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Tiny Houses tiny houses tips and tricks | Newsletter

Tiny houses tips and tricks

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by: Hans van der Broek
tiny houses tips and tricks | Newsletter

Previous generations often had the ultimate dream of ending up in a house bigger than the one they grew up in. This somehow was meant to reflect how they have been moving up in the world and as a sign of their increased welfare. Yet in recent years, this notion seems to have been overturned. The new generations seem to averse this trend - just as they do for so many others started and upheld by their parents and grandparents before them.

Whereas owning a gorgeous, two-story detached house with large garage might have been the aspiration for many generations before us, this view is slowly starting to change. Tiny houses have become the latest fad. These seek to provide its owners with a meaningful, minimalistic living experience, while minimising both the physical and ecological footprint. Even in the smallest of spaces a tiny home can be created that offers a surprising amount of luxury and comfort.

There’s not a set definition as to what constitutes a tiny house. Yet most will agree that it is a building that does not exceed some 50 square meters while being largely self-sufficient, through the use of energy and water saving and producing innovations. While a large number of them will be mobile, this is not a requirement - nor is the notion that it is completely ‘off-grid’ (as some of the greatest examples can be found in urban areas).

blie sign white characters tips & tricks

Looking to get your own tiny house soon? Here are some tips and tricks that will make the move easier.

Tip 1: put lager pieces of furniture inside before finishing the walls

A common headache, even when moving in regular houses: how to get that gorgeous old family heirloom cabinet in? Or your huge sectional, great for the living area but a pain to move? This problem is amplified for tiny houses, as windows and doors will usually be smaller as well. So you might want to consider moving your furniture in before framing and finishing the walls.

Tip 2: consider using ladders for upper-floor acces

Still hung up on the idea of using stairs to get to the upper floors? That grand old stately staircase is a definite no-go. But even for ‘regular’ stairs, it might be a good idea to consider replacing them by smaller and moveable ladders. These can be detached when you do not need them and installed when and where needed. Saves quite some valuable floor space.

Tip 3: say goodbye to the 8-person dining room table

Another unnecessarily luxurious item: the huge, wooden dining room table that will seat your entire family. Why not have it replaced by foldable tables? There are plenty on offer (including some cheap options at IKEA) that do not take up a whole lot of space when folded in, yet are able to magically transform into a suitable alternative. The same principle applies for other furniture, such as retractable pantry drawers that house your appliances.

Tip 4: enlarge the space without enlarging anything

People’s first concern is usually with the limited space feeling claustrophobic, boxed in. Although there are plenty of ways for you to get around this. Make sure that your window-to-wall ratio is high, for starters. Also, avoid the use of fixed indoor walls. You can opt for open, multipurpose spaces - but if you are looking to get more creative, you could opt for glass walls, or use sliding walls, curtains or room dividers to separate spaces.

Tip 5: get inspired by the internet

Another great invention of recent times - the internet. Why not use it to your advantage as you go about building and decorating your own tiny house? Plenty of others have built and innovated before you, so there’s a whole pool of knowledge out there for you to dip your toe in. Browse sites like Pinterest for your design ideas, shop on sites like Etsy, join groups on Facebook related to tiny house building, and so on.

https://www.whatsorb.com/architecture/sunbathing-in-your-tiny-house-with-a-sliding-roof--try-it-with-the-c-cile

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World traveler, entrepreneur and environmental activist. Has countless ideas and set up several businesses in the Netherlands and abroad. Has an opinion about everything and unlimited thoughts about a better world. He likes hiking and climbed numerous 5.000 m.
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World traveler, entrepreneur and environmental activist. Has countless ideas and set up several businesses in the Netherlands and abroad. Has an opinion about everything and unlimited thoughts about a better world. He likes hiking and climbed numerous 5.000 m.
Updates on environmental sustainability, every month in your mailbox!
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Tiny houses tips and tricks

Previous generations often had the ultimate dream of ending up in a house bigger than the one they grew up in. This somehow was meant to reflect how they have been moving up in the world and as a sign of their increased welfare. Yet in recent years, this notion seems to have been overturned. The new generations seem to averse this trend - just as they do for so many others started and upheld by their parents and grandparents before them. Whereas owning a gorgeous, two-story detached house with large garage might have been the aspiration for many generations before us, this view is slowly starting to change. Tiny houses have become the latest fad. These seek to provide its owners with a meaningful, minimalistic living experience, while minimising both the physical and ecological footprint. Even in the smallest of spaces a tiny home can be created that offers a surprising amount of luxury and comfort. There’s not a set definition as to what constitutes a tiny house. Yet most will agree that it is a building that does not exceed some 50 square meters while being largely self-sufficient, through the use of energy and water saving and producing innovations. While a large number of them will be mobile, this is not a requirement - nor is the notion that it is completely ‘off-grid’ (as some of the greatest examples can be found in urban areas). Looking to get your own  tiny house soon? Here are some tips and tricks that will make the move easier. Tip 1: put lager pieces of furniture inside before finishing the walls A common headache, even when moving in regular houses: how to get that gorgeous old family heirloom cabinet in? Or your huge sectional, great for the living area but a pain to move? This problem is amplified for tiny houses, as windows and doors will usually be smaller as well. So you might want to consider moving your furniture in before framing and finishing the walls. Tip 2: consider using ladders for upper-floor acces Still hung up on the idea of using stairs to get to the upper floors? That grand old stately staircase is a definite no-go. But even for ‘regular’ stairs, it might be a good idea to consider replacing them by smaller and moveable ladders. These can be detached when you do not need them and installed when and where needed. Saves quite some valuable floor space. Tip 3: say goodbye to the 8-person dining room table Another unnecessarily luxurious item: the huge, wooden dining room table that will seat your entire family. Why not have it replaced by foldable tables? There are plenty on offer (including some cheap options at IKEA) that do not take up a whole lot of space when folded in, yet are able to magically transform into a suitable alternative. The same principle applies for other furniture, such as retractable pantry drawers that house your appliances. Tip 4: enlarge the space without enlarging anything People’s first concern is usually with the limited space feeling claustrophobic, boxed in. Although there are plenty of ways for you to get around this. Make sure that your window-to-wall ratio is high, for starters. Also, avoid the use of fixed indoor walls. You can opt for open, multipurpose spaces - but if you are looking to get more creative, you could opt for glass walls, or use sliding walls, curtains or room dividers to separate spaces. Tip 5: get inspired by the internet Another great invention of recent times - the internet. Why not use it to your advantage as you go about building and decorating your own tiny house? Plenty of others have built and innovated before you, so there’s a whole pool of knowledge out there for you to dip your toe in. Browse sites like Pinterest for your design ideas, shop on sites like Etsy, join groups on  Facebook  related to tiny house building, and so on. https://www.whatsorb.com/architecture/sunbathing-in-your-tiny-house-with-a-sliding-roof--try-it-with-the-c-cile