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Agri & Gardening food gardens turn cities into organic producers | Upload Vegetables

Food Gardens Turn Cities Into Organic Producers

by: Peter Sant
food gardens turn cities into organic producers | Upload

With ever more people living in urban centers, food security and quality are becoming a pressing issue. In Germany, cities are increasingly taking the task of producing organic products to a hyper-local level. 

Food Gardens Turn Cities Into Organic Producers

In Nuremberg, every first-grader starts the year with a gift: a yellow lunchbox filled with healthy food. The grant, refilled daily, is part of a city initiative to increase the share of local, organic food in public institutions, not just daycare centers and schools, but also retirement homes, hospitals, correctional facilities, and administrative centers. As part of Biostädte, or organic cities, it joins a network of municipalities across Germany, including Munich, Bremen, and Karlsruhe, to make food production healthier and more sustainable.
Schoolchildren in a class keep their yellow food boxes above their head

Recommended: Biggest Garden Trends For 2021 And Beyond

Greening Cities, Also For Food Production

In other cities like Berlin, Cologne, and Kiel, similar food councils introduce urban and community-supported agriculture, including the greening of new buildings and the transformation of uncontaminated industrial land into community gardens. Their plans also include projects for car-free, solar-powered districts where edible plants grow on and around buildings.
#Solar powered school building seen from above

Recommended: Smart Agriculture Will Be Data (AI) Driven

Local citizens are encouraged to cultivate useful crops, using public green areas in their neighborhoods to plant rows of potato plants or fruit trees. Doing so gives municipal coffers a break: it costs less than designing and maintaining public green spaces with ornamental plants.

These urban agricultural spaces are intended to become focal points where food is produced, processed, and traded. With its 3.6 million inhabitants and virtually no local agricultural land in Berlin, the need for such initiatives focusing on high-quality, sustainable food is exceptionally high. To meet these goals, Berlin has recently created the House of Food foundation to help the city transition to organic products — without a budget increase, and if possible, without subsidies.
Vegetable garden Prinzessinnengarten Berlin
Prinzessinnengarten, Berlin.

Recommended: Sustainable Food: How Eco Friendly Is Your Diet?

The city follows a model first created by Copenhagen, wherein 2007 the Danish capital brought together cooks, food experts, teachers, and designers to offer advice and cooking courses. Today, roughly 70 percent of the food in Copenhagen’s city-run kitchens is organic; in smaller institutions, like kindergartens, that figure is as high as 90 percent.

Germany Taking The Lead

In Nuremberg, the city wanted to lead by example: every February, Biofach, which according to organizers is the world’s largest trade fair for organic products, takes place in the northern Bavarian city. At this year’s Biofach, increasing public demand for organic products is in the spotlight: The organic food market has grown by about 6 percent in Germany over the past year, making up about 5 percent of the total food market there. Since 2003, certified organic caterers have been providing meals to daycare centers and schools in Nuremberg and leading cooking workshops for students, teachers, and caretakers.

"The proportion of organic ingredients has continuously increased — and usually without any price increase," said Werner Ebert, head of the environment and health department at BioMetropole Nürnberg, an organization that works on the initiative with the city.
In the meantime, some of the facilities have begun cooking meals themselves, he added. "This fresh food has more nutrients and is cheaper than having meals delivered."
By sticking to seasonal products and reducing the amount of meat on offer, the city can keep costs low.

Recommended: Sustainable Food: Dutch Consumers Eat 25% More.

Organic Initiatives In 2003 

Those interested in the organic movement have the chance to visit farms in the region twice a year through the 'Bio on Tour' initiative, while organized trips abroad allow citizens to see how other regions in Europe are introducing sustainability into their lives.
Even Nuremberg’s world-famous Christmas market has made a move to sustainability, with many stands offering products with quality organic labels — some coming directly from the producer.
As Ebert points out, organic efforts don’t end at the city limits. For example, the city provides financial support for a traditional apple orchard project in the nearby Hersbruck Mountains, which produces bottles of Pom200, an organic apple juice.

Industrial Agriculture Can Contribute To Climate Change. 

"Civic space plays an important role in the societal debate on nutrition," said Philipp Stierand, an expert on nutrition and cities. "It’s all about regionality and food origins."
Urbanization, he points out, takes a serious toll on the environment: arable land surrounding cities is built up, and resources are depleted, while conventional industrial agriculture can deplete the soil, damaged ecosystems, and contribute to climate change with air pollution produced by long shipping routes.

Recommended: Education Matters: Climate Change For Kids

Conventional agriculture is not sustainable. 

At the same time, society is faced with ensuring food security, both in terms of quantity and quality. Cities are increasingly addressing food-related issues like obesity and allergies, and citizens are demanding that they have a say in where their food comes from.

Though most of the global food supply is still organized at a national and international scale, Stierand believes the regional share — be it local markets, corner stores, or home delivery of organic products — will steadily increase, with the local food supply becoming more diverse.
"Nutritional change begins in the city," said Strand. 'These nutrition councils, being set up all over Germany, are a clear signal that consumers are looking for - and organizing - local alternatives to supermarkets and discount stores."

Source Brinkwire

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Recommended: Reduce Your Environmental Impact in 2021: Tips and Tricks

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Being involved in sustainability activities has changed my view on this subject a lot. Climate change and pollution are borderless and thus solutions and information has to be shared globally. Rich, 'developed' countries have to start supporting countries that don't have the means and knowledge to improve their situation. Sustainability movement is as strong as its weakest link - whatsorb.com is a helpful platform to speed up the X-Change of Global Sustainability.

 

Being involved in sustainability activities has changed my view on this subject a lot. Climate change and pollution are borderless and thus solutions and information has to be shared globally. Rich, 'developed' countries have to start supporting countries that don't have the means and knowledge to improve their situation. Sustainability movement is as strong as its weakest link - whatsorb.com is a helpful platform to speed up the X-Change of Global Sustainability.

 

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Food Gardens Turn Cities Into Organic Producers

With ever more people living in urban centers, food security and quality are becoming a pressing issue. In Germany, cities are increasingly taking the task of producing organic products to a hyper-local level.  Food Gardens Turn Cities Into Organic Producers In Nuremberg, every first-grader starts the year with a gift: a yellow lunchbox filled with healthy food. The grant, refilled daily, is part of a city initiative to increase the share of local, organic food in public institutions, not just daycare centers and schools, but also retirement homes, hospitals, correctional facilities, and administrative centers. As part of Biostädte, or organic cities, it joins a network of municipalities across Germany, including Munich, Bremen, and Karlsruhe, to make food production healthier and more sustainable. Recommended:  Biggest Garden Trends For 2021 And Beyond Greening Cities, Also For Food Production In other cities like Berlin, Cologne, and Kiel, similar food councils introduce urban and community-supported agriculture, including the greening of new buildings and the transformation of uncontaminated industrial land into community gardens. Their plans also include projects for car-free, solar-powered districts where edible plants grow on and around buildings. Recommended:  Smart Agriculture Will Be Data (AI) Driven Local citizens are encouraged to cultivate useful crops, using public green areas in their neighborhoods to plant rows of potato plants or fruit trees. Doing so gives municipal coffers a break: it costs less than designing and maintaining public green spaces with ornamental plants. These urban agricultural spaces are intended to become focal points where food is produced, processed, and traded. With its 3.6 million inhabitants and virtually no local agricultural land in Berlin, the need for such initiatives focusing on high-quality, sustainable food is exceptionally high. To meet these goals, Berlin has recently created the House of Food foundation to help the city transition to organic products — without a budget increase, and if possible, without subsidies. Prinzessinnengarten, Berlin. Recommended:  Sustainable Food: How Eco Friendly Is Your Diet? The city follows a model first created by Copenhagen, wherein 2007 the Danish capital brought together cooks, food experts, teachers, and designers to offer advice and cooking courses. Today, roughly 70 percent of the food in Copenhagen’s city-run kitchens is organic; in smaller institutions, like kindergartens, that figure is as high as 90 percent. Germany Taking The Lead In Nuremberg, the city wanted to lead by example: every February, Biofach, which according to organizers is the world’s largest trade fair for organic products, takes place in the northern Bavarian city. At this year’s Biofach, increasing public demand for organic products is in the spotlight: The organic food market has grown by about 6 percent in Germany over the past year, making up about 5 percent of the total food market there. Since 2003, certified organic caterers have been providing meals to daycare centers and schools in Nuremberg and leading cooking workshops for students, teachers, and caretakers. "The proportion of organic ingredients has continuously increased — and usually without any price increase," said Werner Ebert, head of the environment and health department at BioMetropole Nürnberg, an organization that works on the initiative with the city. In the meantime, some of the facilities have begun cooking meals themselves, he added. "This fresh food has more nutrients and is cheaper than having meals delivered." By sticking to seasonal products and reducing the amount of meat on offer, the city can keep costs low. Recommended:  Sustainable Food: Dutch Consumers Eat 25% More . Organic Initiatives In 2003  Those interested in the organic movement have the chance to visit farms in the region twice a year through the 'Bio on Tour' initiative, while organized trips abroad allow citizens to see how other regions in Europe are introducing sustainability into their lives. Even Nuremberg’s world-famous Christmas market has made a move to sustainability, with many stands offering products with quality organic labels — some coming directly from the producer. As Ebert points out, organic efforts don’t end at the city limits. For example, the city provides financial support for a traditional apple orchard project in the nearby Hersbruck Mountains, which produces bottles of Pom200, an organic apple juice. Industrial Agriculture Can Contribute To Climate Change.  "Civic space plays an important role in the societal debate on nutrition," said Philipp Stierand, an expert on nutrition and cities. "It’s all about regionality and food origins." Urbanization, he points out, takes a serious toll on the environment: arable land surrounding cities is built up, and resources are depleted, while conventional industrial agriculture can deplete the soil, damaged ecosystems, and contribute to climate change with air pollution produced by long shipping routes. Recommended:  Education Matters: Climate Change For Kids Conventional agriculture is not sustainable.  At the same time, society is faced with ensuring food security, both in terms of quantity and quality. Cities are increasingly addressing food-related issues like obesity and allergies, and citizens are demanding that they have a say in where their food comes from. Though most of the global food supply is still organized at a national and international scale, Stierand believes the regional share — be it local markets, corner stores, or home delivery of organic products — will steadily increase, with the local food supply becoming more diverse. "Nutritional change begins in the city," said Strand. 'These nutrition councils, being set up all over Germany, are a clear signal that consumers are looking for - and organizing - local alternatives to supermarkets and discount stores." Source Brinkwire Before you go! Recommended:  Reduce Your Environmental Impact in 2021: Tips and Tricks Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about the world's water supply? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  [email protected] , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
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