Breaking News

About:
Close Welcome writers, influencers and dreamers, make the world a greener place
Register here
Forgot password
Forgot password
or
or

Close
Close For sustainability news hunters! The WhatsOrb newsletter!

Receive monthly the newest updates about sustainability from influencers and fellow writers. Cutting edge innovations and global environmental developments.

Close For sustainability news hunters! The WhatsOrb newsletter!

Receive monthly the newest updates about sustainability from influencers and fellow writers. Cutting edge innovations and global environmental developments.

Close Reset password
your profile is 33% complete:
33%
Update profile Close
Close WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-Change

For writers, influencers and dreamers who want to make the world a greener place.

WhatsOrb reaches monthly about 7000 thousand visitors who want - like you - to make the world a greener place. Share your expertise and all can benefit.

Become an influencer and write and share sustainable news and innovations globally
Are you a writer or do you have ideas about sustainability which you want to share? Register and share your green knowledge and news. WhatsOrb offers you global exposure for your article.

If your article meets certain standards, you receive promotional gains like Facebook promotions and Google Ads advertising.



Breaking News categorybanner ALL SOLUTIONS

MenuMenu
Factory Farms May Soon Banned In Switzerland: Animal Welfare
Factory Farms May Soon Banned In Switzerland. Animal agriculture in Switzerland could look very different in the future. The Swiss public will vote on a ban on factory farming. Switzerland is considering a ban on factory farming after campaigners gathered more than 100,000 signatures urging the government to outlaw it. Supporters of the ban argue that factory farming is linked to poor animal welfare. "Fifty percent of all piglets raised in Switzerland are slaughtered without ever seeing the sky," Meret Schneider, co-director of animal rights think tank Sentience Politics, said in a statement. "Over 80 percent of the chickens kept in Switzerland never stand on a meadow in their life and already reach slaughter weight when they are only 30 days old." Recommended: Climate Change: Water Scarcity, Hunger, Agriculture And Food Factory Farming Also Contributes To Climate Change, Water Scarcity, And Hunger Issues "Switzerland imports 1.2 million tonnes of animal feed every year to produce the necessary quantity of animal products," said Vera Weber, president of the Franz Weber Foundation, an organization that works to protect the planet with exposés and lobbying. More research is uncovering animal agriculture’s impact on the planet. The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) named meat 'the world’s most urgent problem'. "Our use of animals as a food-production technology has brought us to the verge of catastrophe,” UNEP said in a statement. “The greenhouse gas footprint of animal agriculture rivals that that of every car, truck, bus, ship, airplane, and rocket ship combined." Supporters of the ban argue that factory farming involves animal cruelty. Recommended:  Bio-industry: Cognitive Dissonance Makes Us Eat Corrupt Meat Factory Farming Is Unacceptable The 'No factory farming in Switzerland' initiative launched in June 2018. It aims to put an end to intensive farming by amending article 80a of the Federal Constitution. Silvano Lieger, co-director of Sentience Politics, told LIVEKINDLY, "The fact that we were able to submit this initiative so quickly shows how much people in Switzerland care about animals. The majority of them are unaware of the significant amount of individuals that are still being raised in unbearable conditions." "Factory farming is unacceptable and we should use the power of direct democracy to also make it illegal," Lieger added. {youtube}                                  TheTruth About Your Food with FOOD, INC. Filmmaker Robert Kenner                                                              Factory Farms: Animal Welfare Food, Inc. is a 2008 American documentary film directed by filmmaker Robert Kenner. The film examine s corporate farming in the United States, but it could be anywhere, concluding that agribusiness produces food that is unhealthy, in a way that is environmentally harmful and abusive of both animals and employees. Switzerland And Animal Welfare The Swiss public is also set to vote on whether animal testing of products sold in the country should be allowed. The vote was made possible after petitioners collected the minimum 100,000 signatures needed to place a measure on the ballot. Last year, Switzerland made boiling lobsters and all other crustaceans illegal due to animal welfare concerns. It was recently reported that 2.6 million Swiss people - or 31 percent of the population - are reducing or have entirely cut meat consumption. Before you go! Recommended:  UN Shows Human Devastating Impact On Nature: Worldwide
Factory Farms May Soon Banned In Switzerland. Animal agriculture in Switzerland could look very different in the future. The Swiss public will vote on a ban on factory farming. Switzerland is considering a ban on factory farming after campaigners gathered more than 100,000 signatures urging the government to outlaw it. Supporters of the ban argue that factory farming is linked to poor animal welfare. "Fifty percent of all piglets raised in Switzerland are slaughtered without ever seeing the sky," Meret Schneider, co-director of animal rights think tank Sentience Politics, said in a statement. "Over 80 percent of the chickens kept in Switzerland never stand on a meadow in their life and already reach slaughter weight when they are only 30 days old." Recommended: Climate Change: Water Scarcity, Hunger, Agriculture And Food Factory Farming Also Contributes To Climate Change, Water Scarcity, And Hunger Issues "Switzerland imports 1.2 million tonnes of animal feed every year to produce the necessary quantity of animal products," said Vera Weber, president of the Franz Weber Foundation, an organization that works to protect the planet with exposés and lobbying. More research is uncovering animal agriculture’s impact on the planet. The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) named meat 'the world’s most urgent problem'. "Our use of animals as a food-production technology has brought us to the verge of catastrophe,” UNEP said in a statement. “The greenhouse gas footprint of animal agriculture rivals that that of every car, truck, bus, ship, airplane, and rocket ship combined." Supporters of the ban argue that factory farming involves animal cruelty. Recommended:  Bio-industry: Cognitive Dissonance Makes Us Eat Corrupt Meat Factory Farming Is Unacceptable The 'No factory farming in Switzerland' initiative launched in June 2018. It aims to put an end to intensive farming by amending article 80a of the Federal Constitution. Silvano Lieger, co-director of Sentience Politics, told LIVEKINDLY, "The fact that we were able to submit this initiative so quickly shows how much people in Switzerland care about animals. The majority of them are unaware of the significant amount of individuals that are still being raised in unbearable conditions." "Factory farming is unacceptable and we should use the power of direct democracy to also make it illegal," Lieger added. {youtube}                                  TheTruth About Your Food with FOOD, INC. Filmmaker Robert Kenner                                                              Factory Farms: Animal Welfare Food, Inc. is a 2008 American documentary film directed by filmmaker Robert Kenner. The film examine s corporate farming in the United States, but it could be anywhere, concluding that agribusiness produces food that is unhealthy, in a way that is environmentally harmful and abusive of both animals and employees. Switzerland And Animal Welfare The Swiss public is also set to vote on whether animal testing of products sold in the country should be allowed. The vote was made possible after petitioners collected the minimum 100,000 signatures needed to place a measure on the ballot. Last year, Switzerland made boiling lobsters and all other crustaceans illegal due to animal welfare concerns. It was recently reported that 2.6 million Swiss people - or 31 percent of the population - are reducing or have entirely cut meat consumption. Before you go! Recommended:  UN Shows Human Devastating Impact On Nature: Worldwide
Factory Farms May Soon Banned In Switzerland: Animal Welfare
Microplastics Can Be Moved From The Ocean: Is It Harming Us?
We Know Plastic Is Harming Marine Life. What About Us? There often are tiny bits of plastic in the fish and shellfish we eat. Scientists are racing to figure out what that means for our health. In a laboratory at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, in Palisades, New York, a reseracher positions a slide under a microscope and flicks on an ultraviolet light. Scrutinizing the liquefied digestive tract of a shrimp the scientist bought at a fish market. After examining every millimeter of the slide, the scientist blurts; This shrimp is fiber city! Inside its gut, seven squiggles of plastic, dyed with Nile red stain, fluoresce. Microplastics ingested by a water flea that’s three millimeters long glow green. In a lab, fleas were exposed to round beads and irregularly shaped fragments in amounts higher than in nature. The irregular pieces pose a greater threat because they can clump and get stuck in the gut. Microplastics, Reserach And A Solution To Remove It All over the world, researchers staring through microscopes at tiny pieces of plastic—fibers, fragments, or microbeads—that have made their way into marine and freshwater species, both wild caught and farmed. Scientists have found microplastics in 114 aquatic species, and more than half of those end up on our dinner plates. Now they are trying to determine what that means for human health. So far science lacks evidence that microplastics—pieces smaller than one-fifth of an inch—are affecting fish at the population level. Our food supply doesn’t seem to be under threat—at least as far as we know. But enough research has been done now to show that the fish and shellfish we enjoy are suffering from the omnipresence of this plastic. Every year five million to 14 million tons flow into our oceans from coastal areas. Sunlight, wind, waves, and heat break down that material into smaller bits that look - to plankton, bivalves, fish, and even whales - a lot like food. Microplastics Can Be Moved From The Ocean: Fionn Ferreira A teen from Ireland may have found the solution to rid world's oceans from the microplastics that are near impossible to remove. Fionn Ferreira, 18, designed a new method for the extraction of microplastics, or particles of plastic less than 5 millimeters in diameter, as part of the Google Science Fair, an online competition open to students between the ages of 13 and 18. {youtube}                          An investigation into the removal of microplastics from water using ferro fluids                                   Microplastics Can Be Moved From The Ocean: Is It Harming Us?   The procedure, inspired by an article written by physicist Arden Warner, involves using non-toxic iron oxide to clean up oil spills, according to Ferreira's project study. When he tested the method on water containing a known concentration of microplastics, the plastic particles migrated into the oil phase, and the fluid was able to be removed using strong magnets, he wrote in his project synopsis. He first produced microplastics to remove from the water and then extracted them using his method. Ten of the most common microplastics were used for the experiment. Ferreira concluded that his extraction method would remove 85% to 92% of microplastics in samples. The next step would be to scale the project up to an industrial level, he said. "From this I can conclude that using magnetite with a minimum of oil forms a viable method for the extraction of microplastics," he wrote. Recommended:  Boyan Slat Ocean Cleanup: Restart Plastic Soup Collection Microplastics Damage Aquatic Creatures Experiments show that microplastics damage aquatic creatures, as well as turtles and birds: They block digestive tracts, diminish the urge to eat, and alter feeding behaviour, all of which reduce growth and reproductive output. Their stomachs stuffed with plastic, some species starve and die. In addition to mechanical effects, microplastics have chemical impacts, because free-floating pollutants that wash off the land and into our seas—such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and heavy metals—tend to adhere to their surfaces. Marine Organisms Are Harmed By Plastics  A professor of ecology at the University of Toronto, soaked ground-up polyethylene, which is used to make some types of plastic bags, in San Diego Bay for three months. She then offered this contaminated plastic, along with a laboratory diet, to Japanese medakas, small fish commonly used for research, for two months. The fish that had ingested the treated plastic suffered more liver damage than those that had consumed virgin plastic. (Fish with compromised livers are less able to metabolize drugs, pesticides, and other pollutants.) Another experiment demonstrated that oysters exposed to tiny pieces of polystyrene - the stuff of take-out food containers - produce fewer eggs and less motile sperm. The list of freshwater and marine organisms that are harmed by plastics stretches to hundreds of species. Microplastics Harming Us It's difficult to parse whether microplastics affect us as individual consumers of seafood, because we’re steeped in this material—from the air we breathe to both the tap and bottled water we drink, the food we eat, and the clothing we wear. Moreover, plastic isn’t one thing. It comes in many forms and contains a wide range of additives—pigments, ultraviolet stabilizers, water repellents, flame retardants, stiffeners such as bisphenol A (BPA), and softeners called phthalates—that can leach into their surroundings. Studying the impacts of marine microplastics on human health is challenging because people can’t be asked to eat plastics for experiments, because plastics and their additives act differently depending on physical and chemical contexts, and because their characteristics may change as creatures along the food chain consume, metabolize, or excrete them. We know virtually nothing about how food processing or cooking affects the toxicity of plastics in aquatic organisms or what level of contamination might hurt us. Fionn Ferreira Now Fionn Ferreira has found a solution to remove microplastic from water. By winning the Google science fair's grand prize - a $50,000 scholarship fund - allowed him to meet several scientists and engineers associated with Google. Ferreira was inspired to launch the project after growing up near the shore in West Cork, Ireland, where he became "increasingly aware of plastic pollution of the oceans," he said. "I was alarmed to find out how many microplastics enter our (wastewater) system and consequently the oceans," he wrote. "This inspired me to try and find out a way to try and remove microplastics from water before they even reached the sea." Because he lives in such a remote area, he had to build his own equipment and lab to conduct tests and experiments, he said. On his website, Ferreria describes himself as not only a scientist but a musician, gardener, educator, entrepreneur and innovator. Scientists have found microplastics in the furthest reaches of the ocean, from the deepest waters of the Mariana Trench to the Arctic and Antarctic, and the entire marine ecosystem is contaminated, researchers say. Plastic typically ends up in oceans through rivers after it is washed down drains by rainwater or blown by wind into bodies of water that flow into rivers and ultimately into the ocean. Since it is extremely difficult to remove plastic - especially microplastics - from open ocean water, experts have leaned toward prevention - such as transforming industry standards, consumer habits and beach clean-ups - as the solution to mitigate the snowballing amount of plastic dumped into the ocean each. Ferreria's method may provide environmentalists a way to clean wastewater of the tiniest particles of plastics that never break down and remain in the water indefinitely. Ferreira said it is "essential to find efficient and effective ways of extracting microplastics from waste waters" before they reach the oceans. "There is no doubt that the most effective way to reduce microplastic pollution in oceans is to use less plastics and ensure that plastics used can be recycled and separated to prevent them from entering our wastewater, but the reality is that more and more of the products we use contain plastics and potentially degrade into microplastics before entering our wastewater," he said. Before you go! Recommended:  Combing Plastic Waste Out Oceans: Competition For Boyan Slat Did you like the article? Leave below a comment. We will reply the same day!
We Know Plastic Is Harming Marine Life. What About Us? There often are tiny bits of plastic in the fish and shellfish we eat. Scientists are racing to figure out what that means for our health. In a laboratory at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, in Palisades, New York, a reseracher positions a slide under a microscope and flicks on an ultraviolet light. Scrutinizing the liquefied digestive tract of a shrimp the scientist bought at a fish market. After examining every millimeter of the slide, the scientist blurts; This shrimp is fiber city! Inside its gut, seven squiggles of plastic, dyed with Nile red stain, fluoresce. Microplastics ingested by a water flea that’s three millimeters long glow green. In a lab, fleas were exposed to round beads and irregularly shaped fragments in amounts higher than in nature. The irregular pieces pose a greater threat because they can clump and get stuck in the gut. Microplastics, Reserach And A Solution To Remove It All over the world, researchers staring through microscopes at tiny pieces of plastic—fibers, fragments, or microbeads—that have made their way into marine and freshwater species, both wild caught and farmed. Scientists have found microplastics in 114 aquatic species, and more than half of those end up on our dinner plates. Now they are trying to determine what that means for human health. So far science lacks evidence that microplastics—pieces smaller than one-fifth of an inch—are affecting fish at the population level. Our food supply doesn’t seem to be under threat—at least as far as we know. But enough research has been done now to show that the fish and shellfish we enjoy are suffering from the omnipresence of this plastic. Every year five million to 14 million tons flow into our oceans from coastal areas. Sunlight, wind, waves, and heat break down that material into smaller bits that look - to plankton, bivalves, fish, and even whales - a lot like food. Microplastics Can Be Moved From The Ocean: Fionn Ferreira A teen from Ireland may have found the solution to rid world's oceans from the microplastics that are near impossible to remove. Fionn Ferreira, 18, designed a new method for the extraction of microplastics, or particles of plastic less than 5 millimeters in diameter, as part of the Google Science Fair, an online competition open to students between the ages of 13 and 18. {youtube}                          An investigation into the removal of microplastics from water using ferro fluids                                   Microplastics Can Be Moved From The Ocean: Is It Harming Us?   The procedure, inspired by an article written by physicist Arden Warner, involves using non-toxic iron oxide to clean up oil spills, according to Ferreira's project study. When he tested the method on water containing a known concentration of microplastics, the plastic particles migrated into the oil phase, and the fluid was able to be removed using strong magnets, he wrote in his project synopsis. He first produced microplastics to remove from the water and then extracted them using his method. Ten of the most common microplastics were used for the experiment. Ferreira concluded that his extraction method would remove 85% to 92% of microplastics in samples. The next step would be to scale the project up to an industrial level, he said. "From this I can conclude that using magnetite with a minimum of oil forms a viable method for the extraction of microplastics," he wrote. Recommended:  Boyan Slat Ocean Cleanup: Restart Plastic Soup Collection Microplastics Damage Aquatic Creatures Experiments show that microplastics damage aquatic creatures, as well as turtles and birds: They block digestive tracts, diminish the urge to eat, and alter feeding behaviour, all of which reduce growth and reproductive output. Their stomachs stuffed with plastic, some species starve and die. In addition to mechanical effects, microplastics have chemical impacts, because free-floating pollutants that wash off the land and into our seas—such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and heavy metals—tend to adhere to their surfaces. Marine Organisms Are Harmed By Plastics  A professor of ecology at the University of Toronto, soaked ground-up polyethylene, which is used to make some types of plastic bags, in San Diego Bay for three months. She then offered this contaminated plastic, along with a laboratory diet, to Japanese medakas, small fish commonly used for research, for two months. The fish that had ingested the treated plastic suffered more liver damage than those that had consumed virgin plastic. (Fish with compromised livers are less able to metabolize drugs, pesticides, and other pollutants.) Another experiment demonstrated that oysters exposed to tiny pieces of polystyrene - the stuff of take-out food containers - produce fewer eggs and less motile sperm. The list of freshwater and marine organisms that are harmed by plastics stretches to hundreds of species. Microplastics Harming Us It's difficult to parse whether microplastics affect us as individual consumers of seafood, because we’re steeped in this material—from the air we breathe to both the tap and bottled water we drink, the food we eat, and the clothing we wear. Moreover, plastic isn’t one thing. It comes in many forms and contains a wide range of additives—pigments, ultraviolet stabilizers, water repellents, flame retardants, stiffeners such as bisphenol A (BPA), and softeners called phthalates—that can leach into their surroundings. Studying the impacts of marine microplastics on human health is challenging because people can’t be asked to eat plastics for experiments, because plastics and their additives act differently depending on physical and chemical contexts, and because their characteristics may change as creatures along the food chain consume, metabolize, or excrete them. We know virtually nothing about how food processing or cooking affects the toxicity of plastics in aquatic organisms or what level of contamination might hurt us. Fionn Ferreira Now Fionn Ferreira has found a solution to remove microplastic from water. By winning the Google science fair's grand prize - a $50,000 scholarship fund - allowed him to meet several scientists and engineers associated with Google. Ferreira was inspired to launch the project after growing up near the shore in West Cork, Ireland, where he became "increasingly aware of plastic pollution of the oceans," he said. "I was alarmed to find out how many microplastics enter our (wastewater) system and consequently the oceans," he wrote. "This inspired me to try and find out a way to try and remove microplastics from water before they even reached the sea." Because he lives in such a remote area, he had to build his own equipment and lab to conduct tests and experiments, he said. On his website, Ferreria describes himself as not only a scientist but a musician, gardener, educator, entrepreneur and innovator. Scientists have found microplastics in the furthest reaches of the ocean, from the deepest waters of the Mariana Trench to the Arctic and Antarctic, and the entire marine ecosystem is contaminated, researchers say. Plastic typically ends up in oceans through rivers after it is washed down drains by rainwater or blown by wind into bodies of water that flow into rivers and ultimately into the ocean. Since it is extremely difficult to remove plastic - especially microplastics - from open ocean water, experts have leaned toward prevention - such as transforming industry standards, consumer habits and beach clean-ups - as the solution to mitigate the snowballing amount of plastic dumped into the ocean each. Ferreria's method may provide environmentalists a way to clean wastewater of the tiniest particles of plastics that never break down and remain in the water indefinitely. Ferreira said it is "essential to find efficient and effective ways of extracting microplastics from waste waters" before they reach the oceans. "There is no doubt that the most effective way to reduce microplastic pollution in oceans is to use less plastics and ensure that plastics used can be recycled and separated to prevent them from entering our wastewater, but the reality is that more and more of the products we use contain plastics and potentially degrade into microplastics before entering our wastewater," he said. Before you go! Recommended:  Combing Plastic Waste Out Oceans: Competition For Boyan Slat Did you like the article? Leave below a comment. We will reply the same day!
Microplastics Can Be Moved From The Ocean: Is It Harming Us?
Electric Car Sales Are Plummeting Globally! The Party Over?
Sales worldwide declined for the first time. That the car industry is in trouble is not news: trade wars, Brexit threat and economic headwind have put an end to a celebration that lasted two decades. Electric Car Sales Plummeting 50% in July Car sales have collapsed almost everywhere. Even the sales of electric cars suddenly dropped in July, where the growth figures so far have regularly been above 50 percent. In July, 14 percent fewer e-cars drove out of the showroom, according to a report from market researcher Bernstein. Main reason: China. The country with the world's largest market for those cars saw sales collapse after the government cut into subsidy schemes for so-called new energy vehicles, which also include hydrogen cars and plug-in hybrids. Recommended:  Environmental Costs Of Lithium Battery Addiction: Worldwide Electric cars sales flattening The change is not entirely unexpected, the signals that the sale of e-cars in China are flattening have come earlier. Relatively speaking, e-cars are still doing well in China. The total car market has been in a minor situation for more than a year, something that has not happened since the turn of the century. Mild consolation: despite the dip, the total increase in the number of e-cars throughout 2019 will be higher than the year before, Bernstein's market researchers expect. Electric cars: Volkswagen, Tesla Nevertheless, the decline is worrying for large groups such as Volkswagen and Tesla. In China, about half of all e-cars are sold and the country is an important market. The decline must have terrified VW, which has started a large-scale conversion of factories from fossil to electric propulsion in Europe. Tesla, which is currently building a factory in China, will also look at the change with great concern. Bernstein expects the decline to be temporary. The demand for e-cars will eventually also pick up in China, if only because the country has stricter demands on car emissions. The same applies to Europe, where e-car sales are still growing. E-cars also still sell well in the Netherlands, although here too the tax benefits are reduced. Certainly compared to the total car market, which shrank by no less than 16 percent last August. Recommended:  Electric Cars: Truly Green Or A New Kind Of Liability?
Sales worldwide declined for the first time. That the car industry is in trouble is not news: trade wars, Brexit threat and economic headwind have put an end to a celebration that lasted two decades. Electric Car Sales Plummeting 50% in July Car sales have collapsed almost everywhere. Even the sales of electric cars suddenly dropped in July, where the growth figures so far have regularly been above 50 percent. In July, 14 percent fewer e-cars drove out of the showroom, according to a report from market researcher Bernstein. Main reason: China. The country with the world's largest market for those cars saw sales collapse after the government cut into subsidy schemes for so-called new energy vehicles, which also include hydrogen cars and plug-in hybrids. Recommended:  Environmental Costs Of Lithium Battery Addiction: Worldwide Electric cars sales flattening The change is not entirely unexpected, the signals that the sale of e-cars in China are flattening have come earlier. Relatively speaking, e-cars are still doing well in China. The total car market has been in a minor situation for more than a year, something that has not happened since the turn of the century. Mild consolation: despite the dip, the total increase in the number of e-cars throughout 2019 will be higher than the year before, Bernstein's market researchers expect. Electric cars: Volkswagen, Tesla Nevertheless, the decline is worrying for large groups such as Volkswagen and Tesla. In China, about half of all e-cars are sold and the country is an important market. The decline must have terrified VW, which has started a large-scale conversion of factories from fossil to electric propulsion in Europe. Tesla, which is currently building a factory in China, will also look at the change with great concern. Bernstein expects the decline to be temporary. The demand for e-cars will eventually also pick up in China, if only because the country has stricter demands on car emissions. The same applies to Europe, where e-car sales are still growing. E-cars also still sell well in the Netherlands, although here too the tax benefits are reduced. Certainly compared to the total car market, which shrank by no less than 16 percent last August. Recommended:  Electric Cars: Truly Green Or A New Kind Of Liability?
Electric Car Sales Are Plummeting Globally! The Party Over?
Renewable Energy Breakthrough: Hydrogen Extract From Oil
Renewable green energy is a step closer after scientists developed an economical method to extract hydrogen (H2) from oil sands. This method could be used to power hydrogen-powered vehicles, in addition to generating electricity. Hydrogen is regarded as an efficient transport fuel, similar to traditonal fuels such as petrol and diesel, without the associated pollution problems. The process can extract hydrogen from existing oil sands reservoirs, with large supplies found in Canada and Venezuela. This revolutionary process can be applied to mainstream oil fields, causing them to produce hydrogen instead of oil. We anticipate we will be able to use the existing infrastructure and distribution chains to produce H2 for between 10 and 50 cents per kilo. Although hydrogen-powered vehicles are known to be efficient, the high price of extracting hydrogen from oil reserves means the technology has not been economically viable. Hydrogen Extract From Oil However, engineers have now developed an economical method of extracting hydrogen from oil sands. Dr Ian Gates, of the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Calgary, said: “There are vast oil sand reservoirs in several countries, with huge fields in Alberta in Canada, but also in Venezuela and other countries.” Oil fields, even abandoned ones, still contain significant amounts of oil. The researchers found that injecting oxygen into the fields raises the temperature and liberates hydrogen, which can then be separated from other gases via specialist filters. Recommended:  Breaking News! Hydrogen Cheaply Produced By Solar In Belgium Hydrogen up, carbon down Hydrogen is not pre-existing in the reservoirs, but the addition of oxygen means the reaction to form hydrogen can occur. Grant Strem, CEO of Proton Technologies which is commercialising the process, said: “This technique can draw up huge quantities of hydrogen while leaving the carbon in the ground. “When working at production level, we anticipate we will be able to use the existing infrastructure and distribution chains to produce H2 for between 10 and 50 cents per kilo. {youtube}               Renewable Energy Breakthrough: Hydrogen Extract From Oil. Proton Technologies Hydrogen Wellsite Tour Recommended:  Hydrogen Powered Car That Emits Water No CO2: The Rasa “This means it potentially costs a fraction of gasoline for equivalent output”. This compares with current H2 production costs of around $2/kg. Around five percent of the hydrogen produced then powers the oxygen production plant, so the system more than pays for itself. Mr Strem stress the economics of the process is favourable. He said: ”What comes out of the ground is hydrogen gas, so we don’t have the huge above-ground purification costs associated with oil refining: we use the ground as our reaction vessel. Hydrogen: effectively pollution and emission free “Just taking Alberta as an example, we have the potential to supply Canada’s entire electricity requirement for 330 years.” Canada uses approximately 2.5 percent of the world’s electricity – approximately the same amount as Germany. Mr Strem added: “Our initial aim is to scale up the production from Canadian oil sands, but in fact, we anticipate that most of the interest in this process will come from outside Canada, as the economics and the environmental implications make people look very hard at whether they want to continue conventional oil production. “The only product of this process is hydrogen, meaning that it the technology is effectively pollution and emission free. “All the other gases remain in the ground because they cannot go through the hydrogen filter and up to the surface”. Breakthrough, innovative, exciting Professor Brian Horsfield, of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences said: “The research is highly innovative and exciting. “It’s an adaptation of some 1970’s fire-flood production concepts, but tuned to a modern day perspective. “Declining oil field production infrastructures now stand to get a new lease of life. “Extensive field testing will be crucial in assessing how the system works on industrial scales and over time” Recommended:  Hydrogen Energy Storage Revolution In The Netherlands
Renewable green energy is a step closer after scientists developed an economical method to extract hydrogen (H2) from oil sands. This method could be used to power hydrogen-powered vehicles, in addition to generating electricity. Hydrogen is regarded as an efficient transport fuel, similar to traditonal fuels such as petrol and diesel, without the associated pollution problems. The process can extract hydrogen from existing oil sands reservoirs, with large supplies found in Canada and Venezuela. This revolutionary process can be applied to mainstream oil fields, causing them to produce hydrogen instead of oil. We anticipate we will be able to use the existing infrastructure and distribution chains to produce H2 for between 10 and 50 cents per kilo. Although hydrogen-powered vehicles are known to be efficient, the high price of extracting hydrogen from oil reserves means the technology has not been economically viable. Hydrogen Extract From Oil However, engineers have now developed an economical method of extracting hydrogen from oil sands. Dr Ian Gates, of the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Calgary, said: “There are vast oil sand reservoirs in several countries, with huge fields in Alberta in Canada, but also in Venezuela and other countries.” Oil fields, even abandoned ones, still contain significant amounts of oil. The researchers found that injecting oxygen into the fields raises the temperature and liberates hydrogen, which can then be separated from other gases via specialist filters. Recommended:  Breaking News! Hydrogen Cheaply Produced By Solar In Belgium Hydrogen up, carbon down Hydrogen is not pre-existing in the reservoirs, but the addition of oxygen means the reaction to form hydrogen can occur. Grant Strem, CEO of Proton Technologies which is commercialising the process, said: “This technique can draw up huge quantities of hydrogen while leaving the carbon in the ground. “When working at production level, we anticipate we will be able to use the existing infrastructure and distribution chains to produce H2 for between 10 and 50 cents per kilo. {youtube}               Renewable Energy Breakthrough: Hydrogen Extract From Oil. Proton Technologies Hydrogen Wellsite Tour Recommended:  Hydrogen Powered Car That Emits Water No CO2: The Rasa “This means it potentially costs a fraction of gasoline for equivalent output”. This compares with current H2 production costs of around $2/kg. Around five percent of the hydrogen produced then powers the oxygen production plant, so the system more than pays for itself. Mr Strem stress the economics of the process is favourable. He said: ”What comes out of the ground is hydrogen gas, so we don’t have the huge above-ground purification costs associated with oil refining: we use the ground as our reaction vessel. Hydrogen: effectively pollution and emission free “Just taking Alberta as an example, we have the potential to supply Canada’s entire electricity requirement for 330 years.” Canada uses approximately 2.5 percent of the world’s electricity – approximately the same amount as Germany. Mr Strem added: “Our initial aim is to scale up the production from Canadian oil sands, but in fact, we anticipate that most of the interest in this process will come from outside Canada, as the economics and the environmental implications make people look very hard at whether they want to continue conventional oil production. “The only product of this process is hydrogen, meaning that it the technology is effectively pollution and emission free. “All the other gases remain in the ground because they cannot go through the hydrogen filter and up to the surface”. Breakthrough, innovative, exciting Professor Brian Horsfield, of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences said: “The research is highly innovative and exciting. “It’s an adaptation of some 1970’s fire-flood production concepts, but tuned to a modern day perspective. “Declining oil field production infrastructures now stand to get a new lease of life. “Extensive field testing will be crucial in assessing how the system works on industrial scales and over time” Recommended:  Hydrogen Energy Storage Revolution In The Netherlands
Renewable Energy Breakthrough: Hydrogen Extract From Oil
Green Villa With Living Facade Of Plant Pots The Netherlands
Architecture practice MVRDV has unveiled designs for a residential development in Sint-Michielsgestel, the Netherlands, with green walls formed of shelves of plants. Together with their co-architect Van Boven Architecten, the Dutch practice has developed Green Villa for property developer Stein to sit in a corner site on the southern edge of the town. The three-storey housing block will follow the mansard roof shape of the neighbouring building, but its entire frontage will be covered in giant rows of shelves covered in greenery. Potted plants, bushes and trees will sit upon shelves of varying sizes and depths. Species planned for the living facade include forsythia bushes and jasmine plants, as well as pine and birch trees. Further pots are to be installed on the roof. Green Villa, green dip "This design is a continuation of our research into facade-less buildings and radical greening," said Winy Maas, founding partner of MVRDV. "The idea from the 1990s of city parks as an oasis in the city is too limited. We need a radical 'green dip'," he added, referencing an upcoming book of the same title from think-tank The Why Factory. The Green Dip reports on the project developed by The Why Factory, the University of Technology Sydney and Delft University of Technology examining how nature can be better integrated into the urban fabric of cities. "We should also cover roofs and high-rise facades with greenery," continued Maas, who leads The Why Factory. "Plants and trees can help us to offset CO2 emissions, cool our cities, and promote biodiversity." ( Recommended:  Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It? ) Green Villa's grid of plants will double as a 'three-dimensional arboretum' and 'tree library', with each plant labelled with a nameplate and accompanying information. Stored rainwater will be used to water the plants via a sensor-controlled irrigation system built into their planters to keep them green all year round. ( Recommended:  Solar Canopies Supply Shade Electricity And Filter Rainwater ) "The Green Villa is also a personal project, because I went to school in Sint-Michielsgestel," added Maas. "Just like I did before with the Glass Farm, in my native village of Schijndel, I am returning to the region of my youth." Completed in 2013, Glass Farm is a shop and office complex made of glass but disguised to look like a tradition farmhouse. ( See photo below ) MVRDV has also designed a skyscraper in Shenzhen, China, with rooftop gardens and outdoor parks at various levels. ( See photo below ) Project credits: Architect: MVRDV Founding partner in charge: Winy Maas Partner/director: Gideon Maasland Design team: Gijs Rikken, Karolina Szóstkiewicz, Daan Zandbergen Co-architect: Van Boven Architecten All Visualisations by: Antonio Luca Coco and Pavlos Ventouris All about Green Architecture
Architecture practice MVRDV has unveiled designs for a residential development in Sint-Michielsgestel, the Netherlands, with green walls formed of shelves of plants. Together with their co-architect Van Boven Architecten, the Dutch practice has developed Green Villa for property developer Stein to sit in a corner site on the southern edge of the town. The three-storey housing block will follow the mansard roof shape of the neighbouring building, but its entire frontage will be covered in giant rows of shelves covered in greenery. Potted plants, bushes and trees will sit upon shelves of varying sizes and depths. Species planned for the living facade include forsythia bushes and jasmine plants, as well as pine and birch trees. Further pots are to be installed on the roof. Green Villa, green dip "This design is a continuation of our research into facade-less buildings and radical greening," said Winy Maas, founding partner of MVRDV. "The idea from the 1990s of city parks as an oasis in the city is too limited. We need a radical 'green dip'," he added, referencing an upcoming book of the same title from think-tank The Why Factory. The Green Dip reports on the project developed by The Why Factory, the University of Technology Sydney and Delft University of Technology examining how nature can be better integrated into the urban fabric of cities. "We should also cover roofs and high-rise facades with greenery," continued Maas, who leads The Why Factory. "Plants and trees can help us to offset CO2 emissions, cool our cities, and promote biodiversity." ( Recommended:  Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It? ) Green Villa's grid of plants will double as a 'three-dimensional arboretum' and 'tree library', with each plant labelled with a nameplate and accompanying information. Stored rainwater will be used to water the plants via a sensor-controlled irrigation system built into their planters to keep them green all year round. ( Recommended:  Solar Canopies Supply Shade Electricity And Filter Rainwater ) "The Green Villa is also a personal project, because I went to school in Sint-Michielsgestel," added Maas. "Just like I did before with the Glass Farm, in my native village of Schijndel, I am returning to the region of my youth." Completed in 2013, Glass Farm is a shop and office complex made of glass but disguised to look like a tradition farmhouse. ( See photo below ) MVRDV has also designed a skyscraper in Shenzhen, China, with rooftop gardens and outdoor parks at various levels. ( See photo below ) Project credits: Architect: MVRDV Founding partner in charge: Winy Maas Partner/director: Gideon Maasland Design team: Gijs Rikken, Karolina Szóstkiewicz, Daan Zandbergen Co-architect: Van Boven Architecten All Visualisations by: Antonio Luca Coco and Pavlos Ventouris All about Green Architecture
Green Villa With Living Facade Of Plant Pots The Netherlands
Get updates on environmental sustainability in your mailbox every month.