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Community gardening decreases stress and is a nice way to improve life | Newsletter Society

Gardening decreases stress and is a nice way to improve life

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by: Sharai Hoeksma
gardening decreases stress and is a nice way to improve life | Newsletter

Those of us who are blessed with green fingers will be quick to roll their eyes and mumble ‘tell me something that I don’t know yet’. But it is still worth pointing out: gardening is not just fun, it is also very good for your health. A fact that is often forgotten in modern times, where we are so consumed by the artificial light from our various screens that we forego stepping outside to enjoy the actual sunlight.

Gardening, a great outdoor activity

Some alarming statistics have shown that we, those living in the developed Western nations, spend a staggering 90% of our time indoors - mostly in a seated of reclining manner, consumed by unhealthy habits and always ‘plugged in’. Not surprisingly, this has led to a wave of obesity and a worrying increase in medical costs associated with this unhealthy lifestyle.
And while most of us are painfully aware of our lack of (outdoor) activity, indicating that we would really want our children to spent more time outdoors, very few of us are making an effort to do so. A shame, because there is so much to do once you get off your couch and open yourself up to the beauty of the world around us. Plus, your kids will be happier and learn more about nature, generally being more open to positive social interaction.

If this does not quite convince you, maybe the cold hard facts below will change your mind. For example, did you know that…

  1. Gardening reduces your chances of heart- and vascular diseases, making you less likely to fall prey to a stroke or high blood pressure. It has pretty much the same effect as jogging or swimming.
  2. Gardening burns quite a lot of calories. Whether you choose to spend a morning in the gym or rather go outdoors to plant some new flowers: gardening lets you burn some 330 calories per hour. Gardening does equal exercise.
  3. gardening is great for your muscles. It has been proven to reduce your chances of osteoporosis, or fragile bones disease. Every time that you start to dig, plant and weed, you are training all of the major muscle groups through your stretching and strengthening of the movements.
  4. Gardening helps to kick the stress to the curb! It might even do more so than any other leisure activity. A study tested the stress levels of two groups of students, one of which would go sit and read and the other would go out to garden, just moments after being exposed to a stressful task. And guess what - the group that was told to garden, reported to be in a better mood than the group that would go and read!
  5. Gardening exposes us to flowers. So what, you may ask? Well, flowers have been found to significantly improve our mood. Flowers are a natural, healthy moderator that instantly affect our happiness - as well as encouraging people to make more intimate connections, as they get ‘taught’ compassion and caring. Plenty of reason to go out and spend some time in the flowerbed!
  6. Gardening is very zen. We get most inspired and relaxed when we are doing something that we enjoy, a task that is somehow repetitive and calming at the same time. This state of relaxation is the same as it is for those who are jogging or doing yoga. You get to reflect, let go of thoughts, and start on organising your life, along with your backyard.
  7. Gardening might lower your risk of dementia. Through the physical activity that is associated with gardening, your risk of falling prey to dementia is likely to be reduced. Several studies have shown a significant difference between people who have gardened regularly and those who haven’t when it comes to their susceptibility to dementia.
  8. Gardening boosts your immune system in a very basic manner: just by being outside, you are likely to catch a few rays of sunlight. These will provide you with some much needed vitamin D, a valuable nutrient for keeping your immune system healthy and your bones strong.

So, did we convince you? Then you might be moving on to the next question of how to go about this new hobby. Well then, you’re in luck, as we’ve got some helpful tips on how to get started.

  • First of all, spring is approaching fast, so get a head start and put in that order of summer-flowering bulbs and seeds. Put those days on which it is cold and rainy outside to good use by browsing catalogues and websites, looking for the perfect find for your garden.
  • Clean up the flower beds and borders, by removing leaves, dead organic matter and other debris; and by cutting back overflowing grasses and bushes. Remove weeds and make sure that the soil is looking fertile and ready to be planted in.
  • Start sowing seeds that need a longer growing season, which can already be done right now: including geraniums, begonias, peppers and aubergines. Check websites and garden calendars to find out which seeds do best in a specific month or season. This way, you can create your own ‘sowing timeline’.
  • Get a grip on garden pests. If you get rid of any pests now, you will thank yourself later. Observe your garden and perennial plants for slugs, snails or aphid colonies. They might have been hibernating still, so this is as good an opportunity as any to ‘clean house’.
  • Start collecting rainwater, for instance by catching it in a water butt - that is connected to downpipes from your home. Once the summer rolls around, you will be grateful. Not only does it circumvent any water shortage issues, rainwater is actually better for your plants - with tapwater generally being somewhat alkaline.
  • Move deciduous shrubs, now that they are still dormant. When you take them out, make sure to take out as much of the root ball as possible, to ensure proper rooting in its new location. Don’t forget to water generously after moving. It will need the extra attention.
  • Prepare and maintain your gardening tools: on a particularly dreary day, get in that shed and take out all of your tools for a much-needed clean, sharpen and oil. This will not only make them last longer, it will also be better for the plants: as it will prevent the spreading of bacteria and diseases.
  • Create a composing area, saving you quite a bit of cash and effort. You could opt for buying a ready-made compost bin or create your own out of spare wood. Then, deposit all organic waste in this dedicated area. Preferably, make sure that there is a varied mixture of materials, to make it easier to turn into compost.

These measures should set you up just fine to get your own garden-project kickstarted and make this big, drastic change in your life: to become a gardener, and not only brighten up your immediate area, but also your life as a whole.

https://www.whatsorb.com/agri-gardening/you-are-what-you-eat-organic-gardening-

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Breaking News, as the world changes…

In our world, WhatsOrb refuses to turn away from the changes in our society and environment which succeeds each other at a rapid pace.

For WhatsOrb, publishing on the environment is a priority. We give reporting on climate, nature, waste, lifestyle and sustainable solutions the prominence it deserves.

At this turbulent time for ‘all’ species and our planet, we are determined to inform readers about threats, consequences and solutions based on facts, not on political prejudice or business interests.

WhatsOrb Breaking News will be published as soon as urgent events from around the world and startling sustainable innovations reach us.

If there is anything we should know and publish about, please send a note to: info@whatsorb.com or write your own story on: www.whatsorb.comthe only news site which gives you a ‘sustainable voice!’

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Gardening decreases stress and is a nice way to improve life

Those of us who are blessed with green fingers will be quick to roll their eyes and mumble ‘tell me something that I don’t know yet’. But it is still worth pointing out: gardening is not just fun, it is also very good for your health. A fact that is often forgotten in modern times, where we are so consumed by the artificial light from our various screens that we forego stepping outside to enjoy the actual sunlight. Gardening, a great outdoor activity Some alarming statistics have shown that we, those living in the developed Western nations, spend a staggering 90% of our time indoors - mostly in a seated of reclining manner, consumed by unhealthy habits and always ‘ plugged in ’. Not surprisingly, this has led to a wave of obesity and a worrying increase in medical costs associated with this unhealthy lifestyle. And while most of us are painfully aware of our lack of (outdoor) activity, indicating that we would really want our children to spent more time outdoors, very few of us are making an effort to do so. A shame, because there is so much to do once you get off your couch and open yourself up to the beauty of the world around us. Plus, your kids will be happier and learn more about nature, generally being more open to positive social interaction. If this does not quite convince you, maybe the cold hard facts below will change your mind. For example, did you know that… Gardening reduces your chances of heart- and vascular diseases, making you less likely to fall prey to a stroke or high blood pressure. It has pretty much the same effect as jogging or swimming. Gardening burns quite a lot of calories. Whether you choose to spend a morning in the gym or rather go outdoors to plant some new flowers: gardening lets you burn some 330 calories per hour. Gardening does equal exercise. gardening  is great for your muscles. It has been proven to reduce your chances of osteoporosis, or fragile bones disease. Every time that you start to dig, plant and weed, you are training all of the major muscle groups through your stretching and strengthening of the movements. Gardening helps to kick the stress to the curb! It might even do more so than any other leisure activity. A study tested the stress levels of two groups of students, one of which would go sit and read and the other would go out to garden, just moments after being exposed to a stressful task. And guess what - the group that was told to garden, reported to be in a better mood than the group that would go and read! Gardening exposes us to flowers. So what, you may ask? Well, flowers have been found to significantly improve our mood. Flowers are a natural, healthy moderator that instantly affect our happiness - as well as encouraging people to make more intimate connections, as they get ‘taught’ compassion and caring. Plenty of reason to go out and spend some time in the flowerbed! Gardening is very zen. We get most inspired and relaxed when we are doing something that we enjoy, a task that is somehow repetitive and calming at the same time. This state of relaxation is the same as it is for those who are jogging or doing yoga. You get to reflect, let go of thoughts, and start on organising your life, along with your backyard. Gardening might lower your risk of dementia. Through the physical activity that is associated with gardening, your risk of falling prey to dementia is likely to be reduced. Several studies have shown a significant difference between people who have gardened regularly and those who haven’t when it comes to their susceptibility to dementia. Gardening boosts your immune system in a very basic manner: just by being outside, you are likely to catch a few rays of sunlight. These will provide you with some much needed vitamin D, a valuable nutrient for keeping your immune system healthy and your bones strong. So, did we convince you? Then you might be moving on to the next question of how to go about this new hobby. Well then, you’re in luck, as we’ve got some helpful tips on how to get started. First of all, spring is approaching fast, so get a head start and put in that order of summer-flowering bulbs and seeds. Put those days on which it is cold and rainy outside to good use by browsing catalogues and websites, looking for the perfect find for your garden. Clean up the flower beds and borders, by removing leaves, dead organic matter and other debris; and by cutting back overflowing grasses and bushes. Remove weeds and make sure that the soil is looking fertile and ready to be planted in. Start sowing seeds that need a longer growing season, which can already be done right now: including geraniums, begonias, peppers and aubergines. Check websites and garden calendars to find out which seeds do best in a specific month or season. This way, you can create your own ‘sowing timeline’. Get a grip on garden pests. If you get rid of any pests now, you will thank yourself later. Observe your garden and perennial plants for slugs, snails or aphid colonies. They might have been hibernating still, so this is as good an opportunity as any to ‘clean house’. Start collecting rainwater , for instance by catching it in a water butt - that is connected to downpipes from your home. Once the summer rolls around, you will be grateful. Not only does it circumvent any water shortage issues, rainwater is actually better for your plants - with tapwater generally being somewhat alkaline. Move deciduous shrubs, now that they are still dormant. When you take them out, make sure to take out as much of the root ball as possible, to ensure proper rooting in its new location. Don’t forget to water generously after moving. It will need the extra attention. Prepare and maintain your gardening tools: on a particularly dreary day, get in that shed and take out all of your tools for a much-needed clean, sharpen and oil. This will not only make them last longer, it will also be better for the plants: as it will prevent the spreading of bacteria and diseases. Create a composing area, saving you quite a bit of cash and effort. You could opt for buying a ready-made compost bin or create your own out of spare wood. Then, deposit all organic waste in this dedicated area. Preferably, make sure that there is a varied mixture of materials, to make it easier to turn into compost. These measures should set you up just fine to get your own garden-project kickstarted and make this big, drastic change in your life: to become a gardener, and not only brighten up your immediate area, but also your life as a whole. https://www.whatsorb.com/agri-gardening/you-are-what-you-eat-organic-gardening-