Close Welcome writers, influencers and dreamers, make the world a greener place
Register here
Forgot password
Forgot password
or
or

Close
Close Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
Close Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
Close Reset password
your profile is 33% complete:
33%
Update profile Close
Close WhatsOrb Global Sustainability X-Change

For writers, influencers and dreamers who want to make the world a greener place.

WhatsOrb reaches monthly about 28.000 thousand visitors who want - like you - to make the world a greener place. Share your expertise and all can benefit.

Become an influencer and write and share sustainable news and innovations globally
Are you a writer or do you have ideas about sustainability which you want to share? Register and share your green knowledge and news. WhatsOrb offers you global exposure for your article.

If your article meets certain standards, you receive promotional gains like Facebook promotions and Google Ads advertising.

Agri & Gardening superfood  murnong gets back to our plates | Upload Vegetables

Superfood! Murnong Gets Back To Our Plates

by: Ariana M
superfood  murnong gets back to our plates | Upload

Our diets have always been an important part of our lifestyles and they have changed a lot over the centuries. Foods that were previously considered delicacies are now available at any supermarket and some of our ancestor’s staples have been forgotten. This is the case with murnong, also known as yam daisy, a root vegetable from Australia that has once dominated Indigenous Australians’ menus. Today, historian, author, and agriculturalist, Bruce Pascoeis hoping to re-introduce this “superfood” and chefs across Australia are very keen to help.

Key Role In Aboriginal People’s Daily Lives

At first glance, murnong doesn’t look very special – in fact, one could easily mistake it for a dandelion – but the root of the plant has played a key role in Aboriginal people’s daily lives before European settlement. The root is nutty and starchy and according to Pascoe, it is eight times as nutritious as a potato.

#superfood Murnong

Image by: Adobe Stock, Murnong

Recommended: Urban Agriculture: Growing Healthy Food In Cities

Yam daisies were easy to grow and harvest and provided a steady supply of food all year round, which made them a perfect crop for Indigenous farmers. However, when settlers came to Australia they brought over farm animals and rabbits. Rabbits, sheep, and cattle have taken a liking to the plant, and farm fields that used to be carpets of yellow yam flowers were now bare. Livestock’s hooves have also damaged the ground, making it impossible for murnong to grow back. Today can still find some yam daisies growing in the bushland in South Eastern Australia, but the plant is still quite rare in the wild.

Combining Traditional Food And Modern Gastronomy

Bruce Pascoe is very passionate about reviving methods of traditional horticulture and bringing back traditional foods. He is doing so with the help of Gurandgi Munjie, a group of Aboriginal men and women sharing the same dream of making native foods mainstream. Together they have been propagating various native grains, fruits, and herbs, but murnong has always been the star of the show. Pascoe calls it a superfood for its nutritional properties and chefs around the country experiment with the different ways yam daisies can be cooked and the unique flavors they can bring to the table.

Recommended: Future Food: Would You Like To Eat Lab-Meat?

Ben Shewry is the chef of Melbourne’s Attica and one of Pascoe’s most enthusiastic supporters. He is known for his creativity and passion for Indigenous foods and was quoted saying: “I’m longing for the day when we can all buy them [murnong] from Gurandgi Munjie and support Aboriginal men and women to grow the crops of their culture”.

It is interesting to note the versatility of murnong when it comes to gastronomy, as it can be eaten both raw and roasted or fried. When eaten raw, the root is similar in texture to radish and has a sweet coconutty and grassy taste. Once roasted or fried the flavor transforms into something similar to a salty potato. And chef Shewry recommends trying the leaves of the plant as well – with their slightly bitter taste they are perfect for salads with some red-wine vinegar dressing.

It will be a while before we would be able to see murnongs aplenty, but it is already gathering a lot of attention and hopefully, more of us will be able to enjoy this 'superfood' very soon.

Are there any native foods from your region that have been forgotten or perhaps even gone extinct? Share your responses with us in the comments!

Before you go!

Recommended: Eating insects Is Healthy, Tasty, And Cool: the United States.

Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day.

Like to write your article about 'super' food?
Click on 'Register' or push the button 'Write An Article' on the 'HomePage.'

Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
SIGN UP
More like this:
Messange
You
Share this post
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations
SIGN UP FOR MONTHLY TIPS & TRICKS
More like this:

Superfood! Murnong Gets Back To Our Plates

Our diets have always been an important part of our lifestyles and they have changed a lot over the centuries. Foods that were previously considered delicacies are now available at any supermarket and some of our ancestor’s staples have been forgotten. This is the case with murnong, also known as yam daisy, a root vegetable from Australia that has once dominated Indigenous Australians’ menus. Today, historian, author, and agriculturalist, Bruce Pascoeis hoping to re-introduce this “superfood” and chefs across Australia are very keen to help. Key Role In Aboriginal People’s Daily Lives At first glance, murnong doesn’t look very special – in fact, one could easily mistake it for a dandelion – but the root of the plant has played a key role in Aboriginal people’s daily lives before European settlement. The root is nutty and starchy and according to Pascoe, it is eight times as nutritious as a potato. Image by: Adobe Stock, Murnong Recommended:  Urban Agriculture: Growing Healthy Food In Cities Yam daisies were easy to grow and harvest and provided a steady supply of food all year round, which made them a perfect crop for Indigenous farmers. However, when settlers came to Australia they brought over farm animals and rabbits. Rabbits, sheep, and cattle have taken a liking to the plant, and farm fields that used to be carpets of yellow yam flowers were now bare. Livestock’s hooves have also damaged the ground, making it impossible for murnong to grow back. Today can still find some yam daisies growing in the bushland in South Eastern Australia, but the plant is still quite rare in the wild. Combining Traditional Food And Modern Gastronomy Bruce Pascoe is very passionate about reviving methods of traditional horticulture and bringing back traditional foods. He is doing so with the help of Gurandgi Munjie, a group of Aboriginal men and women sharing the same dream of making native foods mainstream. Together they have been propagating various native grains, fruits, and herbs, but murnong has always been the star of the show. Pascoe calls it a superfood for its nutritional properties and chefs around the country experiment with the different ways yam daisies can be cooked and the unique flavors they can bring to the table. Recommended:  Future Food: Would You Like To Eat Lab-Meat? Ben Shewry is the chef of Melbourne’s Attica and one of Pascoe’s most enthusiastic supporters. He is known for his creativity and passion for Indigenous foods and was quoted saying: “I’m longing for the day when we can all buy them [murnong] from Gurandgi Munjie and support Aboriginal men and women to grow the crops of their culture”. It is interesting to note the versatility of murnong when it comes to gastronomy, as it can be eaten both raw and roasted or fried. When eaten raw, the root is similar in texture to radish and has a sweet coconutty and grassy taste. Once roasted or fried the flavor transforms into something similar to a salty potato. And chef Shewry recommends trying the leaves of the plant as well – with their slightly bitter taste they are perfect for salads with some red-wine vinegar dressing. It will be a while before we would be able to see murnongs aplenty, but it is already gathering a lot of attention and hopefully, more of us will be able to enjoy this 'superfood' very soon. Are there any native foods from your region that have been forgotten or perhaps even gone extinct? Share your responses with us in the comments! Before you go! Recommended:  Eating insects Is Healthy, Tasty, And Cool: the United States . Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about 'super' food? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage.'
Stay Updated on Environmental Improvements And Global Innovations