Close Login
Register here
Forgot password
Forgot password
or
or

Close
Close Inspiration on environmental sustainability, every month.

Currently 5,988 people are getting new inspiration every month from our global sustainability exchange. Do you want to stay informed? Fill in your e-mail address below:

Close Receive monthly UPDATES ON ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY IN YOUR MAILBOX EVERY MONTH.

Want to be kept in the loop? We will provide monthly overview of what is happening in our community along with new exciting ways on how you can contribute.

Close Reset password
your profile is 33% complete:
33%
Update profile Close

Architecture architecture General

A geodesic dome: sustainable Arctic Circle living in style

Share this post
by: Sharai Hoekema
a geodesic dome  sustainable arctic circle living in style

The Arctic Circle is not exactly known for its pleasant living conditions. The temperatures are more often than not lingering around the freezing point. The winter is long and dark, while the summer is short and still rather cool. Only very few animal and plant species are able to survive in those harsh conditions, making it an even tougher place to live. 

The Hjertefølger family took on the challenge of living in this place where the nearest neighbour might be dozens of miles away. Mom, dad, and four kids have spent the last three years in a hand-built cob house, protected by a huge, geodesic glass dome. Inside, the family can live comfortably during the year, while growing their own food as well. Sounds futuristic? Well, it sure it!

Meet the Arctic Nature House of the Hjertefølgers

The house of the Hjertefølgers is located in the north of Norway, on an island called Sandhornøya. A gorgeous, rough environment, for sure, that is shrouded in darkness for the majority in the year. This puts a great strain on any building. As such, the family came up with their treasured project, that took over two years to design and build. 

The end result? The Naturhuset, or Nature House, is self-sustaining and powered by solar energy, consisting of three storeys and boasting five bedrooms. Along with this, a large irrigated outdoor garden was designed to guarantee a stable supply of food. These crops will be able to grow in the toughest of winters, as they are placed under a massive, 25-foot-high glass dome. Even fruits and vegetables that are not normally suited for the climate thrive in this environment.

Green, eco-friendly and sustainable architecture

All aspects of this building have been designed in such a way that they are as eco-friendly and carbon neutral as possible. For instance, the family composts and re-uses water to water the plants. Additionally, the solar system on the roof ensure that, for those summer months in which the sun is actually out and shining, it fully operates on renewable energy sources. 

Mother Ingrid has been a driving force behind this new family home. She calls herself a permaculturalist, vegan and yoga practitioner and prides herself on a carbon-neutral lifestyle - that she is happy to pass on to her children. And although most would not consider the Arctic Circle to be the best place to raise a family, she is happy they did: “The house works as we intended and planned. We love the house; it has a soul of its own and it feels very personal. What surprises us is the fact that we built ourselves anew as we built the house. The process changed us, shaped us.”

Further technical details

Ingrid is not exactly exaggerating when she claims that she and her family built the house from scratch. It truly is a labour of love, built out of cob. This mixture of earth, straw and sand is an ancient-old, natural material; that is allegedly able to withstand fire and earthquakes - all while being cheap and energy-efficient. 

As for the dome, this has been constructed using 360 panels of 6-millimeter thick glass. At this thickness, it is capable of withstanding the heavy winds and snowfall that the area is infamous for. These glass panels are placed in a recycled aluminium frame, chosen for its lifespan of over 100 years, its low maintenance costs and its structural integrity. To top it off, the solar system covering the dome generates sufficient renewable energy to meet the house’s needs.

Why the dome-home is such a great idea

Normally, people would be discouraged from taking on the challenge of building a house on or near the Arctic Circle. Not only is the delivery of building materials an absolute headache, the energy needs of such a process are substantial. Yet the movement where people opt for homes under a dome is commendable and promising. The greenhouse-dome will mitigate the worst of temperatures and keep heating costs down, a notorious pitfall for Arctic houses.

At the same time, it allows households to grow their own produce, using the excess heat stored in the dome. Homegrown, local products are always preferable to imported fruits and vegetables - another promising movement to drive down energy costs. 

And if this does not ring true - then consider the great pictures you can share on your Instagram account. Just ask Ingrid (@im_hjerte).

https://www.whatsorb.com/category/architecture

Messange
You
Get updates on environmental sustainability in your mailbox every month.

A geodesic dome: sustainable Arctic Circle living in style

The Arctic Circle is not exactly known for its pleasant living conditions. The temperatures are more often than not lingering around the freezing point. The winter is long and dark, while the summer is short and still rather cool. Only very few animal and plant species are able to survive in those harsh conditions, making it an even tougher place to live.   The Hjertefølger family took on the challenge of living in this place where the nearest neighbour might be dozens of miles away. Mom, dad, and four kids have spent the last three years in a hand-built cob house, protected by a huge, geodesic glass dome. Inside, the family can live comfortably during the year, while growing their own food as well. Sounds futuristic? Well, it sure it! Meet the Arctic Nature House of the Hjertefølgers The house of the Hjertefølgers is located in the north of Norway , on an island called Sandhornøya. A gorgeous, rough environment, for sure, that is shrouded in darkness for the majority in the year. This puts a great strain on any building. As such, the family came up with their treasured project, that took over two years to design and build.   The end result? The Naturhuset, or Nature House, is self-sustaining and powered by solar energy, consisting of three storeys and boasting five bedrooms. Along with this, a large irrigated outdoor garden was designed to guarantee a stable supply of food. These crops will be able to grow in the toughest of winters, as they are placed under a massive, 25-foot-high glass dome. Even fruits and vegetables that are not normally suited for the climate thrive in this environment. Green, eco-friendly and  sustainable architecture All aspects of this building have been designed in such a way that they are as eco-friendly and carbon neutral as possible. For instance, the family composts and re-uses water to water the plants. Additionally, the solar system on the roof ensure that, for those summer months in which the sun is actually out and shining, it fully operates on renewable energy sources.   Mother Ingrid has been a driving force behind this new family home. She calls herself a permaculturalist, vegan and yoga practitioner and prides herself on a carbon-neutral lifestyle - that she is happy to pass on to her children. And although most would not consider the Arctic Circle to be the best place to raise a family, she is happy they did: “ The house works as we intended and planned. We love the house; it has a soul of its own and it feels very personal. What surprises us is the fact that we built ourselves anew as we built the house. The process changed us, shaped us .” Further technical details Ingrid is not exactly exaggerating when she claims that she and her family built the house from scratch. It truly is a labour of love, built out of cob. This mixture of earth, straw and sand is an ancient-old, natural material; that is allegedly able to withstand fire and earthquakes - all while being cheap and energy-efficient.   As for the dome, this has been constructed using 360 panels of 6-millimeter thick glass. At this thickness, it is capable of withstanding the heavy winds and snowfall that the area is infamous for. These glass panels are placed in a recycled aluminium frame, chosen for its lifespan of over 100 years, its low maintenance costs and its structural integrity. To top it off, the solar system covering the dome generates sufficient renewable energy to meet the house’s needs. Why the dome-home is such a great idea Normally, people would be discouraged from taking on the challenge of building a house on or near the Arctic Circle. Not only is the delivery of building materials an absolute headache, the energy needs of such a process are substantial. Yet the movement where people opt for homes under a dome is commendable and promising. The greenhouse-dome will mitigate the worst of temperatures and keep heating costs down, a notorious pitfall for Arctic houses. At the same time, it allows households to grow their own produce, using the excess heat stored in the dome. Homegrown, local products are always preferable to imported fruits and vegetables - another promising movement to drive down energy costs.   And if this does not ring true - then consider the great pictures you can share on your Instagram account. Just ask Ingrid (@im_hjerte). https://www.whatsorb.com/category/architecture