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Can Toyota’s Solar-Powered Electric Car
NEDO representative Mitsuhiro Yamazaki says that if such a car were driven four days a week for a maximum of 50 kilometers each day, it wouldn't need charging.  Toyota’s Solar-Powered Electric Car What is a solar car and how does it work? True solar-powered cars are actually electric vehicles that are powered by solar panels . The panels are used produce electricity by converting the sun's rays into energy, which is then stored in solar batteries. The car runs by using the energy that is stored in the batteries. Toyota, Sharp, and NEDO have teamed up to manufacture a unique car that could ‘run forever’. There have been promising advances in developing thin enough solar panels for curved surfaces, as well as in tech for charging vehicles while they're in motion. The solar cells the companies are working on attaching to the car are only 0.03 mm thick, so they can be attached to curved areas on cars like the roof, the hood, or the hatchback. By pairing more efficient solar cells with high-capacity batteries to keep vehicles running at night, solar cars have the potential to outperform hybrid vehicles and hydrogen-powered cars. {youtube}                                        Toyota is testing a much more efficient solar roof for its electric cars                                              Can Toyota’s Solar-Powered Electric Car Can 'Run Forever'? Toyota’s Solar-Powered Electric Car Can 'Run Forever' A solar-powered electric car that runs without needing charging may sound impossible, but Toyota, Sharp, and NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan) have joined forces to hopefully make it a reality. Recommended:  Solar Sono Motors Car: Developed in Germany, Made In Sweden By pairing together the best solar panels on the market with the most efficient batteries available — not to mention years’ worth of experience with car-manufacturing — the companies are hoping, theoretically, to produce a vehicle that might run forever. "The solar car's advantage is that, while it can't drive for a long range, it's really independent of charging facilities," said project manager at Toyota, Koji Makino. Why do we need solar cars? Solar Powered Cars - drive the future Like solar-powered homes, solar cars harness energy from the sun by converting it into electricity. This electricity fuels the battery that runs the car's motor. Solar cars use photovoltaic cells to convert sunlight into energy. Electric Car Can 'Run Forever' One of the main drawbacks with fully electric cars is that, even if their sales were to surpass those of petroleum-based vehicles, they'd still need to be charged — which, in turn, means a string of charging docks, requiring space and further funds. Conversely, the sun provides readily available energy without the need for charging docks or extra costs. Coupled with a high enough battery capacity to keep a vehicle running during darker hours, solar-powered cars have the potential to completely outdo other new types of tech that are currently in the pipeline from hybrid vehicles to hydrogen-powered cars. Recommended:  Solar Car Lightyear Wins Price At Tech Fair: The Netherlands Though this may seem just one small step in the effort to marry together solar energy with a vehicle that actually works, it's actually substantial progress considering the large energy expenditure required to shift a car's weight. Due to the fact that the solar cells the companies are working on are only 0.03 mm thick, they can be attached to a wider variety of surfaces including curved areas on cars like the roof, the hood, or the hatchback. Are solar cars the future? In fact, the first solar vehicle may hit the road in 2019. The technology is still somewhat in its infancy and needs to have some time to work out unexpected issues. However, solar cars could be on their way to regular people's driveways in the near future Recommended:  Solar Powered Silent 55 Yacht Allows You To Cruise The World In addition to the fact that the technology behind this venture has introduced a new efficiency, there's also the fact that the vehicles can be charged while the vehicle is in motion something that has, until recently, been impossible. Recommended:  The Solar Bike: Mix Between A Two-Wheeler And A Tesla To build the optimum solar-powered vehicle, there are still a lot of aspects that need working on and there need to be workarounds to enable such a vehicle to run efficiently in areas that aren't quite as sunny or are more like deserts in terms of their climate. Before you go! Recommended:  Solar Team Eindhoven The Netherlands Presents: The Solar Car Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
NEDO representative Mitsuhiro Yamazaki says that if such a car were driven four days a week for a maximum of 50 kilometers each day, it wouldn't need charging.  Toyota’s Solar-Powered Electric Car What is a solar car and how does it work? True solar-powered cars are actually electric vehicles that are powered by solar panels . The panels are used produce electricity by converting the sun's rays into energy, which is then stored in solar batteries. The car runs by using the energy that is stored in the batteries. Toyota, Sharp, and NEDO have teamed up to manufacture a unique car that could ‘run forever’. There have been promising advances in developing thin enough solar panels for curved surfaces, as well as in tech for charging vehicles while they're in motion. The solar cells the companies are working on attaching to the car are only 0.03 mm thick, so they can be attached to curved areas on cars like the roof, the hood, or the hatchback. By pairing more efficient solar cells with high-capacity batteries to keep vehicles running at night, solar cars have the potential to outperform hybrid vehicles and hydrogen-powered cars. {youtube}                                        Toyota is testing a much more efficient solar roof for its electric cars                                              Can Toyota’s Solar-Powered Electric Car Can 'Run Forever'? Toyota’s Solar-Powered Electric Car Can 'Run Forever' A solar-powered electric car that runs without needing charging may sound impossible, but Toyota, Sharp, and NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan) have joined forces to hopefully make it a reality. Recommended:  Solar Sono Motors Car: Developed in Germany, Made In Sweden By pairing together the best solar panels on the market with the most efficient batteries available — not to mention years’ worth of experience with car-manufacturing — the companies are hoping, theoretically, to produce a vehicle that might run forever. "The solar car's advantage is that, while it can't drive for a long range, it's really independent of charging facilities," said project manager at Toyota, Koji Makino. Why do we need solar cars? Solar Powered Cars - drive the future Like solar-powered homes, solar cars harness energy from the sun by converting it into electricity. This electricity fuels the battery that runs the car's motor. Solar cars use photovoltaic cells to convert sunlight into energy. Electric Car Can 'Run Forever' One of the main drawbacks with fully electric cars is that, even if their sales were to surpass those of petroleum-based vehicles, they'd still need to be charged — which, in turn, means a string of charging docks, requiring space and further funds. Conversely, the sun provides readily available energy without the need for charging docks or extra costs. Coupled with a high enough battery capacity to keep a vehicle running during darker hours, solar-powered cars have the potential to completely outdo other new types of tech that are currently in the pipeline from hybrid vehicles to hydrogen-powered cars. Recommended:  Solar Car Lightyear Wins Price At Tech Fair: The Netherlands Though this may seem just one small step in the effort to marry together solar energy with a vehicle that actually works, it's actually substantial progress considering the large energy expenditure required to shift a car's weight. Due to the fact that the solar cells the companies are working on are only 0.03 mm thick, they can be attached to a wider variety of surfaces including curved areas on cars like the roof, the hood, or the hatchback. Are solar cars the future? In fact, the first solar vehicle may hit the road in 2019. The technology is still somewhat in its infancy and needs to have some time to work out unexpected issues. However, solar cars could be on their way to regular people's driveways in the near future Recommended:  Solar Powered Silent 55 Yacht Allows You To Cruise The World In addition to the fact that the technology behind this venture has introduced a new efficiency, there's also the fact that the vehicles can be charged while the vehicle is in motion something that has, until recently, been impossible. Recommended:  The Solar Bike: Mix Between A Two-Wheeler And A Tesla To build the optimum solar-powered vehicle, there are still a lot of aspects that need working on and there need to be workarounds to enable such a vehicle to run efficiently in areas that aren't quite as sunny or are more like deserts in terms of their climate. Before you go! Recommended:  Solar Team Eindhoven The Netherlands Presents: The Solar Car Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Can Toyota’s Solar-Powered Electric Car 'Run Forever'?
Did Foreign Thirst For Lithium And Profit Make Morales Leave
Bolivian Coup Comes Less Than a Week After Morales Stopped Multinational Firm's Lithium Deal. Bolivia's lithium belongs to the Bolivian people, not to multinational corporate cabals. The Sunday military coup in Bolivia has put in place a government which appears likely to reverse a decision by just-resigned President Evo Morales to cancel an agreement with a German company for developing lithium deposits in the Latin American country for batteries like those in electric cars.  Evo Morales In his cabinets he appointed many women and indigenous politicians. Morales raised the minimum wage, tackled poverty and nationalized companies. He also told the International Monetary Fund (IMF). The new president himself set a good example by drastically reducing his own salary and that of his ministers. When traveling abroad, the world saw a head of state dressed in simple, colorful sweaters. It all strengthened his image of ‘man of the people’. Thirst For Profit: The Tunari Water War In 2000, the Tunari Waters corporation doubled the price at which they sold water to Bolivian consumers, resulting in a backlash from leftist activist groups, including the cocaleros. Activists clashed with police and armed forces, in what was dubbed ‘the Water War’,. Responding to this, the government removed the contract from Tunari and placed the utility under cooperative control. Recommended:  Fog Catchers: Making Water Out Of Air In Africa, Peru, Chile Did Foreign Thirst For Lithium And Profit Make Morales Leave Where is lithium found in Bolivia? It is in the Daniel Campos Province in Potosí in southwest Bolivia, near the crest of the Andes and is at an elevation of 3,656 meters (11,995 ft) above sea level. The coup, which on Sunday resulted in Morales resigning and going into hiding, was the result of days of protests from right-wing elements angry at the leftist Morales government. Sen. Jeanine Añez, of the centre-right party Democratic Unity, is currently the interim president in the unstable post-coup government in advance of elections. Investment analyst publisher Argus urged investors to keep an eye on the developing situation and noted that gas and oil production from foreign companies in Bolivia had remained steady.  Recommended:  Environmental Costs Of Lithium Battery Addiction: Worldwide The Morales move on Nov. 4 to cancel the December 2018 agreement with Germany's ACI Systems Alemania (ACISA) came after weeks of protests from residents of the Potosí area. The region has 50% to 70% of the world's lithium reserves in the Salar de Uyuni salt flats. {youtube}                                                Did Foreign Thirst For Lithium And Profit Make Morales Leave                                             The Lithium Rush: Bolivia looks to profit from battery production How does lithium mining work? After spodumene is mined, it's heated to 1100°C, then cooled to 65°C and ground up, mixed, and roasted with concentrated sulfuric acid. The sulfuric acid kicks off a reaction in which lithium sulfate replaces hydrogen. The slurry is then filtered and a number of additional compounds are added. Foreign Thirst For Lithium And Profit  Among other clients, ACISA provides batteries to Tesla; Tesla's stock rose Monday after the weekend. As Bloomberg News noted in 2018, that has set the country up to be incredibly important in the next decade: Demand for lithium is expected to more than double by 2025. The soft, light mineral is mined mainly in Australia, Chile, and Argentina. Bolivia has plenty - 9 million tons that have never been mined commercially, the second-largest amount in the world - but until now there's been no practical way to mine and sell it. Recommended:  Lithium: The New Oil Source Could Be Extracted From Seawater Morales' cancellation of the ACISA deal opened the door to either a renegotiation of the agreement with terms delivering more of the profits to the area's population or the outright nationalization of the Bolivian lithium extraction industry. As Telesur reported in June, the Morales government announced at the time it was determined to industrialize Bolivia and has invested huge amounts to ensure that lithium is processed within the country to export it only in value-added form, such as in batteries. It's unclear what the next steps are for the industry in a post-coup Bolivia. Is Lithium dust dangerous? Breathing lithium dust or alkaline lithium compounds irritates respiratory tracts. Prolonged exposure to lithium can cause fluid to build-up in the lungs, leading to pulmonary edema. The metal itself is a handling hazard because of the caustic hydroxide produced when it is in contact with water causing an explosion. In the longer term, continued political uncertainty will make it more difficult for Bolivia to increase its production of strategic metals like lithium or develop a value-added sector in the battery market. The poor investment climate comes at a time of expanding global opportunities in lithium-ion battery production to meet rising demand from electric vehicle manufacturing. ACISA told German broadcaster DW last week that the company was confident that our lithium project will be resumed after a phase of political calmness and clarification. Last Sunday the 10th of November 2019, Morales resigned. Before you go! Recommended:  Electric Cars: Truly Green Or A New Kind Of Liability? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Bolivian Coup Comes Less Than a Week After Morales Stopped Multinational Firm's Lithium Deal. Bolivia's lithium belongs to the Bolivian people, not to multinational corporate cabals. The Sunday military coup in Bolivia has put in place a government which appears likely to reverse a decision by just-resigned President Evo Morales to cancel an agreement with a German company for developing lithium deposits in the Latin American country for batteries like those in electric cars.  Evo Morales In his cabinets he appointed many women and indigenous politicians. Morales raised the minimum wage, tackled poverty and nationalized companies. He also told the International Monetary Fund (IMF). The new president himself set a good example by drastically reducing his own salary and that of his ministers. When traveling abroad, the world saw a head of state dressed in simple, colorful sweaters. It all strengthened his image of ‘man of the people’. Thirst For Profit: The Tunari Water War In 2000, the Tunari Waters corporation doubled the price at which they sold water to Bolivian consumers, resulting in a backlash from leftist activist groups, including the cocaleros. Activists clashed with police and armed forces, in what was dubbed ‘the Water War’,. Responding to this, the government removed the contract from Tunari and placed the utility under cooperative control. Recommended:  Fog Catchers: Making Water Out Of Air In Africa, Peru, Chile Did Foreign Thirst For Lithium And Profit Make Morales Leave Where is lithium found in Bolivia? It is in the Daniel Campos Province in Potosí in southwest Bolivia, near the crest of the Andes and is at an elevation of 3,656 meters (11,995 ft) above sea level. The coup, which on Sunday resulted in Morales resigning and going into hiding, was the result of days of protests from right-wing elements angry at the leftist Morales government. Sen. Jeanine Añez, of the centre-right party Democratic Unity, is currently the interim president in the unstable post-coup government in advance of elections. Investment analyst publisher Argus urged investors to keep an eye on the developing situation and noted that gas and oil production from foreign companies in Bolivia had remained steady.  Recommended:  Environmental Costs Of Lithium Battery Addiction: Worldwide The Morales move on Nov. 4 to cancel the December 2018 agreement with Germany's ACI Systems Alemania (ACISA) came after weeks of protests from residents of the Potosí area. The region has 50% to 70% of the world's lithium reserves in the Salar de Uyuni salt flats. {youtube}                                                Did Foreign Thirst For Lithium And Profit Make Morales Leave                                             The Lithium Rush: Bolivia looks to profit from battery production How does lithium mining work? After spodumene is mined, it's heated to 1100°C, then cooled to 65°C and ground up, mixed, and roasted with concentrated sulfuric acid. The sulfuric acid kicks off a reaction in which lithium sulfate replaces hydrogen. The slurry is then filtered and a number of additional compounds are added. Foreign Thirst For Lithium And Profit  Among other clients, ACISA provides batteries to Tesla; Tesla's stock rose Monday after the weekend. As Bloomberg News noted in 2018, that has set the country up to be incredibly important in the next decade: Demand for lithium is expected to more than double by 2025. The soft, light mineral is mined mainly in Australia, Chile, and Argentina. Bolivia has plenty - 9 million tons that have never been mined commercially, the second-largest amount in the world - but until now there's been no practical way to mine and sell it. Recommended:  Lithium: The New Oil Source Could Be Extracted From Seawater Morales' cancellation of the ACISA deal opened the door to either a renegotiation of the agreement with terms delivering more of the profits to the area's population or the outright nationalization of the Bolivian lithium extraction industry. As Telesur reported in June, the Morales government announced at the time it was determined to industrialize Bolivia and has invested huge amounts to ensure that lithium is processed within the country to export it only in value-added form, such as in batteries. It's unclear what the next steps are for the industry in a post-coup Bolivia. Is Lithium dust dangerous? Breathing lithium dust or alkaline lithium compounds irritates respiratory tracts. Prolonged exposure to lithium can cause fluid to build-up in the lungs, leading to pulmonary edema. The metal itself is a handling hazard because of the caustic hydroxide produced when it is in contact with water causing an explosion. In the longer term, continued political uncertainty will make it more difficult for Bolivia to increase its production of strategic metals like lithium or develop a value-added sector in the battery market. The poor investment climate comes at a time of expanding global opportunities in lithium-ion battery production to meet rising demand from electric vehicle manufacturing. ACISA told German broadcaster DW last week that the company was confident that our lithium project will be resumed after a phase of political calmness and clarification. Last Sunday the 10th of November 2019, Morales resigned. Before you go! Recommended:  Electric Cars: Truly Green Or A New Kind Of Liability? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Did Foreign Thirst For Lithium And Profit Make Morales Leave
Ocean Cleanup’s New Plastic-Catcher: Is It Working?
The Ocean Clean-up unveiled in a slick Apple-style event in Rotterdam (Netherlands), what it’s calling the Interceptor, a solar-powered barge with a long floating barrier that extends upstream, funneling debris into the vessel’s mouth, where a conveyor belt ferries the trash into onboard containers, and.... it works! Ocean Cleanup’s: Start, Alarm, The wrong Solution The anti-plastic crusaders have another plan to keep junk from reaching the sea: trash-eating barges in rivers. A little over a year ago, a group called The Ocean Cleanup launched an unprecedented campaign to rid the seas of plastic, complete with an unprecedented device: a 600-meter-long, U-shaped tube that was meant to passively gather debris in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch for a ship to come along and scoop up and take back to land. A few months later, the plastic catcher not only wasn’t catching plastic, it had split in two, so The Ocean Cleanup had to tow it to Hawaii for repairs and upgrades. Then earlier this month the group announced its device was at last gathering plastic, though one researcher pointed out on Twitter that it was also gathering marine life. Not such smooth sailing, it would seem. How does Boyan Slat's ocean cleanup work? The system aims to collect plastic from the water's surface, which would then be picked up every few months by a support vessel and transported back to land for recycling. The garbage trap uses solar-powered lights, cameras, sensors and satellite antennas to communicate its position to Slat's team and passerby vessels. Scientists started raising the alarm about The Ocean Cleanup’s design choices years before the device even launched. The potential to harm ocean life, the fact that the giant piece of plastic would slough off its own microplastics, the vulnerability of 600-meter-long tubes amid brutal seas: all were obvious causes for concern from the start. And then there’s the fact that The Ocean Cleanup has spent tens of millions of dollars on what scientists consider to be the wrong solution. The best place to catch plastics, they say, is upstream, before it even enters the sea. Who pollutes the ocean the most? A team of researchers in the United States and Australia led by Jenna Jambeck, an environmental engineer at the University of Georgia, analyzed plastic waste levels in the world's oceans. They found that China and Indonesia are the top sources of plastic bottles, bags and other rubbish clogging up global sea lanes. Ocean Cleanup’s New Plastic-Catcher: The Interceptor The Ocean Cleanup was apparently listening. Today in a slick Apple-style event in Rotterdam (Netherlands), the group unveiled what it’s calling The Interceptor, a solar-powered barge with a long floating barrier that extends upstream, funneling debris into the vessel’s mouth, where a conveyor belt ferries the trash into onboard containers. Two are already in operation in Indonesia and Malaysia, with another preparing for operation in the Mekong in Vietnam and another planned for the Dominican Republic. It's a great idea that, well, has been done before: interceptors (lowercase), as their known, have been operating for several years in Baltimore. That’d be Mr. Trash Wheel, an interceptor with giant googly eyes in Baltimore Harbor that gobbles up 200 tons of trash a year, and its sibling Professor Trash Wheel. “The scientific community has been saying for years that moving upstream is the way to correctly solve this problem,” says Adam Lindquist, director of the Waterfront Partnership of Baltimore’s Healthy Harbor campaign. “And certainly imitation is the greatest form of flattery.” {youtube}                                                 RIVERS | The Interceptor™, Explained | The Ocean Cleanup   Plastic-Catcher: The Interceptor VS Mr. Trash Whereas Mr. Trash Wheel was purpose-built for Baltimore, The Ocean Cleanup designed its barge to be mass-producible. And it’s significantly higher tech: Baltimore’s barge uses a water wheel to power its conveyor belt, with solar power as backup, while The Interceptor is fully solar powered. Trash flows up its belt (Boyan Slat, founder and CEO of The Ocean Cleanup, demonstrated today with a flow of rubber duckies) and into a “shuttle” bin, which deposits the waste in one of six dumpsters situated below. Once the barge is full, the system sends a text message to operators in the area, who come with a tug boat and pull the bins to shore. It can capture some 50,000 kilograms of trash a day, and is designed to last 20 years. The Water Wheel, Mr. Trash The Ocean Cleanup says The Interceptor is also easily transportable to rivers around the world. Not all rivers, mind you, but by singling out the worst plastic emitters, the group can make a bigger dent in the problem. “About 1,000 rivers contribute 80 percent of terrestrial emissions,” says Laurent Lebreton, chief scientist at The Ocean Cleanup. “So if we want to reduce significantly plastic emissions into the ocean, we want to tackle those rivers.” Recommended: Boyan Slat Ocean Cleanup: Restart Plastic Soup Collection Ocean Cleanup’s Calculations We know that rivers are spewing massive amounts of plastic, but where that plastic eventually ends up has been harder to pin down. Even by The Ocean Cleanup’s own calculations, the far-offshore gyres it had been trying to tidy up with its big tube hold a tiny fraction of ocean plastics: Perhaps .06 percent of plastics from coastlines make it out to gyres, the rest likely caught in a perpetual cycle of washing out a bit, then returning to shore, then washing out. “I would argue almost any weekend of beach cleanup could probably capture more trash than they've collected in their six, seven years in business,” says Marcus Eriksen, who studies ocean plastic and directs the 5 Gyres Institute. “If you want to solve a problem, you go upstream or downstream. And the further you go downstream, you just keep on adding dollar signs to the cost of the mitigation.” Another perk of the upstream method: propaganda—the good variety. Mr. Trash Wheel doesn’t have googly eyes so it can see the trash and move around the harbor to gobble it up, a la Pac-Man. “We put the googly eyes on it and turned it into a behavioral change campaign,” says Lindquist. “We think it's a very, very important part not just to have an interceptor, but to have behavior change associated with those interceptors. So you're not just endlessly picking up trash out of a waterway.” Whatever your feelings about The Ocean Cleanup’s ocean-going catchers, it’s hard to deny that they’ve garnered a whole lot of attention about plastic pollution in just a few short years. And by moving upstream in their efforts, perhaps they can bring that attention even closer to home. “We want people to realize that we have an emergency, a plastic epidemic,” says Lebreton, of The Ocean Cleanup. “Putting something in a river is not going to solve everything, but it will help going up upstream and trying to change behavior.” Before you go! Recommended:  Combing Plastic Waste Out Oceans: Competition For Boyan Slat Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
The Ocean Clean-up unveiled in a slick Apple-style event in Rotterdam (Netherlands), what it’s calling the Interceptor, a solar-powered barge with a long floating barrier that extends upstream, funneling debris into the vessel’s mouth, where a conveyor belt ferries the trash into onboard containers, and.... it works! Ocean Cleanup’s: Start, Alarm, The wrong Solution The anti-plastic crusaders have another plan to keep junk from reaching the sea: trash-eating barges in rivers. A little over a year ago, a group called The Ocean Cleanup launched an unprecedented campaign to rid the seas of plastic, complete with an unprecedented device: a 600-meter-long, U-shaped tube that was meant to passively gather debris in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch for a ship to come along and scoop up and take back to land. A few months later, the plastic catcher not only wasn’t catching plastic, it had split in two, so The Ocean Cleanup had to tow it to Hawaii for repairs and upgrades. Then earlier this month the group announced its device was at last gathering plastic, though one researcher pointed out on Twitter that it was also gathering marine life. Not such smooth sailing, it would seem. How does Boyan Slat's ocean cleanup work? The system aims to collect plastic from the water's surface, which would then be picked up every few months by a support vessel and transported back to land for recycling. The garbage trap uses solar-powered lights, cameras, sensors and satellite antennas to communicate its position to Slat's team and passerby vessels. Scientists started raising the alarm about The Ocean Cleanup’s design choices years before the device even launched. The potential to harm ocean life, the fact that the giant piece of plastic would slough off its own microplastics, the vulnerability of 600-meter-long tubes amid brutal seas: all were obvious causes for concern from the start. And then there’s the fact that The Ocean Cleanup has spent tens of millions of dollars on what scientists consider to be the wrong solution. The best place to catch plastics, they say, is upstream, before it even enters the sea. Who pollutes the ocean the most? A team of researchers in the United States and Australia led by Jenna Jambeck, an environmental engineer at the University of Georgia, analyzed plastic waste levels in the world's oceans. They found that China and Indonesia are the top sources of plastic bottles, bags and other rubbish clogging up global sea lanes. Ocean Cleanup’s New Plastic-Catcher: The Interceptor The Ocean Cleanup was apparently listening. Today in a slick Apple-style event in Rotterdam (Netherlands), the group unveiled what it’s calling The Interceptor, a solar-powered barge with a long floating barrier that extends upstream, funneling debris into the vessel’s mouth, where a conveyor belt ferries the trash into onboard containers. Two are already in operation in Indonesia and Malaysia, with another preparing for operation in the Mekong in Vietnam and another planned for the Dominican Republic. It's a great idea that, well, has been done before: interceptors (lowercase), as their known, have been operating for several years in Baltimore. That’d be Mr. Trash Wheel, an interceptor with giant googly eyes in Baltimore Harbor that gobbles up 200 tons of trash a year, and its sibling Professor Trash Wheel. “The scientific community has been saying for years that moving upstream is the way to correctly solve this problem,” says Adam Lindquist, director of the Waterfront Partnership of Baltimore’s Healthy Harbor campaign. “And certainly imitation is the greatest form of flattery.” {youtube}                                                 RIVERS | The Interceptor™, Explained | The Ocean Cleanup   Plastic-Catcher: The Interceptor VS Mr. Trash Whereas Mr. Trash Wheel was purpose-built for Baltimore, The Ocean Cleanup designed its barge to be mass-producible. And it’s significantly higher tech: Baltimore’s barge uses a water wheel to power its conveyor belt, with solar power as backup, while The Interceptor is fully solar powered. Trash flows up its belt (Boyan Slat, founder and CEO of The Ocean Cleanup, demonstrated today with a flow of rubber duckies) and into a “shuttle” bin, which deposits the waste in one of six dumpsters situated below. Once the barge is full, the system sends a text message to operators in the area, who come with a tug boat and pull the bins to shore. It can capture some 50,000 kilograms of trash a day, and is designed to last 20 years. The Water Wheel, Mr. Trash The Ocean Cleanup says The Interceptor is also easily transportable to rivers around the world. Not all rivers, mind you, but by singling out the worst plastic emitters, the group can make a bigger dent in the problem. “About 1,000 rivers contribute 80 percent of terrestrial emissions,” says Laurent Lebreton, chief scientist at The Ocean Cleanup. “So if we want to reduce significantly plastic emissions into the ocean, we want to tackle those rivers.” Recommended: Boyan Slat Ocean Cleanup: Restart Plastic Soup Collection Ocean Cleanup’s Calculations We know that rivers are spewing massive amounts of plastic, but where that plastic eventually ends up has been harder to pin down. Even by The Ocean Cleanup’s own calculations, the far-offshore gyres it had been trying to tidy up with its big tube hold a tiny fraction of ocean plastics: Perhaps .06 percent of plastics from coastlines make it out to gyres, the rest likely caught in a perpetual cycle of washing out a bit, then returning to shore, then washing out. “I would argue almost any weekend of beach cleanup could probably capture more trash than they've collected in their six, seven years in business,” says Marcus Eriksen, who studies ocean plastic and directs the 5 Gyres Institute. “If you want to solve a problem, you go upstream or downstream. And the further you go downstream, you just keep on adding dollar signs to the cost of the mitigation.” Another perk of the upstream method: propaganda—the good variety. Mr. Trash Wheel doesn’t have googly eyes so it can see the trash and move around the harbor to gobble it up, a la Pac-Man. “We put the googly eyes on it and turned it into a behavioral change campaign,” says Lindquist. “We think it's a very, very important part not just to have an interceptor, but to have behavior change associated with those interceptors. So you're not just endlessly picking up trash out of a waterway.” Whatever your feelings about The Ocean Cleanup’s ocean-going catchers, it’s hard to deny that they’ve garnered a whole lot of attention about plastic pollution in just a few short years. And by moving upstream in their efforts, perhaps they can bring that attention even closer to home. “We want people to realize that we have an emergency, a plastic epidemic,” says Lebreton, of The Ocean Cleanup. “Putting something in a river is not going to solve everything, but it will help going up upstream and trying to change behavior.” Before you go! Recommended:  Combing Plastic Waste Out Oceans: Competition For Boyan Slat Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Ocean Cleanup’s New Plastic-Catcher: Is It Working?
Exclusive: What Reveals Leaks On Harley-Davidson e-Bicycles
So far, the only thing we’ve known about Harley-Davidson’s upcoming electric bicycles is that they are coming. But now we’ve received new info that sheds some light on what H-D is planning for the lightest motorbikes they’ve ever built. Where Do The Leaks On Harley-Davidson e-Bicycles Come From? The new info comes to us by way of a Harley-Davidson dealership employee. Speaking to Electrek on condition of anonymity, he shared some new information provided by a high-ranking member of the Harley-Davidson Dealership Advisory Council (DAC). What is Harley Davidson famous for? Harley-Davidson isn't just the most famous motorcycle company it's also one of the most legendary and beloved brands in human history. Harley-Davidson got its all-American start in 1903, at the dawn of the ‘Motor Age’. Two friends got together and combined bicycles with new-fangled engines. What Reveals Leaks On Harley-Davidson e-Bicycles According to the information provided, Harley-Davidson is planning to offer a range of e-bike speed classes. For Europe, Harley-Davidson would produce a lower-power e-bike with a top speed of just 25 km/h (15.5 mph). Meanwhile, that model of e-bike in the US would receive a slightly higher 32 km/h (20 mph) top speed, classifying it as a Class 1 e-bike stateside. Harley-Davidson will apparently also be producing higher-speed electric bicycles up to 45 km/h (28 mph) for the US market, according to the source. The prices of the bikes will fall in the $2,500 to $5,000 range, the source added. Recommended:  Harley Electric Motorbike Make More Sense Than Electric Cars {youtube}                                When a Legendary Former Harley-Davidson Engineer Builds an e-bike                                    Exclusive: What Reveals Leaks On Harley-Davidson e-Bicycles Brakes On Harley-Davidson e-Bicycles And despite the initial press photos released by Harley-Davidson appearing to show e-bikes with just one brake lever, all of the e-bikes will have two brake levers. The confusion apparently came from the angles of the photos that made the brake levers appear to disappear. The source also provided internal literature regarding Harley-Davidson’s design and planning process for the new electric bicycles. Interestingly though, this information contradicts the DAC regarding the speed of H-D’s electric bicycles. Here we provide a primer on On Harley-Davidson e-Bicycles to help you begin to prepare for the launch of these products in 2020. Who is Harley Davidson owned by? Harley Davidson acquired by Japanese owned Kawasaki Motor Company LTD. Milwaukee, April 1, 2014 Harley-Davidson, Inc. (HOG) has announced agreement to be acquired by Japanese owned Kawasaki Motor Company LTD today, Tuesday, April 1, 2014 for an undisclosed sum. Harley Davidsons e-Bicycle Classes Various global government regulatory agencies have created a definition of an eBicycle, and the industry and those agencies have adopted very similar e-Bicycle rules that establish three classes of e-Bicycles: Class 1 pedal-assist e-Bicycles are the most popular, representing 88% of the global market. In Europe, Class 1 e-Bicycles are limited to 250 watts of power and the system cannot provide assistance over 25 kilometers per hour (15 mph). In the US this class is limited to approximately 20 mph and can have up to 750 watts of power. Harley-Davidson will be pursuing Class 1 pedal-assist eBicycles only. Note that the Harley-Davidson electric bike concepts that were displayed at events in early 2019 are not e-Bicycles because they do not have pedals. That last line refers to a pair of H-D concept electric motorbikes, including a light electric dirt bike and an electric scooter. Both are expected to offer speeds in excess of 45 km/h (28 mph). Harley-Davidson’s Upcoming Electric Scooter The critical part here, though, is the line that reads, ‘Harley-Davidson will be pursuing Class 1 pedal-assist e-Bicycles only’. So who is right? The DAC or the internal H-D literature? Could this be a case of crossed signals, or just the early planning stages before designs are finalized ahead of the expected 2020 release? It’s hard to say, but the sudden surge of new info at least demonstrates that Harley-Davidson is not only making progress on their internal e-bike designs, but is already working to prepare its dealers for a new type of vehicle,  something most dealers are likely to find foreign at first. And  Harley-Davidson isn’t just preparing on the hardware front, either. The company has already trademarked the name ‘Rude Boy’ for use with electric motorcycles. With work on so many different fronts, the question of a Harley-Davidson e-bike is no longer “if,” it’s now “when.” Harley-Davidson Electrek’s Take While I’m quite excited to see Harley-Davidson take a stab at electric bicycles, the $2,500-$5,000 price range is a bit worrying. Even at the lower end of that range, that would price H-D’s electric bicycles well above many e-bikes in the US. It is currently possible to find a number of e-bike models for $600 to $800 in the US. However, most e-bikes don’t offer quality that can last for years until you’ve reached at least $1,500. With Harley-Davidson’s brand name, wide network of dealerships for local sales and support, and even potential for US manufacturing, there’s a chance that it could still succeed with higher prices. Plus, as we pointed out earlier this year, the H-D e-bikes appear to be sporting some fancy (and expensive) components, including mid-drive motors, hydraulic disc brakes, internally geared rear hubs, and belt drive. Those components add up and frequently push other e-bikes well above $4,000, meaning H-D may still be price competitive against other comparably spec’d e-bikes. The next issue is the speed. I really hope they aren’t going to limit all of the bikes to Class 1 speeds of just 20 mph. I’ve written previously about why faster electric bicycles are actually safer, and have also reviewed a number of 28 mph Class 3 e-bikes, which have led me to the same conclusion. Harley isn’t known for muted or low-power products, so I’d be surprised if the brand didn’t come out with a fast Class 3 e-bike. I’m definitely jazzed to see what’s coming, but let’s hear what you think. Let us know in the comments below! Before you go! Recommended:  Harley Davidson LiveWire Electric Bike Drives Like A Tesla Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
So far, the only thing we’ve known about Harley-Davidson’s upcoming electric bicycles is that they are coming. But now we’ve received new info that sheds some light on what H-D is planning for the lightest motorbikes they’ve ever built. Where Do The Leaks On Harley-Davidson e-Bicycles Come From? The new info comes to us by way of a Harley-Davidson dealership employee. Speaking to Electrek on condition of anonymity, he shared some new information provided by a high-ranking member of the Harley-Davidson Dealership Advisory Council (DAC). What is Harley Davidson famous for? Harley-Davidson isn't just the most famous motorcycle company it's also one of the most legendary and beloved brands in human history. Harley-Davidson got its all-American start in 1903, at the dawn of the ‘Motor Age’. Two friends got together and combined bicycles with new-fangled engines. What Reveals Leaks On Harley-Davidson e-Bicycles According to the information provided, Harley-Davidson is planning to offer a range of e-bike speed classes. For Europe, Harley-Davidson would produce a lower-power e-bike with a top speed of just 25 km/h (15.5 mph). Meanwhile, that model of e-bike in the US would receive a slightly higher 32 km/h (20 mph) top speed, classifying it as a Class 1 e-bike stateside. Harley-Davidson will apparently also be producing higher-speed electric bicycles up to 45 km/h (28 mph) for the US market, according to the source. The prices of the bikes will fall in the $2,500 to $5,000 range, the source added. Recommended:  Harley Electric Motorbike Make More Sense Than Electric Cars {youtube}                                When a Legendary Former Harley-Davidson Engineer Builds an e-bike                                    Exclusive: What Reveals Leaks On Harley-Davidson e-Bicycles Brakes On Harley-Davidson e-Bicycles And despite the initial press photos released by Harley-Davidson appearing to show e-bikes with just one brake lever, all of the e-bikes will have two brake levers. The confusion apparently came from the angles of the photos that made the brake levers appear to disappear. The source also provided internal literature regarding Harley-Davidson’s design and planning process for the new electric bicycles. Interestingly though, this information contradicts the DAC regarding the speed of H-D’s electric bicycles. Here we provide a primer on On Harley-Davidson e-Bicycles to help you begin to prepare for the launch of these products in 2020. Who is Harley Davidson owned by? Harley Davidson acquired by Japanese owned Kawasaki Motor Company LTD. Milwaukee, April 1, 2014 Harley-Davidson, Inc. (HOG) has announced agreement to be acquired by Japanese owned Kawasaki Motor Company LTD today, Tuesday, April 1, 2014 for an undisclosed sum. Harley Davidsons e-Bicycle Classes Various global government regulatory agencies have created a definition of an eBicycle, and the industry and those agencies have adopted very similar e-Bicycle rules that establish three classes of e-Bicycles: Class 1 pedal-assist e-Bicycles are the most popular, representing 88% of the global market. In Europe, Class 1 e-Bicycles are limited to 250 watts of power and the system cannot provide assistance over 25 kilometers per hour (15 mph). In the US this class is limited to approximately 20 mph and can have up to 750 watts of power. Harley-Davidson will be pursuing Class 1 pedal-assist eBicycles only. Note that the Harley-Davidson electric bike concepts that were displayed at events in early 2019 are not e-Bicycles because they do not have pedals. That last line refers to a pair of H-D concept electric motorbikes, including a light electric dirt bike and an electric scooter. Both are expected to offer speeds in excess of 45 km/h (28 mph). Harley-Davidson’s Upcoming Electric Scooter The critical part here, though, is the line that reads, ‘Harley-Davidson will be pursuing Class 1 pedal-assist e-Bicycles only’. So who is right? The DAC or the internal H-D literature? Could this be a case of crossed signals, or just the early planning stages before designs are finalized ahead of the expected 2020 release? It’s hard to say, but the sudden surge of new info at least demonstrates that Harley-Davidson is not only making progress on their internal e-bike designs, but is already working to prepare its dealers for a new type of vehicle,  something most dealers are likely to find foreign at first. And  Harley-Davidson isn’t just preparing on the hardware front, either. The company has already trademarked the name ‘Rude Boy’ for use with electric motorcycles. With work on so many different fronts, the question of a Harley-Davidson e-bike is no longer “if,” it’s now “when.” Harley-Davidson Electrek’s Take While I’m quite excited to see Harley-Davidson take a stab at electric bicycles, the $2,500-$5,000 price range is a bit worrying. Even at the lower end of that range, that would price H-D’s electric bicycles well above many e-bikes in the US. It is currently possible to find a number of e-bike models for $600 to $800 in the US. However, most e-bikes don’t offer quality that can last for years until you’ve reached at least $1,500. With Harley-Davidson’s brand name, wide network of dealerships for local sales and support, and even potential for US manufacturing, there’s a chance that it could still succeed with higher prices. Plus, as we pointed out earlier this year, the H-D e-bikes appear to be sporting some fancy (and expensive) components, including mid-drive motors, hydraulic disc brakes, internally geared rear hubs, and belt drive. Those components add up and frequently push other e-bikes well above $4,000, meaning H-D may still be price competitive against other comparably spec’d e-bikes. The next issue is the speed. I really hope they aren’t going to limit all of the bikes to Class 1 speeds of just 20 mph. I’ve written previously about why faster electric bicycles are actually safer, and have also reviewed a number of 28 mph Class 3 e-bikes, which have led me to the same conclusion. Harley isn’t known for muted or low-power products, so I’d be surprised if the brand didn’t come out with a fast Class 3 e-bike. I’m definitely jazzed to see what’s coming, but let’s hear what you think. Let us know in the comments below! Before you go! Recommended:  Harley Davidson LiveWire Electric Bike Drives Like A Tesla Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Exclusive: What Reveals Leaks On Harley-Davidson e-Bicycles
Futuristic Cars Tokyo Show 2019: Will You Ever Drive them?
The Tokyo Motor Show is one of the best places to catch a glimpse of the latest concept cars and drivable prototypes. The theme for this year's show is 'Open Future' with an emphasis on new mobility vehicles, autonomous driving and - hurrah! - flying cars. Unfortunate you will not get a chance to ride them but at least you can admire them! Futuristic Cars Tokyo Show 2019: Here Are Five Exciting Concepts  The Tokyo Motor Show is a biennial auto  show hosted by the Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association (JAMA). Starting all the way back in 1954, it has become one of the premiere auto shows for futurists, with concept cars typically outnumbering production models. (Although their are plenty of the latter on display too.) In 2019, JAMA has taken the crystal gazing to a new level - the Aomi Exhibition Hall has been transformed into a futuristic cityscape where attendees will interact with actual physical prototypes designed by the wold's leading car manufacturers. The Tokyo Motor Show doesn't kick off until October 24, but here are a few previously announced concepts we're excited to learn more about at the show. Lunar Exploration Vehicle One of the coolest aspects of the Tokyo Motor Show is getting to see vehicles that will never appear in a dealership's showroom. Chief among these is the Manned Pressurised Rover, a new prototype developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) in partnership with Toyota. Powered by fuel cell technology , it will be used to explore the moon's polar regions with a tentative launch date of 2029. Recommended:  Hydrogen-Powered Energy Observer Reaches London: The Future Over the course of the three-year joint research period, JAXA and Toyota will manufacture, test, and evaluate a range of prototypes, the first of which can be experienced at the 2019 Tokyo Motor Show. NEC Flying Concept Car Tokyo Motor Show attendees will be able to check out NEC's "near-future type flying vehicle" - a prototype flying car developed and built at the company's Akibo Plant. NEC reckons its new mobility solution will seamlessly connect the ground to the sky. As you can see from the above photo, the design is strikingly similar to a remote-controlled drone - it even has an autonomous flight mode. {youtube}                                                Futuristic Cars Tokyo Show 2019: Will You Ever Drive them?                                              Flying car prototype tested in Japan and hovers above ground The vehicle, which has successfully completed a series of "levitation tests", measures 3.9 metres in length, 3.7 metres in width and 1.3 metres in height. It's also remarkably light for its size, weighing in at around 150kg. The prototype is part of a government-endorsed initiative to ease the burden on road traffic in Japan. NEC - which is not a car company - will be licencing the technology to third parties including Japanese drone manufacturer Cartivator. What year will flying cars come out? Shortly after its debut, we can expect to see Airbus's flying electric taxis shuttling people through the air, Toyota's flying car carrying the 2020 Olympic torch, and AirSpaceX's autonomous flying taxis debut in 2026 The Futuristic Car Toyota LQ You can tell this is a concept car just by looking it. The LQ is the latest iteration of Toyota's self-driving, electric-powered hatchback of the future. (It was formerly dubbed the 'Concept-I'.) The car has it own artificial intelligence assistant named Yui which will reportedly be able to sense the driver's emotional state and alertness. (Hopefully it will utter an understated "...Dude." when you're road raging). According to Toyota, Yui will have a wide range of "human-machine interactions" at its disposal, including in-seat functions designed to increase alertness or reduce stress, in-vehicle illumination, air conditioning and a fragrance dispenser(!) You can also put it in charge of your music playlist and chat to it about a range of topics. In other words, it's basically K.I.T.T. from Nigtrider. In addition to a digital pal, the LQ will come with an autonomous driving system equivalent to SAE Level 4. This means it can practically drive itself. Autonomus Driving Panasonic SPACe_L Autonomous driving is set to play a huge role at this year's Tokyo Motor Show. One of the more intriguing concepts is Panasonic's SPACe_L which looks like something out of 2001: A Space Odyssey. Previously unveiled at CES 2019, the vehicle contains a highly customisable interior that can shift between different 'atmospheres' ranging from “Living Room” to 'Business'. As we have noted in the past, the self-driving cars of the future are expected to look nothing like the cars of today. For example, it will be possible to install seats that swivel around so that the passengers are all facing each other because nobody is driving. You could also have video conferencing equipment built into the dash and touch screens or LED panels instead of windows. Panasonic reckons we'll be seeing cars like this around 2030. At the rate this technology is developing, we think that's a pretty conservative estimate. How much do autonomous cars cost? Developing self-driving cars is of course, very expensive. Fully autonomous tech could add at least $100,000 ( € 87,700) to the price of a vehicle, while even semi-autonomous features like Tesla's Autopilot and Cadillac's Super Cruise already add $5,000 (€4,400) and $10,000 (8,975), respectively, to the base vehicle cost. Tiny Electric cars! In addition to concept cars of the future, the Tokyo Motor Show will also be showing off plenty of models that are almost ready for prime time. This includes a bevy of new electric vehicles. Among the new battery-powered vehicles set to debut at this year's show is the Toyota Ultra-Compact BEV. As we previously reported, this is a ridiculously cute two-seater designed for regular, short-distance trips. It has a maximum speed of 60 km/h and can be driven for approximately 100 km on a single charge. Think of it as a mobility device for the elderly, but on steroids. Lexus, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Suzuki and Suburu will also be showing off hybrid- and battery-powered vehicles this year. In fact, most of the models at the show are powered by some form of electrification. It's where the future of the auto industry is unquestionably heading. (Accept it, petrol heads.) Before you go! Recommended:  Solar And Hydrogen Boats Win The Future: France, Monaco Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
The Tokyo Motor Show is one of the best places to catch a glimpse of the latest concept cars and drivable prototypes. The theme for this year's show is 'Open Future' with an emphasis on new mobility vehicles, autonomous driving and - hurrah! - flying cars. Unfortunate you will not get a chance to ride them but at least you can admire them! Futuristic Cars Tokyo Show 2019: Here Are Five Exciting Concepts  The Tokyo Motor Show is a biennial auto  show hosted by the Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association (JAMA). Starting all the way back in 1954, it has become one of the premiere auto shows for futurists, with concept cars typically outnumbering production models. (Although their are plenty of the latter on display too.) In 2019, JAMA has taken the crystal gazing to a new level - the Aomi Exhibition Hall has been transformed into a futuristic cityscape where attendees will interact with actual physical prototypes designed by the wold's leading car manufacturers. The Tokyo Motor Show doesn't kick off until October 24, but here are a few previously announced concepts we're excited to learn more about at the show. Lunar Exploration Vehicle One of the coolest aspects of the Tokyo Motor Show is getting to see vehicles that will never appear in a dealership's showroom. Chief among these is the Manned Pressurised Rover, a new prototype developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) in partnership with Toyota. Powered by fuel cell technology , it will be used to explore the moon's polar regions with a tentative launch date of 2029. Recommended:  Hydrogen-Powered Energy Observer Reaches London: The Future Over the course of the three-year joint research period, JAXA and Toyota will manufacture, test, and evaluate a range of prototypes, the first of which can be experienced at the 2019 Tokyo Motor Show. NEC Flying Concept Car Tokyo Motor Show attendees will be able to check out NEC's "near-future type flying vehicle" - a prototype flying car developed and built at the company's Akibo Plant. NEC reckons its new mobility solution will seamlessly connect the ground to the sky. As you can see from the above photo, the design is strikingly similar to a remote-controlled drone - it even has an autonomous flight mode. {youtube}                                                Futuristic Cars Tokyo Show 2019: Will You Ever Drive them?                                              Flying car prototype tested in Japan and hovers above ground The vehicle, which has successfully completed a series of "levitation tests", measures 3.9 metres in length, 3.7 metres in width and 1.3 metres in height. It's also remarkably light for its size, weighing in at around 150kg. The prototype is part of a government-endorsed initiative to ease the burden on road traffic in Japan. NEC - which is not a car company - will be licencing the technology to third parties including Japanese drone manufacturer Cartivator. What year will flying cars come out? Shortly after its debut, we can expect to see Airbus's flying electric taxis shuttling people through the air, Toyota's flying car carrying the 2020 Olympic torch, and AirSpaceX's autonomous flying taxis debut in 2026 The Futuristic Car Toyota LQ You can tell this is a concept car just by looking it. The LQ is the latest iteration of Toyota's self-driving, electric-powered hatchback of the future. (It was formerly dubbed the 'Concept-I'.) The car has it own artificial intelligence assistant named Yui which will reportedly be able to sense the driver's emotional state and alertness. (Hopefully it will utter an understated "...Dude." when you're road raging). According to Toyota, Yui will have a wide range of "human-machine interactions" at its disposal, including in-seat functions designed to increase alertness or reduce stress, in-vehicle illumination, air conditioning and a fragrance dispenser(!) You can also put it in charge of your music playlist and chat to it about a range of topics. In other words, it's basically K.I.T.T. from Nigtrider. In addition to a digital pal, the LQ will come with an autonomous driving system equivalent to SAE Level 4. This means it can practically drive itself. Autonomus Driving Panasonic SPACe_L Autonomous driving is set to play a huge role at this year's Tokyo Motor Show. One of the more intriguing concepts is Panasonic's SPACe_L which looks like something out of 2001: A Space Odyssey. Previously unveiled at CES 2019, the vehicle contains a highly customisable interior that can shift between different 'atmospheres' ranging from “Living Room” to 'Business'. As we have noted in the past, the self-driving cars of the future are expected to look nothing like the cars of today. For example, it will be possible to install seats that swivel around so that the passengers are all facing each other because nobody is driving. You could also have video conferencing equipment built into the dash and touch screens or LED panels instead of windows. Panasonic reckons we'll be seeing cars like this around 2030. At the rate this technology is developing, we think that's a pretty conservative estimate. How much do autonomous cars cost? Developing self-driving cars is of course, very expensive. Fully autonomous tech could add at least $100,000 ( € 87,700) to the price of a vehicle, while even semi-autonomous features like Tesla's Autopilot and Cadillac's Super Cruise already add $5,000 (€4,400) and $10,000 (8,975), respectively, to the base vehicle cost. Tiny Electric cars! In addition to concept cars of the future, the Tokyo Motor Show will also be showing off plenty of models that are almost ready for prime time. This includes a bevy of new electric vehicles. Among the new battery-powered vehicles set to debut at this year's show is the Toyota Ultra-Compact BEV. As we previously reported, this is a ridiculously cute two-seater designed for regular, short-distance trips. It has a maximum speed of 60 km/h and can be driven for approximately 100 km on a single charge. Think of it as a mobility device for the elderly, but on steroids. Lexus, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Suzuki and Suburu will also be showing off hybrid- and battery-powered vehicles this year. In fact, most of the models at the show are powered by some form of electrification. It's where the future of the auto industry is unquestionably heading. (Accept it, petrol heads.) Before you go! Recommended:  Solar And Hydrogen Boats Win The Future: France, Monaco Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Futuristic Cars Tokyo Show 2019: Will You Ever Drive them?
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