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Climate heatwaves worldwide  nothing new  how to protect your self   | Newsletter General

Heatwaves Worldwide: Nothing New! How To Protect Your Self

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by: Hans van der Broek
heatwaves worldwide  nothing new  how to protect your self   | Newsletter

Unless you have been living under a rock, you won’t have failed to notice that it’s rather hot outside. While many of us are basking in the glorious sunshine, it’s not great news for everyone. Authorities have urged children and older people to stay indoors and issued severe warnings against dehydration and heatstroke as an unprecedented week-long heatwave begins its advance across continental Europe. Meteorologists said temperatures would reach or even exceed 40C from Spain to Switzerland as hot air was sucked up from the Sahara by the combination of a storm stalling over the Atlantic and high pressure over central Europe.

'El inferno (hell) is coming,'

High humidity meant it would feel like 47C, experts warned. 'El inferno (hell) is coming,' tweeted the TV meteorologist Silvia Laplana in Spain, where the AEMET weather service forecast temperatures of 42C by Thursday (27-06-2019) in the Ebro, Tagus, Guadiana and Guadalquivir valleys and warned of an ‘extreme risk’ of forest fires.

In France, officials in Paris set up 'cool rooms' in municipal buildings, opened pools for late-night swimming and installed extra drinking fountains as temperatures in the capital reached 34C on Monday and were forecast to climb further later in the week. “I’m worried about people who are downplaying this, who are continuing to exercise as usual or stay out in the sun,” the health minister, Agnès Buzyn, said. “This affects all of us, nobody is a superman when it comes to dealing with the extreme heat we’re going to see on Thursday and Friday,” she told a press conference. Emmanuel Demaël of Météo-France said the heatwave was unprecedented “because it’s hitting so early in June – we haven’t seen this since 1947.” Record monthly and all-time highs were likely to be set in several parts of the country, Demaël predicted, and night-time temperatures were unlikely to fall below 20C.
School exams were postponed until next week, charities distributed water to homeless people and sales of fans quadrupled. France’s deadliest recent heatwave was in August 2003, when almost 15,000 mainly elderly people died as hospitals were overwhelmed.

In Italy, “the most intense heatwave in a decade” was under way, with hospitals preparing to deal with a wave of heat-related illnesses and the health ministry suggesting army doctors may be needed to counter a shortage of medics. Highs of 37C to 40C were forecast across the north and centre, including in Rome, Florence, Bologna, Milan and Turin, with several Italian cities expected to set new records for the highest ever June temperatures. Authorities in Rome warned of the health risk from uncollected rubbish piled up on the capital’s streets, and eight tourists – including a Briton – were fined €450 each on Sunday for cooling off in the city’s fountains.

Woman in cloth in swimming tube man watching
Sabine Krüger of the German state meteorological service, DWD, said the June record of 38.2C, set in Frankfurt in 1947, was likely to be beaten by the middle or end of this week, with 100 hours of sunshine forecast before Friday, temperatures in Frankfurt set to reach 39C or even 40C by Wednesday and Berlin predicted to swelter in 37C. DWD on Monday warned citizens to take extra precaution in view of the extreme heat and high UV radiation over the coming days: “Avoid staying outdoors for long periods between 11am and 3pm,” it said, adding that sunblock, sunglasses and a sun hat were advisable even in the shade. Animal protection groups also warned pet owners to avoid leaving dogs or cats in cars unattended.
The heatwave comes after storms and record rainfall caused major problems in parts of Bavaria this weekend, with the Munich fire brigade called out 50 times and flights into and out of Munich airport suspended on Saturday evening.

In Switzerland, MeteoSwiss issued a “severe danger” level four heat alert for several parts of the country, warning of temperatures in excess of 33C and reaching 37C or even 39C in some places from Tuesday until Thursday. A number of all-time highs were likely to be recorded, it said.

Even Scandinavia looks unlikely to be spared, with parts of southern Denmark and Sweden predicted to reach 30C by Tuesday – and to feel more like a thoroughly un-Scandinavian 35C, the Danish broadcaster TV2 said.

Longer range weather forecasts show summer temperatures throughout July and August are expected to be higher than normal this year, rivalling those of 2018, which according to the European Environment Agency was one of the three warmest years on record on the continent.

Scientists have said last year’s heatwave, which led to increased mortality rates, a dramatic decline in crop yields, the shutdown of nuclear power plants and wildfires inside the Arctic Circle, was linked to the climate emergency. Meteorologists warn that such heatwaves are likely to become more frequent even if countries succeed in their commitments to limit global temperature increases to 1.5C as part of the 2015 Paris climate accord. The EU has pledged to cut carbon emissions to 40% below 1990 levels by 2030.

many people on the beach
Photo by: Aldric RIVAT Unsplash

How to cope with the hot weather 

For millions more it means a daily struggle in the rising temperatures, which are expected to peak at 37C-40C. There are some steps, however, that you can take to make life a little more bearable. The main problems likely to occur in the hot weather are dehydration, heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Overheating could also be an issue for people who already have problems with their heart or breathing. The health service says that the very young and very old are the most vulnerable plus people with mobility problems, mental health issues, people who misuse drugs or alcohol and people on medication that affect body temperature. Even those who are physically active are also at risk of some problems, such as people who do sports or manual work.
The elderly and people with lung or heart problems have been advised to reduce strenuous exercise and physical exertion. However, there are things that you can do to try to help yourself during the hot spell.

  • Avoid the heat by not going out between 11am and 3pm, which is the hottest part of the day
  • Keep rooms cool by using shutting the windows and pulling down the shades if the temperatures are hotter outdoors than inside
  • Shut windows and pull down the shades when it is hotter outside
  • You can open the windows for ventilation when it is cooler
  • Avoid the heat: stay out of the sun and don’t go out between 11am and 3pm (the hottest part of the day) if you’re vulnerable to the effects of heat
  • Keep rooms cool by using shades or reflective material outside the windows. If this isn’t possible, use light-coloured curtains and keep them closed (metallic blinds and dark curtains can make the room hotter). Have cool baths or showers, and splash yourself with cool water
  • Drink cold drinks regularly, such as water and diluted fruit juice
  • Eat small meals and eat more often
  • Avoid excess alcohol, caffeine (tea, coffee and cola) or drinks high in sugar
  • Listen to alerts on the radio, TV and social media about keeping cool. Plan ahead to make sure you have enough supplies, such as food, water and any medications you need
  • Identify the coolest room in the house so you know where to go to keep cool
  • Wear loose, cool clothing, and a hat and sunglasses if you go outdoors
  • Check up on friends, relatives and neighbours who may be less able to look after themselves
  • Never leave children or pets alone in enclosed vehicles
  • Check on your animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat.

     Dog and water fountain

And remember, even if you are fine others around you might not be so check up on friends, relatives and neighbours who might be less able to look after themselves!

Recognize a heatstroke

Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat injury and is considered a medical emergency. If you suspect that someone has heat stroke - also known as sunstroke - call emergency immediately and give first aid until paramedics arrive.

  • Heat stroke can kill or cause damage to the brain and other internal organs. Although heat stroke mainly affects people over age 50, it also takes a toll on healthy young athletes
  • Heat stroke often occurs as a progression from milder heat-related illnesses such as heat cramps, heat syncope (fainting), and heat exhaustion. But it can strike even if you have no previous signs of heat injury
  • Heat stroke results from prolonged exposure to high temperatures -- usually in combination with dehydration -- which leads to failure of the body's temperature control system. The medical definition of heat stroke is a core body temperature greater than 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40C), with complications involving the central nervous system that occur after exposure to high temperatures
  • Other common symptoms include nausea, seizures, confusion, disorientation, and sometimes loss of consciousness or coma

Heatstroke graph

Symptoms of Heat Stroke

  • The hallmark symptom of heat stroke is a core body temperature above 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40C). But fainting may be the first sign
  • Throbbing headache
  • Dizziness and light-headedness
  • Lack of sweating despite the heat
  • Red, hot, and dry skin
  • Muscle weakness or cramps
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Rapid heartbeat, which may be either strong or weak
  • Rapid, shallow breathing
  • Behavioral changes such as confusion, disorientation, or staggering
  • Seizures
  • Unconsciousness

Treatment

Heatstroke treatment centres on cooling your body to a normal temperature to prevent or reduce damage to your brain and vital organs. To do this, your doctor may take these steps:

  • Immerse you in cold water. A bath of cold or ice water has been proved to be the most effective way of quickly lowering your core body temperature. The quicker you can receive cold water immersion, the less risk of death and organ damage
  • Use evaporation cooling techniques. If cold water immersion is unavailable, health care workers may try to lower your body temperature using an evaporation method. Cool water is misted on your body while warm air is fanned over you, causing the water to evaporate and cool your skin
  • Pack you with ice and cooling blankets. Another method is to wrap you in a special cooling blanket and apply ice packs to your groin, neck, back and armpits to lower your temperature
  • Give you medications to stop your shivering. If treatments to lower your body temperature make you shiver, your doctor may give you a muscle relaxant, such as a benzodiazepine. Shivering increases your body temperature, making treatment less effective

Heat waves in the past and recently

Before 1901

  • July 1757 heatwave, Europe, hottest summer in 500 years prior to 2003.
  • 1896 Eastern North America heat wave killed 1,500 people in August 1896.
  • 1900 – The historical heatwave of the centre of Argentina between the first eight days of February 1900 known as ‘the week of fire’ affects the city of Buenos Aires and Rosario with temperatures of up to 37 °C (98.6 °F) but with a very high index of humidity that elevates the sensation of heat to 49 °C (120.2 °F) severely affecting the health of people causing at least more than 478 fatalities.

20th century

1901 – The 1901 eastern United States heat wave killed 9,500 in the Eastern United States.

  • 1906 – During the 1906 United Kingdom heat wave which began in August and lasted into September broke numerous records. On the 2nd temperatures reached 36 °C (96 °F) which still holds the September record however some places beat their local record during September 1911 and September 2016.
  • 1911 – The 1911 United Kingdom heat wave was one of the most severe periods of heat to hit the country with temperatures around 36 °C (97 °F). The heat began in early July and didn't let up until mid-September where even in September temperatures were still up to 33 °C (92 °F). It took 79 years for temperature higher to be recorded in the United Kingdom during 1990 United Kingdom heat wave.
  • 1911 - The 1911 Eastern North America heat wave killed between 380 to 2,000 people.
  • 1913 – In July, a heat wave struck California. During this heat wave, Death Valley recorded a record high temperature of 134 °F (56.7 °C) at Furnace Creek, which still remains the highest ambient air temperature recorded on Earth.
  • 1923–1924 – During a period of 160 such days from 31 October 1923 to 7 April 1924, the Western Australian town of Marble Bar reached 100 °F (38 °C).
  • 1936 – The 1936 North American heat wave during the Dust Bowl, followed one of the coldest winters on record the 1936 North American cold wave. Massive heat waves across North America were persistent in the 1930s, many mid-Atlantic/Ohio valley states recorded their highest temperatures during July 1934.

        Dust Bowl. Dallas, South Dakota 1936. Wikimedia
        Dust Bowl. Dallas, South Dakota 1936. Wikimedia

  • The longest continuous string of 100 °F (38 °C) or higher temperatures was reached for 101 days in Yuma, Arizona during 1937 and the highest temperatures ever reached in Canada were recorded in two locations in Saskatchewan in July 1937.
  • 1950s – A prolonged severe drought and heat wave occurred in the early 1950s throughout the central and southern United States. In some areas it was drier than during the Dust Bowl and the heat wave in most areas was within the top five on record. The heat was particularly severe in 1954 with 22 days of temperatures exceeding 100 °F (38 °C) covering significant parts of eleven states. On 14 July, the thermometer reached 117 °F (47 °C) at East St. Louis, Illinois, which remains the record highest temperature for that state.
  • 1955 – The 1955 United Kingdom heat wave was a period of hot weather that was accompanied by drought. In some places it was the worst drought on record, more severe than 1976 and 1995.
  • 1960 – On January 2, Oodnadatta, South Australia hit 50.7 °C (123.3 °F) degrees, the highest temperature ever recorded in the Southern Hemisphere and Oceania.
  • 1972 – The heat waves of 1972 in New York and North-eastern United States were significant. Almost 900 people perished; the heat conditions lasted almost 16 days, aggravated by very high humidity levels.
  • 1976 – The 1976 United Kingdom heat wave was one of the hottest in living memory and was marked by constant blue skies from May until September when dramatic thunderstorms signalled the heat wave's end.
  • 1980 – An estimated 1,000 people perished in the 1980 United States heat wave and drought, which impacted the central and eastern United States. Temperatures were highest in the southern plains. From June through September, temperatures remained above 90 °F (32 °C) all but two days in Kansas City, Missouri. The Dallas/Fort Worth area experienced 42 consecutive days with high temperatures above 100 °F (38 °C), with temperatures reaching 117 °F (47 °C) at Wichita Falls, Texas on 28 June. Economic losses were $20 billion (1980 dollars).
  • 1983 – During the Summer of 1983 temperatures over 100 °F (38 °C) were common across Iowa, Missouri, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Indiana, Ohio, Minnesota, Nebraska, and certain parts of Kentucky; the summer of 1983 remains one of the hottest summers ever recorded in many of the states affected. The hundred-degree readings were accompanied by very dry conditions associated with drought affecting the Corn Belt States and Upper Midwest. The heat also affected the South-eastern U.S. and the Mid-Atlantic states as well that same summer. New York Times represented articles about the heat waves of 1983 affecting the central United States. This heat wave was associated with the I-94 Deroche.
  • 1983 – The United Kingdom experienced a heatwave during July 1983. This was the hottest month ever recorded until it was beaten in 2006. The heatwave is remembered, not for its extreme heat but the relentless heat with temperatures around 32 °C (90 °F) every day. Temperature maxima for the month were high but not especially so.
  • 1987 – prolonged heat wave from 20 to 31 July in Greece, with more than 1,000 deaths in the area of Athens. The maximum temperature measured was 41.6 °C at 23 July at the centre of Athens and in the suburb of Nea Philadelphia, 8 km northeast was 43.6 °C at 27 July, and were combined with high minima, with the highest being 30.2 °C in the centre of Athens at 27 July and 29.9 °C at 24 July at Nea Philadelfia. The lowest minimum was 25.6 °C at the centre of Athens. Moreover, humidity was high and wind speeds low, contributing to human discomfort, even during the night.
  • 1988 - intense heat spells in combination with the drought of 1988, reminiscent of the dust bowl years caused deadly results across the United States. Some 5,000 to 10,000 people perished because of constant heat across the United States although-according to many estimates-total death reports run as high as next to 17,000 deaths.
  • 1990 – Cities across the United Kingdom broke their all-time temperature records in the dramatic 1990 United Kingdom heat wave temperatures peaked at 37 °C (99 °F). This led to one of the hottest Augusts on record, records going back to 1659.
  • 1995 – The 1995 Chicago heat wave produced record high dew point levels and heat indices in the Chicago area and Wisconsin. The lack of emergency cooling facilities and inadequate response from civic authorities to the senior population, particularly in lower income neighborhoods in Chicago and other Midwestern cities, lead to many hundreds of deaths. A series of damaging derechos (long-lived, straight-line wind storm that is associated with a fast-moving group of severe thunderstorms) (long-lived, straight-line wind storm that is associated with a fast-moving group of severe thunderstorms) occurred on the periphery of the hot air dome.
  • 1995 – The United Kingdom experienced its 3rd hottest summer since 1659. August was the hottest on record since 1659. The summer was also the driest on record since 1766. Temperatures peaked at 35 °C (95 °F) on 1 August, which did not break the all-time record.
  • 1997 – The United Kingdom experienced its 3rd major heatwave in 7 years with August 1997 being one of the hottest on record.
  • 1999 – a heat wave and drought in the eastern United States during the summer of 1999. Rainfall shortages resulted in worst drought on record for Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, and Rhode Island. The state of West Virginia was declared a disaster area. 3,810,000 acres (15,400 km2) were consumed by fire as of mid-August. Record heat throughout the country resulted in 502 deaths nationwide. There were many deaths in urban centres of the Midwest.
  • 2000 – in late Summer 2000, a heat wave occurred in the southern United States, breaking many cities' all-time maximum temperature records.

21st century

2001–2009

  • In early August 2001 an intense heatwave hit the eastern seaboard of the United States and neighbouring south-eastern Canada. For over a week, temperatures climbed above 35 °C (95 °F) combined with stifling high humidity. Newark, New Jersey tied its all-time record high temperature of 41 °C (106 °F) with a heat index of over 50 °C (122 °F).
  • In April 2002 a summer-like heat wave in spring affected much of the Eastern United States.
  • During April 2003 there was a summer-like heatwave that affected the United Kingdom however mainly England and Wales where temperature records were broken. The all-time record still stands however temperatures reached around 80 °F (27 °C)
  • The European heat wave of 2003 affected much of western Europe, breaking temperature records. Much of the heat was concentrated in France, England and Spain where nearly 15,000 people died. In Portugal, the temperatures reached as high as 47 °C (117 °F) in the south.
  • The European heat wave of 2006 was the second massive heat wave to hit the continent in four years, with temperatures rising to 40 °C (104 °F) in Paris; in Ireland, which has a moderate maritime climate, temperatures of over 32 °C (90 °F) were reported. Temperatures of 35 °C (95 °F) were reached in the Benelux and Germany (in some areas 38 °C (100 °F)), while Great Britain recorded 37 °C (99 °F). Many heat records were broken (including the hottest ever July temperature in Great Britain) and many people who experienced the heat waves of 1976 and 2003 drew comparisons with them. Highest average July temperatures were recorded at many locations in Great Britain, Netherlands, Denmark, Sweden and Germany.
  • The 2006 North American heat wave affected a wide area of the United States and parts of neighbouring Canada during July and August 2006. Over 220 deaths were reported. Temperatures in some parts of South Dakota exceeded 115 °F (46 °C). Also, California experienced temperatures that were extraordinarily high, with records ranging from 100 to 130 °F (38 to 54 °C). On 22 July, the County of Los Angeles recorded its highest temperature ever at 119 °F (48 °C). Humidity levels in California were also unusually high, although low compared with normal gulf coast/eastern seaboard summer humidity they were significant enough to cause widespread discomfort. Additionally, the heat wave was associated a series of derechos (long-lived, straight-line wind storm that is associated with a fast-moving group of severe thunderstorms) (long-lived, straight-line wind storm that is associated with a fast-moving group of severe thunderstorms) that produced widespread damage.
  • The European heat wave of 2007 affected primarily south-eastern Europe during late June through August. Bulgaria experienced its hottest year on record, with previously unrecorded temperatures above 45 °C (113 °F). The 2007 Greek forest fires were associated with the heat wave.
  • During the 2007 Asian heat wave, the Indian city of Datia experienced temperatures of 48 °C (118 °F).
  • In January 2008, Alice Springs in Australia's Northern Territory recorded ten consecutive days of temperatures above 40 °C (104 °F) with the average temperature for that month being 39.8 °C (103.6 °F). In March 2008, Adelaide, South Australia experienced maximum temperatures of above 35 °C (95 °F) for fifteen consecutive days, seven days more than the previous longest stretch of 35 °C (95 °F) days. The March 2008 heat wave also included eleven consecutive days above 38 °C (100 °F). The heat wave was especially notable because it occurred in March, an autumn month, in which Adelaide averages only 2.3 days above 35 °C (95 °F).
  • The eastern United States experienced an early Summer heat wave from 6–10 June 2008 with record temperatures. There was a heat wave in Southern California beginning late June, which contributed to widespread fires. On 6 July, a renewed heat wave was forecast, which was expected to affect the entire state.
  • In early 2009, Adelaide, South Australia was hit by a heat wave with temperatures reaching 40+ °C for six days in a row, while many rural areas experienced temperatures hovering around about mid 40s °C (mid 110s°F). Kyancutta on the Eyre Peninsula endured at least one day at 48 °C, with 46 and 47 being common in the hottest parts of the state. Melbourne, in neighbouring Victoria recorded 3 consecutive days over 43 °C (109 °F), and also recorded its highest ever temperature 8 days later in a secondary heatwave, with the mercury peaking at 46.4 °C (115.5 °F). During this heat wave Victoria suffered from large bushfires which claimed the lives of 173 people and destroyed more than 2,500 homes. There were also over half a million people without power as the heatwave blew transformers and the power grid was overloaded.
  • In August 2009, Argentina experienced a period of unusual and exceptionally hot weather during 24–30 August, during the Southern Hemisphere winter, just a month before Spring, when an unusual and unrecorded winter heat wave hit the country. A shot of tropical heat drawn unusually far southward hiked temperatures 22 degrees Celsius (40 degrees Fahrenheit) above normal in the city of Buenos Aires and across the northern-centre regions of the country. Several records were broken. Even though normal high temperatures for late August are in the lower 15 °C (59 °F), readings topped 30 °C (86 °F) degrees at midweek, then topped out above 32 °C (90 °F) degrees during the weekend. Temperatures hit 33.8 °C (92.8 °F) on 29 August and finally 34.6 °C (94.3 °F) on 30 August in Buenos Aires, making it the hottest day ever recorded in winter breaking the 1996 winter record of 33.7 °C (92.7 °F). In the city of Santa Fe, 38.3 °C (100.9 °F) degrees on 30 August was registered, notwithstanding the normal high in the upper 15 °C/60°Fs. As per the Meteorological Office of Argentina, August 2009 has been the warmest month during winter since official measurements began.

2010

  • The Northern Hemisphere summer heat wave of 2010 affected many areas across the Northern Hemisphere, especially parts of North-eastern China and European Russia.
  • Starting in May 2010, records were being set. On 26 May, at Mohenjo-Daro, Sindh province in Pakistan a national record high temperature of 53.5 °C (128.3 °F) occurred.
  • In June 2010, Eastern Europe experienced very warm conditions. Ruse, Bulgaria hit 36.6 °C (97.9 °F) on the 13th making it the warmest spot in Europe. Other records broken on the 13th include Vidin, Bulgaria at 35.8 °C (96.4 °F), Sandanski, Bulgaria hitting 35.5 °C (95.9 °F), Lovech and Pazardzhik, Bulgaria at 35.1 °C (95.2 °F) as well as the capital, Sofia, hitting 33.3 °C (91.9 °F). The heat came from the Sahara desert and was not associated with rain. This helped the situation with high water levels in that part of the continent. On the 14th, several cities were once again above the 35 °C (95 °F) mark even though they did not break records. The only cities in Bulgaria breaking records were Musala peak hitting 15.2 °C (59.4 °F) and Elhovo hitting 35.6 °C (96.1 °F). On the 15th, Ruse, Bulgaria peaked at 37.2 °C (99.0 °F). Although it was not a record, this was the highest temperature recorded in the country. Five Bulgarian cities broke records that day: Ahtopol hit 28.6 °C (83.5 °F), Dobrich was 33.8 °C (92.8 °F), Karnobat hit 34 °C (93 °F), Sliven hit 35 °C (95 °F) and Elhovo recorded 36.1 °C (97.0 °F).
  • From 4 to 9 July 2010, the majority of the American East Coast, from the Carolinas to Maine, was gripped in a severe heat wave. Philadelphia, New York, Baltimore, Washington, Raleigh, and even Boston eclipsed 100 °F (38 °C). Many records were broken, some of which dated back to the 19th century, including Wilmington, Delaware's temperature of 103 °F (39 °C) on Wednesday, 7 July, which broke the record of 97 °F (36 °C) from 1897. Philadelphia and New York eclipsed 100 °F (38 °C) for the first time since 2001. Frederick, Maryland, and Newark, New Jersey, among others topped the century mark (37.8 Celsius) for four days in a row.

2011

  • The 2011 North American heat wave brought record heat to the Midwestern United States, Eastern Canada, and much of the Eastern Seaboard.
  • A record-breaking heat wave hit Southwestern Asia in late July and early August 2011, with temperatures in Iraq exceeding 120 °F (49 °C), and an "asphalt-melting, earth-parching, brain-scrambling heat of midsummer" in Tbilisi, Georgia. The Iraqis were further challenged by pressure to fast during Ramadan, despite heat of 124 °F (51 °C) in Baghdad and 126 °F (52 °C) in Diwaniya on 4 August. The extreme heat inspired conspiracy theories of the government corruption in Iraq and retaliation from the United States government; and, in Georgia, the Apocalypse, mutant locusts caused by Chernobyl, snakes imported by unseen enemies, and sun spots.[31]
  • Most parts of the United Kingdom experienced an Indian summer between September and October 2011. The heat wave resulted in a new record high temperature for October at 30 °C (86 °F).

2012

  • In March 2012, the United Kingdom experienced a heat wave with temperature anomalies of +10 °C in many places.
  • In March 2012, the Midwest experienced one of the biggest heat waves of all time.
  • In late June 2012, much of North America began experiencing a heat wave, as heat spread east from the Rocky Mountains. During the heat wave, the June 2012 North American derecho (one within a series) caused violent storms that downed trees and power lines, leaving 3 million people in the eastern U. S. without power on 30 June. The heat lasted until Mid-August in some parts of the country.

2013

  • The Australian summer of 2012–2013, known as the Angry Summer or Extreme Summer, resulted in 123 weather records being broken over a 90-day period, including the hottest day ever recorded for Australia as a whole, the hottest January on record, the hottest summer average on record, and a record seven days in row when the whole continent averaged above 39 °C (102 °F). Single-day temperature record were broken in dozens of towns and cities, as well as single-day rainfall records, and several rivers flooded to new record highs. From 28 December 2012 through at least 9 January 2013 Australia has faced its most severe heatwave in over 80 years, with a large portion of the nation recording high temperature reading above 40 °C to 45 °C or greater in some areas, a couple of spots have also neared 50 °C (122 °F). This extreme heat has also resulted in a 'flash' drought across southern and central areas of the country and has sparked several massive wildfires due to periodic high winds.
  • In late June 2013, an intense heat wave struck the Southwestern United States. Various places in Southern California reached up to 122 °F (50 °C).[38]On 30 June, Death Valley, California hit 129.2 °F (54.0 °C) which is the hottest temperature ever recorded on Earth during the month of June. It was five degrees shy of the world record highest temperature measured in Death Valley, which was 134 °F (57 °C), recorded in July 1913.
  • Around Canada Day 2013, the same heatwave that hit the Southwestern United States moved north and hit southern British Columbia, Washington and Oregon. Temperatures in BC hit 40 °C (104 °F) in Lytton on 1 July 2013, and on 2 July 2013, the city of Penticton hit 38 °C (100 °F), with both Summerland and Osoyoos hitting the same. The Tri-Cities in Washington were among the hottest, with temperatures around 110 °F (43 °C)
  • In China from July to August 2013, the South continued to experience an unusually severe heat wave with exceptionally high temperatures. In multiple regions of Zhejiang, Chongqing, Shanghai, Hunan, and other areas the temperatures soared to over 40 degrees Celsius and lasted for a long time. Xinchang, Zhejiang endured extreme hot weather of 44.1 ℃, on 8 August Fenghua, Zhejiang reached a new all-time record high temperature of 43.5 ℃, Changsha, Hunan in July 2013 achieved a high temperature "Grand Slam", all 31 days in July set a new daily record high temperature of over 35 ℃. Hangzhou experienced 14 consecutive days over 40 ℃ while Xujiahui Station of Shanghai shattered 140 years of meteorological records to set a new all-time record high temperature of 40.8 ℃. Sustained high temperatures caused many people, especially the elderly to get heatstroke or sunstroke, seriously affecting millions of lives. Many areas throughout China endured record high temperatures resulting in multiple continuous meteorological department issued high-temperature orange or red alerts. 2013 saw a wide range of abnormally hot temperatures not seen for the past 60 years of national meteorological records dating back to 1951.
  • In July 2013, the United Kingdom experienced the warmest July since 2006.
  • The Argentina heatwave of 2013 was a historical phenomenon that occurred from 11 December 2013 to 2 January 2014 in the north and centre of the country, as well as in northern Patagonia . It was the longest heat wave experienced in Argentina since records began in 1906 affecting many cities throughout the country. For the first time since the creation of the heat alarm system, a red level alert was issued for several days consecutive for both the city of Buenos Aires and the city of Rosario, which are the cities for which the National Meteorological Service conducts heat waves. From 11 December began to register a marked increase in temperatures, especially the maximum in a vast area of the central and northern Patagonian region, affecting southern Córdoba, southern Santa Fe, southern Entre Ríos, much of the province of Buenos Aires, La Pampa, east of Mendoza, east of Neuquén and Río Negro. From day 19 this anomalous situation began to expand towards the north of Argentina and returned to intensify on the central part, arriving to affect to 18 provinces, yielding the same towards 30 December in the central part and between 1º and 2 January in the extreme north of the country with the passage of a cold front that produced a change of mass of air. The long persistence of this heat wave (22 days), made the event an exceptional one, breaking several brands in regard to more consecutive days with minimum and maximum temperatures above the average in several meteorological stations of the affected zone. The National Meteorological Service communicated, through its daily reports, reports on the development of the heat wave. The strongest point of heat was registered in the city of Chamical, province of La Rioja with 45.5 °C (113,9 °F) in the city of Santiago del Estero (provincial capital) was 45 °C (113 °F) and in Buenos Aires (national capital) was 39 °C (102,2 °F). The extensive heat wave severely affected the health of thousands of people who needed medical assistance during those days, it is believed that the historical heat wave caused hundreds of victims in different points of the centre and north of the country.

2015

  • Between April to May 2015, a heat wave occurred in India, killing more than 2200 people in that country's different geographical regions. Daytime temperatures hovered between 45 and 47 ℃ (113–116 °F) in parts of two states over the weekend, 3–7 ℃ (5–12 °F) above normal. Andhra Pradesh was hardest hit, with 1,636 people dying from the heat since mid-April, a government statement said. A further 561 people have died in neighbouring Telangana, said Sada Bhargavi, a state disaster management commissioner.
  • Starting 20–21 June 2015, a severe heat wave has killed more than 2500 people in Karachi, Pakistan.
  • Between 28 June – 3 July 2015, in The Northwest United States, and southern British Columbia, a heat wave
  • Between 30 June – 5 July 2015, a heat wave, brought upon by a Spanish plume, occurred in Western Europe, which pushed hot temperatures from Morocco to England. Temperatures in England reached 37 °C (99 °F), beating the previous July record from 2006 but the all-time record of 38.5 °C (101.3 °F) stayed unbeaten. Continuing:
  • From late June to mid-September 2015, unusual and prolonged heat waves occurred across Europe [de]. With temperatures above 40 °C (104 °F), new record temperatures have been measured since the start of weather recording in many locations. The Maghreb Mediterranean coast, south-western, central and south-eastern Europe experienced one of the biggest heat waves of recent decades.
  • In August 2015, a heat wave affected much of the Middle East causing almost a hundred deaths in Egypt. Temperatures reached above 50 C in Iraq and Qatar.

2016

  • During June 2016, record heat appeared in Arizona, southern Nevada, and southern California. Burbank, California reached 111 °F (44 °C), Phoenix, Arizona reached 118 °F (48 °C), Yuma, Arizona reached 120 °F (49 °C) and Tucson, Arizona reached 115 °F (46 °C), its warmest temperature in more than 20 years, on 19 June. Riverside, California reached 114 °F (46 °C), Palm Springs, California reached 122 °F (50 °C), Las Vegas, Nevada reached 115 °F (46 °C), Death Valley reached 126 °F (52 °C), Needles, California tied its all-time record high of 125 °F (52 °C) while Blythe, California set a new all-time record high of 124 °F (51 °C) on 20 June.
  • In July 2016, Mitribah, Kuwait reached 54 °C (129 °F) and Basra, Iraq reached 53.9 °C (129.0 °F). These are the highest temperatures ever recorded in the Eastern Hemisphere and on planet Earth outside of Death Valley.
  • During September 2016, the United Kingdom experienced its hottest September day since 1911 with temperatures as high as 34.4 °C (93.9 °F) on the 13th. However the all-time September record still stands at 35.6 °C (96.1 °F) from 1906.

2017

  • In February 2017, Australia experienced an extreme heat wave with temperatures as high as 46.6 °C (115.9 °F) in Port Macquarie, New South Wales and 47.6 °C (117.7 °F) in Ivanhoe, New South Wales.
  • In June 2017, more than 40 airline flights in the United States were grounded, with American Airlines reducing sales on certain flights to prevent the vehicles from being over the maximum weight permitted for safe take-off and Las Vegas tying its record high at 117 °F (47 °C).
  • In June 2017 again, a heatwave in Iran broke record high temperature. On 28 June 2017 city of Jask suffocated dew point of 33 °C (91.4 °F) degrees and this kind of dew point is rare. If it were 5 °C (9 °F) degrees higher human breath would condense the humidity in the air. But the highest temperature in Ahvaz soared to 54 °C (129.2 °F) degrees and the humidity creates a heat index of 61 °C (142 °F).
  • Also, on 21 June 2017, the United Kingdom experienced a rather brutal heat wave, where temperatures reached the hottest since 28 June 1976, hitting 34.5˚C at London Heathrow Airport.
  • In July 2017, most parts of China experienced a severe heat wave. Xi'an experienced the hottest July with the average high of 36.6 °C (97.9 °F). Additional record highs were set in Chongqing (42.0 °C (107.6 °F)), Xi'an (41.8 °C (107.2 °F)), Hangzhou (41.3 °C (106.3 °F)), Hefei (41.1 °C (106.0 °F)), Xujiahui Station of Shanghai (40.9 °C (105.6 °F)), Nanjing (40.0 °C (104.0 °F)), and Wuhan (39.7 °C (103.5 °F)). Xunyang, Shaanxi set a new record for southern China at 44.7 °C (112.5 °F). Erbaoxiang, Turpan set a new record for the whole of China at 50.5 °C (122.9 °F). The average temperature for China in July 2017 was 23.2 °C (73.8 °F), which was also a new record.
  • In September 2017 a heat wave affected a large portion of the Eastern United States; it is notable for producing unusually hot temperatures the latest in a calendar year in places. The heat wave also affected parts of Eastern Canada.

2018

  • In May and June 2018 a heat wave affected Pakistan and a significant portion of India. At least 65 people have died due to the heat as of 28 May. Temperatures have reached as high as 48 °C (118 °F) and are expected to stay between 40 °C (104 °F) and 44 °C (111 °F) for the foreseeable future. The health dangers to a large part of the population are exacerbated by the ongoing Ramadan fast.
  • 2018 British Isles heat wave. In April 2018, a heat wave affected the United Kingdom and Ireland. A brief cooling interlude in early May, and temperatures rose again to 25–30 °C (77–86 °F) for the rest of May and in to June. In July 2018, many areas of the UK saw temperatures exceed 30 degrees for over 15 days in a row, an other areas still affected by a heat wave. The hot weather continued into early August before temperatures returned closer to the average during the second half of the month
  • 2018 North American heat wave. The heat wave started in Mexico in late May 2018. By June 2018, the Mexican government issued a state of emergency to more than 300 municipalities. In early July 2018, the heat wave in Quebec, Canada caused about 74 deaths. In July, the heat wave in Southern California caused many power outages, where over 34,000 Los Angeles customers serviced by LADWP had no power for over one week. In south western states such as Arizona and Colorado were above 100 °F (38 °C).
  • 2018 Japan heat wave. In mid-July 2018, the heat wave in Japan arrived after a major flood. It caused over 22,000 hospitalization and 80 deaths.
  • 2018 European drought and heat waves. Much of Europe experienced above-average temperatures and drought, which resulted in wildfires in Sweden and wildfires in Greece.

2019

        Australian heatwave map 2019
        Australia's historic heatwave continues as temperatures stay above 40C 2018-2019

  • Australian heat wave
     
    • From December 25, 2018, Australia was faced with constant record-breaking heatwaves with few breaks. December 2018 was recorded as the hottest December on record, while New South Wales had their warmest January since 2011. Adelaide recorded its hottest day on record on January 24, surpassing the previous record from 1939, reaching 46.6 °C (115.9 °F) at 3:36pm local time, and many settlements across South Australia set new records the same day. At least one man, 90 feral horses and 2,000 bats died, while 25,000 homes lost power.
    • Melbourne was forecast to have its hottest day since the 2009 Black Saturday bushfires on January 25 (although this failed to eventuate), while over 200,000 homes across Victoria lost power due to load shedding. On January 25 Melbourne had its hottest day of either January or February: 109 F.
    • On January 25 the temperature of The Treasure Coast-West reached 113 °F (45.0 °C).
  • In late-May 2019, an unusually strong early-season heat wave affected the south-eastern United States, breaking all-time May record high temperatures in several cities. Many locations also broke the record for the earliest-in-season 100 °F (38 °C) temperature.
  • Also in late-May, an early-season heat wave affected parts of Japan. The town of Saroma in Hokkaido reached 39.5 °C (103.1 °F), the highest May temperature ever recorded anywhere in Japan.
  • The 2019 Indian heat wave reached a near record high temperature of 50.8 °C (123.44 °F) in Churu. The Indian media reported dozens of deaths due to the heat wave.
  • Starting from 25th June, very hot air masses from the Sahara desert moved over Europe, leading to heatwave alerts in several European countries, including France, Germany and the UK. The extent and intensity of this heatwave is unusual for this early in the summer season.

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Heatwaves Worldwide: Nothing New! How To Protect Your Self

Unless you have been living under a rock, you won’t have failed to notice that it’s rather hot outside. While many of us are basking in the glorious sunshine, it’s not great news for everyone. Authorities have urged children and older people to stay indoors and issued severe warnings against dehydration and heatstroke as an unprecedented week-long heatwave begins its advance across continental Europe. Meteorologists said temperatures would reach or even exceed 40C from Spain to Switzerland as hot air was sucked up from the Sahara by the combination of a storm stalling over the Atlantic and high pressure over central Europe. 'El inferno (hell) is coming,' High humidity meant it would feel like 47C, experts warned. 'El inferno (hell) is coming,' tweeted the TV meteorologist Silvia Laplana in Spain, where the AEMET weather service forecast temperatures of 42C by Thursday (27-06-2019) in the Ebro, Tagus, Guadiana and Guadalquivir valleys and warned of an ‘extreme risk’ of forest fires. In France, officials in Paris set up 'cool rooms' in municipal buildings, opened pools for late-night swimming and installed extra drinking fountains as temperatures in the capital reached 34C on Monday and were forecast to climb further later in the week. “I’m worried about people who are downplaying this, who are continuing to exercise as usual or stay out in the sun,” the health minister, Agnès Buzyn, said. “This affects all of us, nobody is a superman when it comes to dealing with the extreme heat we’re going to see on Thursday and Friday,” she told a press conference. Emmanuel Demaël of Météo-France said the heatwave was unprecedented “because it’s hitting so early in June – we haven’t seen this since 1947.” Record monthly and all-time highs were likely to be set in several parts of the country, Demaël predicted, and night-time temperatures were unlikely to fall below 20C. School exams were postponed until next week, charities distributed water to homeless people and sales of fans quadrupled. France’s deadliest recent heatwave was in August 2003, when almost 15,000 mainly elderly people died as hospitals were overwhelmed. In Italy, “the most intense heatwave in a decade” was under way, with hospitals preparing to deal with a wave of heat-related illnesses and the health ministry suggesting army doctors may be needed to counter a shortage of medics. Highs of 37C to 40C were forecast across the north and centre, including in Rome, Florence, Bologna, Milan and Turin, with several Italian cities expected to set new records for the highest ever June temperatures. Authorities in Rome warned of the health risk from uncollected rubbish piled up on the capital’s streets, and eight tourists – including a Briton – were fined €450 each on Sunday for cooling off in the city’s fountains. Sabine Krüger of the German state meteorological service, DWD, said the June record of 38.2C, set in Frankfurt in 1947, was likely to be beaten by the middle or end of this week, with 100 hours of sunshine forecast before Friday, temperatures in Frankfurt set to reach 39C or even 40C by Wednesday and Berlin predicted to swelter in 37C. DWD on Monday warned citizens to take extra precaution in view of the extreme heat and high UV radiation over the coming days: “Avoid staying outdoors for long periods between 11am and 3pm,” it said, adding that sunblock, sunglasses and a sun hat were advisable even in the shade. Animal protection groups also warned pet owners to avoid leaving dogs or cats in cars unattended. The heatwave comes after storms and record rainfall caused major problems in parts of Bavaria this weekend, with the Munich fire brigade called out 50 times and flights into and out of Munich airport suspended on Saturday evening. In Switzerland, MeteoSwiss issued a “severe danger” level four heat alert for several parts of the country, warning of temperatures in excess of 33C and reaching 37C or even 39C in some places from Tuesday until Thursday. A number of all-time highs were likely to be recorded, it said. Even Scandinavia looks unlikely to be spared, with parts of southern Denmark and Sweden predicted to reach 30C by Tuesday – and to feel more like a thoroughly un-Scandinavian 35C, the Danish broadcaster TV2 said. Longer range weather forecasts show summer temperatures throughout July and August are expected to be higher than normal this year, rivalling those of 2018, which according to the European Environment Agency was one of the three warmest years on record on the continent. Scientists have said last year’s heatwave, which led to increased mortality rates, a dramatic decline in crop yields, the shutdown of nuclear power plants and wildfires inside the Arctic Circle, was linked to the climate emergency. Meteorologists warn that such heatwaves are likely to become more frequent even if countries succeed in their commitments to limit global temperature increases to 1.5C as part of the 2015 Paris climate accord. The EU has pledged to cut carbon emissions to 40% below 1990 levels by 2030. Photo by:  Aldric RIVAT  Unsplash How to cope with the hot weather  For millions more it means a daily struggle in the rising temperatures, which are expected to peak at 37C-40C. There are some steps, however, that you can take to make life a little more bearable. The main problems likely to occur in the hot weather are dehydration, heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Overheating could also be an issue for people who already have problems with their heart or breathing. The health service says that the very young and very old are the most vulnerable plus people with mobility problems, mental health issues, people who misuse drugs or alcohol and people on medication that affect body temperature. Even those who are physically active are also at risk of some problems, such as people who do sports or manual work. The elderly and people with lung or heart problems have been advised to reduce strenuous exercise and physical exertion. However, there are things that you can do to try to help yourself during the hot spell. Avoid the heat by not going out between 11am and 3pm, which is the hottest part of the day Keep rooms cool by using shutting the windows and pulling down the shades if the temperatures are hotter outdoors than inside Shut windows and pull down the shades when it is hotter outside You can open the windows for ventilation when it is cooler Avoid the heat: stay out of the sun and don’t go out between 11am and 3pm (the hottest part of the day) if you’re vulnerable to the effects of heat Keep rooms cool by using shades or reflective material outside the windows. If this isn’t possible, use light-coloured curtains and keep them closed (metallic blinds and dark curtains can make the room hotter). Have cool baths or showers, and splash yourself with cool water Drink cold drinks regularly, such as water and diluted fruit juice Eat small meals and eat more often Avoid excess alcohol, caffeine (tea, coffee and cola) or drinks high in sugar Listen to alerts on the radio, TV and social media about keeping cool. Plan ahead to make sure you have enough supplies, such as food, water and any medications you need Identify the coolest room in the house so you know where to go to keep cool Wear loose, cool clothing, and a hat and sunglasses if you go outdoors Check up on friends, relatives and neighbours who may be less able to look after themselves Never leave children or pets alone in enclosed vehicles Check on your animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat.       And remember, even if you are fine others around you might not be so check up on friends, relatives and neighbours who might be less able to look after themselves! Recognize a heatstroke Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat injury and is considered a medical emergency. If you suspect that someone has heat stroke - also known as sunstroke - call emergency immediately and give first aid until paramedics arrive. Heat stroke can kill or cause damage to the brain and other internal organs. Although heat stroke mainly affects people over age 50, it also takes a toll on healthy young athletes Heat stroke often occurs as a progression from milder heat-related illnesses such as heat cramps, heat syncope (fainting), and heat exhaustion. But it can strike even if you have no previous signs of heat injury Heat stroke results from prolonged exposure to high temperatures -- usually in combination with dehydration -- which leads to failure of the body's temperature control system. The medical definition of heat stroke is a core body temperature greater than 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40C), with complications involving the central nervous system that occur after exposure to high temperatures Other common symptoms include nausea, seizures, confusion, disorientation, and sometimes loss of consciousness or coma Symptoms of Heat Stroke The hallmark symptom of heat stroke is a core body temperature above 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40C). But fainting may be the first sign Throbbing headache Dizziness and light-headedness Lack of sweating despite the heat Red, hot, and dry skin Muscle weakness or cramps Nausea and vomiting Rapid heartbeat, which may be either strong or weak Rapid, shallow breathing Behavioral changes such as confusion, disorientation, or staggering Seizures Unconsciousness Treatment Heatstroke treatment centres on cooling your body to a normal temperature to prevent or reduce damage to your brain and vital organs. To do this, your doctor may take these steps: Immerse you in cold water. A bath of cold or ice water has been proved to be the most effective way of quickly lowering your core body temperature. The quicker you can receive cold water immersion, the less risk of death and organ damage Use evaporation cooling techniques. If cold water immersion is unavailable, health care workers may try to lower your body temperature using an evaporation method. Cool water is misted on your body while warm air is fanned over you, causing the water to evaporate and cool your skin Pack you with ice and cooling blankets. Another method is to wrap you in a special cooling blanket and apply ice packs to your groin, neck, back and armpits to lower your temperature Give you medications to stop your shivering. If treatments to lower your body temperature make you shiver, your doctor may give you a muscle relaxant, such as a benzodiazepine. Shivering increases your body temperature, making treatment less effective Heat waves in the past and recently Before 1901 July 1757 heatwave, Europe, hottest summer in 500 years prior to 2003. 1896 Eastern North America heat wave killed 1,500 people in August 1896. 1900 – The historical heatwave of the centre of Argentina between the first eight days of February 1900 known as ‘the week of fire’ affects the city of Buenos Aires and Rosario with temperatures of up to 37 °C (98.6 °F) but with a very high index of humidity that elevates the sensation of heat to 49 °C (120.2 °F) severely affecting the health of people causing at least more than 478 fatalities. 20th century 1901 – The 1901 eastern United States heat wave killed 9,500 in the Eastern United States. 1906 – During the 1906 United Kingdom heat wave which began in August and lasted into September broke numerous records. On the 2nd temperatures reached 36 °C (96 °F) which still holds the September record however some places beat their local record during September 1911 and September 2016. 1911 – The 1911 United Kingdom heat wave was one of the most severe periods of heat to hit the country with temperatures around 36 °C (97 °F). The heat began in early July and didn't let up until mid-September where even in September temperatures were still up to 33 °C (92 °F). It took 79 years for temperature higher to be recorded in the United Kingdom during 1990 United Kingdom heat wave. 1911 - The 1911 Eastern North America heat wave killed between 380 to 2,000 people. 1913 – In July, a heat wave struck California. During this heat wave, Death Valley recorded a record high temperature of 134 °F (56.7 °C) at Furnace Creek, which still remains the highest ambient air temperature recorded on Earth. 1923–1924 – During a period of 160 such days from 31 October 1923 to 7 April 1924, the Western Australian town of Marble Bar reached 100 °F (38 °C). 1936 – The 1936 North American heat wave during the  Dust Bowl , followed one of the coldest winters on record the 1936 North American cold wave. Massive heat waves across North America were persistent in the 1930s, many mid-Atlantic/Ohio valley states recorded their highest temperatures during July 1934.                   Dust Bowl. Dallas, South Dakota 1936. Wikimedia The longest continuous string of 100 °F (38 °C) or higher temperatures was reached for 101 days in Yuma, Arizona during 1937 and the highest temperatures ever reached in Canada were recorded in two locations in Saskatchewan in July 1937. 1950s – A prolonged severe drought and heat wave occurred in the early 1950s throughout the central and southern United States. In some areas it was drier than during the Dust Bowl and the heat wave in most areas was within the top five on record. The heat was particularly severe in 1954 with 22 days of temperatures exceeding 100 °F (38 °C) covering significant parts of eleven states. On 14 July, the thermometer reached 117 °F (47 °C) at East St. Louis, Illinois, which remains the record highest temperature for that state. 1955 – The 1955 United Kingdom heat wave was a period of hot weather that was accompanied by drought. In some places it was the worst drought on record, more severe than 1976 and 1995. 1960 – On January 2, Oodnadatta, South Australia hit 50.7 °C (123.3 °F) degrees, the highest temperature ever recorded in the Southern Hemisphere and Oceania. 1972 – The heat waves of 1972 in New York and North-eastern United States were significant. Almost 900 people perished; the heat conditions lasted almost 16 days, aggravated by very high humidity levels. 1976 – The 1976 United Kingdom heat wave was one of the hottest in living memory and was marked by constant blue skies from May until September when dramatic thunderstorms signalled the heat wave's end. 1980 – An estimated 1,000 people perished in the 1980 United States heat wave and drought, which impacted the central and eastern United States. Temperatures were highest in the southern plains. From June through September, temperatures remained above 90 °F (32 °C) all but two days in Kansas City, Missouri. The Dallas/Fort Worth area experienced 42 consecutive days with high temperatures above 100 °F (38 °C), with temperatures reaching 117 °F (47 °C) at Wichita Falls, Texas on 28 June. Economic losses were $20 billion (1980 dollars). 1983 – During the Summer of 1983 temperatures over 100 °F (38 °C) were common across Iowa, Missouri, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Indiana, Ohio, Minnesota, Nebraska, and certain parts of Kentucky; the summer of 1983 remains one of the hottest summers ever recorded in many of the states affected. The hundred-degree readings were accompanied by very dry conditions associated with drought affecting the Corn Belt States and Upper Midwest. The heat also affected the South-eastern U.S. and the Mid-Atlantic states as well that same summer. New York Times represented articles about the heat waves of 1983 affecting the central United States. This heat wave was associated with the I-94 Deroche. 1983 – The United Kingdom experienced a heatwave during July 1983. This was the hottest month ever recorded until it was beaten in 2006. The heatwave is remembered, not for its extreme heat but the relentless heat with temperatures around 32 °C (90 °F) every day. Temperature maxima for the month were high but not especially so. 1987 – prolonged heat wave from 20 to 31 July in Greece, with more than 1,000 deaths in the area of Athens. The maximum temperature measured was 41.6 °C at 23 July at the centre of Athens and in the suburb of Nea Philadelphia, 8 km northeast was 43.6 °C at 27 July, and were combined with high minima, with the highest being 30.2 °C in the centre of Athens at 27 July and 29.9 °C at 24 July at Nea Philadelfia. The lowest minimum was 25.6 °C at the centre of Athens. Moreover, humidity was high and wind speeds low, contributing to human discomfort, even during the night. 1988 - intense heat spells in combination with the drought of 1988, reminiscent of the dust bowl years caused deadly results across the United States. Some 5,000 to 10,000 people perished because of constant heat across the United States although-according to many estimates-total death reports run as high as next to 17,000 deaths. 1990 – Cities across the United Kingdom broke their all-time temperature records in the dramatic 1990 United Kingdom heat wave temperatures peaked at 37 °C (99 °F). This led to one of the hottest Augusts on record, records going back to 1659. 1995 – The 1995 Chicago heat wave produced record high dew point levels and heat indices in the Chicago area and Wisconsin. The lack of emergency cooling facilities and inadequate response from civic authorities to the senior population, particularly in lower income neighborhoods in Chicago and other Midwestern cities, lead to many hundreds of deaths. A series of damaging derechos (long-lived, straight-line wind storm that is associated with a fast-moving group of severe thunderstorms) (long-lived, straight-line wind storm that is associated with a fast-moving group of severe thunderstorms) occurred on the periphery of the hot air dome. 1995 – The United Kingdom experienced its 3rd hottest summer since 1659. August was the hottest on record since 1659. The summer was also the driest on record since 1766. Temperatures peaked at 35 °C (95 °F) on 1 August, which did not break the all-time record. 1997 – The United Kingdom experienced its 3rd major heatwave in 7 years with August 1997 being one of the hottest on record. 1999 – a heat wave and drought in the eastern United States during the summer of 1999. Rainfall shortages resulted in worst drought on record for Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, and Rhode Island. The state of West Virginia was declared a disaster area. 3,810,000 acres (15,400 km 2 ) were consumed by fire as of mid-August. Record heat throughout the country resulted in 502 deaths nationwide. There were many deaths in urban centres of the Midwest. 2000 – in late Summer 2000, a heat wave occurred in the southern United States, breaking many cities' all-time maximum temperature records. 21st century 2001–2009 In early August 2001 an intense heatwave hit the eastern seaboard of the United States and neighbouring south-eastern Canada. For over a week, temperatures climbed above 35 °C (95 °F) combined with stifling high humidity. Newark, New Jersey tied its all-time record high temperature of 41 °C (106 °F) with a heat index of over 50 °C (122 °F). In April 2002 a summer-like heat wave in spring affected much of the Eastern United States. During April 2003 there was a summer-like heatwave that affected the United Kingdom however mainly England and Wales where temperature records were broken. The all-time record still stands however temperatures reached around 80 °F (27 °C) The European heat wave of 2003 affected much of western Europe, breaking temperature records. Much of the heat was concentrated in France, England and Spain where nearly 15,000 people died. In Portugal, the temperatures reached as high as 47 °C (117 °F) in the south. The European heat wave of 2006 was the second massive heat wave to hit the continent in four years, with temperatures rising to 40 °C (104 °F) in Paris; in Ireland, which has a moderate maritime climate, temperatures of over 32 °C (90 °F) were reported. Temperatures of 35 °C (95 °F) were reached in the Benelux and Germany (in some areas 38 °C (100 °F)), while Great Britain recorded 37 °C (99 °F). Many heat records were broken (including the hottest ever July temperature in Great Britain) and many people who experienced the heat waves of 1976 and 2003 drew comparisons with them. Highest average July temperatures were recorded at many locations in Great Britain, Netherlands, Denmark, Sweden and Germany. The 2006 North American heat wave affected a wide area of the United States and parts of neighbouring Canada during July and August 2006. Over 220 deaths were reported. Temperatures in some parts of South Dakota exceeded 115 °F (46 °C). Also, California experienced temperatures that were extraordinarily high, with records ranging from 100 to 130 °F (38 to 54 °C). On 22 July, the County of Los Angeles recorded its highest temperature ever at 119 °F (48 °C). Humidity levels in California were also unusually high, although low compared with normal gulf coast/eastern seaboard summer humidity they were significant enough to cause widespread discomfort. Additionally, the heat wave was associated a series of derechos (long-lived, straight-line wind storm that is associated with a fast-moving group of severe thunderstorms) (long-lived, straight-line wind storm that is associated with a fast-moving group of severe thunderstorms) that produced widespread damage. The European heat wave of 2007 affected primarily south-eastern Europe during late June through August. Bulgaria experienced its hottest year on record, with previously unrecorded temperatures above 45 °C (113 °F). The 2007 Greek forest fires were associated with the heat wave. During the 2007 Asian heat wave, the Indian city of Datia experienced temperatures of 48 °C (118 °F). In January 2008, Alice Springs in Australia's Northern Territory recorded ten consecutive days of temperatures above 40 °C (104 °F) with the average temperature for that month being 39.8 °C (103.6 °F). In March 2008, Adelaide, South Australia experienced maximum temperatures of above 35 °C (95 °F) for fifteen consecutive days, seven days more than the previous longest stretch of 35 °C (95 °F) days. The March 2008 heat wave also included eleven consecutive days above 38 °C (100 °F). The heat wave was especially notable because it occurred in March, an autumn month, in which Adelaide averages only 2.3 days above 35 °C (95 °F). The eastern United States experienced an early Summer heat wave from 6–10 June 2008 with record temperatures. There was a heat wave in Southern California beginning late June, which contributed to widespread fires. On 6 July, a renewed heat wave was forecast, which was expected to affect the entire state. In early 2009, Adelaide, South Australia was hit by a heat wave with temperatures reaching 40+ °C for six days in a row, while many rural areas experienced temperatures hovering around about mid 40s °C (mid 110s°F). Kyancutta on the Eyre Peninsula endured at least one day at 48 °C, with 46 and 47 being common in the hottest parts of the state. Melbourne, in neighbouring Victoria recorded 3 consecutive days over 43 °C (109 °F), and also recorded its highest ever temperature 8 days later in a secondary heatwave, with the mercury peaking at 46.4 °C (115.5 °F). During this heat wave Victoria suffered from large bushfires which claimed the lives of 173 people and destroyed more than 2,500 homes. There were also over half a million people without power as the heatwave blew transformers and the power grid was overloaded. In August 2009, Argentina experienced a period of unusual and exceptionally hot weather during 24–30 August, during the Southern Hemisphere winter, just a month before Spring, when an unusual and unrecorded winter heat wave hit the country. A shot of tropical heat drawn unusually far southward hiked temperatures 22 degrees Celsius (40 degrees Fahrenheit) above normal in the city of Buenos Aires and across the northern-centre regions of the country. Several records were broken. Even though normal high temperatures for late August are in the lower 15 °C (59 °F), readings topped 30 °C (86 °F) degrees at midweek, then topped out above 32 °C (90 °F) degrees during the weekend. Temperatures hit 33.8 °C (92.8 °F) on 29 August and finally 34.6 °C (94.3 °F) on 30 August in Buenos Aires, making it the hottest day ever recorded in winter breaking the 1996 winter record of 33.7 °C (92.7 °F). In the city of Santa Fe, 38.3 °C (100.9 °F) degrees on 30 August was registered, notwithstanding the normal high in the upper 15 °C/60°Fs. As per the Meteorological Office of Argentina, August 2009 has been the warmest month during winter since official measurements began. 2010 The Northern Hemisphere summer heat wave of 2010 affected many areas across the Northern Hemisphere, especially parts of North-eastern China and European Russia. Starting in May 2010, records were being set. On 26 May, at Mohenjo-Daro, Sindh province in Pakistan a national record high temperature of 53.5 °C (128.3 °F) occurred. In June 2010, Eastern Europe experienced very warm conditions. Ruse, Bulgaria hit 36.6 °C (97.9 °F) on the 13th making it the warmest spot in Europe. Other records broken on the 13th include Vidin, Bulgaria at 35.8 °C (96.4 °F), Sandanski, Bulgaria hitting 35.5 °C (95.9 °F), Lovech and Pazardzhik, Bulgaria at 35.1 °C (95.2 °F) as well as the capital, Sofia, hitting 33.3 °C (91.9 °F). The heat came from the Sahara desert and was not associated with rain. This helped the situation with high water levels in that part of the continent. On the 14th, several cities were once again above the 35 °C (95 °F) mark even though they did not break records. The only cities in Bulgaria breaking records were Musala peak hitting 15.2 °C (59.4 °F) and Elhovo hitting 35.6 °C (96.1 °F). On the 15th, Ruse, Bulgaria peaked at 37.2 °C (99.0 °F). Although it was not a record, this was the highest temperature recorded in the country. Five Bulgarian cities broke records that day: Ahtopol hit 28.6 °C (83.5 °F), Dobrich was 33.8 °C (92.8 °F), Karnobat hit 34 °C (93 °F), Sliven hit 35 °C (95 °F) and Elhovo recorded 36.1 °C (97.0 °F). From 4 to 9 July 2010, the majority of the American East Coast, from the Carolinas to Maine, was gripped in a severe heat wave. Philadelphia, New York, Baltimore, Washington, Raleigh, and even Boston eclipsed 100 °F (38 °C). Many records were broken, some of which dated back to the 19th century, including Wilmington, Delaware's temperature of 103 °F (39 °C) on Wednesday, 7 July, which broke the record of 97 °F (36 °C) from 1897. Philadelphia and New York eclipsed 100 °F (38 °C) for the first time since 2001. Frederick, Maryland, and Newark, New Jersey, among others topped the century mark (37.8 Celsius) for four days in a row. 2011 The 2011 North American heat wave brought record heat to the Midwestern United States, Eastern Canada, and much of the Eastern Seaboard. A record-breaking heat wave hit Southwestern Asia in late July and early August 2011, with temperatures in Iraq exceeding 120 °F (49 °C), and an "asphalt-melting, earth-parching, brain-scrambling heat of midsummer" in Tbilisi, Georgia. The Iraqis were further challenged by pressure to fast during Ramadan, despite heat of 124 °F (51 °C) in Baghdad and 126 °F (52 °C) in Diwaniya on 4 August. The extreme heat inspired conspiracy theories of the government corruption in Iraq and retaliation from the United States government; and, in Georgia, the Apocalypse, mutant locusts caused by Chernobyl, snakes imported by unseen enemies, and sun spots. [31] Most parts of the United Kingdom experienced an Indian summer between September and October 2011. The heat wave resulted in a new record high temperature for October at 30 °C (86 °F). 2012 In March 2012, the United Kingdom experienced a heat wave with temperature anomalies of +10 °C in many places. In March 2012, the Midwest experienced one of the biggest heat waves of all time. In late June 2012, much of North America began experiencing a heat wave, as heat spread east from the Rocky Mountains. During the heat wave, the June 2012 North American derecho (one within a series) caused violent storms that downed trees and power lines, leaving 3 million people in the eastern U. S. without power on 30 June. The heat lasted until Mid-August in some parts of the country. 2013 The Australian summer of 2012–2013, known as the Angry Summer or Extreme Summer, resulted in 123 weather records being broken over a 90-day period, including the hottest day ever recorded for Australia as a whole, the hottest January on record, the hottest summer average on record, and a record seven days in row when the whole continent averaged above 39 °C (102 °F). Single-day temperature record were broken in dozens of towns and cities, as well as single-day rainfall records, and several rivers flooded to new record highs. From 28 December 2012 through at least 9 January 2013 Australia has faced its most severe heatwave in over 80 years, with a large portion of the nation recording high temperature reading above 40 °C to 45 °C or greater in some areas, a couple of spots have also neared 50 °C (122 °F). This extreme heat has also resulted in a 'flash' drought across southern and central areas of the country and has sparked several massive wildfires due to periodic high winds. In late June 2013, an intense heat wave struck the Southwestern United States. Various places in Southern California reached up to 122 °F (50 °C). [38] On 30 June, Death Valley, California hit 129.2 °F (54.0 °C) which is the hottest temperature ever recorded on Earth during the month of June. It was five degrees shy of the world record highest temperature measured in Death Valley, which was 134 °F (57 °C), recorded in July 1913. Around Canada Day 2013, the same heatwave that hit the Southwestern United States moved north and hit southern British Columbia, Washington and Oregon. Temperatures in BC hit 40 °C (104 °F) in Lytton on 1 July 2013, and on 2 July 2013, the city of Penticton hit 38 °C (100 °F), with both Summerland and Osoyoos hitting the same. The Tri-Cities in Washington were among the hottest, with temperatures around 110 °F (43 °C) In China from July to August 2013, the South continued to experience an unusually severe heat wave with exceptionally high temperatures. In multiple regions of Zhejiang, Chongqing, Shanghai, Hunan, and other areas the temperatures soared to over 40 degrees Celsius and lasted for a long time. Xinchang, Zhejiang endured extreme hot weather of 44.1 ℃, on 8 August Fenghua, Zhejiang reached a new all-time record high temperature of 43.5 ℃, Changsha, Hunan in July 2013 achieved a high temperature "Grand Slam", all 31 days in July set a new daily record high temperature of over 35 ℃. Hangzhou experienced 14 consecutive days over 40 ℃ while Xujiahui Station of Shanghai shattered 140 years of meteorological records to set a new all-time record high temperature of 40.8 ℃. Sustained high temperatures caused many people, especially the elderly to get heatstroke or sunstroke, seriously affecting millions of lives. Many areas throughout China endured record high temperatures resulting in multiple continuous meteorological department issued high-temperature orange or red alerts. 2013 saw a wide range of abnormally hot temperatures not seen for the past 60 years of national meteorological records dating back to 1951. In July 2013, the United Kingdom experienced the warmest July since 2006. The Argentina heatwave of 2013 was a historical phenomenon that occurred from 11 December 2013 to 2 January 2014 in the north and centre of the country, as well as in northern Patagonia . It was the longest heat wave experienced in Argentina since records began in 1906 affecting many cities throughout the country. For the first time since the creation of the heat alarm system, a red level alert was issued for several days consecutive for both the city of Buenos Aires and the city of Rosario, which are the cities for which the National Meteorological Service conducts heat waves. From 11 December began to register a marked increase in temperatures, especially the maximum in a vast area of the central and northern Patagonian region, affecting southern Córdoba, southern Santa Fe, southern Entre Ríos, much of the province of Buenos Aires, La Pampa, east of Mendoza, east of Neuquén and Río Negro. From day 19 this anomalous situation began to expand towards the north of Argentina and returned to intensify on the central part, arriving to affect to 18 provinces, yielding the same towards 30 December in the central part and between 1º and 2 January in the extreme north of the country with the passage of a cold front that produced a change of mass of air. The long persistence of this heat wave (22 days), made the event an exceptional one, breaking several brands in regard to more consecutive days with minimum and maximum temperatures above the average in several meteorological stations of the affected zone. The National Meteorological Service communicated, through its daily reports, reports on the development of the heat wave. The strongest point of heat was registered in the city of Chamical, province of La Rioja with 45.5 °C (113,9 °F) in the city of Santiago del Estero (provincial capital) was 45 °C (113 °F) and in Buenos Aires (national capital) was 39 °C (102,2 °F). The extensive heat wave severely affected the health of thousands of people who needed medical assistance during those days, it is believed that the historical heat wave caused hundreds of victims in different points of the centre and north of the country. 2015 Between April to May 2015, a heat wave occurred in India, killing more than 2200 people in that country's different geographical regions. Daytime temperatures hovered between 45 and 47 ℃ (113–116 °F) in parts of two states over the weekend, 3–7 ℃ (5–12 °F) above normal. Andhra Pradesh was hardest hit, with 1,636 people dying from the heat since mid-April, a government statement said. A further 561 people have died in neighbouring Telangana, said Sada Bhargavi, a state disaster management commissioner. Starting 20–21 June 2015, a severe heat wave has killed more than 2500 people in Karachi, Pakistan. Between 28 June – 3 July 2015, in The Northwest United States, and southern British Columbia, a heat wave Between 30 June – 5 July 2015, a heat wave, brought upon by a Spanish plume, occurred in Western Europe, which pushed hot temperatures from Morocco to England. Temperatures in England reached 37 °C (99 °F), beating the previous July record from 2006 but the all-time record of 38.5 °C (101.3 °F) stayed unbeaten. Continuing: From late June to mid-September 2015, unusual and prolonged heat waves occurred across Europe [de]. With temperatures above 40 °C (104 °F), new record temperatures have been measured since the start of weather recording in many locations. The Maghreb Mediterranean coast, south-western, central and south-eastern Europe experienced one of the biggest heat waves of recent decades. In August 2015, a heat wave affected much of the Middle East causing almost a hundred deaths in Egypt. Temperatures reached above 50 C in Iraq and Qatar. 2016 During June 2016, record heat appeared in Arizona, southern Nevada, and southern California. Burbank, California reached 111 °F (44 °C), Phoenix, Arizona reached 118 °F (48 °C), Yuma, Arizona reached 120 °F (49 °C) and Tucson, Arizona reached 115 °F (46 °C), its warmest temperature in more than 20 years, on 19 June. Riverside, California reached 114 °F (46 °C), Palm Springs, California reached 122 °F (50 °C), Las Vegas, Nevada reached 115 °F (46 °C), Death Valley reached 126 °F (52 °C), Needles, California tied its all-time record high of 125 °F (52 °C) while Blythe, California set a new all-time record high of 124 °F (51 °C) on 20 June. In July 2016, Mitribah, Kuwait reached 54 °C (129 °F) and Basra, Iraq reached 53.9 °C (129.0 °F). These are the highest temperatures ever recorded in the Eastern Hemisphere and on planet Earth outside of Death Valley. During September 2016, the United Kingdom experienced its hottest September day since 1911 with temperatures as high as 34.4 °C (93.9 °F) on the 13th. However the all-time September record still stands at 35.6 °C (96.1 °F) from 1906. 2017 In February 2017, Australia experienced an extreme heat wave with temperatures as high as 46.6 °C (115.9 °F) in Port Macquarie, New South Wales and 47.6 °C (117.7 °F) in Ivanhoe, New South Wales. In June 2017, more than 40 airline flights in the United States were grounded, with American Airlines reducing sales on certain flights to prevent the vehicles from being over the maximum weight permitted for safe take-off and Las Vegas tying its record high at 117 °F (47 °C). In June 2017 again, a heatwave in Iran broke record high temperature. On 28 June 2017 city of Jask suffocated dew point of 33 °C (91.4 °F) degrees and this kind of dew point is rare. If it were 5 °C (9 °F) degrees higher human breath would condense the humidity in the air. But the highest temperature in Ahvaz soared to 54 °C (129.2 °F) degrees and the humidity creates a heat index of 61 °C (142 °F). Also, on 21 June 2017, the United Kingdom experienced a rather brutal heat wave, where temperatures reached the hottest since 28 June 1976, hitting 34.5˚C at London Heathrow Airport. In July 2017, most parts of China experienced a severe heat wave. Xi'an experienced the hottest July with the average high of 36.6 °C (97.9 °F). Additional record highs were set in Chongqing (42.0 °C (107.6 °F)), Xi'an (41.8 °C (107.2 °F)), Hangzhou (41.3 °C (106.3 °F)), Hefei (41.1 °C (106.0 °F)), Xujiahui Station of Shanghai (40.9 °C (105.6 °F)), Nanjing (40.0 °C (104.0 °F)), and Wuhan (39.7 °C (103.5 °F)). Xunyang, Shaanxi set a new record for southern China at 44.7 °C (112.5 °F). Erbaoxiang, Turpan set a new record for the whole of China at 50.5 °C (122.9 °F). The average temperature for China in July 2017 was 23.2 °C (73.8 °F), which was also a new record. In September 2017 a heat wave affected a large portion of the Eastern United States; it is notable for producing unusually hot temperatures the latest in a calendar year in places. The heat wave also affected parts of Eastern Canada. 2018 In May and June 2018 a heat wave affected Pakistan and a significant portion of India. At least 65 people have died due to the heat as of 28 May. Temperatures have reached as high as 48 °C (118 °F) and are expected to stay between 40 °C (104 °F) and 44 °C (111 °F) for the foreseeable future. The health dangers to a large part of the population are exacerbated by the ongoing Ramadan fast. 2018 British Isles heat wave. In April 2018, a heat wave affected the United Kingdom and Ireland. A brief cooling interlude in early May, and temperatures rose again to 25–30 °C (77–86 °F) for the rest of May and in to June. In July 2018, many areas of the UK saw temperatures exceed 30 degrees for over 15 days in a row, an other areas still affected by a heat wave. The hot weather continued into early August before temperatures returned closer to the average during the second half of the month 2018 North American heat wave. The heat wave started in Mexico in late May 2018. By June 2018, the Mexican government issued a state of emergency to more than 300 municipalities. In early July 2018, the heat wave in Quebec, Canada caused about 74 deaths. In July, the heat wave in Southern California caused many power outages, where over 34,000 Los Angeles customers serviced by LADWP had no power for over one week. In south western states such as Arizona and Colorado were above 100 °F (38 °C). 2018 Japan heat wave. In mid-July 2018, the heat wave in Japan arrived after a major flood. It caused over 22,000 hospitalization and 80 deaths. 2018 European drought and heat waves. Much of Europe experienced above-average temperatures and drought, which resulted in wildfires in Sweden and wildfires in Greece. 2019                   Australia's historic heatwave continues as temperatures stay above 40C 2018-2019 Australian heat wave   From December 25, 2018, Australia was faced with constant record-breaking heatwaves with few breaks. December 2018 was recorded as the hottest December on record, while New South Wales had their warmest January since 2011. Adelaide recorded its hottest day on record on January 24, surpassing the previous record from 1939, reaching 46.6 °C (115.9 °F) at 3:36pm local time, and many settlements across South Australia set new records the same day. At least one man, 90 feral horses and 2,000 bats died, while 25,000 homes lost power. Melbourne was forecast to have its hottest day since the 2009 Black Saturday bushfires on January 25 (although this failed to eventuate), while over 200,000 homes across Victoria lost power due to load shedding. On January 25 Melbourne had its hottest day of either January or February: 109 F. On January 25 the temperature of The Treasure Coast-West reached 113 °F (45.0 °C). In late-May 2019, an unusually strong early-season heat wave affected the south-eastern United States, breaking all-time May record high temperatures in several cities. Many locations also broke the record for the earliest-in-season 100 °F (38 °C) temperature. Also in late-May, an early-season heat wave affected parts of Japan. The town of Saroma in Hokkaido reached 39.5 °C (103.1 °F), the highest May temperature ever recorded anywhere in Japan. The 2019 Indian heat wave reached a near record high temperature of 50.8 °C (123.44 °F) in Churu. The Indian media reported dozens of deaths due to the heat wave. Starting from 25th June, very hot air masses from the Sahara desert moved over Europe, leading to heatwave alerts in several European countries, including France, Germany and the UK. The extent and intensity of this heatwave is unusual for this early in the summer season. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate