred during the Dalton Minimum, in 1816. It was caused by a combination of already low temperatures plus the aftereffects of the second largest volcanic eruption in 2000 years: Mount Tambora’s VEI 7 on April 10, 1815. {youtube} https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate
Global Warming By CO2 Or Cooling By A Grand Solar Minimum
Boyan Slat Ocean Cleanup: Restart Plastic Soup Collection
Great Pacific garbage patch: giant plastic trap put to sea again. Boyan Slat ’s Ocean Cleanup System nicknamed ‘Wilson’ broke when first deployed, but its creator is buoyant about the second attempt to clean up the 'plastic soup'.  A floating device designed to catch plastic waste has been redeployed in a second attempt to clean up a huge island of garbage swirling in the Pacific Ocean between California and Hawaii. Twitter Boyan Slat, creator of the Ocean Cleanup project , announced on Twitter that a 600 metre (2,000ft) long floating boom that broke apart late last year was sent back to the Great Pacific garbage patch this week after four months of repair. A ship towed the U-shaped barrier from San Francisco to the patch in September to trap the plastic. But during the four months at sea, the boom broke apart under constant waves and wind and the boom was not retaining the plastic it caught. “Hopefully nature doesn’t have too many surprises in store for us this time,” Slat tweeted. “Either way, we’re set to learn a lot from this campaign.” Fitted with solar-powered lights, cameras, sensors and satellite antennas, the device intends to communicate its position at all times, allowing a support vessel to fish out the collected plastic every few months and transport it to dry land. The plastic barrier with a tapered three metre deep (10ft deep) screen is intended to act like a coastline, trapping some of the 1.8tn pieces of plastic that scientists estimate are swirling in the patch while allowing marine life to safely swim beneath it. Post by: Associated Press https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste
Great Pacific garbage patch: giant plastic trap put to sea again. Boyan Slat ’s Ocean Cleanup System nicknamed ‘Wilson’ broke when first deployed, but its creator is buoyant about the second attempt to clean up the 'plastic soup'.  A floating device designed to catch plastic waste has been redeployed in a second attempt to clean up a huge island of garbage swirling in the Pacific Ocean between California and Hawaii. Twitter Boyan Slat, creator of the Ocean Cleanup project , announced on Twitter that a 600 metre (2,000ft) long floating boom that broke apart late last year was sent back to the Great Pacific garbage patch this week after four months of repair. A ship towed the U-shaped barrier from San Francisco to the patch in September to trap the plastic. But during the four months at sea, the boom broke apart under constant waves and wind and the boom was not retaining the plastic it caught. “Hopefully nature doesn’t have too many surprises in store for us this time,” Slat tweeted. “Either way, we’re set to learn a lot from this campaign.” Fitted with solar-powered lights, cameras, sensors and satellite antennas, the device intends to communicate its position at all times, allowing a support vessel to fish out the collected plastic every few months and transport it to dry land. The plastic barrier with a tapered three metre deep (10ft deep) screen is intended to act like a coastline, trapping some of the 1.8tn pieces of plastic that scientists estimate are swirling in the patch while allowing marine life to safely swim beneath it. Post by: Associated Press https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste
Boyan Slat Ocean Cleanup: Restart Plastic Soup Collection
Solar Collector Produces Bio Fuels And Saves The Planet: MIT
The brainchild of Harvard biochemist Daniel Nocera, the ‘bionic leaf’ is a small man-made solar collector that takes sunlight and water and turns it into any of a variety of usable fuels or fertilizers. Nocera’s first iteration, the so-called ‘artificial leaf’, was developed in 2011 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and could split water into oxygen and hydrogen when exposed to sunlight in a process similar to (and inspired by) Mother Nature’s photosynthesis. Bionic Leaves and the Environment . Can they save the planet? Nocera soon thereafter moved his lab to Harvard and teamed up with Pamela Silver there to create the 'bionic' version which takes the concept further. There they fed the resulting hydrogen to an on-board catalyst, resulting in the generation of immediately useable downstream liquid ‘fuels’ such as fertilizer for farms, isobutanol to run generators and engines, and PHB, a precursor for bio-plastic. The team’s first version of the ‘bionic’ leaf was about as efficient as natural photosynthesis, which is about one percent of the solar energy flowing in came out as biomass dense enough to use as fuel. But their most recent version ups the ante considerably, clocking in at 10 times more efficient than Mother Nature’s fastest growing plants. Graph by: BlueRingMedia. Photosynthesis, carbon dioxide and water are transformed into sugars and oxygen. Sunlight powers this chemical reaction “If you think about it, photosynthesis is amazing,” Nocera tells the Harvard Gazette. “It takes sunlight, water, and air, and then look at a tree. That’s exactly what we did, but we do it significantly better because we turn all that energy into a fuel.” When mass-produced, these tiny solar ‘carbon-negative’ fuel factories could be inexpensive enough for everyday people to use to power their vehicles and run their lights and appliances. Maybe you also like: Geothermal Power Accessible As Wind And Solar Energy: Climeon Farmers with a small on-site array of bionic leaves could create enough fertilizer for their own needs instead of buying container-loads of synthetic fertilizer produced at sprawling CO2-spewing factories and shipped for thousands of miles. The widespread application of bionic leaves could be especially advantageous in developing countries (and remote areas in general) where access to conventional fuels and fertilizers is limited and expensive or non-existent. Nocera hopes his work can bring the poor of the world their ‘first 100 watts’ of energy through one form or another of the technologies he is developing. A Harvard-funded pilot program putting bionic leaves to use in India is just getting off the ground and Nocera hopes to expand globally within the near future. The vision is for retiring every fossil fuel out there and replacing them with solar fuels from your own ‘bionic’ garden. Imagine a world with no more utility bills or lining up at the gas pump? “You can use just sunlight, air, and water,” concludes Nocera, “and you can do it in your backyard.” https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
The brainchild of Harvard biochemist Daniel Nocera, the ‘bionic leaf’ is a small man-made solar collector that takes sunlight and water and turns it into any of a variety of usable fuels or fertilizers. Nocera’s first iteration, the so-called ‘artificial leaf’, was developed in 2011 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and could split water into oxygen and hydrogen when exposed to sunlight in a process similar to (and inspired by) Mother Nature’s photosynthesis. Bionic Leaves and the Environment . Can they save the planet? Nocera soon thereafter moved his lab to Harvard and teamed up with Pamela Silver there to create the 'bionic' version which takes the concept further. There they fed the resulting hydrogen to an on-board catalyst, resulting in the generation of immediately useable downstream liquid ‘fuels’ such as fertilizer for farms, isobutanol to run generators and engines, and PHB, a precursor for bio-plastic. The team’s first version of the ‘bionic’ leaf was about as efficient as natural photosynthesis, which is about one percent of the solar energy flowing in came out as biomass dense enough to use as fuel. But their most recent version ups the ante considerably, clocking in at 10 times more efficient than Mother Nature’s fastest growing plants. Graph by: BlueRingMedia. Photosynthesis, carbon dioxide and water are transformed into sugars and oxygen. Sunlight powers this chemical reaction “If you think about it, photosynthesis is amazing,” Nocera tells the Harvard Gazette. “It takes sunlight, water, and air, and then look at a tree. That’s exactly what we did, but we do it significantly better because we turn all that energy into a fuel.” When mass-produced, these tiny solar ‘carbon-negative’ fuel factories could be inexpensive enough for everyday people to use to power their vehicles and run their lights and appliances. Maybe you also like: Geothermal Power Accessible As Wind And Solar Energy: Climeon Farmers with a small on-site array of bionic leaves could create enough fertilizer for their own needs instead of buying container-loads of synthetic fertilizer produced at sprawling CO2-spewing factories and shipped for thousands of miles. The widespread application of bionic leaves could be especially advantageous in developing countries (and remote areas in general) where access to conventional fuels and fertilizers is limited and expensive or non-existent. Nocera hopes his work can bring the poor of the world their ‘first 100 watts’ of energy through one form or another of the technologies he is developing. A Harvard-funded pilot program putting bionic leaves to use in India is just getting off the ground and Nocera hopes to expand globally within the near future. The vision is for retiring every fossil fuel out there and replacing them with solar fuels from your own ‘bionic’ garden. Imagine a world with no more utility bills or lining up at the gas pump? “You can use just sunlight, air, and water,” concludes Nocera, “and you can do it in your backyard.” https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
Solar Collector Produces Bio Fuels And Saves The Planet: MIT
Trump State Visit 2019 Emits 2.619 Tonnes Of CO2: London, UK
Donald Trump’s state visit ‘to emit 2,619 tonnes of carbon dioxide’. That is the same amount of greenhouse gases emitted by an average UK home over 970 years. Donald Trump’s state visit will produce as much carbon dioxide as an average British home does in 970 years. That’s the verdict from renewable energy supplier Pure Planet, which has calculated the US President’s trip to the UK will emit 2,619 tonnes of carbon dioxide. The President, the First Lady, family members and officials arrived on two Boeing 747 jets, which together will emit 979 tonnes of extra carbon dioxide to the atmosphere on their journeys between London and Washington DC. The transport while President Trump is in the UK will also have a significant impact – two identical seven-seat armoured limousines dubbed The Beasts have a fuel economy of just four miles per gallon, meaning they will emit 1.2 tonnes of carbon dioxide while they are here. The study suggests the rest of the 30-car motorcade will pump out an additional 4.3 tonnes of greenhouse gases from driving around – however, the big chunk of emissions the fleet is responsible for happened when it was transported over to the UK in an estimated four cargo planes, sending out 1,600 tonnes of carbon dioxide into the air. Many of the 1,000-person entourage, which includes secret service agents, staff, military aides and members of the press, also use helicopters to get around, emitting an estimated total of 35 tonnes of carbon dioxide. The dietary requirements of such a large volume of people and the related carbon footprint is also likely to have a significant effect on emissions. Steven Day, Co-Founder of Pure Planet, said: "President Trump’s state visit is equivalent to almost a millennium’s worth of emissions from a typical home. It is a staggering large amount. “ Trump has said climate change is a Chinese hoax but this is no joke. The emissions from this state visit are vast." Donald Trump believes the US has a 'clean climate'. He had informed Prince Charles in a 90-minute conversation that the US right now has among the cleanest climates there are based on all statistics, and it’s even getting better because I agree with that we want the best water, the cleanest water. Well, let's debunk these believes with some facts: Greenhouse gas emissions The US is still the world’s second biggest emitter of greenhouse gas emissions, having been overtaken by China more than a decade ago. In per capita terms, however, the US far outstrips China, though it comes below some Middle Eastern states with tiny populations and vast fossil fuel industries. While carbon emissions have been falling, in part because of the switch from coal to gas, Climate Tracker estimates that the US will fail to meet its carbon reduction targets set by Barack Obama, to cut emissions by 26-28% below 2005 levels by 2025. Fracking The US is now one of the world’s biggest gas producers, thanks to fracking, and about half of its oil now comes from the production method, which requires the blasting of dense shale rock with water, sand and chemicals to release the tiny bubbles of fossil fuel trapped inside. This boom has come at a cost, as the vast water requirements are draining some areas dry, and pollutants found near fracking sites include heavy metals, chemicals that disrupt hormones, and particulates. The effects range from memory, learning and IQ deficits to behavioural problems. Leaks of 'fugitive' methane are an additional contributor to climate change. Fossil fuel exploration Not content with the US’s existing conventional oil reserves, and the expansion of the oil and gas industries through fracking, the US fossil fuel industry is seeking new grounds for exploration – among them, the pristine Alaskan wilderness. Drilling in the Alaskan wildlife reserve is a key Trump policy. {youtube} Fuel efficiency standards The Trump administration has moved to loosen regulations on fuel efficiency for cars and vans, which were already less stringent than in many other countries. Opponents fear this will increase greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution. International cooperation Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement of 2015 cannot legally take effect until after the next presidential election, in an irony of timing. However, the effect can already be seen, in the emboldening of other nations considering a withdrawal, such as Brazil, formerly a strong proponent of action at the UN talks, and the increasing influence of fossil fuel lobbyists. Climate denial With the president claiming climate change to be a 'Chinese hoax', it is perhaps not surprising that the US has some of the highest rates of climate denial in the world. Despite this, a sizeable majority of the US public – nearly six in 10 people – still agree with the science on climate change, and support action to stave off the worst consequences. Water Despite Trump’s claim that 'we want the best water, the cleanest water' – it’s crystal clean, has to be crystal clean clear, his recent actions on water have been an attempt to roll back decades of progress on cleaning up the US water supply. Last December, he announced plans to undo or weaken federal rules that protect millions of acres of wetlands and thousands of miles of streams from pesticide run-off and other pollutants. Air By rolling back Obama-era measures intended to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from power plants, the Trump administration is also threatening to increase air pollution, as coal-fired power stations will be able to spew out toxins once more, according to 14 states who last year opposed the Environmental Protection Agency’s plans. This is in contrast with China and India, cited by Trump – along with Russia – as having polluted air. Those nations are trying to clean up their pollution with stricter limits on what power plants https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate
Donald Trump’s state visit ‘to emit 2,619 tonnes of carbon dioxide’. That is the same amount of greenhouse gases emitted by an average UK home over 970 years. Donald Trump’s state visit will produce as much carbon dioxide as an average British home does in 970 years. That’s the verdict from renewable energy supplier Pure Planet, which has calculated the US President’s trip to the UK will emit 2,619 tonnes of carbon dioxide. The President, the First Lady, family members and officials arrived on two Boeing 747 jets, which together will emit 979 tonnes of extra carbon dioxide to the atmosphere on their journeys between London and Washington DC. The transport while President Trump is in the UK will also have a significant impact – two identical seven-seat armoured limousines dubbed The Beasts have a fuel economy of just four miles per gallon, meaning they will emit 1.2 tonnes of carbon dioxide while they are here. The study suggests the rest of the 30-car motorcade will pump out an additional 4.3 tonnes of greenhouse gases from driving around – however, the big chunk of emissions the fleet is responsible for happened when it was transported over to the UK in an estimated four cargo planes, sending out 1,600 tonnes of carbon dioxide into the air. Many of the 1,000-person entourage, which includes secret service agents, staff, military aides and members of the press, also use helicopters to get around, emitting an estimated total of 35 tonnes of carbon dioxide. The dietary requirements of such a large volume of people and the related carbon footprint is also likely to have a significant effect on emissions. Steven Day, Co-Founder of Pure Planet, said: "President Trump’s state visit is equivalent to almost a millennium’s worth of emissions from a typical home. It is a staggering large amount. “ Trump has said climate change is a Chinese hoax but this is no joke. The emissions from this state visit are vast." Donald Trump believes the US has a 'clean climate'. He had informed Prince Charles in a 90-minute conversation that the US right now has among the cleanest climates there are based on all statistics, and it’s even getting better because I agree with that we want the best water, the cleanest water. Well, let's debunk these believes with some facts: Greenhouse gas emissions The US is still the world’s second biggest emitter of greenhouse gas emissions, having been overtaken by China more than a decade ago. In per capita terms, however, the US far outstrips China, though it comes below some Middle Eastern states with tiny populations and vast fossil fuel industries. While carbon emissions have been falling, in part because of the switch from coal to gas, Climate Tracker estimates that the US will fail to meet its carbon reduction targets set by Barack Obama, to cut emissions by 26-28% below 2005 levels by 2025. Fracking The US is now one of the world’s biggest gas producers, thanks to fracking, and about half of its oil now comes from the production method, which requires the blasting of dense shale rock with water, sand and chemicals to release the tiny bubbles of fossil fuel trapped inside. This boom has come at a cost, as the vast water requirements are draining some areas dry, and pollutants found near fracking sites include heavy metals, chemicals that disrupt hormones, and particulates. The effects range from memory, learning and IQ deficits to behavioural problems. Leaks of 'fugitive' methane are an additional contributor to climate change. Fossil fuel exploration Not content with the US’s existing conventional oil reserves, and the expansion of the oil and gas industries through fracking, the US fossil fuel industry is seeking new grounds for exploration – among them, the pristine Alaskan wilderness. Drilling in the Alaskan wildlife reserve is a key Trump policy. {youtube} Fuel efficiency standards The Trump administration has moved to loosen regulations on fuel efficiency for cars and vans, which were already less stringent than in many other countries. Opponents fear this will increase greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution. International cooperation Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement of 2015 cannot legally take effect until after the next presidential election, in an irony of timing. However, the effect can already be seen, in the emboldening of other nations considering a withdrawal, such as Brazil, formerly a strong proponent of action at the UN talks, and the increasing influence of fossil fuel lobbyists. Climate denial With the president claiming climate change to be a 'Chinese hoax', it is perhaps not surprising that the US has some of the highest rates of climate denial in the world. Despite this, a sizeable majority of the US public – nearly six in 10 people – still agree with the science on climate change, and support action to stave off the worst consequences. Water Despite Trump’s claim that 'we want the best water, the cleanest water' – it’s crystal clean, has to be crystal clean clear, his recent actions on water have been an attempt to roll back decades of progress on cleaning up the US water supply. Last December, he announced plans to undo or weaken federal rules that protect millions of acres of wetlands and thousands of miles of streams from pesticide run-off and other pollutants. Air By rolling back Obama-era measures intended to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from power plants, the Trump administration is also threatening to increase air pollution, as coal-fired power stations will be able to spew out toxins once more, according to 14 states who last year opposed the Environmental Protection Agency’s plans. This is in contrast with China and India, cited by Trump – along with Russia – as having polluted air. Those nations are trying to clean up their pollution with stricter limits on what power plants https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate
Trump State Visit 2019 Emits 2.619 Tonnes Of CO2: London, UK
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