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Pin-up House: A way of living in pink
Founder, architect and designer Joshua Woodsman, founder, architect and designer of the Pin-Up Houses, had the dream to build his own house. He believes every man shares this dream and wants to build his own home. Woodsman’s little house, a kind of cabin, is the place that meets all your dreams and wishes. His focus is on style, but at the same time, he also shows the functionality of the cabin. Woodsman shows that his cabin is really different from the rest. He illustrates this with his design down to the last detail. What is a Pin-Up House? A Pin-Up House is similar to a Tiny House, yet easier to build and with attractive designs. They are typically small houses, built with sheer simplicity. These compact tiny houses offer a cosy environment, creating an intimacy that you will miss in a large house. These Pin-Up Houses are perfect for people looking for a smart, flexible, cost-effective and energy saving home. Small houses are less expensive and easier to build, heat, cool, clean and maintain. The Pin-Up Houses are easy to build because they have easy-to-follow-plans. The plans outline the whole process in detail. You can use a Pin-Up House as holiday accommodation, an office, a guesthouse or whatever you like. Why live in a Tiny House or Pin-Up House? Living in a Tiny House or Pin-Up House is different than living in a normal home. It is an alternative way of living where people design and build compact, intelligent and mobile homes. Living in a Tiny House goes hand in hand with creativity and freedom. It offers a whole new lifestyle: You will get more space! More space in your wallet, to do stuff and to be less chaotic. Because the space is not that big, it will be easy to maintain and clean the space. A clean home means a happy mind. In addition, because you live smaller, you simply live cheaper, more economical and more consciously. And the best thing is that you can live wherever you like! You can take your home everywhere. Living on the road in your own home? Yes! This house, built on a flat trailer, can be driven on the road. The Magenta Tiny House The Magenta Pin-Up House is built by Joshua Woodsman. The pink Magenta is proof of temporary independent housing, without the debts and loans of a ‘normal’ house. The Magenta is built on a flat trailer, it has a heat insulated wooden structure on all sides of the cabin. This sounds both nice and cosy in summer- and wintertime. Because of the large window, you will easily get enough sunlight into the living space. The Magenta is made of lightweight materials, spruce beams and waterproof plywood, so it is transportable. The flat trailer can be used as a porch, where you can drink your morning coffee or read the newspaper. The interior The pink Magenta has a built-in kitchenette, a sofa, heating stoves, and a chemical toilet. Do you ever wonder how all of this fits in a small cabin? this all fits in these cabins? The Pin-Up Houses make convenient use of storage space. They created space to use built-in furniture in the cabin to store things in there. Stretched nets hang from the ceiling, so you can hang or place things in them that you do not use every day. Better for you and the earth? There are a few things a Pin-Up House offers which a normal house does not offer. For example, if you live in a small home wherever you like, you can opt for nature. You feel more connected with nature because you are more surrounded by it. The house has not a great impact on the earth, because you will consume less. It is all about to settle for less, what really matters. We live in a consuming society: everything has to be expensive and big, labelled with a brand. But if you think about what is really important, that you can live with less, you will get a different view on life. You can live in a sustainable way and thus contribute to a better world.   https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/architecture/tinyhouses  
Founder, architect and designer Joshua Woodsman, founder, architect and designer of the Pin-Up Houses, had the dream to build his own house. He believes every man shares this dream and wants to build his own home. Woodsman’s little house, a kind of cabin, is the place that meets all your dreams and wishes. His focus is on style, but at the same time, he also shows the functionality of the cabin. Woodsman shows that his cabin is really different from the rest. He illustrates this with his design down to the last detail. What is a Pin-Up House? A Pin-Up House is similar to a Tiny House, yet easier to build and with attractive designs. They are typically small houses, built with sheer simplicity. These compact tiny houses offer a cosy environment, creating an intimacy that you will miss in a large house. These Pin-Up Houses are perfect for people looking for a smart, flexible, cost-effective and energy saving home. Small houses are less expensive and easier to build, heat, cool, clean and maintain. The Pin-Up Houses are easy to build because they have easy-to-follow-plans. The plans outline the whole process in detail. You can use a Pin-Up House as holiday accommodation, an office, a guesthouse or whatever you like. Why live in a Tiny House or Pin-Up House? Living in a Tiny House or Pin-Up House is different than living in a normal home. It is an alternative way of living where people design and build compact, intelligent and mobile homes. Living in a Tiny House goes hand in hand with creativity and freedom. It offers a whole new lifestyle: You will get more space! More space in your wallet, to do stuff and to be less chaotic. Because the space is not that big, it will be easy to maintain and clean the space. A clean home means a happy mind. In addition, because you live smaller, you simply live cheaper, more economical and more consciously. And the best thing is that you can live wherever you like! You can take your home everywhere. Living on the road in your own home? Yes! This house, built on a flat trailer, can be driven on the road. The Magenta Tiny House The Magenta Pin-Up House is built by Joshua Woodsman. The pink Magenta is proof of temporary independent housing, without the debts and loans of a ‘normal’ house. The Magenta is built on a flat trailer, it has a heat insulated wooden structure on all sides of the cabin. This sounds both nice and cosy in summer- and wintertime. Because of the large window, you will easily get enough sunlight into the living space. The Magenta is made of lightweight materials, spruce beams and waterproof plywood, so it is transportable. The flat trailer can be used as a porch, where you can drink your morning coffee or read the newspaper. The interior The pink Magenta has a built-in kitchenette, a sofa, heating stoves, and a chemical toilet. Do you ever wonder how all of this fits in a small cabin? this all fits in these cabins? The Pin-Up Houses make convenient use of storage space. They created space to use built-in furniture in the cabin to store things in there. Stretched nets hang from the ceiling, so you can hang or place things in them that you do not use every day. Better for you and the earth? There are a few things a Pin-Up House offers which a normal house does not offer. For example, if you live in a small home wherever you like, you can opt for nature. You feel more connected with nature because you are more surrounded by it. The house has not a great impact on the earth, because you will consume less. It is all about to settle for less, what really matters. We live in a consuming society: everything has to be expensive and big, labelled with a brand. But if you think about what is really important, that you can live with less, you will get a different view on life. You can live in a sustainable way and thus contribute to a better world.   https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/architecture/tinyhouses  
Pin-up House: A way of living in pink
Pin-up House: A way of living in pink
A geodesic dome: sustainable Arctic Circle living in style
The Arctic Circle is not exactly known for its pleasant living conditions. The temperatures are more often than not lingering around the freezing point. The winter is long and dark, while the summer is short and still rather cool. Only very few animal and plant species are able to survive in those harsh conditions, making it an even tougher place to live.   The Hjertefølger family took on the challenge of living in this place where the nearest neighbour might be dozens of miles away. Mom, dad, and four kids have spent the last three years in a hand-built cob house, protected by a huge, geodesic glass dome. Inside, the family can live comfortably during the year, while growing their own food as well. Sounds futuristic? Well, it sure it! Meet the Arctic Nature House of the Hjertefølgers The house of the Hjertefølgers is located in the north of Norway , on an island called Sandhornøya. A gorgeous, rough environment, for sure, that is shrouded in darkness for the majority in the year. This puts a great strain on any building. As such, the family came up with their treasured project, that took over two years to design and build.   The end result? The Naturhuset, or Nature House, is self-sustaining and powered by solar energy, consisting of three storeys and boasting five bedrooms. Along with this, a large irrigated outdoor garden was designed to guarantee a stable supply of food. These crops will be able to grow in the toughest of winters, as they are placed under a massive, 25-foot-high glass dome. Even fruits and vegetables that are not normally suited for the climate thrive in this environment. Green, eco-friendly and  sustainable architecture All aspects of this building have been designed in such a way that they are as eco-friendly and carbon neutral as possible. For instance, the family composts and re-uses water to water the plants. Additionally, the solar system on the roof ensure that, for those summer months in which the sun is actually out and shining, it fully operates on renewable energy sources.   Mother Ingrid has been a driving force behind this new family home. She calls herself a permaculturalist, vegan and yoga practitioner and prides herself on a carbon-neutral lifestyle - that she is happy to pass on to her children. And although most would not consider the Arctic Circle to be the best place to raise a family, she is happy they did: “ The house works as we intended and planned. We love the house; it has a soul of its own and it feels very personal. What surprises us is the fact that we built ourselves anew as we built the house. The process changed us, shaped us .” Further technical details Ingrid is not exactly exaggerating when she claims that she and her family built the house from scratch. It truly is a labour of love, built out of cob. This mixture of earth, straw and sand is an ancient-old, natural material; that is allegedly able to withstand fire and earthquakes - all while being cheap and energy-efficient.   As for the dome, this has been constructed using 360 panels of 6-millimeter thick glass. At this thickness, it is capable of withstanding the heavy winds and snowfall that the area is infamous for. These glass panels are placed in a recycled aluminium frame, chosen for its lifespan of over 100 years, its low maintenance costs and its structural integrity. To top it off, the solar system covering the dome generates sufficient renewable energy to meet the house’s needs. Why the dome-home is such a great idea Normally, people would be discouraged from taking on the challenge of building a house on or near the Arctic Circle. Not only is the delivery of building materials an absolute headache, the energy needs of such a process are substantial. Yet the movement where people opt for homes under a dome is commendable and promising. The greenhouse-dome will mitigate the worst of temperatures and keep heating costs down, a notorious pitfall for Arctic houses. At the same time, it allows households to grow their own produce, using the excess heat stored in the dome. Homegrown, local products are always preferable to imported fruits and vegetables - another promising movement to drive down energy costs.   And if this does not ring true - then consider the great pictures you can share on your Instagram account. Just ask Ingrid (@im_hjerte). https://www.whatsorb.com/category/architecture
The Arctic Circle is not exactly known for its pleasant living conditions. The temperatures are more often than not lingering around the freezing point. The winter is long and dark, while the summer is short and still rather cool. Only very few animal and plant species are able to survive in those harsh conditions, making it an even tougher place to live.   The Hjertefølger family took on the challenge of living in this place where the nearest neighbour might be dozens of miles away. Mom, dad, and four kids have spent the last three years in a hand-built cob house, protected by a huge, geodesic glass dome. Inside, the family can live comfortably during the year, while growing their own food as well. Sounds futuristic? Well, it sure it! Meet the Arctic Nature House of the Hjertefølgers The house of the Hjertefølgers is located in the north of Norway , on an island called Sandhornøya. A gorgeous, rough environment, for sure, that is shrouded in darkness for the majority in the year. This puts a great strain on any building. As such, the family came up with their treasured project, that took over two years to design and build.   The end result? The Naturhuset, or Nature House, is self-sustaining and powered by solar energy, consisting of three storeys and boasting five bedrooms. Along with this, a large irrigated outdoor garden was designed to guarantee a stable supply of food. These crops will be able to grow in the toughest of winters, as they are placed under a massive, 25-foot-high glass dome. Even fruits and vegetables that are not normally suited for the climate thrive in this environment. Green, eco-friendly and  sustainable architecture All aspects of this building have been designed in such a way that they are as eco-friendly and carbon neutral as possible. For instance, the family composts and re-uses water to water the plants. Additionally, the solar system on the roof ensure that, for those summer months in which the sun is actually out and shining, it fully operates on renewable energy sources.   Mother Ingrid has been a driving force behind this new family home. She calls herself a permaculturalist, vegan and yoga practitioner and prides herself on a carbon-neutral lifestyle - that she is happy to pass on to her children. And although most would not consider the Arctic Circle to be the best place to raise a family, she is happy they did: “ The house works as we intended and planned. We love the house; it has a soul of its own and it feels very personal. What surprises us is the fact that we built ourselves anew as we built the house. The process changed us, shaped us .” Further technical details Ingrid is not exactly exaggerating when she claims that she and her family built the house from scratch. It truly is a labour of love, built out of cob. This mixture of earth, straw and sand is an ancient-old, natural material; that is allegedly able to withstand fire and earthquakes - all while being cheap and energy-efficient.   As for the dome, this has been constructed using 360 panels of 6-millimeter thick glass. At this thickness, it is capable of withstanding the heavy winds and snowfall that the area is infamous for. These glass panels are placed in a recycled aluminium frame, chosen for its lifespan of over 100 years, its low maintenance costs and its structural integrity. To top it off, the solar system covering the dome generates sufficient renewable energy to meet the house’s needs. Why the dome-home is such a great idea Normally, people would be discouraged from taking on the challenge of building a house on or near the Arctic Circle. Not only is the delivery of building materials an absolute headache, the energy needs of such a process are substantial. Yet the movement where people opt for homes under a dome is commendable and promising. The greenhouse-dome will mitigate the worst of temperatures and keep heating costs down, a notorious pitfall for Arctic houses. At the same time, it allows households to grow their own produce, using the excess heat stored in the dome. Homegrown, local products are always preferable to imported fruits and vegetables - another promising movement to drive down energy costs.   And if this does not ring true - then consider the great pictures you can share on your Instagram account. Just ask Ingrid (@im_hjerte). https://www.whatsorb.com/category/architecture
A geodesic dome: sustainable Arctic Circle living in style
A geodesic dome: sustainable Arctic Circle living in style
Smart design: combining greater sustainability with higher efficiency
Design has a great impact on our society. Not only will it please our eye when done right, it also has the unique potential to host sustainable and healthy communities. Nothing can hurt the environment more than a poorly designed building: both in terms of sustainability and liveability.   Now that the urban population is growing exponentially, hand in hand with the overall number of people on our world, we need to think carefully about how to make sure we all ‘fit’. By 2050, another staggering two billion people are expected to move to a global city. There has to be a way to get all of them a proper home and sufficient facilities and amenities. In anticipation of this enormous change, designers and architects are working tirelessly to come up with buildings that use the available space effectively, to ensure that they use fewer resources and will be much more sustainable - while guaranteeing optimal comfort and quality of life. And in order to do so, a few trends can be identified: the driving forces behind smart design. Use of data to anticipate climate change While no-one knows exactly how climate change will affect our world, we do know that it will do so. Therefore, buildings must be built with the entire notion of global warming in mind. A concept called climate resilience plays a very important role in this. It describes the way in which we are able to adapt to climate change, or to bounce back after weather-related disasters.   So, how can we guarantee climate resilience without actually knowing what this would entail? A major headache for architects, yet at the same time one of their greatest opportunities. Those who are able to figure out a strategy for incorporating this in their design will be one step ahead of the competition.   Data plays an important role in this. Data on pollution levels, data on extreme weather events, historical trends in combination with projected sea levels and other weather-related statistics: they will help to document climate change. This, in turn, helps us to improve our designed answer. We can design buildings that tackle the root issues of climate change while being prepared for its consequences. Planning for resilience Concretely speaking, the effects of all this are best seen in the planning of our cities and buildings. Each city faces its own set of challenges in the face of changing weather patterns and the rising sea level; and the mass migration and resource scarcity that may result from this.   This is where policy and design meet in a unique feat of city-planning, that takes into account how certain areas can be kept secure, while the prevailing culture is protected and honoured - all while behaviour change is encouraged that will help cities respond to challenges and disasters.   Restricting carbon emissions A known fact is that about half of all greenhouse gas emissions are directly related to that share of the world that has been built by us, also known as the built environment. So, we should be very mindful of the impact of those objects and areas that we have built - and consider their impact on the larger environment. Especially now that the latest projections of the UN estimate that some additional 2.5 trillion square feet of new spaces will have to be built over the course of the next 40 years. This roughly adds up to a brand new New York City that has to be erected every single month during these 40 years. An amazing number, that will seriously jeopardise our environment if we do not take drastic measures to amp up the sustainability of the energy and materials that we use for this; and carefully consider where to build. Once we minimise the impact of the building on the environment, and clearly mapping out where our energy is needed the most, we can cut back on overall emissions by simply planning and working sustainably.   Designing and constructing for a changing world The far majority - about 75% - of the world’s population will be living in urban areas. We are occupying increasingly smaller amounts of space in the most crowded areas, clustering together. While this may bring along challenges, its also gives us the unique opportunity to design for the changing world. Buildings with zero or negative emissions, focused on climate resilience, and using sustainable and energy-efficient constructions: careful planning can make a world of difference in the way we build a different world. https://www.whatsorb.com/architecture/category/architecture
Design has a great impact on our society. Not only will it please our eye when done right, it also has the unique potential to host sustainable and healthy communities. Nothing can hurt the environment more than a poorly designed building: both in terms of sustainability and liveability.   Now that the urban population is growing exponentially, hand in hand with the overall number of people on our world, we need to think carefully about how to make sure we all ‘fit’. By 2050, another staggering two billion people are expected to move to a global city. There has to be a way to get all of them a proper home and sufficient facilities and amenities. In anticipation of this enormous change, designers and architects are working tirelessly to come up with buildings that use the available space effectively, to ensure that they use fewer resources and will be much more sustainable - while guaranteeing optimal comfort and quality of life. And in order to do so, a few trends can be identified: the driving forces behind smart design. Use of data to anticipate climate change While no-one knows exactly how climate change will affect our world, we do know that it will do so. Therefore, buildings must be built with the entire notion of global warming in mind. A concept called climate resilience plays a very important role in this. It describes the way in which we are able to adapt to climate change, or to bounce back after weather-related disasters.   So, how can we guarantee climate resilience without actually knowing what this would entail? A major headache for architects, yet at the same time one of their greatest opportunities. Those who are able to figure out a strategy for incorporating this in their design will be one step ahead of the competition.   Data plays an important role in this. Data on pollution levels, data on extreme weather events, historical trends in combination with projected sea levels and other weather-related statistics: they will help to document climate change. This, in turn, helps us to improve our designed answer. We can design buildings that tackle the root issues of climate change while being prepared for its consequences. Planning for resilience Concretely speaking, the effects of all this are best seen in the planning of our cities and buildings. Each city faces its own set of challenges in the face of changing weather patterns and the rising sea level; and the mass migration and resource scarcity that may result from this.   This is where policy and design meet in a unique feat of city-planning, that takes into account how certain areas can be kept secure, while the prevailing culture is protected and honoured - all while behaviour change is encouraged that will help cities respond to challenges and disasters.   Restricting carbon emissions A known fact is that about half of all greenhouse gas emissions are directly related to that share of the world that has been built by us, also known as the built environment. So, we should be very mindful of the impact of those objects and areas that we have built - and consider their impact on the larger environment. Especially now that the latest projections of the UN estimate that some additional 2.5 trillion square feet of new spaces will have to be built over the course of the next 40 years. This roughly adds up to a brand new New York City that has to be erected every single month during these 40 years. An amazing number, that will seriously jeopardise our environment if we do not take drastic measures to amp up the sustainability of the energy and materials that we use for this; and carefully consider where to build. Once we minimise the impact of the building on the environment, and clearly mapping out where our energy is needed the most, we can cut back on overall emissions by simply planning and working sustainably.   Designing and constructing for a changing world The far majority - about 75% - of the world’s population will be living in urban areas. We are occupying increasingly smaller amounts of space in the most crowded areas, clustering together. While this may bring along challenges, its also gives us the unique opportunity to design for the changing world. Buildings with zero or negative emissions, focused on climate resilience, and using sustainable and energy-efficient constructions: careful planning can make a world of difference in the way we build a different world. https://www.whatsorb.com/architecture/category/architecture
Smart design: combining greater sustainability with higher efficiency
Smart design: combining greater sustainability with higher efficiency
The Devasa tiny house raises the roof
What about a tiny house which you can expand in minutes to add a new room. When parked, it is possible to change the size of the Devasa, when on the road it fits below all bridges. Before we have shown you the Cécile from the French company ‘Optinid’, a tiny house with a sliding roof. When open you can watch the stars from your bed or take a sunbath without moving to your terrace. A tiny house which ‘slides up its roof’ Now on www.whatsorb.com the Devasa which ‘slides up its roof’. It’s a model from Tiny House NYC, which can increase in height to provide more space when staying in it. You can compare this technique with a European Alpen Kreuzer or Paradise, which was used by camping enthusiast especially in the 70 th and 80 th from the last century. Nowadays you could compare it with a camper van with a pop-up roof. Image by: Tiny House NYC, mediadrumimages Most tiny houses have a crampy low loft where you have to crawl to get in your bed. The Devasa  tiny house solves this problem just by the possibility to expand upward. When on the road in a lower position it meets legal standards to tow. The Devasa tiny house measures 7,20-meter-long and 3.80 meter high. By raising the ‘roof’ the height will be total a little more than 5 meters. Upstairs you will have an impressive 2-meter-high ceiling. The floorspace of the Devasa tiny house Floorspace is about 28 m2 with a standard outfit for tiny houses. There is a living room, kitchen, a bathroom with shower, sink and composting toilet. Upstairs are 2 bedrooms which is very unusually. They can be reached by a staircase which also is part of a storage. Image by: Tiny House NYC, mediadrumimages Having your bed(s) ready for a good night rest is all what is possible on the ‘top-floor’. Of course, some small furniture which does not extent the height of your bed. When the roof is lowered you would otherwise have to move all what is higher than your bed or it will be squeezed to a size which probably is not what you want! The lifting part of the roof runs on a 12 V car battery which powers 4 screw jacks which are fit in each corner of the Devasa tiny house. It is also possible to operate it manually in case of the system would fail. The price from the Devasa tiny house will be around €110.000 or $ 125.000 (with no appliances yet installed in the kitchen). Source:  Tiny Houses NYC https://www.whatsorb.com/architecture/sunbathing-in-your-tiny-house-with-a-sliding-roof--try-it-with-the-c-cile
What about a tiny house which you can expand in minutes to add a new room. When parked, it is possible to change the size of the Devasa, when on the road it fits below all bridges. Before we have shown you the Cécile from the French company ‘Optinid’, a tiny house with a sliding roof. When open you can watch the stars from your bed or take a sunbath without moving to your terrace. A tiny house which ‘slides up its roof’ Now on www.whatsorb.com the Devasa which ‘slides up its roof’. It’s a model from Tiny House NYC, which can increase in height to provide more space when staying in it. You can compare this technique with a European Alpen Kreuzer or Paradise, which was used by camping enthusiast especially in the 70 th and 80 th from the last century. Nowadays you could compare it with a camper van with a pop-up roof. Image by: Tiny House NYC, mediadrumimages Most tiny houses have a crampy low loft where you have to crawl to get in your bed. The Devasa  tiny house solves this problem just by the possibility to expand upward. When on the road in a lower position it meets legal standards to tow. The Devasa tiny house measures 7,20-meter-long and 3.80 meter high. By raising the ‘roof’ the height will be total a little more than 5 meters. Upstairs you will have an impressive 2-meter-high ceiling. The floorspace of the Devasa tiny house Floorspace is about 28 m2 with a standard outfit for tiny houses. There is a living room, kitchen, a bathroom with shower, sink and composting toilet. Upstairs are 2 bedrooms which is very unusually. They can be reached by a staircase which also is part of a storage. Image by: Tiny House NYC, mediadrumimages Having your bed(s) ready for a good night rest is all what is possible on the ‘top-floor’. Of course, some small furniture which does not extent the height of your bed. When the roof is lowered you would otherwise have to move all what is higher than your bed or it will be squeezed to a size which probably is not what you want! The lifting part of the roof runs on a 12 V car battery which powers 4 screw jacks which are fit in each corner of the Devasa tiny house. It is also possible to operate it manually in case of the system would fail. The price from the Devasa tiny house will be around €110.000 or $ 125.000 (with no appliances yet installed in the kitchen). Source:  Tiny Houses NYC https://www.whatsorb.com/architecture/sunbathing-in-your-tiny-house-with-a-sliding-roof--try-it-with-the-c-cile
The Devasa tiny house raises the roof
The Devasa tiny house raises the roof
Copenhagen
Being a true metropolis and one of the most popular tourist destinations in Northern Europe, Copenhagen (Denmark) is a place most commonly associated with all kinds of city-typical views and buildings. High-rise office buildings are interspersed with historical, stately monuments and fancy urban areas. Yet those visiting will be delighted to find, right in the middle of a crowded intersection, a experimental piece of nature. Right next to a busy train station and a road junction that is crossed by thousands of people every day, effortlessly blending in to its environment. A living, breathing organism This piece of nature is called “Biotope”, and was created by architect Simon Hjermind Jensen. The artfully designed pavilion is home to a microcosm of plants and insects - housing some sixty different seeds sown into the soil and a beehive, meant to encourage the flourishing and evolving of the ecosystem.   The shape of the pavilion best resembles an organism or bacteria, and through its translucent shell (which is, in fact, a 4 mm thick polycarbonate membrane), it truly comes across as something natural, while giving outsiders and passersby a unique perspective of the blossoming and flourishing life inside the greenhouse. Surviving in the harsh city Additionally, there is no need for a gardener: the greenhouse is self-watering, through the collection of rainwater, that flows to the soil through small holes in the membrane. It also doubles as a bench for tired pedestrians, who can sit on the outer side of the organic bowl and admire the life inside, that evolves fully of its own account, without any outside interference. This was exactly the question that led to this project: to see how and if a fully enclosed natural microcosm could survive in a city, in those harsh and hostile conditions. As climate change could irreversibly change the world and our ecosystem as we know it, this study seeks to find ways of integrating nature in our lives, even in harsher environments: could it survive inside the homes of people in a global-warming-stricken world?   While this might sound gloomy and ominous to some, it could be seen as a shining light, a reassurance that, no matter what, we will always be surrounded by nature, even in the harshest of environments.
Being a true metropolis and one of the most popular tourist destinations in Northern Europe, Copenhagen (Denmark) is a place most commonly associated with all kinds of city-typical views and buildings. High-rise office buildings are interspersed with historical, stately monuments and fancy urban areas. Yet those visiting will be delighted to find, right in the middle of a crowded intersection, a experimental piece of nature. Right next to a busy train station and a road junction that is crossed by thousands of people every day, effortlessly blending in to its environment. A living, breathing organism This piece of nature is called “Biotope”, and was created by architect Simon Hjermind Jensen. The artfully designed pavilion is home to a microcosm of plants and insects - housing some sixty different seeds sown into the soil and a beehive, meant to encourage the flourishing and evolving of the ecosystem.   The shape of the pavilion best resembles an organism or bacteria, and through its translucent shell (which is, in fact, a 4 mm thick polycarbonate membrane), it truly comes across as something natural, while giving outsiders and passersby a unique perspective of the blossoming and flourishing life inside the greenhouse. Surviving in the harsh city Additionally, there is no need for a gardener: the greenhouse is self-watering, through the collection of rainwater, that flows to the soil through small holes in the membrane. It also doubles as a bench for tired pedestrians, who can sit on the outer side of the organic bowl and admire the life inside, that evolves fully of its own account, without any outside interference. This was exactly the question that led to this project: to see how and if a fully enclosed natural microcosm could survive in a city, in those harsh and hostile conditions. As climate change could irreversibly change the world and our ecosystem as we know it, this study seeks to find ways of integrating nature in our lives, even in harsher environments: could it survive inside the homes of people in a global-warming-stricken world?   While this might sound gloomy and ominous to some, it could be seen as a shining light, a reassurance that, no matter what, we will always be surrounded by nature, even in the harshest of environments.
Copenhagen
Copenhagen's experimental greenhouse
Architecture

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