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Can Toyota’s Solar Electric Car
NEDO representative Mitsuhiro Yamazaki says that if such a car were driven four days a week for a maximum of 50 kilometers each day, it wouldn't need charging.  Toyota’s Solar-Powered Electric Car What is a solar car and how does it work? True solar-powered cars are actually electric vehicles that are powered by solar panels . The panels are used produce electricity by converting the sun's rays into energy, which is then stored in solar batteries. The car runs by using the energy that is stored in the batteries. Toyota, Sharp, and NEDO have teamed up to manufacture a unique car that could ‘run forever.’ There have been promising advances in developing thin enough solar panels for curved surfaces, as well as in tech for charging vehicles while they're in motion. The solar cells the companies are working on attaching to the car are only 0.03 mm thick so that they can be attached to curved areas on vehicles like the roof, the hood, or the hatchback. By pairing more efficient solar cells with high-capacity batteries to keep vehicles running at night, solar cars have the potential to outperform hybrid cars and hydrogen-powered vehicles. {youtube}                                        Toyota is testing a much more efficient solar roof for its electric cars                                              Can Toyota’s Solar-Powered Electric Car Can 'Run Forever'? Toyota’s Solar-Powered Electric Car Can 'Run Forever' A solar-powered electric car that runs without needing charging may sound impossible. Still, Toyota, Sharp, and NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan) have joined forces to make it a reality hopefully. Recommended:  Solar Sono Motors Car: Developed in Germany, Made In Sweden By pairing together the best solar panels on the market with the most efficient batteries available — not to mention years’ worth of experience with car-manufacturing — the companies are hoping, theoretically, to produce a vehicle that might run forever. "The solar car's advantage is that, while it can't drive for a long-range, it's independent of charging facilities," said project manager at Toyota, Koji Makino. Why do we need solar cars? Like solar-powered homes, solar cars harness energy from the sun by converting it into electricity. This electricity fuels the battery that runs the car's motor. Solar cars use photovoltaic cells to convert sunlight into energy. Solar Powered Cars - drive the future Electric Car Can 'Run Forever' One of the main drawbacks with fully electric cars is that, even if their sales were to surpass those of petroleum-based vehicles, they'd still need to be charged — which, in turn, means a string of loading docks, requiring space and further funds. Conversely, the sun provides readily available energy without the need for charging docks or extra costs. Coupled with a high enough battery capacity to keep a vehicle running during darker hours, solar-powered cars have the potential to completely outdo other new types of tech that are currently in the pipeline from hybrid cars to hydrogen-powered vehicles. Recommended:  Solar Car Lightyear Wins Price At Tech Fair: The Netherlands Though this may seem just one small step in the effort to marry together solar energy with a vehicle that works, it's substantial progress considering the enormous energy expenditure required to shift a car's weight. Because the solar cells the companies are working on are only 0.03 mm thick, they can be attached to a wider variety of surfaces, including curved areas on cars like the roof, the hood, or the hatchback. Are solar cars the future? In fact, the first solar vehicle may hit the road in 2019. The technology is still somewhat in its infancy and needs to have some time to work out unexpected issues. However, solar cars could be on their way to regular people's driveways in the near future Recommended:  Solar Powered Silent 55 Yacht Allows You To Cruise The World In addition to the fact that the technology behind this venture has introduced a new efficiency, there's also the fact that the vehicles can be charged. In contrast, the car is in motion, something that has, until recently, been impossible. Recommended:  The Solar Bike: Mix Between A Two-Wheeler And A Tesla To build the optimum solar-powered vehicle, there are still a lot of aspects that need working on, and there need to be workarounds to enable such a car to run efficiently in areas that aren't quite as sunny or are more like deserts in terms of their climate. Before you go! Recommended:  Solar Team Eindhoven The Netherlands Presents: The Solar Car Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
NEDO representative Mitsuhiro Yamazaki says that if such a car were driven four days a week for a maximum of 50 kilometers each day, it wouldn't need charging.  Toyota’s Solar-Powered Electric Car What is a solar car and how does it work? True solar-powered cars are actually electric vehicles that are powered by solar panels . The panels are used produce electricity by converting the sun's rays into energy, which is then stored in solar batteries. The car runs by using the energy that is stored in the batteries. Toyota, Sharp, and NEDO have teamed up to manufacture a unique car that could ‘run forever.’ There have been promising advances in developing thin enough solar panels for curved surfaces, as well as in tech for charging vehicles while they're in motion. The solar cells the companies are working on attaching to the car are only 0.03 mm thick so that they can be attached to curved areas on vehicles like the roof, the hood, or the hatchback. By pairing more efficient solar cells with high-capacity batteries to keep vehicles running at night, solar cars have the potential to outperform hybrid cars and hydrogen-powered vehicles. {youtube}                                        Toyota is testing a much more efficient solar roof for its electric cars                                              Can Toyota’s Solar-Powered Electric Car Can 'Run Forever'? Toyota’s Solar-Powered Electric Car Can 'Run Forever' A solar-powered electric car that runs without needing charging may sound impossible. Still, Toyota, Sharp, and NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan) have joined forces to make it a reality hopefully. Recommended:  Solar Sono Motors Car: Developed in Germany, Made In Sweden By pairing together the best solar panels on the market with the most efficient batteries available — not to mention years’ worth of experience with car-manufacturing — the companies are hoping, theoretically, to produce a vehicle that might run forever. "The solar car's advantage is that, while it can't drive for a long-range, it's independent of charging facilities," said project manager at Toyota, Koji Makino. Why do we need solar cars? Like solar-powered homes, solar cars harness energy from the sun by converting it into electricity. This electricity fuels the battery that runs the car's motor. Solar cars use photovoltaic cells to convert sunlight into energy. Solar Powered Cars - drive the future Electric Car Can 'Run Forever' One of the main drawbacks with fully electric cars is that, even if their sales were to surpass those of petroleum-based vehicles, they'd still need to be charged — which, in turn, means a string of loading docks, requiring space and further funds. Conversely, the sun provides readily available energy without the need for charging docks or extra costs. Coupled with a high enough battery capacity to keep a vehicle running during darker hours, solar-powered cars have the potential to completely outdo other new types of tech that are currently in the pipeline from hybrid cars to hydrogen-powered vehicles. Recommended:  Solar Car Lightyear Wins Price At Tech Fair: The Netherlands Though this may seem just one small step in the effort to marry together solar energy with a vehicle that works, it's substantial progress considering the enormous energy expenditure required to shift a car's weight. Because the solar cells the companies are working on are only 0.03 mm thick, they can be attached to a wider variety of surfaces, including curved areas on cars like the roof, the hood, or the hatchback. Are solar cars the future? In fact, the first solar vehicle may hit the road in 2019. The technology is still somewhat in its infancy and needs to have some time to work out unexpected issues. However, solar cars could be on their way to regular people's driveways in the near future Recommended:  Solar Powered Silent 55 Yacht Allows You To Cruise The World In addition to the fact that the technology behind this venture has introduced a new efficiency, there's also the fact that the vehicles can be charged. In contrast, the car is in motion, something that has, until recently, been impossible. Recommended:  The Solar Bike: Mix Between A Two-Wheeler And A Tesla To build the optimum solar-powered vehicle, there are still a lot of aspects that need working on, and there need to be workarounds to enable such a car to run efficiently in areas that aren't quite as sunny or are more like deserts in terms of their climate. Before you go! Recommended:  Solar Team Eindhoven The Netherlands Presents: The Solar Car Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Can Toyota’s Solar Electric Car 'Run Forever'?
Heat Waves And COVID-19: A Killers Mix On Its Way
COVID-19, the Coronavirus Worldwide Breaking News Updates. Updates from around the world from different news sources. Stay safe and take the right precautions if you are going to travel to potentially contaminated areas! All times mentioned are according to UK time. COVID-19, The Coronavirus Worldwide Breaking News Updates 05-07-2020 Coronavirus, COVID-19: 53329.693+ Death, and 11.673. proven infected worldwide. Photo by: PTI. Amid COVID-19, coronavirus lockdown, a heatwave has intensified in several states across north India. A railway employee refills water bottles of migrants sitting in a train to reach their native places, during the ongoing COVID-19 lockdown, in Jabalpur. Daily Updates About The Coronavirus, COVID-19 Jump quickly to 5 Online Tools by clicking on: 5 Online Tools Provide Up-to-Date Tracking History global updates about the coronavirus, COVID-19: Recommended:  Coronavirus Updates 2020 History (1) Globally, 24 of January till the 13th of April Recommended:  Coronavirus Updates 2020 History (2) Globally, 15th of April till the 13th of May Recommended:  Coronavirus Updates 2020 History (3) Globally, 14th of May till the 22nd of June Recommended: Coronavirus, COVID-19 Travel Updates By Tu i   Coronavirus, COVID-19 Global Updates Updates, 05-07-2020 115 new cases and 1 new death in Austria  21 new cases in Slovenia  136 new cases in Singapore  706 new cases and 7 new deaths in Armenia  196 new cases in Israel  408 new cases and 10 new deaths in India  212 new cases in the United States 9 new cases in Hungary  3 new cases in Georgia  2 new deaths in the State of Palestine  28 new cases in Lesotho  279 new cases and 38 new deaths in Afghanistan  87 new cases in Australia      121 new cases in Uzbekistan  1 new death in Costa Rica  5 new cases in Thailand  283 new cases and 10 new deaths in Kyrgyzstan  3,191 new cases and 93 new deaths in Pakistan  64 new cases and 3 new deaths in Haiti  1 new death in Montenegro  1,452 new cases in Kazakhstan  805 new cases and 24 new deaths in Honduras  3 new cases in New Zealand  1,253 new cases and 58 new deaths in Bolivia  104 new cases and 4 new deaths in Sudan   61 new cases in South Korea  6,914 new cases and 523 new deaths in Mexico  7 new cases in Jamaica  8 new cases in China  Updates 04-07-2020 Headlines 06:41 The World Health Organization was alerted to the coronavirus crisis by its own office in China, and not by the local authorities, according to reports, as worldwide cases of Covid-19 passed 11 million and infections in the US rose by another 53,000. Brazil reported 1,290 more deaths and registered 42,223 new cases on Friday. It remains the second-worst in terms of case numbers in the world with more than 1.5 million, behind the US. Portugal’s government has expressed anger that it has been left off the list of countries designated safe for English holidaymakers to travel to when the so-called “air bridges” open across Europe next week. The outbreak in the state of Victoria has divided Australia. After days when the numbers of new cases did not rise very sharply, the state recorded its highest single daily total since 28 March with 108 new infections. {youtube}                                                                                           Coronavirus: The latest COVID-19 news.    Source Worldometers, The Guardian Updates: 06:33 3 new cases in Georgia  104 new cases in Uzbekistan  1 new case in Bhutan  5 new cases in Thailand   3,387 new cases and 68 new deaths in Pakistan  327 new cases and 2 new deaths in Kyrgyzstan  1,644 new cases in Kazakhstan  129 new cases in Haiti   5 new cases in Australia      996 new cases and 14 new deaths in Honduras  2 new cases in Belize  1,290 new cases and 49 new deaths in Bolivia  63 new cases and 1 new death in South Korea  6 new cases in Jamaica  6,740 new cases and 654 new deaths in Mexico  3 new cases in China  Source Worldometers, The Guardian Updates 03-07-2020 Headlines 06:41 Global cases are nearing 11 million. There are 10,842,615 known infections worldwide and 520,785 deaths. The past week has seen the United States break its own one-day case record four times, according to data compiled by researchers at Johns Hopkins University. In the seven days up to and including 1 July, the country, which has the highest number of cases and deaths worldwide, confirmed over 40,000 cases on four separate days. Wednesday also saw cases rise by more than 50,000 for the first time in the US, with 51,200 confirmed in 24 hours. Brazil, second only to the US in terms of the number of cases and deaths, has almost 1.5 million confirmed infections after it added 48,105 new cases on Thursday. Cases there stand at 1,496,858, with deaths at 61,884. Brazil has reported more than 40,000 daily cases at least three times in the past week. The top health official in the state of Sonora, Mexico has asked the federal government to temporarily close the border to non-essential visits from the US, in response to a spike in virus cases reported in Arizona. Mexico’s coronavirus outbreak also rose by a record of 6,741 confirmed cases and 679 deaths on Thursday, putting the country’s death toll at 29,189. The United Nations has predicted that more than 2.7m businesses could go under and 8.5m jobs could be lost in Latin America due to the coronavirus crisis. The UN’s economic commission for the region said shops, hotels, and restaurants, many of which are small- and medium-sized businesses, will be the hardest hit. The Australia’s state of Victoria is still struggling to contain a new outbreak, with 66 additional cases confirmed on Friday. The state health minister, Jenny Mikakos, said on Friday there was evidence of a “super spreader” in the Victorian outbreak. In Tokyo, Japan, more than 120 new cases were found on Friday, the Nikkei newspaper reported. On Thursday, the metropolis confirmed 107 new cases, the most in two months, but the government – eager to revive a slumping economy – said it was not planning to reimpose the emergency that was lifted on 25 May. Tokyo’s governor, Yuriko Koike, looks set cruise to victory in her bid for re-election on Sunday, buoyed by approval of her handling of the pandemic. Tokyo accounts for nearly 6,400 of Japan’s approximately 19,000 cases. South Korea reported 63 new coronavirus cases as of Thursday, most from domestic infections outside Seoul, triggering the return of tighter social distancing curbs in one city as the specter of a second wave of the disease worried authorities. For the first time in almost two months, new daily cases from other cities surpassed those from the Seoul area. The south-western city of Gwangju has recorded more than 50 cases in the past few days, prompting the suspension of operations at public facilities such as public libraries and museums. North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un meanwhile praised what he described as his country’s “shining success” in holding off the pandemic, according to state-run KCNA news agency on Friday. The head of the totalitarian state spoke at a Workers’ Party politburo meeting on Thursday discussing the impact of the virus, AFP reported. Pyongyang has not confirmed a single case of the deadly disease but has imposed strict rules, including closing its borders and schools and putting thousands of its people into isolation. Analysts say the North is unlikely to have avoided infections, and that its ramshackle health system could struggle to cope with a major outbreak. Staff and residents in the UK care homes for people over 65 and those with dementia will receive regular tests from Monday. Staff will be tested for the virus weekly while residents will receive a test every 28 days. The new measures will be in addition to intensive testing in any care home facing an outbreak or an increased risk of a surge in cases. Holidaymakers from England will be able to visit Spain, Italy, France, and Germany without having to quarantine for 14 days on their return and travel restrictions on up to 60 other countries and territories are also set to be lifted. Hundreds of health workers have been infected with coronavirus in South Africa’s Gauteng province, which includes Johannesburg and the capital, Pretoria. Across South Africa, more than 2,000 health workers across have been infected. There is “very little risk” that pets can infect their owners with Covid-19, the chief scientist of the World Health Organization said on Thursday. A leading obstetrician has advised women in Papua New Guinea not to fall pregnant for up to two years, saying fears of Covid-19 transmission have seen pregnant women turned away from hospitals, resulting in the death of at least one baby. Source Worldometers, The Guardian Updates: 06:33 121 new cases in Uzbekistan 1,501 new cases in Kazakhstan  One new case in Thailand  4,087 new cases and 78 new deaths in Pakistan  506 new cases and ten new deaths in Kyrgyzstan  858 new cases and 49 new deaths in Honduras  61 new cases and three new deaths in Haiti   Two new cases in the Turks and Caicos Islands  1,301 new cases and 70 new deaths in Bolivia   65 new cases in Australia     1,070 new cases and 19 new deaths in Equatorial Guinea  63 new cases in South Korea  Eight new cases in Jamaica  1,061 new cases and 26 new deaths in Guatemala  6,741 new cases and 679 new deaths in Mexico   Five new cases in China  Updates 02-07-2020 Headlines 07:08 More than 300,000 people entered the second lockdown in Melbourne’s inner north and west from Thursday after a spike in coronavirus cases. Police will target certain roads and backstreets in the areas and public places with large volumes of foot traffic. Thailand has confirmed six new cases of Covid-19, all related to returnees who are staying in-state quarantine. The country has recorded no local transmission of the virus for more than five weeks. India has now recorded more than 600,000 coronavirus infections and 17,834 deaths. The country has the fourth-largest outbreak in the world, and the increase in infections presents a severe challenge for its overburdened health system. Tokyo confirmed more than 100 new coronavirus infection cases on Thursday, according to public broadcaster NHK, the Japanese capital’s highest daily tally in two months. The city of 14 million initially sought to hold new daily cases below 20 since Japan lifted a state of emergency on May 25, but its tally has consistently exceeded 50 recently. More than 15,000 prisoners have been freed from overcrowded jails in the Philippines, in an attempt to stop the spread of the coronavirus, the Philippine Daily Inquirer reports. The 15,322 prisoners, mostly older people, were released between 17 March and June 22, following an order allowing people who are awaiting trial, but unable to afford bail, to be sent home. Most are accused of less serious crimes. The US has postponed flights for dozens of American diplomats who had planned to return to China later this month, Reuters reports, after failing to reach an agreement with Beijing over issues including Covid-19 testing and quarantine. Five months after the coronavirus epidemic forced the evacuation of some 1,300 US diplomats and family members from China, Washington and Beijing remain locked in negotiations over conditions for their return, according to more than a dozen internal State Department emails seen by Reuters and people familiar with the matter. The impasse comes as the pandemic intensifies in many parts of the world, including the US, with the global tally this week topping 10 million cases and half a million deaths. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Germany increased by 503 to 195,228, data from the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) for infectious diseases showed on Thursday. The reported death toll rose by 9 to 8,994. Source Worldometers, The Guardian Updates: 06:53 Six new cases in Thailand  526 new cases and four new deaths in Kyrgyzstan  65 new cases and two new deaths in Haiti   4,339 new cases and 78 new deaths in Pakistan  1,509 new cases in Kazakhstan  704 new cases and 45 new deaths in Honduras  1,008 new cases and 78 new deaths in Bolivia  81 new cases in Australia      Five new cases in Jamaica  54 new cases in South Korea  Two new cases in New Zealand  915 new cases and 44 new deaths in Guatemala  5,681 new cases and 741 new deaths in Mexico   Three new cases in China  Source Worldometers, The Guardian Updates 01-07-2020 Headlines 07:08 Cases worldwide are nearing 10.5m. There are 10,450,628 confirmed coronavirus cases worldwide, and 510,632 deaths, according to the Johns Hopkins University tracker. The US saw a record one-day case increase. Tuesday saw 44,358 new coronavirus cases confirmed in the US, according to The COVID-19 Tracking Project, which said on Twitter that the 7-day average for new daily cases as doubled since 13 June and that hospitalizations in the country jumped by the highest number since 21 April. Tuesday saw 44,358 new coronavirus cases confirmed in the US, according to The COVID-19 Tracking Project, which said on Twitter that the 7-day average for new daily cases as doubled since 13 June and that hospitalizations in the country jumped by the highest number since 21 April. Deaths in Brazil, the second-worst affected country after the US, are nearing 60,000. Brazil has suffered 1,280 more deaths, bringing the country’s confirmed death toll to 59,594, according to Health Ministry data. The total number of confirmed cases rose by 33,846 to reach 1,402,041, the worst outbreak in the world outside the United States. Australia locked down 300,000 in Victoria state suburbs. Authorities will lockdown around 300,000 people in the suburbs north of Melbourne for a month from late on Wednesday to contain the risk of infection after two weeks of double-digit rises in new coronavirus cases in Australia’s second-most populous state. The UN warned jobs figures are worse than feared. The pandemic has taken a much heavier toll on jobs than previously feared, the UN says, warning the situation in the Americas is particularly dire. In a fresh study, the International Labour Organization (ILO) estimates that by the mid-year point, global working hours were down 14 percent compared to last December - equivalent to some 400 million full-time jobs. Three asylum seekers at a camp near the US border tested positive for coronavirus. Three asylum seekers have tested positive for coronavirus in a sprawling border encampment, marking the first cases in a settlement that advocates have long viewed as vulnerable amid the pandemic. The US has bought up virtually all the stocks for the next three months of remdesivir, one of the two drugs proven to work against Covid-19, leaving none for the UK, Europe, or most of the rest of the world, my colleague Sarah Boseley reports. Experts and campaigners are alarmed both by the US unilateral action on remdesivir and the wider implications, for instance in the event of a vaccine became available. The Trump administration has already shown that it is prepared to outbid and outmaneuver all other countries to secure the medical supplies it needs for the US. South Korea is treating severe coronavirus cases with remdesivir. South Korea’s Yonhap News Agency reports that South Korea has started providing remdesivir to patients for coronavirus treatment. Dr. Anthony Fauci told US senators he “would not be surprised” if cases go up to 100,000 a day. He said the US was “going in the wrong direction” in its handling of the coronavirus pandemic and warned that the death toll “is going to be very disturbing” unless officials intervene, and urged Americans to wear masks and practice social distancing in public spaces. Speaking in Delaware, Joe Biden said the pandemic is unlikely to have subsided by January 2021, and if he’s elected. “On the day I’m sworn in, I’ll get right to work implementing all aspects of the response that remain undone,” he said. The United Nations has called on governments to provide nearly $10bn in aid for Syria, as the war-torn country’s humanitarian crisis deepens amid the coronavirus pandemic. The UN said it needed $3.8bn to help 11 million people in Syria – where food prices have soared – and a further $6.04bn to help the 6.6 million Syrians who have fled the country. Greece should prepare for a 'very difficult' tourist season, the country’s prime minister has said. Tourism officials say the country – which usually takes around 18.1 billion a year from tourism – would be lucky if revenues hit the 4-5 billion euro mark this year. Source Worldometers, The Guardian Updates: 06:53 124 new cases in Uzbekistan  Two new cases in Thailand  439 new cases and five new deaths in Kyrgyzstan  4,133 new cases and 91 new deaths in Pakistan  740 new cases and 12 new deaths in Honduras  489 new cases in Kazakhstan  42 new cases in Haiti  1,094 new cases and 52 new deaths in Bolivia   84 new cases in Australia      50 new cases in South Korea  Four new cases in Jamaica  687 new cases and 27 new deaths in Guatemala  5,432 new cases and 648 new deaths in Mexico   Three new cases in China  Source Worldometers, The Guardian Heat Waves And Covid-19: A Killers Mix On Its Way The world faces mass unemployment caused by the COVID-19 crisis and a climate emergency that could spell the end of humanity. There is no sign in the UK, US, or anywhere in the world of the effort required to combine our need for jobs with the pursuit of alternatives to fossil fuels and a concomitant reduction in greenhouse gases. Heat Waves: Dust Storms The dust storms that devastated the US prairie during the Great Depression were the worst ecological disaster in American history. They were also, partly, humanmade. Decades of farming in the Great Plains had rid the topsoil of its native grass, leaving nothing to prevent fields crumbling to dust when drought struck in 1931. Across the Dust Bowl in midwest America, millions of acres of farmland were swept away in brown blizzards. Forced off the land, hungry families headed west in search of new jobs and lives. The dust blew so far east that it settled on the White House lawn. The 'White-House battling another 'storm.' Almost 90 years ago, the US president’s response was not to lie about the scale of disaster or blame others. Instead, Franklin D Roosevelt launched one of his New Deal’s signature relief programs: the Civilian Conservation Corps. Its mission was to put unemployed Americans to work. More than 3 million people planted 3bn trees, built shelterbelts across the Great Plains to reduce the risk of dust storms, and created 700 state parks. FDR’s legacy survives, but his policy is revered more in name than indeed. COVID-19: The Environment The coronavirus pandemic and the environmental crisis share the same roots—humans’ success as a species in arrogating global resources for themselves and the consequent ecological disturbance. The environmental disruption is increasing viral exchanges – first from animal to human, then from human to human – on a pandemic scale. Our environmental footprint is too large for the planet, leading to accelerated species extinctions and atmospheric chaos. Both the COVID-19  and climate catastrophes are not misfortunes that befell us. They are part of a pattern of decisions that we humans are taking. We need to make different choices. Heat Waves And Covid-19: The US As underserved populations face hotter neighborhoods and limited access to air conditioning, the pandemic threatens the malls and libraries where they typically find relief. This year is on track to be one of the hottest on record, and public health officials worry that in cities across the US, summer heatwaves will collide with the coronavirus pandemic, with deadly consequences for poor, minority and older populations.  Portable Air Conditioner, 2020 Space Air Cooler with Humidifier Air Purifier Mini Air Conditioner with 7 Colors Light Changing, 3 Fan Speed, Quiet New Space Air Conditioner - This is a compact and portable 3-in-1 Air Conditioner, Humidifier, and Air Purification. The latest evaporative cooling technology, draw in hot air and pass it through a wet filter, which then exits the other side as cool, refreshing air. Be cool this summer, no matter where you are with your economical, highly effective Personal Space Cooler using standard swamp cooler technology. Energy Efficient & Eco-friendly - Power Plug or USB to save you lots of money over conventional air conditioners. Weighs just 3 pounds! Size 16 x 16 x 17 inches fits nicely on your desk, coffee table, nightstand, or window sill. The 3-speed buttons ensure you will enjoy the right amount of chilled air as you desire. £39.00 (UK)                                                               Even before the pandemic hit, the heat was killing more Americans than all other natural disasters combined. People who live in cities are especially vulnerable to heatwaves because of a phenomenon called the ‘urban heat island effect.’ Cities with populations of 1 million or more can be up to 5F (1,8C) hotter than surrounding areas due to high population density, a lack of greenery and shade, and because materials like steel, concrete, and asphalt tend to absorb more heat.  Heat Waves: Low-Income Families Analyses have also found that cities’ most impoverished neighborhoods tend to be hotter and that many low-income families have been struggling to cope for years. Due to the economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic, many families are unable to pay to run their AC. And even as cities begin reopening after lockdown, many of the malls, public libraries, and recreation centers where overheated Americans traditionally went to cool down remain risky, especially for older people and others with a heightened risk of dying from Covid-19.  "This summer is not going to be like any other summer," said Deanne Criswell, the commissioner of New York City Emergency Management. "We’re not going to have the same level of facilities open that New Yorkers typically go to all the time to stay cool. It’s a big concern."  A Killers Mix On Its Way: Cooling Centres At five cooling centers in LA, anyone who enters has their temperature checked and is required to wear a mask and remain 6ft away from other people. In Nevada’s Clark County, which includes Las Vegas, four cooling centers stayed open during the most recent heatwave. But none of these solutions are broad enough to catch everyone at risk of dying from heatstroke. It is just a staggering problem.  In South LA, where 64% of residents fall below the poverty line, more than 40% of households lack air conditioning, according to a study published this month by researchers at the University of Southern California. They analyzed data from the electrical meters of nearly 180,500 households. Poverty was a better predictor of whether or not people had AC than even how hot or cool it was in a neighborhood. Killers: Food Insecurity Crisis If above is not enough. America’s food insecurity crisis was dire even before the COVID-19 pandemic when at least 37 million people lived in households without adequate resources to guarantee consistent access to enough food for an active, healthy life. 'Today' with COVID-19, there are 54m Americans without food. A Killers Mix On Its Way: Worldwide The vast majority of heat-related deaths in cities occur inside homes that aren’t air-conditioned. Add to this the COVID-19 problems, mass unemployment, food-, water shortages, locust swarms in East Africa, Pakistan, India, the coming storm season, and forest fires; we can expect 2020 to be a disaster yea Source Worldometers, The Guardian .  5 Online Tools Provide Up-to-Date Tracking of The New Coronavirus Spread WHO and Centres for Disease Control data to track outbreaks and recoveries, while others are aimed only at a Chinese audience, and focused on controlling the infection be helping people track who they might have contacted. Using these tools, along with preventative measures like handwashing and avoiding contact with sick people, could slow the spread of the coronavirus. The outbreak originated in Wuhan, China, in December 2019 and is now in at least 26 countries. Experts are now calling it a 'mild pandemic' and theorizing that it could become a permanent virus that humans face, akin to the seasonal flu. Here are five tools to follow the coronavirus: Johns Hopkins CSSE map This online dashboard from Johns Hopkins uses CDC and WHO data to track the outbreak in real-time. Click here for Johns Hopkins CSSE map . Health Map This map also tracks outbreaks of the virus, but it uses AI to scrape posts on news sites and social media to create a heat map of the virus, which can be useful to health officials. Click here for the Health Map, which tracks outbreaks of the coronavirus worldwide . Coronavirus app This app from two French ex-pats in Taiwan has a useful breakdown of infections, deaths, and recoveries by region. Click here for the Coronavirus Map     Baidu map Chinese search engine Baidu has created an epidemic map alongside its normal route, which shows real-time locations of confirmed and suspected coronavirus cases. Click here for the Baidu map Chinese flight and train checker A Chinese cybersecurity firm created a tool available in China that lets people input flight or train numbers to see if they have traveled with anyone infected with the coronavirus. Click here for the Chinese flight and train tracker . Recommended previous updates from this article back to the 24th of January 2020:  Coronavirus History Updates 2020 Globally Before you go! Recommended:  Travel The World: Keeping The Environment Healthy Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about the coronavirus, the possible relation with the winter season, or climate change? Click on  'Re g ister'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
COVID-19, the Coronavirus Worldwide Breaking News Updates. Updates from around the world from different news sources. Stay safe and take the right precautions if you are going to travel to potentially contaminated areas! All times mentioned are according to UK time. COVID-19, The Coronavirus Worldwide Breaking News Updates 05-07-2020 Coronavirus, COVID-19: 53329.693+ Death, and 11.673. proven infected worldwide. Photo by: PTI. Amid COVID-19, coronavirus lockdown, a heatwave has intensified in several states across north India. A railway employee refills water bottles of migrants sitting in a train to reach their native places, during the ongoing COVID-19 lockdown, in Jabalpur. Daily Updates About The Coronavirus, COVID-19 Jump quickly to 5 Online Tools by clicking on: 5 Online Tools Provide Up-to-Date Tracking History global updates about the coronavirus, COVID-19: Recommended:  Coronavirus Updates 2020 History (1) Globally, 24 of January till the 13th of April Recommended:  Coronavirus Updates 2020 History (2) Globally, 15th of April till the 13th of May Recommended:  Coronavirus Updates 2020 History (3) Globally, 14th of May till the 22nd of June Recommended: Coronavirus, COVID-19 Travel Updates By Tu i   Coronavirus, COVID-19 Global Updates Updates, 05-07-2020 115 new cases and 1 new death in Austria  21 new cases in Slovenia  136 new cases in Singapore  706 new cases and 7 new deaths in Armenia  196 new cases in Israel  408 new cases and 10 new deaths in India  212 new cases in the United States 9 new cases in Hungary  3 new cases in Georgia  2 new deaths in the State of Palestine  28 new cases in Lesotho  279 new cases and 38 new deaths in Afghanistan  87 new cases in Australia      121 new cases in Uzbekistan  1 new death in Costa Rica  5 new cases in Thailand  283 new cases and 10 new deaths in Kyrgyzstan  3,191 new cases and 93 new deaths in Pakistan  64 new cases and 3 new deaths in Haiti  1 new death in Montenegro  1,452 new cases in Kazakhstan  805 new cases and 24 new deaths in Honduras  3 new cases in New Zealand  1,253 new cases and 58 new deaths in Bolivia  104 new cases and 4 new deaths in Sudan   61 new cases in South Korea  6,914 new cases and 523 new deaths in Mexico  7 new cases in Jamaica  8 new cases in China  Updates 04-07-2020 Headlines 06:41 The World Health Organization was alerted to the coronavirus crisis by its own office in China, and not by the local authorities, according to reports, as worldwide cases of Covid-19 passed 11 million and infections in the US rose by another 53,000. Brazil reported 1,290 more deaths and registered 42,223 new cases on Friday. It remains the second-worst in terms of case numbers in the world with more than 1.5 million, behind the US. Portugal’s government has expressed anger that it has been left off the list of countries designated safe for English holidaymakers to travel to when the so-called “air bridges” open across Europe next week. The outbreak in the state of Victoria has divided Australia. After days when the numbers of new cases did not rise very sharply, the state recorded its highest single daily total since 28 March with 108 new infections. {youtube}                                                                                           Coronavirus: The latest COVID-19 news.    Source Worldometers, The Guardian Updates: 06:33 3 new cases in Georgia  104 new cases in Uzbekistan  1 new case in Bhutan  5 new cases in Thailand   3,387 new cases and 68 new deaths in Pakistan  327 new cases and 2 new deaths in Kyrgyzstan  1,644 new cases in Kazakhstan  129 new cases in Haiti   5 new cases in Australia      996 new cases and 14 new deaths in Honduras  2 new cases in Belize  1,290 new cases and 49 new deaths in Bolivia  63 new cases and 1 new death in South Korea  6 new cases in Jamaica  6,740 new cases and 654 new deaths in Mexico  3 new cases in China  Source Worldometers, The Guardian Updates 03-07-2020 Headlines 06:41 Global cases are nearing 11 million. There are 10,842,615 known infections worldwide and 520,785 deaths. The past week has seen the United States break its own one-day case record four times, according to data compiled by researchers at Johns Hopkins University. In the seven days up to and including 1 July, the country, which has the highest number of cases and deaths worldwide, confirmed over 40,000 cases on four separate days. Wednesday also saw cases rise by more than 50,000 for the first time in the US, with 51,200 confirmed in 24 hours. Brazil, second only to the US in terms of the number of cases and deaths, has almost 1.5 million confirmed infections after it added 48,105 new cases on Thursday. Cases there stand at 1,496,858, with deaths at 61,884. Brazil has reported more than 40,000 daily cases at least three times in the past week. The top health official in the state of Sonora, Mexico has asked the federal government to temporarily close the border to non-essential visits from the US, in response to a spike in virus cases reported in Arizona. Mexico’s coronavirus outbreak also rose by a record of 6,741 confirmed cases and 679 deaths on Thursday, putting the country’s death toll at 29,189. The United Nations has predicted that more than 2.7m businesses could go under and 8.5m jobs could be lost in Latin America due to the coronavirus crisis. The UN’s economic commission for the region said shops, hotels, and restaurants, many of which are small- and medium-sized businesses, will be the hardest hit. The Australia’s state of Victoria is still struggling to contain a new outbreak, with 66 additional cases confirmed on Friday. The state health minister, Jenny Mikakos, said on Friday there was evidence of a “super spreader” in the Victorian outbreak. In Tokyo, Japan, more than 120 new cases were found on Friday, the Nikkei newspaper reported. On Thursday, the metropolis confirmed 107 new cases, the most in two months, but the government – eager to revive a slumping economy – said it was not planning to reimpose the emergency that was lifted on 25 May. Tokyo’s governor, Yuriko Koike, looks set cruise to victory in her bid for re-election on Sunday, buoyed by approval of her handling of the pandemic. Tokyo accounts for nearly 6,400 of Japan’s approximately 19,000 cases. South Korea reported 63 new coronavirus cases as of Thursday, most from domestic infections outside Seoul, triggering the return of tighter social distancing curbs in one city as the specter of a second wave of the disease worried authorities. For the first time in almost two months, new daily cases from other cities surpassed those from the Seoul area. The south-western city of Gwangju has recorded more than 50 cases in the past few days, prompting the suspension of operations at public facilities such as public libraries and museums. North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un meanwhile praised what he described as his country’s “shining success” in holding off the pandemic, according to state-run KCNA news agency on Friday. The head of the totalitarian state spoke at a Workers’ Party politburo meeting on Thursday discussing the impact of the virus, AFP reported. Pyongyang has not confirmed a single case of the deadly disease but has imposed strict rules, including closing its borders and schools and putting thousands of its people into isolation. Analysts say the North is unlikely to have avoided infections, and that its ramshackle health system could struggle to cope with a major outbreak. Staff and residents in the UK care homes for people over 65 and those with dementia will receive regular tests from Monday. Staff will be tested for the virus weekly while residents will receive a test every 28 days. The new measures will be in addition to intensive testing in any care home facing an outbreak or an increased risk of a surge in cases. Holidaymakers from England will be able to visit Spain, Italy, France, and Germany without having to quarantine for 14 days on their return and travel restrictions on up to 60 other countries and territories are also set to be lifted. Hundreds of health workers have been infected with coronavirus in South Africa’s Gauteng province, which includes Johannesburg and the capital, Pretoria. Across South Africa, more than 2,000 health workers across have been infected. There is “very little risk” that pets can infect their owners with Covid-19, the chief scientist of the World Health Organization said on Thursday. A leading obstetrician has advised women in Papua New Guinea not to fall pregnant for up to two years, saying fears of Covid-19 transmission have seen pregnant women turned away from hospitals, resulting in the death of at least one baby. Source Worldometers, The Guardian Updates: 06:33 121 new cases in Uzbekistan 1,501 new cases in Kazakhstan  One new case in Thailand  4,087 new cases and 78 new deaths in Pakistan  506 new cases and ten new deaths in Kyrgyzstan  858 new cases and 49 new deaths in Honduras  61 new cases and three new deaths in Haiti   Two new cases in the Turks and Caicos Islands  1,301 new cases and 70 new deaths in Bolivia   65 new cases in Australia     1,070 new cases and 19 new deaths in Equatorial Guinea  63 new cases in South Korea  Eight new cases in Jamaica  1,061 new cases and 26 new deaths in Guatemala  6,741 new cases and 679 new deaths in Mexico   Five new cases in China  Updates 02-07-2020 Headlines 07:08 More than 300,000 people entered the second lockdown in Melbourne’s inner north and west from Thursday after a spike in coronavirus cases. Police will target certain roads and backstreets in the areas and public places with large volumes of foot traffic. Thailand has confirmed six new cases of Covid-19, all related to returnees who are staying in-state quarantine. The country has recorded no local transmission of the virus for more than five weeks. India has now recorded more than 600,000 coronavirus infections and 17,834 deaths. The country has the fourth-largest outbreak in the world, and the increase in infections presents a severe challenge for its overburdened health system. Tokyo confirmed more than 100 new coronavirus infection cases on Thursday, according to public broadcaster NHK, the Japanese capital’s highest daily tally in two months. The city of 14 million initially sought to hold new daily cases below 20 since Japan lifted a state of emergency on May 25, but its tally has consistently exceeded 50 recently. More than 15,000 prisoners have been freed from overcrowded jails in the Philippines, in an attempt to stop the spread of the coronavirus, the Philippine Daily Inquirer reports. The 15,322 prisoners, mostly older people, were released between 17 March and June 22, following an order allowing people who are awaiting trial, but unable to afford bail, to be sent home. Most are accused of less serious crimes. The US has postponed flights for dozens of American diplomats who had planned to return to China later this month, Reuters reports, after failing to reach an agreement with Beijing over issues including Covid-19 testing and quarantine. Five months after the coronavirus epidemic forced the evacuation of some 1,300 US diplomats and family members from China, Washington and Beijing remain locked in negotiations over conditions for their return, according to more than a dozen internal State Department emails seen by Reuters and people familiar with the matter. The impasse comes as the pandemic intensifies in many parts of the world, including the US, with the global tally this week topping 10 million cases and half a million deaths. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Germany increased by 503 to 195,228, data from the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) for infectious diseases showed on Thursday. The reported death toll rose by 9 to 8,994. Source Worldometers, The Guardian Updates: 06:53 Six new cases in Thailand  526 new cases and four new deaths in Kyrgyzstan  65 new cases and two new deaths in Haiti   4,339 new cases and 78 new deaths in Pakistan  1,509 new cases in Kazakhstan  704 new cases and 45 new deaths in Honduras  1,008 new cases and 78 new deaths in Bolivia  81 new cases in Australia      Five new cases in Jamaica  54 new cases in South Korea  Two new cases in New Zealand  915 new cases and 44 new deaths in Guatemala  5,681 new cases and 741 new deaths in Mexico   Three new cases in China  Source Worldometers, The Guardian Updates 01-07-2020 Headlines 07:08 Cases worldwide are nearing 10.5m. There are 10,450,628 confirmed coronavirus cases worldwide, and 510,632 deaths, according to the Johns Hopkins University tracker. The US saw a record one-day case increase. Tuesday saw 44,358 new coronavirus cases confirmed in the US, according to The COVID-19 Tracking Project, which said on Twitter that the 7-day average for new daily cases as doubled since 13 June and that hospitalizations in the country jumped by the highest number since 21 April. Tuesday saw 44,358 new coronavirus cases confirmed in the US, according to The COVID-19 Tracking Project, which said on Twitter that the 7-day average for new daily cases as doubled since 13 June and that hospitalizations in the country jumped by the highest number since 21 April. Deaths in Brazil, the second-worst affected country after the US, are nearing 60,000. Brazil has suffered 1,280 more deaths, bringing the country’s confirmed death toll to 59,594, according to Health Ministry data. The total number of confirmed cases rose by 33,846 to reach 1,402,041, the worst outbreak in the world outside the United States. Australia locked down 300,000 in Victoria state suburbs. Authorities will lockdown around 300,000 people in the suburbs north of Melbourne for a month from late on Wednesday to contain the risk of infection after two weeks of double-digit rises in new coronavirus cases in Australia’s second-most populous state. The UN warned jobs figures are worse than feared. The pandemic has taken a much heavier toll on jobs than previously feared, the UN says, warning the situation in the Americas is particularly dire. In a fresh study, the International Labour Organization (ILO) estimates that by the mid-year point, global working hours were down 14 percent compared to last December - equivalent to some 400 million full-time jobs. Three asylum seekers at a camp near the US border tested positive for coronavirus. Three asylum seekers have tested positive for coronavirus in a sprawling border encampment, marking the first cases in a settlement that advocates have long viewed as vulnerable amid the pandemic. The US has bought up virtually all the stocks for the next three months of remdesivir, one of the two drugs proven to work against Covid-19, leaving none for the UK, Europe, or most of the rest of the world, my colleague Sarah Boseley reports. Experts and campaigners are alarmed both by the US unilateral action on remdesivir and the wider implications, for instance in the event of a vaccine became available. The Trump administration has already shown that it is prepared to outbid and outmaneuver all other countries to secure the medical supplies it needs for the US. South Korea is treating severe coronavirus cases with remdesivir. South Korea’s Yonhap News Agency reports that South Korea has started providing remdesivir to patients for coronavirus treatment. Dr. Anthony Fauci told US senators he “would not be surprised” if cases go up to 100,000 a day. He said the US was “going in the wrong direction” in its handling of the coronavirus pandemic and warned that the death toll “is going to be very disturbing” unless officials intervene, and urged Americans to wear masks and practice social distancing in public spaces. Speaking in Delaware, Joe Biden said the pandemic is unlikely to have subsided by January 2021, and if he’s elected. “On the day I’m sworn in, I’ll get right to work implementing all aspects of the response that remain undone,” he said. The United Nations has called on governments to provide nearly $10bn in aid for Syria, as the war-torn country’s humanitarian crisis deepens amid the coronavirus pandemic. The UN said it needed $3.8bn to help 11 million people in Syria – where food prices have soared – and a further $6.04bn to help the 6.6 million Syrians who have fled the country. Greece should prepare for a 'very difficult' tourist season, the country’s prime minister has said. Tourism officials say the country – which usually takes around 18.1 billion a year from tourism – would be lucky if revenues hit the 4-5 billion euro mark this year. Source Worldometers, The Guardian Updates: 06:53 124 new cases in Uzbekistan  Two new cases in Thailand  439 new cases and five new deaths in Kyrgyzstan  4,133 new cases and 91 new deaths in Pakistan  740 new cases and 12 new deaths in Honduras  489 new cases in Kazakhstan  42 new cases in Haiti  1,094 new cases and 52 new deaths in Bolivia   84 new cases in Australia      50 new cases in South Korea  Four new cases in Jamaica  687 new cases and 27 new deaths in Guatemala  5,432 new cases and 648 new deaths in Mexico   Three new cases in China  Source Worldometers, The Guardian Heat Waves And Covid-19: A Killers Mix On Its Way The world faces mass unemployment caused by the COVID-19 crisis and a climate emergency that could spell the end of humanity. There is no sign in the UK, US, or anywhere in the world of the effort required to combine our need for jobs with the pursuit of alternatives to fossil fuels and a concomitant reduction in greenhouse gases. Heat Waves: Dust Storms The dust storms that devastated the US prairie during the Great Depression were the worst ecological disaster in American history. They were also, partly, humanmade. Decades of farming in the Great Plains had rid the topsoil of its native grass, leaving nothing to prevent fields crumbling to dust when drought struck in 1931. Across the Dust Bowl in midwest America, millions of acres of farmland were swept away in brown blizzards. Forced off the land, hungry families headed west in search of new jobs and lives. The dust blew so far east that it settled on the White House lawn. The 'White-House battling another 'storm.' Almost 90 years ago, the US president’s response was not to lie about the scale of disaster or blame others. Instead, Franklin D Roosevelt launched one of his New Deal’s signature relief programs: the Civilian Conservation Corps. Its mission was to put unemployed Americans to work. More than 3 million people planted 3bn trees, built shelterbelts across the Great Plains to reduce the risk of dust storms, and created 700 state parks. FDR’s legacy survives, but his policy is revered more in name than indeed. COVID-19: The Environment The coronavirus pandemic and the environmental crisis share the same roots—humans’ success as a species in arrogating global resources for themselves and the consequent ecological disturbance. The environmental disruption is increasing viral exchanges – first from animal to human, then from human to human – on a pandemic scale. Our environmental footprint is too large for the planet, leading to accelerated species extinctions and atmospheric chaos. Both the COVID-19  and climate catastrophes are not misfortunes that befell us. They are part of a pattern of decisions that we humans are taking. We need to make different choices. Heat Waves And Covid-19: The US As underserved populations face hotter neighborhoods and limited access to air conditioning, the pandemic threatens the malls and libraries where they typically find relief. This year is on track to be one of the hottest on record, and public health officials worry that in cities across the US, summer heatwaves will collide with the coronavirus pandemic, with deadly consequences for poor, minority and older populations.  Portable Air Conditioner, 2020 Space Air Cooler with Humidifier Air Purifier Mini Air Conditioner with 7 Colors Light Changing, 3 Fan Speed, Quiet New Space Air Conditioner - This is a compact and portable 3-in-1 Air Conditioner, Humidifier, and Air Purification. The latest evaporative cooling technology, draw in hot air and pass it through a wet filter, which then exits the other side as cool, refreshing air. Be cool this summer, no matter where you are with your economical, highly effective Personal Space Cooler using standard swamp cooler technology. Energy Efficient & Eco-friendly - Power Plug or USB to save you lots of money over conventional air conditioners. Weighs just 3 pounds! Size 16 x 16 x 17 inches fits nicely on your desk, coffee table, nightstand, or window sill. The 3-speed buttons ensure you will enjoy the right amount of chilled air as you desire. £39.00 (UK)                                                               Even before the pandemic hit, the heat was killing more Americans than all other natural disasters combined. People who live in cities are especially vulnerable to heatwaves because of a phenomenon called the ‘urban heat island effect.’ Cities with populations of 1 million or more can be up to 5F (1,8C) hotter than surrounding areas due to high population density, a lack of greenery and shade, and because materials like steel, concrete, and asphalt tend to absorb more heat.  Heat Waves: Low-Income Families Analyses have also found that cities’ most impoverished neighborhoods tend to be hotter and that many low-income families have been struggling to cope for years. Due to the economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic, many families are unable to pay to run their AC. And even as cities begin reopening after lockdown, many of the malls, public libraries, and recreation centers where overheated Americans traditionally went to cool down remain risky, especially for older people and others with a heightened risk of dying from Covid-19.  "This summer is not going to be like any other summer," said Deanne Criswell, the commissioner of New York City Emergency Management. "We’re not going to have the same level of facilities open that New Yorkers typically go to all the time to stay cool. It’s a big concern."  A Killers Mix On Its Way: Cooling Centres At five cooling centers in LA, anyone who enters has their temperature checked and is required to wear a mask and remain 6ft away from other people. In Nevada’s Clark County, which includes Las Vegas, four cooling centers stayed open during the most recent heatwave. But none of these solutions are broad enough to catch everyone at risk of dying from heatstroke. It is just a staggering problem.  In South LA, where 64% of residents fall below the poverty line, more than 40% of households lack air conditioning, according to a study published this month by researchers at the University of Southern California. They analyzed data from the electrical meters of nearly 180,500 households. Poverty was a better predictor of whether or not people had AC than even how hot or cool it was in a neighborhood. Killers: Food Insecurity Crisis If above is not enough. America’s food insecurity crisis was dire even before the COVID-19 pandemic when at least 37 million people lived in households without adequate resources to guarantee consistent access to enough food for an active, healthy life. 'Today' with COVID-19, there are 54m Americans without food. A Killers Mix On Its Way: Worldwide The vast majority of heat-related deaths in cities occur inside homes that aren’t air-conditioned. Add to this the COVID-19 problems, mass unemployment, food-, water shortages, locust swarms in East Africa, Pakistan, India, the coming storm season, and forest fires; we can expect 2020 to be a disaster yea Source Worldometers, The Guardian .  5 Online Tools Provide Up-to-Date Tracking of The New Coronavirus Spread WHO and Centres for Disease Control data to track outbreaks and recoveries, while others are aimed only at a Chinese audience, and focused on controlling the infection be helping people track who they might have contacted. Using these tools, along with preventative measures like handwashing and avoiding contact with sick people, could slow the spread of the coronavirus. The outbreak originated in Wuhan, China, in December 2019 and is now in at least 26 countries. Experts are now calling it a 'mild pandemic' and theorizing that it could become a permanent virus that humans face, akin to the seasonal flu. Here are five tools to follow the coronavirus: Johns Hopkins CSSE map This online dashboard from Johns Hopkins uses CDC and WHO data to track the outbreak in real-time. Click here for Johns Hopkins CSSE map . Health Map This map also tracks outbreaks of the virus, but it uses AI to scrape posts on news sites and social media to create a heat map of the virus, which can be useful to health officials. Click here for the Health Map, which tracks outbreaks of the coronavirus worldwide . Coronavirus app This app from two French ex-pats in Taiwan has a useful breakdown of infections, deaths, and recoveries by region. Click here for the Coronavirus Map     Baidu map Chinese search engine Baidu has created an epidemic map alongside its normal route, which shows real-time locations of confirmed and suspected coronavirus cases. Click here for the Baidu map Chinese flight and train checker A Chinese cybersecurity firm created a tool available in China that lets people input flight or train numbers to see if they have traveled with anyone infected with the coronavirus. Click here for the Chinese flight and train tracker . Recommended previous updates from this article back to the 24th of January 2020:  Coronavirus History Updates 2020 Globally Before you go! Recommended:  Travel The World: Keeping The Environment Healthy Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about the coronavirus, the possible relation with the winter season, or climate change? Click on  'Re g ister'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Heat Waves And COVID-19: A Killers Mix On Its Way
Largest Electric Plane In The World Takes Off
Nine-seater plane took off to skies on Thursday the 28th of May 2020 and produced no carbon emissions. The world’s largest all-electric aircraft took off to the skies for the first time. The world’s largest all-electric aircraft - retrofitted Cessna Caravan - the took off to the skies for the first time Electric Plane Takes Off MOSES LAKE - The American aerospace test and development company AeroTEC performed its first thirty-minute flight on Thursday (May 28, 2020) with the electric motor-driven Cessna Caravan 208B. During this flight, a flight altitude of 2,500 ft AG (763 m) was recorded, corresponding to 3,800 ft (1,158 m) above sea level. The Cessna Caravan retrofitted with an electric engine and flew for 20-30 minutes over Washington State in the US on Thursday the 28th of May 2020. The plane can carry nine passengers, but a test pilot undertook the inaugural flight alone, cruising at a speed of 114mph (185km/h). Engine maker magniX hopes the aircraft could enter commercial service by the end of 2021 and have a range of 100 miles (160km). Before the coronavirus pandemic, aviation was one of the fastest-growing sources of the carbon emissions that are driving the climate emergency. Scores of companies are working on electric planes. However, significant breakthroughs in reducing the weight of batteries will be needed before large planes can fly considerable distances on electric power alone. Other power sources being tested include hydrogen fuel cells and biofuels. Recommended:  Transport By Airships: Back To The Future With Zeppelins Another Electric Plane: The De-Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver The de-Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver, the seaplane powered by magniX that was the first all-electric commercial aircraft to fly in December 2019. The aviation industry is heavily regulated to ensure safety, but magniX hopes that by retrofitting an existing plane, the certification process can be accelerated. A smaller seaplane powered by a magniX engine completed a short flight in December.  Recommended:  How A Fossil Fuel Seaplane Got Converted Into An e-Plane In June 2019, another company, Ampaire, flew an aircraft powered by a hybrid electric-fossil fuel engine over California. Analysts at investment bank UBS said at the time that the aviation industry would move towards hybrid and electric motors for routes less than 1,000 miles (1,600km) long much more quickly than many think. Roei Ganzarski, the CEO of magniX, said current airplanes were both expensive to operate and very polluting. “Electric airplanes will be 40%-70% lower cost to operate per flight hour,” he said. “That means operators will be able to fly more planes into smaller airports, meaning a shorter and door-to-door experience, with no harmful CO2 emissions.” {youtube}                                                      All Electric eCaravan Taxi Tests May 23, 2020 Ganzarski said the company believed all flights less than 1,000 miles in range would be utterly electric in 15 years. But he said: “Battery [energy] density is not where we would like to see it. While it is good for ultra-short flights of 100 miles on a retrofit aircraft and over 500 miles on a new design aircraft like the Alice, there is plenty of untapped potential in batteries. Now that the first commercial aircraft has flown all-electric, battery companies are starting to work more diligently on aerospace-ready battery solutions.” Among the other companies developing electric aircraft are Zunum Aero, which is building a 27-seat plane with a 680-mile (1,100km) range and the engine maker Rolls Royce, whose Accel program aims to produce the fastest all-electric plane to date. However, in April, Rolls Royce and Airbus canceled their plans for a hybrid electric aircraft. The German company Lilium is working on a five-seater jet-powered electric air taxi. The Cessna Caravan, being used by magniX, is one of the world’s most used medium-range planes, with more than 2,600 operating in 100 countries. The first flight is set for 8 am Pacific time on Thursday, weather permitting. Original by: The Guardian Before you go! Recommended:  Facebook Solar Planes For Network Internet Connectivity Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about electric transport? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage .
Nine-seater plane took off to skies on Thursday the 28th of May 2020 and produced no carbon emissions. The world’s largest all-electric aircraft took off to the skies for the first time. The world’s largest all-electric aircraft - retrofitted Cessna Caravan - the took off to the skies for the first time Electric Plane Takes Off MOSES LAKE - The American aerospace test and development company AeroTEC performed its first thirty-minute flight on Thursday (May 28, 2020) with the electric motor-driven Cessna Caravan 208B. During this flight, a flight altitude of 2,500 ft AG (763 m) was recorded, corresponding to 3,800 ft (1,158 m) above sea level. The Cessna Caravan retrofitted with an electric engine and flew for 20-30 minutes over Washington State in the US on Thursday the 28th of May 2020. The plane can carry nine passengers, but a test pilot undertook the inaugural flight alone, cruising at a speed of 114mph (185km/h). Engine maker magniX hopes the aircraft could enter commercial service by the end of 2021 and have a range of 100 miles (160km). Before the coronavirus pandemic, aviation was one of the fastest-growing sources of the carbon emissions that are driving the climate emergency. Scores of companies are working on electric planes. However, significant breakthroughs in reducing the weight of batteries will be needed before large planes can fly considerable distances on electric power alone. Other power sources being tested include hydrogen fuel cells and biofuels. Recommended:  Transport By Airships: Back To The Future With Zeppelins Another Electric Plane: The De-Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver The de-Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver, the seaplane powered by magniX that was the first all-electric commercial aircraft to fly in December 2019. The aviation industry is heavily regulated to ensure safety, but magniX hopes that by retrofitting an existing plane, the certification process can be accelerated. A smaller seaplane powered by a magniX engine completed a short flight in December.  Recommended:  How A Fossil Fuel Seaplane Got Converted Into An e-Plane In June 2019, another company, Ampaire, flew an aircraft powered by a hybrid electric-fossil fuel engine over California. Analysts at investment bank UBS said at the time that the aviation industry would move towards hybrid and electric motors for routes less than 1,000 miles (1,600km) long much more quickly than many think. Roei Ganzarski, the CEO of magniX, said current airplanes were both expensive to operate and very polluting. “Electric airplanes will be 40%-70% lower cost to operate per flight hour,” he said. “That means operators will be able to fly more planes into smaller airports, meaning a shorter and door-to-door experience, with no harmful CO2 emissions.” {youtube}                                                      All Electric eCaravan Taxi Tests May 23, 2020 Ganzarski said the company believed all flights less than 1,000 miles in range would be utterly electric in 15 years. But he said: “Battery [energy] density is not where we would like to see it. While it is good for ultra-short flights of 100 miles on a retrofit aircraft and over 500 miles on a new design aircraft like the Alice, there is plenty of untapped potential in batteries. Now that the first commercial aircraft has flown all-electric, battery companies are starting to work more diligently on aerospace-ready battery solutions.” Among the other companies developing electric aircraft are Zunum Aero, which is building a 27-seat plane with a 680-mile (1,100km) range and the engine maker Rolls Royce, whose Accel program aims to produce the fastest all-electric plane to date. However, in April, Rolls Royce and Airbus canceled their plans for a hybrid electric aircraft. The German company Lilium is working on a five-seater jet-powered electric air taxi. The Cessna Caravan, being used by magniX, is one of the world’s most used medium-range planes, with more than 2,600 operating in 100 countries. The first flight is set for 8 am Pacific time on Thursday, weather permitting. Original by: The Guardian Before you go! Recommended:  Facebook Solar Planes For Network Internet Connectivity Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about electric transport? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage .
Largest Electric Plane In The World Takes Off
Renewables Are Fossil Fuel In A Different Form
If the world isn’t careful, renewable energy could become as destructive as fossil fuels. The conversation about climate change has been blazing ahead in 2019. Propelled by the school climate strikes and social movements like Extinction Rebellion, a number of governments have declared a climate emergency, and progressive political parties are making plans - at last - for a rapid transition to clean energy under the Green New Deal. Renewables Are Fossil: The Green Deal This is a welcome shift, and we need more of it. But a new problem is beginning to emerge that warrants our attention. Some proponents of the Green New Deal seem to believe that it will pave the way to a utopia of ‘green growth’. Once we trade dirty fossil fuels for clean energy, there’s no reason we can’t keep expanding the economy forever. This narrative may seem reasonable enough at first glance, but there are good reasons to think twice about it. One of them has to do with clean energy itself. The phrase ‘clean energy’ normally conjures up happy, innocent images of warm sunshine and fresh wind. But while sunshine and wind is obviously clean, the infrastructure we need to capture it is not. Far from it. The transition to renewables is going to require a dramatic increase in the extraction of metals and rare-earth minerals, with real ecological and social costs. We need a rapid transition to renewables, yes - but scientists warn that we can’t keep growing energy use at existing rates. No energy is innocent. The only truly clean energy is less energy. {youtube}                     Michael Moore Presents: Planet of the Humans | Full Documentary | Directed by Jeff Gibbs Michael Moore presents Planet of the Humans, a documentary that dares to say what no one else will this Earth Day — that we are losing the battle to stop climate change on planet earth because we are following leaders who have taken us down the wrong road — selling out the green movement to wealthy interests and corporate America. This film is the wake-up call to the reality we are afraid to face: that in the midst of a human-caused extinction event, the environmental movement’s answer is to push for techno-fixes and band-aids. It's too little, too late. Removed from the debate is the only thing that MIGHT save us: getting a grip on our out-of-control human presence and consumption. Why is this not THE issue? Because that would be bad for profits, bad for business. Have we environmentalists fallen for illusions, “green” illusions, that are anything but green, because we’re scared that this is the end—and we’ve pinned all our hopes on biomass, wind turbines, and electric cars? Click here to read bout Planet of the Humans. No amount of batteries are going to save us, warns director Jeff Gibbs (lifelong environmentalist and co-producer of “Fahrenheit 9/11” and “Bowling for Columbine"). This urgent, must-see movie, a full-frontal assault on our sacred cows, is guaranteed to generate anger, debate, and, hopefully, a willingness to see our survival in a new way—before it’s too late. Featuring: Al Gore, Bill McKibben, Richard Branson, Robert F Kennedy Jr., Michael Bloomberg, Van Jones, Vinod Khosla, Koch Brothers, Vandana Shiva, General Motors, 350.org, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sierra Club, the Union of Concerned Scientists, Nature Conservancy, Elon Musk, Tesla. Recommended:  Earth Day 2020: One World Stays Together At Home In 2017, the World Bank released a little-noticed report that offered the first comprehensive look at this question. It models the increase in material extraction that would be required to build enough solar and wind utilities to produce an annual output of about 7 terawatts of electricity by 2050. That’s enough to power roughly half of the global economy. By doubling the World Bank figures, we can estimate what it will take to get all the way to zero emissions—and the results are staggering: 34 million metric tons of copper, 40 million tons of lead, 50 million tons of zinc, 162 million tons of aluminum, and no less than 4.8 billion tons of iron. Renewables Are Fossil Fuel: Massive Increase Of Extraction In some cases, the transition to renewables will require a massive increase over existing levels of extraction. For neodymium—an essential element in wind turbines—extraction will need to rise by nearly 35 percent over current levels. Higher-end estimates reported by the World Bank suggest it could double. Recommended:  Wind Turbines: Waste From These Blade Runners? The same is true of silver, which is critical to solar panels. Silver extraction will go up 38 percent and perhaps as much as 105 percent. Demand for indium, also essential to solar technology, will more than triple and could end up skyrocketing by 920 percent. And then there are all the batteries we’re going to need for power storage. To keep energy flowing when the sun isn’t shining and the wind isn’t blowing will require enormous batteries at the grid level. This means 40 million tons of lithium—an eye-watering 2,700 percent increase over current levels of extraction. Renewables Are Fossil Fuel: Electric Cars That’s just for electricity. We also need to think about vehicles. This year, a group of leading British scientists submitted a letter to the U.K. Committee on Climate Change outlining their concerns about the ecological impact of electric cars. They agree, of course, that we need to end the sale and use of combustion engines. But they pointed out that unless consumption habits change, replacing the world’s projected fleet of 2 billion vehicles is going to require an explosive increase in mining: Global annual extraction of neodymium and dysprosium will go up by another 70 percent, annual extraction of copper will need to more than double, and cobalt will need to increase by a factor of almost four—all for the entire period from now to 2050. Recommended:  Electric Cars: Truly Green Or A New Kind Of Liability? The problem here is not that we’re going to run out of key minerals—although that may indeed become a concern. The real issue is that this will exacerbate an already existing crisis of over extraction. Mining has become one of the biggest single drivers of deforestation, ecosystem collapse, and biodiversity loss around the world. Ecologists estimate that even at present rates of global material use, we are overshooting sustainable levels by 82 percent. Take silver, for instance. Mexico is home to the Peñasquito mine, one of the biggest silver mines in the world. Covering nearly 40 square miles, the operation is staggering in its scale: a sprawling open-pit complex ripped into the mountains, flanked by two waste dumps each a mile long, and a tailings dam full of toxic sludge held back by a wall that’s 7 miles around and as high as a 50-story skyscraper. This mine will produce 11,000 tons of silver in 10 years before its reserves, the biggest in the world, are gone. To transition the global economy to renewables, we need to commission up to 130 more mines on the scale of Peñasquito. Just for silver. Renweables: Lithium Mining Lithium is another ecological disaster. It takes 500,000 gallons of water to produce a single ton of lithium. Even at present levels of extraction this is causing problems. In the Andes, where most of the world’s lithium is located, mining companies are burning through the water tables and leaving farmers with nothing to irrigate their crops. Many have had no choice but to abandon their land altogether. Meanwhile, chemical leaks from lithium mines have poisoned rivers from Chile to Argentina, Nevada to Tibet, killing off whole freshwater ecosystems. The lithium boom has barely even started, and it’s already a crisis. Recommended:  Environmental Costs Of Lithium Battery Addiction: Worldwide And all of this is just to power the existing global economy. Things become even more extreme when we start accounting for growth. As energy demand continues to rise, material extraction for renewables will become all the more aggressive—and the higher the growth rate, the worse it will get. Recommended:  Why Is Our Renewable Technology Powered By Child Labor? It’s important to keep in mind that most of the key materials for the energy transition are located in the global south. Parts of Latin America, Africa, and Asia will likely become the target of a new scramble for resources, and some countries may become victims of new forms of colonization. It happened in the 17th and 18th centuries with the hunt for gold and silver from South America. In the 19th century, it was land for cotton and sugar plantations in the Caribbean. In the 20th century, it was diamonds from South Africa, cobalt from Congo, and oil from the Middle East. It’s not difficult to imagine that the scramble for renewables might become similarly violent. If we don’t take precautions, clean energy firms could become as destructive as fossil fuel companies—buying off politicians, trashing ecosystems, lobbying against environmental regulations, even assassinating community leaders who stand in their way. Renewables Are Fossil Fuel: Nuclear Power Some hope that nuclear power will help us get around these problems—and surely it needs to be part of the mix. But nuclear comes with its own constraints. For one, it takes so long to get new power plants up and running that they can play only a small role in getting us to zero emissions by mid-century. And even in the longer term, nuclear can’t be scaled beyond about 1 terawatt. Absent a miraculous technological breakthrough, the vast majority of our energy will have to come from solar and wind. Recommended:  Climate Change Halted By Nuclear Reactors: Fission, Fusion None of this is to say that we shouldn’t pursue a rapid transition to renewable energy. We absolutely must and urgently. But if we’re after a greener, more sustainable economy, we need to disabuse ourselves of the fantasy that we can carry on growing energy demand at existing rates. Of course, we know that poorer countries still need to increase their energy use in order to meet basic needs. But richer countries, fortunately, do not. In high-income nations, the transition to green energy needs to be accompanied by a planned reduction of aggregate energy use. How might this be accomplished? Given that the majority of our energy is used to power the extraction and production of material goods, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change suggests that high-income nations reduce their material throughput—legislating longer product life spans and rights to repair, banning planned obsolescence and throwaway fashion, shifting from private cars to public transportation, while scaling down socially unnecessary industries and wasteful luxury consumption like the arms trade, SUVs, and McMansions. Reducing energy demand not only enables a faster transition to renewables, but also ensures that the transition doesn’t trigger new waves of destruction. Any Green New Deal that hopes to be socially just and ecologically coherent needs to have these principles at its heart. Before you go! Recommended:  Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the climate, the coronavirus and Earth Day? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
If the world isn’t careful, renewable energy could become as destructive as fossil fuels. The conversation about climate change has been blazing ahead in 2019. Propelled by the school climate strikes and social movements like Extinction Rebellion, a number of governments have declared a climate emergency, and progressive political parties are making plans - at last - for a rapid transition to clean energy under the Green New Deal. Renewables Are Fossil: The Green Deal This is a welcome shift, and we need more of it. But a new problem is beginning to emerge that warrants our attention. Some proponents of the Green New Deal seem to believe that it will pave the way to a utopia of ‘green growth’. Once we trade dirty fossil fuels for clean energy, there’s no reason we can’t keep expanding the economy forever. This narrative may seem reasonable enough at first glance, but there are good reasons to think twice about it. One of them has to do with clean energy itself. The phrase ‘clean energy’ normally conjures up happy, innocent images of warm sunshine and fresh wind. But while sunshine and wind is obviously clean, the infrastructure we need to capture it is not. Far from it. The transition to renewables is going to require a dramatic increase in the extraction of metals and rare-earth minerals, with real ecological and social costs. We need a rapid transition to renewables, yes - but scientists warn that we can’t keep growing energy use at existing rates. No energy is innocent. The only truly clean energy is less energy. {youtube}                     Michael Moore Presents: Planet of the Humans | Full Documentary | Directed by Jeff Gibbs Michael Moore presents Planet of the Humans, a documentary that dares to say what no one else will this Earth Day — that we are losing the battle to stop climate change on planet earth because we are following leaders who have taken us down the wrong road — selling out the green movement to wealthy interests and corporate America. This film is the wake-up call to the reality we are afraid to face: that in the midst of a human-caused extinction event, the environmental movement’s answer is to push for techno-fixes and band-aids. It's too little, too late. Removed from the debate is the only thing that MIGHT save us: getting a grip on our out-of-control human presence and consumption. Why is this not THE issue? Because that would be bad for profits, bad for business. Have we environmentalists fallen for illusions, “green” illusions, that are anything but green, because we’re scared that this is the end—and we’ve pinned all our hopes on biomass, wind turbines, and electric cars? Click here to read bout Planet of the Humans. No amount of batteries are going to save us, warns director Jeff Gibbs (lifelong environmentalist and co-producer of “Fahrenheit 9/11” and “Bowling for Columbine"). This urgent, must-see movie, a full-frontal assault on our sacred cows, is guaranteed to generate anger, debate, and, hopefully, a willingness to see our survival in a new way—before it’s too late. Featuring: Al Gore, Bill McKibben, Richard Branson, Robert F Kennedy Jr., Michael Bloomberg, Van Jones, Vinod Khosla, Koch Brothers, Vandana Shiva, General Motors, 350.org, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sierra Club, the Union of Concerned Scientists, Nature Conservancy, Elon Musk, Tesla. Recommended:  Earth Day 2020: One World Stays Together At Home In 2017, the World Bank released a little-noticed report that offered the first comprehensive look at this question. It models the increase in material extraction that would be required to build enough solar and wind utilities to produce an annual output of about 7 terawatts of electricity by 2050. That’s enough to power roughly half of the global economy. By doubling the World Bank figures, we can estimate what it will take to get all the way to zero emissions—and the results are staggering: 34 million metric tons of copper, 40 million tons of lead, 50 million tons of zinc, 162 million tons of aluminum, and no less than 4.8 billion tons of iron. Renewables Are Fossil Fuel: Massive Increase Of Extraction In some cases, the transition to renewables will require a massive increase over existing levels of extraction. For neodymium—an essential element in wind turbines—extraction will need to rise by nearly 35 percent over current levels. Higher-end estimates reported by the World Bank suggest it could double. Recommended:  Wind Turbines: Waste From These Blade Runners? The same is true of silver, which is critical to solar panels. Silver extraction will go up 38 percent and perhaps as much as 105 percent. Demand for indium, also essential to solar technology, will more than triple and could end up skyrocketing by 920 percent. And then there are all the batteries we’re going to need for power storage. To keep energy flowing when the sun isn’t shining and the wind isn’t blowing will require enormous batteries at the grid level. This means 40 million tons of lithium—an eye-watering 2,700 percent increase over current levels of extraction. Renewables Are Fossil Fuel: Electric Cars That’s just for electricity. We also need to think about vehicles. This year, a group of leading British scientists submitted a letter to the U.K. Committee on Climate Change outlining their concerns about the ecological impact of electric cars. They agree, of course, that we need to end the sale and use of combustion engines. But they pointed out that unless consumption habits change, replacing the world’s projected fleet of 2 billion vehicles is going to require an explosive increase in mining: Global annual extraction of neodymium and dysprosium will go up by another 70 percent, annual extraction of copper will need to more than double, and cobalt will need to increase by a factor of almost four—all for the entire period from now to 2050. Recommended:  Electric Cars: Truly Green Or A New Kind Of Liability? The problem here is not that we’re going to run out of key minerals—although that may indeed become a concern. The real issue is that this will exacerbate an already existing crisis of over extraction. Mining has become one of the biggest single drivers of deforestation, ecosystem collapse, and biodiversity loss around the world. Ecologists estimate that even at present rates of global material use, we are overshooting sustainable levels by 82 percent. Take silver, for instance. Mexico is home to the Peñasquito mine, one of the biggest silver mines in the world. Covering nearly 40 square miles, the operation is staggering in its scale: a sprawling open-pit complex ripped into the mountains, flanked by two waste dumps each a mile long, and a tailings dam full of toxic sludge held back by a wall that’s 7 miles around and as high as a 50-story skyscraper. This mine will produce 11,000 tons of silver in 10 years before its reserves, the biggest in the world, are gone. To transition the global economy to renewables, we need to commission up to 130 more mines on the scale of Peñasquito. Just for silver. Renweables: Lithium Mining Lithium is another ecological disaster. It takes 500,000 gallons of water to produce a single ton of lithium. Even at present levels of extraction this is causing problems. In the Andes, where most of the world’s lithium is located, mining companies are burning through the water tables and leaving farmers with nothing to irrigate their crops. Many have had no choice but to abandon their land altogether. Meanwhile, chemical leaks from lithium mines have poisoned rivers from Chile to Argentina, Nevada to Tibet, killing off whole freshwater ecosystems. The lithium boom has barely even started, and it’s already a crisis. Recommended:  Environmental Costs Of Lithium Battery Addiction: Worldwide And all of this is just to power the existing global economy. Things become even more extreme when we start accounting for growth. As energy demand continues to rise, material extraction for renewables will become all the more aggressive—and the higher the growth rate, the worse it will get. Recommended:  Why Is Our Renewable Technology Powered By Child Labor? It’s important to keep in mind that most of the key materials for the energy transition are located in the global south. Parts of Latin America, Africa, and Asia will likely become the target of a new scramble for resources, and some countries may become victims of new forms of colonization. It happened in the 17th and 18th centuries with the hunt for gold and silver from South America. In the 19th century, it was land for cotton and sugar plantations in the Caribbean. In the 20th century, it was diamonds from South Africa, cobalt from Congo, and oil from the Middle East. It’s not difficult to imagine that the scramble for renewables might become similarly violent. If we don’t take precautions, clean energy firms could become as destructive as fossil fuel companies—buying off politicians, trashing ecosystems, lobbying against environmental regulations, even assassinating community leaders who stand in their way. Renewables Are Fossil Fuel: Nuclear Power Some hope that nuclear power will help us get around these problems—and surely it needs to be part of the mix. But nuclear comes with its own constraints. For one, it takes so long to get new power plants up and running that they can play only a small role in getting us to zero emissions by mid-century. And even in the longer term, nuclear can’t be scaled beyond about 1 terawatt. Absent a miraculous technological breakthrough, the vast majority of our energy will have to come from solar and wind. Recommended:  Climate Change Halted By Nuclear Reactors: Fission, Fusion None of this is to say that we shouldn’t pursue a rapid transition to renewable energy. We absolutely must and urgently. But if we’re after a greener, more sustainable economy, we need to disabuse ourselves of the fantasy that we can carry on growing energy demand at existing rates. Of course, we know that poorer countries still need to increase their energy use in order to meet basic needs. But richer countries, fortunately, do not. In high-income nations, the transition to green energy needs to be accompanied by a planned reduction of aggregate energy use. How might this be accomplished? Given that the majority of our energy is used to power the extraction and production of material goods, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change suggests that high-income nations reduce their material throughput—legislating longer product life spans and rights to repair, banning planned obsolescence and throwaway fashion, shifting from private cars to public transportation, while scaling down socially unnecessary industries and wasteful luxury consumption like the arms trade, SUVs, and McMansions. Reducing energy demand not only enables a faster transition to renewables, but also ensures that the transition doesn’t trigger new waves of destruction. Any Green New Deal that hopes to be socially just and ecologically coherent needs to have these principles at its heart. Before you go! Recommended:  Earth Matters. Nature And Us: What Was, What’s Left: Hope? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about the climate, the coronavirus and Earth Day? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Renewables Are Fossil Fuel In A Different Form
Climate Change: Locust Second Wave And A Lockdown
A second wave of desert locusts is threatening East Africa with estimates that it will be 20 times worse than the plague that descended two months ago. Climate Change: Locust Second Wave And A Lockdown Jump quickly to 'The First Wave' by clicking on: Locust First Wave: January 2020 The locusts present ‘an extremely alarming and unprecedented threat’ to food security and livelihoods, according to the UN. A swarm of just more than a third of a square mile can eat the same amount of food in one day as 35,000 people. This second invasion from breeding grounds in Somalia includes more young adults which are especially voracious eaters. In its latest locust watch update, the UN said the situation was ‘extremely alarming’ as an increasing number of new swarms form in north and central Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia. Uganda reported two swarms arriving from neighbouring Kenya, further destabilising food security and the livelihoods of people in the east and north of the country. The insects follow spring rains, seeking emerging crops and other vegetation. Hellen Adoa, a minister at Uganda’s agriculture department, said: "This is very active, destructive and we are worried it has come at the time of lockdown. We are a bit overwhelmed. The insects can travel about 90 miles a day and eat their own body weight in crops." Locust Second Wave And A Lockdown: Heavy Rains Heavy rains in late March established favourable breeding conditions for yet another generation of locusts in the Horn of Africa. By now, most farmers have planted the first season annual crops. Immature swarms are the most voracious stage of locust development. They are aggressive feeders and as such can cause a lot of damage to crops and forage. We were hopeful of to receive some relief food to support the situation on ground, the locust invaded and Covid-19 lockdown is moving towards devastating the economy. We expect government, number of partners and World Food Programme to come to our rescue with relief food. Otherwise our people will end with starvation. Recommended:  Lockdown Caused By The Coronavirus: A Relieve For Our Planet   Locust First Wave: January 2020 Locust swarm 37 miles long and 25 miles wide threatens crops across swathes of east Africa and Pakistan. The swarm of locusts has been tracked in Kenya and the insects are now threatening to decimate crops across swatches of east Africa and Pakistan. Locust Swarm Pakistan: Blamed The Chaos On War-Torn Yemen  Pakistan's worst locust plague in decades has devastated parts of the south west as swarms have ravaged wheat, cotton and vegetable crops, farmers' leaders said. The country is battling its worst infestation of the marauding insects since the 1990s and a swarm earlier this month (January 2020) descended on the port metropolis of Karachi for the first time since the 1960s. Locusts struck first earlier this year, but the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organisation has warned a serious threat remains as swarms now start to leave their summer breeding grounds along the India-Pakistan border. The insects are hitting some of the poorest rural parts of Pakistan, where malnutrition is already common and farmers are often heavily in debt. Locust swarms can fly up to 90 miles (144 km) per day and if good rains fall and conditions are favourable, can increase their numbers 20-fold in three months. Locust adults can eat their own weight every day and a swarm can consume vast quantities of food. Locusts impact much of the Middle East and Asia and officials have blamed the chaos in war-torn Yemen for this year's blight in Pakistan. A failure to control the pests in Yemen meant they gradually grew in number as they passed through Saudi Arabia and Iran before entering Western Pakistan. Swarms have now started to leave their summer breeding grounds along the border with India and head West. Climate Change Africa: Locust Swarm The most serious outbreak of desert locusts in 25 years is posing an unprecedented threat to food security in some of the world’s most vulnerable countries, authorities say. Unusual climate conditions are partly to blame. Recommended:  Water War Brewing Over New River Nile Dam: Egypt, Ethiopia Locusts swarm near the village of Sissia, in Samburu county, Kenya Locust, what are they do? Locusts are sometimes solitary insects with lifestyles much like grasshoppers. But locusts have another behavioral phase called the gregarious phase. When environmental conditions produce many green plants and promote breeding, locusts can congregate into thick, mobile, ravenous swarms Kenya's Intergovernmental Authority on Development said: "A typical desert locust swarm can contain up to 150 million locusts per square kilometre. "Swarms migrate with the wind and can cover 100 to 150 kilometres in a day. An average swarm can destroy as much food crops in a day as is sufficient to feed 2,500 people." {youtube}                                                 Climate Change Africa: Largest Locust Swarm In 25 Years                                                 Locust swarm threatens food security in several countries Roughly the length of a finger, the insects fly together by the millions and are devouring crops and forcing people in some areas to bodily wade through them. The outbreak of desert locusts, considered the most dangerous locust species, also has affected parts of Somalia, Ethiopia, Sudan, Djibouti and Eritrea and IGAD warns that parts of South Sudan and Uganda could be next. Are Locusts harmful to humans? Locusts do not attack people or animals. There is no evidence that suggests that locusts carry diseases that could harm humans. Recommended:  African Agricultural Revolution Falters: Food Grow Is Low The "extremely dangerous" outbreak is making the region's bad food security situation worse, the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organisation has warned. Hundreds of thousands of acres of crops have been destroyed. How long do locusts live for? It takes approximately two weeks for the fledgling locust to reach sexual maturity. Adults often group together into swarms containing thousands of locusts. Adult locusts typically live about 10 weeks. The further increase in locust swarms could last until June as favorable breeding conditions continue, IGAD said, helped along by unusually heavy flooding in parts of the region in recent weeks. Recommended:  Climate Change Causes Nature To Change: The World Affected A man holds a desert locust, considered to be the most dangerous of the locust species Climate Change Africa: Major Locust Outbreaks Can Be Devastating A major one between 2003 and 2005 cost more than $500 million to control across 20 countries in northern Africa, the FAO has said, with more than $2.5billion in harvest losses. To help prevent and control outbreaks, authorities analyse satellite images, stockpile pesticides and conduct aerial spraying. In Ethiopia, officials said they have deployed four small planes to help fight the invasion. Before you go! Recommended:  Hunger, Not Global Warming Will Impact Our Future Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about environmental issues? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
A second wave of desert locusts is threatening East Africa with estimates that it will be 20 times worse than the plague that descended two months ago. Climate Change: Locust Second Wave And A Lockdown Jump quickly to 'The First Wave' by clicking on: Locust First Wave: January 2020 The locusts present ‘an extremely alarming and unprecedented threat’ to food security and livelihoods, according to the UN. A swarm of just more than a third of a square mile can eat the same amount of food in one day as 35,000 people. This second invasion from breeding grounds in Somalia includes more young adults which are especially voracious eaters. In its latest locust watch update, the UN said the situation was ‘extremely alarming’ as an increasing number of new swarms form in north and central Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia. Uganda reported two swarms arriving from neighbouring Kenya, further destabilising food security and the livelihoods of people in the east and north of the country. The insects follow spring rains, seeking emerging crops and other vegetation. Hellen Adoa, a minister at Uganda’s agriculture department, said: "This is very active, destructive and we are worried it has come at the time of lockdown. We are a bit overwhelmed. The insects can travel about 90 miles a day and eat their own body weight in crops." Locust Second Wave And A Lockdown: Heavy Rains Heavy rains in late March established favourable breeding conditions for yet another generation of locusts in the Horn of Africa. By now, most farmers have planted the first season annual crops. Immature swarms are the most voracious stage of locust development. They are aggressive feeders and as such can cause a lot of damage to crops and forage. We were hopeful of to receive some relief food to support the situation on ground, the locust invaded and Covid-19 lockdown is moving towards devastating the economy. We expect government, number of partners and World Food Programme to come to our rescue with relief food. Otherwise our people will end with starvation. Recommended:  Lockdown Caused By The Coronavirus: A Relieve For Our Planet   Locust First Wave: January 2020 Locust swarm 37 miles long and 25 miles wide threatens crops across swathes of east Africa and Pakistan. The swarm of locusts has been tracked in Kenya and the insects are now threatening to decimate crops across swatches of east Africa and Pakistan. Locust Swarm Pakistan: Blamed The Chaos On War-Torn Yemen  Pakistan's worst locust plague in decades has devastated parts of the south west as swarms have ravaged wheat, cotton and vegetable crops, farmers' leaders said. The country is battling its worst infestation of the marauding insects since the 1990s and a swarm earlier this month (January 2020) descended on the port metropolis of Karachi for the first time since the 1960s. Locusts struck first earlier this year, but the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organisation has warned a serious threat remains as swarms now start to leave their summer breeding grounds along the India-Pakistan border. The insects are hitting some of the poorest rural parts of Pakistan, where malnutrition is already common and farmers are often heavily in debt. Locust swarms can fly up to 90 miles (144 km) per day and if good rains fall and conditions are favourable, can increase their numbers 20-fold in three months. Locust adults can eat their own weight every day and a swarm can consume vast quantities of food. Locusts impact much of the Middle East and Asia and officials have blamed the chaos in war-torn Yemen for this year's blight in Pakistan. A failure to control the pests in Yemen meant they gradually grew in number as they passed through Saudi Arabia and Iran before entering Western Pakistan. Swarms have now started to leave their summer breeding grounds along the border with India and head West. Climate Change Africa: Locust Swarm The most serious outbreak of desert locusts in 25 years is posing an unprecedented threat to food security in some of the world’s most vulnerable countries, authorities say. Unusual climate conditions are partly to blame. Recommended:  Water War Brewing Over New River Nile Dam: Egypt, Ethiopia Locusts swarm near the village of Sissia, in Samburu county, Kenya Locust, what are they do? Locusts are sometimes solitary insects with lifestyles much like grasshoppers. But locusts have another behavioral phase called the gregarious phase. When environmental conditions produce many green plants and promote breeding, locusts can congregate into thick, mobile, ravenous swarms Kenya's Intergovernmental Authority on Development said: "A typical desert locust swarm can contain up to 150 million locusts per square kilometre. "Swarms migrate with the wind and can cover 100 to 150 kilometres in a day. An average swarm can destroy as much food crops in a day as is sufficient to feed 2,500 people." {youtube}                                                 Climate Change Africa: Largest Locust Swarm In 25 Years                                                 Locust swarm threatens food security in several countries Roughly the length of a finger, the insects fly together by the millions and are devouring crops and forcing people in some areas to bodily wade through them. The outbreak of desert locusts, considered the most dangerous locust species, also has affected parts of Somalia, Ethiopia, Sudan, Djibouti and Eritrea and IGAD warns that parts of South Sudan and Uganda could be next. Are Locusts harmful to humans? Locusts do not attack people or animals. There is no evidence that suggests that locusts carry diseases that could harm humans. Recommended:  African Agricultural Revolution Falters: Food Grow Is Low The "extremely dangerous" outbreak is making the region's bad food security situation worse, the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organisation has warned. Hundreds of thousands of acres of crops have been destroyed. How long do locusts live for? It takes approximately two weeks for the fledgling locust to reach sexual maturity. Adults often group together into swarms containing thousands of locusts. Adult locusts typically live about 10 weeks. The further increase in locust swarms could last until June as favorable breeding conditions continue, IGAD said, helped along by unusually heavy flooding in parts of the region in recent weeks. Recommended:  Climate Change Causes Nature To Change: The World Affected A man holds a desert locust, considered to be the most dangerous of the locust species Climate Change Africa: Major Locust Outbreaks Can Be Devastating A major one between 2003 and 2005 cost more than $500 million to control across 20 countries in northern Africa, the FAO has said, with more than $2.5billion in harvest losses. To help prevent and control outbreaks, authorities analyse satellite images, stockpile pesticides and conduct aerial spraying. In Ethiopia, officials said they have deployed four small planes to help fight the invasion. Before you go! Recommended:  Hunger, Not Global Warming Will Impact Our Future Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about environmental issues? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Climate Change: Locust Second Wave And A Lockdown
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