Close Login
Register here
Forgot password
Forgot password
or
or

Close
Close Inspiration on environmental sustainability, every month.

Currently 5,988 people are getting new inspiration every month from our global sustainability exchange. Do you want to stay informed? Fill in your e-mail address below:

Close Receive monthly UPDATES ON ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY IN YOUR MAILBOX EVERY MONTH.

Want to be kept in the loop? We will provide monthly overview of what is happening in our community along with new exciting ways on how you can contribute.

Close Reset password
your profile is 33% complete:
33%
Update profile Close
MenuMenu
Vortex Bladeless providing wind energy without blades
In a much needed re-invention of wind turbines, Vortex Bladeless has introduced a concept that has definitely made waves in the energy industry. Its unique concept has been hailed as a technological leap forward and a resolution in the generation of wind power, that will not only make wind energy simpler and more effective, it will also ultimately be more environmentally friendly. Vortex induced vibration resonant wind generator The official description of Vortex Bladeless’ product is quite a mouthful: a vortex induced vibration resonant wind generator. It is a way of generating energy using a vorticity phenomenon called Vortex Shedding. In layman’s terms, this is the generation of energy from the spinning motion of air. This basic principle uses cylindrical turbines, which will allow for the development of a spinning whirlpool or vortex when wind passes through it. As the cylinder swings back and forth in the wind (“oscillates”), it will be subject to sufficient force to find itself vibrating quite heavily, all while remaining fixed to an elastic rod. Using a linear generator, that is quite similar to the one used for harnessing wave energy, this kinetic energy can be captured and used.   Clear benefits and differences In fact, some have argued that the Vortex is not quite a wind turbine per se, as it more closely resembles other forms of renewable energy generation. Either way, it has been deemed promising enough to be awarded a grant under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation fund. One of the most obvious selling points is that it provides a clean source of energy, as it uses advanced technology to harvest energy from an aeroelastic oscillation movement.   Yet at the same time, its largest advantage in comparison to other forms of wind energy would have to be its reduced costs: it requires no gears, bearings or other expensive parts that could easily break and need expensive replacement. Simultaneously, it does not require any oil or intensive maintenance. In fact, costs for manufacturing, operating and maintaining the Vortex will be way down. Adding to the previous point, it is worth noting that the lower costs also extend to the costs of its effect on the environment at large. The construction and development of this source of wind energy requires much less energy and takes up less space. Production is simple and swift, with a minimal impact on the surrounding area. It is quiet, blends in, does not require contaminants and will not harm birds or in any other way impact the ecosystem it is placed in - according to the official Vortex website. Easy to put in your backyard or on your worksite Not many people would be happy to place a  wind turbine in their backyard, especially in densely populated areas. It takes up a massive amount of space and would lead to obvious complaints from those living around you. Yet you will find that it is very easy to place a Vortex Bladeless in your area. It is perfectly suited for on-site energy generation through its light weight, simple installation, self-running capacity and limited space required. This is why the manufacturer has been targeting end-consumers, making it available for grid and off-grid operations, as well as offering hybrid models that allow for integration with, for instance, solar panels. The costs for generating energy are, according to one of the founders, brought down by 40% when compared to conventional forms of wind energy. It is capable of reaching a conversion efficiency of 70 percent - which definitely not excessively high and somewhat lagging behind when compared to their bladed brothers, but a good proposition nonetheless. The actual potential of the Vortex Bladeless There are quite a few researchers who question the actual effectiveness of the Vortex Bladeless. Aside from the somewhat limited conversion efficiency, as oscillating cylinders are not capable of converting much of their energy into electricity, there is the question of feasibility of on-site use. In order to generate sufficient energy, the pole-shaped turbine would have to be of a significant size, while an aeronautics professor at MIT questions its claim of being silent. “ The oscillating frequencies that shake the cylinder will make noise. It will sound like a freight train coming through your wind farm,” she remarks. Does this mean that the concept is flawed? Not necessarily. Most innovations are met with trepidation and concerns when first introduced. It is up to the community to come up with ways of building on the existing idea to improve it further. That is how we ended up with massive wind and  solar farms as they are. Why not apply this to innovative solutions that simply remove the blades from the wind turbines?   https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
In a much needed re-invention of wind turbines, Vortex Bladeless has introduced a concept that has definitely made waves in the energy industry. Its unique concept has been hailed as a technological leap forward and a resolution in the generation of wind power, that will not only make wind energy simpler and more effective, it will also ultimately be more environmentally friendly. Vortex induced vibration resonant wind generator The official description of Vortex Bladeless’ product is quite a mouthful: a vortex induced vibration resonant wind generator. It is a way of generating energy using a vorticity phenomenon called Vortex Shedding. In layman’s terms, this is the generation of energy from the spinning motion of air. This basic principle uses cylindrical turbines, which will allow for the development of a spinning whirlpool or vortex when wind passes through it. As the cylinder swings back and forth in the wind (“oscillates”), it will be subject to sufficient force to find itself vibrating quite heavily, all while remaining fixed to an elastic rod. Using a linear generator, that is quite similar to the one used for harnessing wave energy, this kinetic energy can be captured and used.   Clear benefits and differences In fact, some have argued that the Vortex is not quite a wind turbine per se, as it more closely resembles other forms of renewable energy generation. Either way, it has been deemed promising enough to be awarded a grant under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation fund. One of the most obvious selling points is that it provides a clean source of energy, as it uses advanced technology to harvest energy from an aeroelastic oscillation movement.   Yet at the same time, its largest advantage in comparison to other forms of wind energy would have to be its reduced costs: it requires no gears, bearings or other expensive parts that could easily break and need expensive replacement. Simultaneously, it does not require any oil or intensive maintenance. In fact, costs for manufacturing, operating and maintaining the Vortex will be way down. Adding to the previous point, it is worth noting that the lower costs also extend to the costs of its effect on the environment at large. The construction and development of this source of wind energy requires much less energy and takes up less space. Production is simple and swift, with a minimal impact on the surrounding area. It is quiet, blends in, does not require contaminants and will not harm birds or in any other way impact the ecosystem it is placed in - according to the official Vortex website. Easy to put in your backyard or on your worksite Not many people would be happy to place a  wind turbine in their backyard, especially in densely populated areas. It takes up a massive amount of space and would lead to obvious complaints from those living around you. Yet you will find that it is very easy to place a Vortex Bladeless in your area. It is perfectly suited for on-site energy generation through its light weight, simple installation, self-running capacity and limited space required. This is why the manufacturer has been targeting end-consumers, making it available for grid and off-grid operations, as well as offering hybrid models that allow for integration with, for instance, solar panels. The costs for generating energy are, according to one of the founders, brought down by 40% when compared to conventional forms of wind energy. It is capable of reaching a conversion efficiency of 70 percent - which definitely not excessively high and somewhat lagging behind when compared to their bladed brothers, but a good proposition nonetheless. The actual potential of the Vortex Bladeless There are quite a few researchers who question the actual effectiveness of the Vortex Bladeless. Aside from the somewhat limited conversion efficiency, as oscillating cylinders are not capable of converting much of their energy into electricity, there is the question of feasibility of on-site use. In order to generate sufficient energy, the pole-shaped turbine would have to be of a significant size, while an aeronautics professor at MIT questions its claim of being silent. “ The oscillating frequencies that shake the cylinder will make noise. It will sound like a freight train coming through your wind farm,” she remarks. Does this mean that the concept is flawed? Not necessarily. Most innovations are met with trepidation and concerns when first introduced. It is up to the community to come up with ways of building on the existing idea to improve it further. That is how we ended up with massive wind and  solar farms as they are. Why not apply this to innovative solutions that simply remove the blades from the wind turbines?   https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
Vortex Bladeless providing wind energy without blades
Vortex Bladeless providing wind energy without blades
Pin-up House: A way of living in pink
Founder, architect and designer Joshua Woodsman, founder, architect and designer of the Pin-Up Houses, had the dream to build his own house. He believes every man shares this dream and wants to build his own home. Woodsman’s little house, a kind of cabin, is the place that meets all your dreams and wishes. His focus is on style, but at the same time, he also shows the functionality of the cabin. Woodsman shows that his cabin is really different from the rest. He illustrates this with his design down to the last detail. What is a Pin-Up House? A Pin-Up House is similar to a Tiny House, yet easier to build and with attractive designs. They are typically small houses, built with sheer simplicity. These compact tiny houses offer a cosy environment, creating an intimacy that you will miss in a large house. These Pin-Up Houses are perfect for people looking for a smart, flexible, cost-effective and energy saving home. Small houses are less expensive and easier to build, heat, cool, clean and maintain. The Pin-Up Houses are easy to build because they have easy-to-follow-plans. The plans outline the whole process in detail. You can use a Pin-Up House as holiday accommodation, an office, a guesthouse or whatever you like. Why live in a Tiny House or Pin-Up House? Living in a Tiny House or Pin-Up House is different than living in a normal home. It is an alternative way of living where people design and build compact, intelligent and mobile homes. Living in a Tiny House goes hand in hand with creativity and freedom. It offers a whole new lifestyle: You will get more space! More space in your wallet, to do stuff and to be less chaotic. Because the space is not that big, it will be easy to maintain and clean the space. A clean home means a happy mind. In addition, because you live smaller, you simply live cheaper, more economical and more consciously. And the best thing is that you can live wherever you like! You can take your home everywhere. Living on the road in your own home? Yes! This house, built on a flat trailer, can be driven on the road. The Magenta Tiny House The Magenta Pin-Up House is built by Joshua Woodsman. The pink Magenta is proof of temporary independent housing, without the debts and loans of a ‘normal’ house. The Magenta is built on a flat trailer, it has a heat insulated wooden structure on all sides of the cabin. This sounds both nice and cosy in summer- and wintertime. Because of the large window, you will easily get enough sunlight into the living space. The Magenta is made of lightweight materials, spruce beams and waterproof plywood, so it is transportable. The flat trailer can be used as a porch, where you can drink your morning coffee or read the newspaper. The interior The pink Magenta has a built-in kitchenette, a sofa, heating stoves, and a chemical toilet. Do you ever wonder how all of this fits in a small cabin? this all fits in these cabins? The Pin-Up Houses make convenient use of storage space. They created space to use built-in furniture in the cabin to store things in there. Stretched nets hang from the ceiling, so you can hang or place things in them that you do not use every day. Better for you and the earth? There are a few things a Pin-Up House offers which a normal house does not offer. For example, if you live in a small home wherever you like, you can opt for nature. You feel more connected with nature because you are more surrounded by it. The house has not a great impact on the earth, because you will consume less. It is all about to settle for less, what really matters. We live in a consuming society: everything has to be expensive and big, labelled with a brand. But if you think about what is really important, that you can live with less, you will get a different view on life. You can live in a sustainable way and thus contribute to a better world.   https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/architecture/tinyhouses  
Founder, architect and designer Joshua Woodsman, founder, architect and designer of the Pin-Up Houses, had the dream to build his own house. He believes every man shares this dream and wants to build his own home. Woodsman’s little house, a kind of cabin, is the place that meets all your dreams and wishes. His focus is on style, but at the same time, he also shows the functionality of the cabin. Woodsman shows that his cabin is really different from the rest. He illustrates this with his design down to the last detail. What is a Pin-Up House? A Pin-Up House is similar to a Tiny House, yet easier to build and with attractive designs. They are typically small houses, built with sheer simplicity. These compact tiny houses offer a cosy environment, creating an intimacy that you will miss in a large house. These Pin-Up Houses are perfect for people looking for a smart, flexible, cost-effective and energy saving home. Small houses are less expensive and easier to build, heat, cool, clean and maintain. The Pin-Up Houses are easy to build because they have easy-to-follow-plans. The plans outline the whole process in detail. You can use a Pin-Up House as holiday accommodation, an office, a guesthouse or whatever you like. Why live in a Tiny House or Pin-Up House? Living in a Tiny House or Pin-Up House is different than living in a normal home. It is an alternative way of living where people design and build compact, intelligent and mobile homes. Living in a Tiny House goes hand in hand with creativity and freedom. It offers a whole new lifestyle: You will get more space! More space in your wallet, to do stuff and to be less chaotic. Because the space is not that big, it will be easy to maintain and clean the space. A clean home means a happy mind. In addition, because you live smaller, you simply live cheaper, more economical and more consciously. And the best thing is that you can live wherever you like! You can take your home everywhere. Living on the road in your own home? Yes! This house, built on a flat trailer, can be driven on the road. The Magenta Tiny House The Magenta Pin-Up House is built by Joshua Woodsman. The pink Magenta is proof of temporary independent housing, without the debts and loans of a ‘normal’ house. The Magenta is built on a flat trailer, it has a heat insulated wooden structure on all sides of the cabin. This sounds both nice and cosy in summer- and wintertime. Because of the large window, you will easily get enough sunlight into the living space. The Magenta is made of lightweight materials, spruce beams and waterproof plywood, so it is transportable. The flat trailer can be used as a porch, where you can drink your morning coffee or read the newspaper. The interior The pink Magenta has a built-in kitchenette, a sofa, heating stoves, and a chemical toilet. Do you ever wonder how all of this fits in a small cabin? this all fits in these cabins? The Pin-Up Houses make convenient use of storage space. They created space to use built-in furniture in the cabin to store things in there. Stretched nets hang from the ceiling, so you can hang or place things in them that you do not use every day. Better for you and the earth? There are a few things a Pin-Up House offers which a normal house does not offer. For example, if you live in a small home wherever you like, you can opt for nature. You feel more connected with nature because you are more surrounded by it. The house has not a great impact on the earth, because you will consume less. It is all about to settle for less, what really matters. We live in a consuming society: everything has to be expensive and big, labelled with a brand. But if you think about what is really important, that you can live with less, you will get a different view on life. You can live in a sustainable way and thus contribute to a better world.   https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/architecture/tinyhouses  
Pin-up House: A way of living in pink
Pin-up House: A way of living in pink
The Great Wall urban car that might fix China’s mobility problem
It seems inevitable that in places where many people live together, just as many people will be on the move. Whether it is to travel to work, for entertainment, or to visit family - we will constantly find ourselves wanting to get from place A to place B. Now imagine this dilemma for countries even more densely populated than the ones most of us will find ourselves living in.   Take China, for instance, where a staggering 1.4 billion people are congregated on a relatively small piece of land. Two of its cities - Shenzhen and Shanghai - list in the top 10 of most densely populated cities in the world, with Beijing trailing behind in 12th place with ‘only’ 11,500 Beijingers living on a square kilometer.   For the sake of comparison: the first Western cities listed come in at 42nd and 43rd, being Madrid and London respectively, ranking at some 5,000 inhabitants per square kilometer each.   The strain of densely populated urban areas While most will surely agree that such densely populated areas might significantly lag behind in terms of quality of life, usually suffering from tiny living spaces and limited resources, one problem stands out most markedly: the overcrowded infrastructure. Most people will not even dare to get in their car during rush hour, while  public transport is struggling to keep up with the ever-growing flow of impatient travellers. This does not even take into account the strain that urban living puts on the environment at large. All of these cars dieseling and fuming out exhaust gasses whilst stationary in traffic have been identified as some of the most significant culprits in the fight against global warming. This is exactly why we are so excited about the trend of urban cars, that are hoping to fix the urban mobility issue and tackle pollution at the same time. Introducing the Great Wall urban car The Chinese automotive company Great Wall Motor has unveiled its prototype of an urban car, aptly named ORA R1. With its claim of being all-electric, capable of achieving a 200-mile range, and its relatively low purchase price at $8,680 - a bargain in the world of  electric cars -, it is certainly looking promising.   The ORA R1 will become the poster child of the ORA brand, that is looking to take the world by storm. For this, it cites its relatively large range and smart solutions as the main selling points. General Manager Ning Shuyong explains its appeal as follows: “ ORA replaces the traditional sales, service, spare parts and surveys (4S) dealership-centered model that is common in China with a network consisting of ORA Home, experience centers and smart outlets in the central business districts of Chinese cities. In addition, the big data cloud that is created as the result of the information collected from the ORA app, the ORA shopping site and the Tmall e-shop opens the way to the development of multiple scenarios for offline sales and services as well as new transportation services for both drivers and passengers .” Efficiency meets cost-effectiveness So, ORA is looking to disrupt the car industry in China through a model that replaces dealerships with all kinds of experience centers, while adding a big data solution that provides its drivers with enhanced personalisation. Although some have remarked that the actual milage might be somewhat lower than the 200-mile range that it is marketed at, and its speed insufficient for longer distances anyway. With its 35 kW electric motor, rather small for its size, the absolute maximum speed will be some 100 km/h or 62 mph.   Yet one should not forget that this is designed to be a car for urban use only. For these purposes, a maximum range of < 200 miles at a speed of < 62 mph should suffice. It will allow you to safely and efficiently cruise through the city, all while minimising your carbon footprint and requiring less space for parking.   Yet experts all agree on one thing: its ultimate selling point is the price. Taking into account the incentives as offered by the government in tax cuts and subsidies, it is priced somewhere between 59,800 RMB and 77,800 RMD (or USD 8,680 and USD 11,293), making it a very competitive offering. Just add the three-year or 120,000 km guarantee for the vehicle as a whole and an eight-year or 150,000 km guarantee for core components, and you might just find yourself wanting one of these. Chances are you will have to wait for a bit, though: for now, it only retails in China. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
It seems inevitable that in places where many people live together, just as many people will be on the move. Whether it is to travel to work, for entertainment, or to visit family - we will constantly find ourselves wanting to get from place A to place B. Now imagine this dilemma for countries even more densely populated than the ones most of us will find ourselves living in.   Take China, for instance, where a staggering 1.4 billion people are congregated on a relatively small piece of land. Two of its cities - Shenzhen and Shanghai - list in the top 10 of most densely populated cities in the world, with Beijing trailing behind in 12th place with ‘only’ 11,500 Beijingers living on a square kilometer.   For the sake of comparison: the first Western cities listed come in at 42nd and 43rd, being Madrid and London respectively, ranking at some 5,000 inhabitants per square kilometer each.   The strain of densely populated urban areas While most will surely agree that such densely populated areas might significantly lag behind in terms of quality of life, usually suffering from tiny living spaces and limited resources, one problem stands out most markedly: the overcrowded infrastructure. Most people will not even dare to get in their car during rush hour, while  public transport is struggling to keep up with the ever-growing flow of impatient travellers. This does not even take into account the strain that urban living puts on the environment at large. All of these cars dieseling and fuming out exhaust gasses whilst stationary in traffic have been identified as some of the most significant culprits in the fight against global warming. This is exactly why we are so excited about the trend of urban cars, that are hoping to fix the urban mobility issue and tackle pollution at the same time. Introducing the Great Wall urban car The Chinese automotive company Great Wall Motor has unveiled its prototype of an urban car, aptly named ORA R1. With its claim of being all-electric, capable of achieving a 200-mile range, and its relatively low purchase price at $8,680 - a bargain in the world of  electric cars -, it is certainly looking promising.   The ORA R1 will become the poster child of the ORA brand, that is looking to take the world by storm. For this, it cites its relatively large range and smart solutions as the main selling points. General Manager Ning Shuyong explains its appeal as follows: “ ORA replaces the traditional sales, service, spare parts and surveys (4S) dealership-centered model that is common in China with a network consisting of ORA Home, experience centers and smart outlets in the central business districts of Chinese cities. In addition, the big data cloud that is created as the result of the information collected from the ORA app, the ORA shopping site and the Tmall e-shop opens the way to the development of multiple scenarios for offline sales and services as well as new transportation services for both drivers and passengers .” Efficiency meets cost-effectiveness So, ORA is looking to disrupt the car industry in China through a model that replaces dealerships with all kinds of experience centers, while adding a big data solution that provides its drivers with enhanced personalisation. Although some have remarked that the actual milage might be somewhat lower than the 200-mile range that it is marketed at, and its speed insufficient for longer distances anyway. With its 35 kW electric motor, rather small for its size, the absolute maximum speed will be some 100 km/h or 62 mph.   Yet one should not forget that this is designed to be a car for urban use only. For these purposes, a maximum range of < 200 miles at a speed of < 62 mph should suffice. It will allow you to safely and efficiently cruise through the city, all while minimising your carbon footprint and requiring less space for parking.   Yet experts all agree on one thing: its ultimate selling point is the price. Taking into account the incentives as offered by the government in tax cuts and subsidies, it is priced somewhere between 59,800 RMB and 77,800 RMD (or USD 8,680 and USD 11,293), making it a very competitive offering. Just add the three-year or 120,000 km guarantee for the vehicle as a whole and an eight-year or 150,000 km guarantee for core components, and you might just find yourself wanting one of these. Chances are you will have to wait for a bit, though: for now, it only retails in China. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
The Great Wall urban car that might fix China’s mobility problem
The Great Wall urban car that might fix China’s mobility problem
The tiny house plug-in-plug-out boat of Punta Del Mar
The idea of tiny floating houses is not quite as revolutionary as it was some years ago. That is not to say that we cannot be impressed by the new startups that flaunt their unique take on the concept, often surprising with their refreshingly new interpretations. One of those concepts was launched by the Spanish startup Punta Del Mar. This collaboration between a local innovation hub and an architecture firm has led to a so-called marina lodge experiment - in the form of a plain, sturdy houseboat solution that will allow users to plug in and plug out when needed. What this means? Well, you get to alternate between plugging in to make it a semi-permanent residence or temporary lodge, fixing it in place in a marina or a hotel waterfront; and plugging out, where it basically functions as a naval caravan that lets you explore seas, rivers and lakes. Sustainable boating which stayes in one place   The first option is a great solution for hotels, campgrounds or marinas that are looking to add capacity during high season, or even to function as a permanent extension of its accommodation. The houseboat only takes up very limited space, yet provides great comfort to those given the privilege of staying in it. At the same time, it is a good way of showing that you are concerned with the environment and looking to do well. Although the claims as to how are somewhat fuzzy, Punta Del Mar is dedicated to sustainable boating and employs a green production process that involves the use of recycled, durable materials for building the houseboat.   Move around sustainably The second solution might work well for adventurers, retirees and holidaymakers all at the same time. If you opt for plugging out your houseboat, you will be able to use it much like a caravan, only on the water. It can rather easily be transported both over land as well as towed on water, allowing you to quite literally plug and go. This will let you explore the most gorgeous places that our earth has to offer. After charging the lithium batteries, the fully automated on-board system takes over to create a connected boat. Whether you are controlling it in situ or remotely, all systems on board will be at your fingertips, including safety measures that can detect and fix simple damages. This makes it a ‘smart’ houseboat, hooked up to an app for its lighting, temperature and sound features.   Great interior providing all basic needs Measuring some 74 square meters, it offers a rather comfortable living area. This surface area is divided over two floors, making it suitable for 2 persons in its standard configuration. This includes a fancy master bedroom with en suite bathroom on the first level, with doors opening out onto your private deck terrace.   The second level is the designated ‘chill-out deck’, that can be equipped with comfortable lounge furniture. Guests can sit back and relax, while enjoying great views over the water. It can be accessed through an interior set of stairs, as such easily extending living space outdoors. The houseboat is really playing up this element of outdoor living as it is, since it is keen on letting in plenty of sunlight through floor-to-ceiling windows. All the while, privacy is guaranteed through semi-open cladding of vertical slats. Efficient use of water and energy Punta Del Mar claims that their houseboat is a floating piece of sustainable engineering. Energy consumption is reduced through the use of passive systems, optimising the heat distribution, while water reservoirs are designed to minimise waste. One of the bolder statements as made by the manufacturer is that it is ‘fully immersive and environment-friendly’, which they explain by saying:   “ Visitors seek unique experiences, memorable trips and destinations moving away from mass tourism. This growing concept of tourism is committed to sustainability. Integration with the environment and exclusivity plays a fundamental role. Moreover, getting space from the sea in a respectful manner is an excellent option to increase available space in an innovative and disruptive way.” Maybe not the most sustainable , but intriguing nonetheless Yes, most people will claim that it is merely another fun toy for those who have the money to enjoy it, pointing at the extra waste that having it transported will generate. Additionally, even though Punta Del Mar is repeatedly mentioning its focus on sustainability, its exact carbon footprint remains unknown.   Having said that, we are certainly excited about its slick appeal and premise. Mock-up photos showing entire marinas and hotel waterfronts filled with those houseboats are a sight to behold, perhaps offering a sneak preview of what might be a good solution in years to come if the sea levels continue to rise.   https://www.whatsorb.com/category/travel
The idea of tiny floating houses is not quite as revolutionary as it was some years ago. That is not to say that we cannot be impressed by the new startups that flaunt their unique take on the concept, often surprising with their refreshingly new interpretations. One of those concepts was launched by the Spanish startup Punta Del Mar. This collaboration between a local innovation hub and an architecture firm has led to a so-called marina lodge experiment - in the form of a plain, sturdy houseboat solution that will allow users to plug in and plug out when needed. What this means? Well, you get to alternate between plugging in to make it a semi-permanent residence or temporary lodge, fixing it in place in a marina or a hotel waterfront; and plugging out, where it basically functions as a naval caravan that lets you explore seas, rivers and lakes. Sustainable boating which stayes in one place   The first option is a great solution for hotels, campgrounds or marinas that are looking to add capacity during high season, or even to function as a permanent extension of its accommodation. The houseboat only takes up very limited space, yet provides great comfort to those given the privilege of staying in it. At the same time, it is a good way of showing that you are concerned with the environment and looking to do well. Although the claims as to how are somewhat fuzzy, Punta Del Mar is dedicated to sustainable boating and employs a green production process that involves the use of recycled, durable materials for building the houseboat.   Move around sustainably The second solution might work well for adventurers, retirees and holidaymakers all at the same time. If you opt for plugging out your houseboat, you will be able to use it much like a caravan, only on the water. It can rather easily be transported both over land as well as towed on water, allowing you to quite literally plug and go. This will let you explore the most gorgeous places that our earth has to offer. After charging the lithium batteries, the fully automated on-board system takes over to create a connected boat. Whether you are controlling it in situ or remotely, all systems on board will be at your fingertips, including safety measures that can detect and fix simple damages. This makes it a ‘smart’ houseboat, hooked up to an app for its lighting, temperature and sound features.   Great interior providing all basic needs Measuring some 74 square meters, it offers a rather comfortable living area. This surface area is divided over two floors, making it suitable for 2 persons in its standard configuration. This includes a fancy master bedroom with en suite bathroom on the first level, with doors opening out onto your private deck terrace.   The second level is the designated ‘chill-out deck’, that can be equipped with comfortable lounge furniture. Guests can sit back and relax, while enjoying great views over the water. It can be accessed through an interior set of stairs, as such easily extending living space outdoors. The houseboat is really playing up this element of outdoor living as it is, since it is keen on letting in plenty of sunlight through floor-to-ceiling windows. All the while, privacy is guaranteed through semi-open cladding of vertical slats. Efficient use of water and energy Punta Del Mar claims that their houseboat is a floating piece of sustainable engineering. Energy consumption is reduced through the use of passive systems, optimising the heat distribution, while water reservoirs are designed to minimise waste. One of the bolder statements as made by the manufacturer is that it is ‘fully immersive and environment-friendly’, which they explain by saying:   “ Visitors seek unique experiences, memorable trips and destinations moving away from mass tourism. This growing concept of tourism is committed to sustainability. Integration with the environment and exclusivity plays a fundamental role. Moreover, getting space from the sea in a respectful manner is an excellent option to increase available space in an innovative and disruptive way.” Maybe not the most sustainable , but intriguing nonetheless Yes, most people will claim that it is merely another fun toy for those who have the money to enjoy it, pointing at the extra waste that having it transported will generate. Additionally, even though Punta Del Mar is repeatedly mentioning its focus on sustainability, its exact carbon footprint remains unknown.   Having said that, we are certainly excited about its slick appeal and premise. Mock-up photos showing entire marinas and hotel waterfronts filled with those houseboats are a sight to behold, perhaps offering a sneak preview of what might be a good solution in years to come if the sea levels continue to rise.   https://www.whatsorb.com/category/travel
The tiny house plug-in-plug-out boat of Punta Del Mar
The tiny house plug-in-plug-out boat of Punta Del Mar
Climate change was a sideshow in president Trump
Climate change was a sideshow of the State of the Union but it should be the catch While climate change was hardly addressed during the State of the Union by president Trump, a few blocks away from the capitol Building the Navy is thinking about building a more than 4 meters high floodwall costing 20 million US dollars around the Washington Navy Yard. This to cope with the rising sea levels caused by climate change. Instead of addressing climate change president Trump mainly addressed: national security, immigration, infrastructure, works and health care. President Trump was proud to announce that the fossil fuel boost in production in the US was close to a ‘revolution’. The US - according president Trumps words – was now the number one producer of oil and gas in the world. He forgot to tell what the consequences are from these fossil fuels and climate change. The US experienced under the presidency from president Trump billion dollar disasters. Fires, draughts, hurricanes and floods causing a massive human and economic toll . Thousands of people are still homeless, thousands died. The United States also have to deal with  climate change Even president Trumps advisors are saying that the climate risks are rising. More than 10 federal agencies concluded that the whole country is at risk. According to the report of the World Assessment from top intelligence officials released in January 2019 warned that climate change poses an enormous risk. The US has to deal with challenges like human displacement, health threats, negative effects of environmental degradation and yes, climate change. The State of the Union would have been a great platform to admit that that many US citizens suffer already from climate change. Unfortunate it got not addressed. Fortunate the boom in renewables and therefore jobs are on the rise. The left is looking for a 'New Green Deal’ and the Republicans are looking for a carbon tax to cut greenhouse gasses. Climate change was hardly addressed at the State of the Union but some people in the audience tried to make clear to the people who watched the State of the Union that climate change should be on top of the list of issues where the US has to deal with today!   https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate
Climate change was a sideshow of the State of the Union but it should be the catch While climate change was hardly addressed during the State of the Union by president Trump, a few blocks away from the capitol Building the Navy is thinking about building a more than 4 meters high floodwall costing 20 million US dollars around the Washington Navy Yard. This to cope with the rising sea levels caused by climate change. Instead of addressing climate change president Trump mainly addressed: national security, immigration, infrastructure, works and health care. President Trump was proud to announce that the fossil fuel boost in production in the US was close to a ‘revolution’. The US - according president Trumps words – was now the number one producer of oil and gas in the world. He forgot to tell what the consequences are from these fossil fuels and climate change. The US experienced under the presidency from president Trump billion dollar disasters. Fires, draughts, hurricanes and floods causing a massive human and economic toll . Thousands of people are still homeless, thousands died. The United States also have to deal with  climate change Even president Trumps advisors are saying that the climate risks are rising. More than 10 federal agencies concluded that the whole country is at risk. According to the report of the World Assessment from top intelligence officials released in January 2019 warned that climate change poses an enormous risk. The US has to deal with challenges like human displacement, health threats, negative effects of environmental degradation and yes, climate change. The State of the Union would have been a great platform to admit that that many US citizens suffer already from climate change. Unfortunate it got not addressed. Fortunate the boom in renewables and therefore jobs are on the rise. The left is looking for a 'New Green Deal’ and the Republicans are looking for a carbon tax to cut greenhouse gasses. Climate change was hardly addressed at the State of the Union but some people in the audience tried to make clear to the people who watched the State of the Union that climate change should be on top of the list of issues where the US has to deal with today!   https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate
Climate change was a sideshow in president Trump's State of the Union
Sustainable bicyle is made from recycled plastic in Brazil
The bicycle is made from recycled plastic. There are no shock absorbers and the bicycle is without weldings. It does not rust and it does not have a paint. Who created this recycled plastic bicycle? Mr. Juan Muzzi, original from Uruguay and now settled in Brazil, came up with the idea. Mr. Muzzi is a graduated in engineering and fine Arts. After his study he found himself more interested in his creative side. Mr. Muzzi found the idea of the circular economy very interesting. This led to the creation of the recycled plastic bicycle and as a result the company; Muzzicycles. How is the recycled plastic bicycle made? The plastic waste is crushed til ir become small grains. Than the grains are heated till they get liquid. An additive is added to give the material more strength. Than the liquid is deposited in a injection machine which – under high pressure – sprays the liquid in a moult. Less than 4 minutes later the frame of the recycle plastic bicycle is ready. Muzzicycles gives a lifetime warranty for it’s bicycles . The bicycle cost around $ 700,00 or € 610,00 The manufactory process of the plastic bicyle The whole process uses more ten 90% less energy than a traditional one and a minimum of water. At this day, Mr. Muzzi used already about 15 tons of plastic and manufactured more than 130.000 bicycles. The bicycle are available in different colours and the ring sizes 24, 27 and 29. Recycle Muzzicycles delivered around the world At the moment the recycle plastic  bicycles get exported to: The Netherlands, Poland and Argentina. This year they will be also available in: Austria, and the United States. Mr. Muzzi earned international award with his recycled bicycles like the Top XXI Brazil Design Award, the Biennial Iberoamericana de Diseno in Spain and later the Sustentar in the category Urban Ecological Mobility. The next step; the rubber chain Mr. Muzzi’s next goal is to develop a rubber chain so users can easily bike on the beach without having trouble with their chain and gear and cog-wheels. Have a nice ride. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
The bicycle is made from recycled plastic. There are no shock absorbers and the bicycle is without weldings. It does not rust and it does not have a paint. Who created this recycled plastic bicycle? Mr. Juan Muzzi, original from Uruguay and now settled in Brazil, came up with the idea. Mr. Muzzi is a graduated in engineering and fine Arts. After his study he found himself more interested in his creative side. Mr. Muzzi found the idea of the circular economy very interesting. This led to the creation of the recycled plastic bicycle and as a result the company; Muzzicycles. How is the recycled plastic bicycle made? The plastic waste is crushed til ir become small grains. Than the grains are heated till they get liquid. An additive is added to give the material more strength. Than the liquid is deposited in a injection machine which – under high pressure – sprays the liquid in a moult. Less than 4 minutes later the frame of the recycle plastic bicycle is ready. Muzzicycles gives a lifetime warranty for it’s bicycles . The bicycle cost around $ 700,00 or € 610,00 The manufactory process of the plastic bicyle The whole process uses more ten 90% less energy than a traditional one and a minimum of water. At this day, Mr. Muzzi used already about 15 tons of plastic and manufactured more than 130.000 bicycles. The bicycle are available in different colours and the ring sizes 24, 27 and 29. Recycle Muzzicycles delivered around the world At the moment the recycle plastic  bicycles get exported to: The Netherlands, Poland and Argentina. This year they will be also available in: Austria, and the United States. Mr. Muzzi earned international award with his recycled bicycles like the Top XXI Brazil Design Award, the Biennial Iberoamericana de Diseno in Spain and later the Sustentar in the category Urban Ecological Mobility. The next step; the rubber chain Mr. Muzzi’s next goal is to develop a rubber chain so users can easily bike on the beach without having trouble with their chain and gear and cog-wheels. Have a nice ride. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
Sustainable bicyle is made from recycled plastic in Brazil
Sustainable bicyle is made from recycled plastic in Brazil
The Vintage Teardrop: camping with a nod to the past
The so-called Teardrop trailer was first introduced in March/April 1939, in a magazine called Popular Homecraft. Originally designed and built by Louis Rogers of Pasadena, California as a coach for his honeymoon, it quickly made headlines for its futuristic design and ease of use. Thousands and thousands of people fell in love with the quirky trailer that gave them an unprecedented level of freedom, or so they thought. Just a first glance at the fun-looking vehicle and you will be dreaming away of summer road trips and camping outdoors. And while it may not have been in fashion as much as it was back in the forties, it does not take away anything from the fact that it might have been one of the very first examples of a tiny house. The recent wave of popularity surrounding the concept of downsizing and living in increasingly smaller spaces is, as such, not entirely new - although it nicely goes hand in hand with sustainability goals.   Reducing  carbon footprints A closer look at the specifics of the Vintage Teardrop illustrate how it could be considered a predecessor of the tiny house movement. At the time of its first publication, people went nuts for its advantages. The trailers were tiny, light, easy to tow, and reduced drag and fuel consumption due to its aerodynamic shape. Even the Italian mini-car Isetta, better known as the original Bubble Car due to its egg shape and bubble-like windows, could easily tow it - making for a great sight along the way. With a total floor plan of 8 inch by 4 inch, comprised of tongue-and-groove oak flooring on a pine chassis and hard pressed board as sides and top, the original egg-shaped trailer sleeps two. Additionally, it boasted a kitchenette in the rear with an ice box, sink and stove, and a separate curtain-enclosed dressing room providing some privacy while dressing. Furthermore, the floor plan included space for a pressurised water tank, a small clothes closet, and a chemical toilet. Refined teardrop concept After the initial success, two guys bought an abandoned fruit stand in Norwalk in post-World War II California. They figured they would take the concept, tune it down and clad it by aluminum instead. Soon after, they started selling their unique take on the Teardrop trailer, in doing so minimising its use of raw materials. These raw materials were often procured from recycled products - particularly war reminisants, such as Jeeps salvaged from sunken ships. The only downside? The many bullet holes in them, that had to be welded up during production. Although the main incentive driving the use of minimal, recycled materials was not nearly as noble as ‘saving the planet’ and something more along the lines of ‘saving money’, it sure teaches us great lessons for the development of tiny house projects today.   From fruit cart to worldwide obsession If you are interested where the guys with the fruit cart ended up with their concept, you can rest assured that the answer is, in fact, ‘in the history books’. Soon after their prototype completion, sales exploded - in particular after some much-needed upgrades to the interior and facilities. Solely working from their own workplace, constructing their specially developed kits, these guys ended up building more than 40 trailers per day. Thousands and thousands of Teardrop trailers hit the road in the following years.   As if this was not yet enough, the guys kept on innovating and came up with a slightly more conventional 8 inch by 14 inch “coach” model in a camper edition, that once again resulted in demand crushing the actual supply.   Even today, their company Kit Manufacturing Co. still thrives, manufacturing all kinds of recreational vehicles and mobile home equipment. One of these guys kept on running the company until his death in 2012, while the other spent the last decades of his life enjoying his well-earned retirement. Why it matters As explained before, the Vintage Teardrop is a perfect example of why  tiny houses can - and will! -   be successful if done right. Downsizing and living small will feel like an adventure to us, people, if we feel that it adds value to our life. Or charm, as the Teardrop trailer did. Combine this with a promise to make one’s life more sustainable and eco-friendly through the reduced carbon footprint and use of recycled materials, and we will be sure to embrace the tiny house-trend - just like our (grand)parents embraced the teardrop trailer in the forties and fifties. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
The so-called Teardrop trailer was first introduced in March/April 1939, in a magazine called Popular Homecraft. Originally designed and built by Louis Rogers of Pasadena, California as a coach for his honeymoon, it quickly made headlines for its futuristic design and ease of use. Thousands and thousands of people fell in love with the quirky trailer that gave them an unprecedented level of freedom, or so they thought. Just a first glance at the fun-looking vehicle and you will be dreaming away of summer road trips and camping outdoors. And while it may not have been in fashion as much as it was back in the forties, it does not take away anything from the fact that it might have been one of the very first examples of a tiny house. The recent wave of popularity surrounding the concept of downsizing and living in increasingly smaller spaces is, as such, not entirely new - although it nicely goes hand in hand with sustainability goals.   Reducing  carbon footprints A closer look at the specifics of the Vintage Teardrop illustrate how it could be considered a predecessor of the tiny house movement. At the time of its first publication, people went nuts for its advantages. The trailers were tiny, light, easy to tow, and reduced drag and fuel consumption due to its aerodynamic shape. Even the Italian mini-car Isetta, better known as the original Bubble Car due to its egg shape and bubble-like windows, could easily tow it - making for a great sight along the way. With a total floor plan of 8 inch by 4 inch, comprised of tongue-and-groove oak flooring on a pine chassis and hard pressed board as sides and top, the original egg-shaped trailer sleeps two. Additionally, it boasted a kitchenette in the rear with an ice box, sink and stove, and a separate curtain-enclosed dressing room providing some privacy while dressing. Furthermore, the floor plan included space for a pressurised water tank, a small clothes closet, and a chemical toilet. Refined teardrop concept After the initial success, two guys bought an abandoned fruit stand in Norwalk in post-World War II California. They figured they would take the concept, tune it down and clad it by aluminum instead. Soon after, they started selling their unique take on the Teardrop trailer, in doing so minimising its use of raw materials. These raw materials were often procured from recycled products - particularly war reminisants, such as Jeeps salvaged from sunken ships. The only downside? The many bullet holes in them, that had to be welded up during production. Although the main incentive driving the use of minimal, recycled materials was not nearly as noble as ‘saving the planet’ and something more along the lines of ‘saving money’, it sure teaches us great lessons for the development of tiny house projects today.   From fruit cart to worldwide obsession If you are interested where the guys with the fruit cart ended up with their concept, you can rest assured that the answer is, in fact, ‘in the history books’. Soon after their prototype completion, sales exploded - in particular after some much-needed upgrades to the interior and facilities. Solely working from their own workplace, constructing their specially developed kits, these guys ended up building more than 40 trailers per day. Thousands and thousands of Teardrop trailers hit the road in the following years.   As if this was not yet enough, the guys kept on innovating and came up with a slightly more conventional 8 inch by 14 inch “coach” model in a camper edition, that once again resulted in demand crushing the actual supply.   Even today, their company Kit Manufacturing Co. still thrives, manufacturing all kinds of recreational vehicles and mobile home equipment. One of these guys kept on running the company until his death in 2012, while the other spent the last decades of his life enjoying his well-earned retirement. Why it matters As explained before, the Vintage Teardrop is a perfect example of why  tiny houses can - and will! -   be successful if done right. Downsizing and living small will feel like an adventure to us, people, if we feel that it adds value to our life. Or charm, as the Teardrop trailer did. Combine this with a promise to make one’s life more sustainable and eco-friendly through the reduced carbon footprint and use of recycled materials, and we will be sure to embrace the tiny house-trend - just like our (grand)parents embraced the teardrop trailer in the forties and fifties. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
The Vintage Teardrop: camping with a nod to the past
The Vintage Teardrop: camping with a nod to the past
Your cup of coffee will destroy the planet while the planet destroys your coffee
Most of us thoroughly enjoy our cup of coffee in the morning. It wakes us up to a bright new world and it warms us up on chilly days, prepping us for a full day of work ahead. How ironic that this little habit might just lead to permanently warming up any chilly days and eventually us not having any world to wake up to. And if this is not yet bad enough, all of these adverse weather effects might ultimately lead to you not having any more coffee to drink. Why? Recently, scientists put out a warning stating that the majority of coffee species are at risk of extinction, as the sole result of climate change. They estimate the number of species that might go extinct at 60 percent - or higher. This is bad news for more than one reason, as it might trigger a sequence that ultimately leads to the end of coffee as we know it today. Or force us to save it by taking very unsustainable actions. The hard numbers of climate change Research is hard to refute. And research is exactly what lies at the basis of the coffee vs. climate change debate. It found that climate change has already been affecting two of the most frequently consumed coffee species, being the C. Arabica (better known as Arabica coffee) and C. Capephonara, otherwise known as Robusta coffee.   Of the remaining 124 wild coffee species, it has been found that at least 60 percent will go extinct if global warming is not addressed properly. And while not all of these are heavily consumed species, they are important for keeping up the diversity in the plant-family. Once diversity in coffee species dwindles, it will become harder to find hybrids that are capable of resisting extreme weather events and pests - side-effects of global warming.   The facts above are basically just the first trigger in a causal chain that will lead to more and more coffee species dying out as they are not able to fulfil to the first rule of Darwinism: adapt or die. The only alternative will be using up scarce resources and huge amounts of energy to artificially keep our nation’s favourite beverage alive. Which will leave the world in an even worse situation as it is in today. Finding sustainable conservation plans You might as well make yourself another cup of cappuccino at this point, because it is not getting any better. Despite pleas and warning cries from coffee producers and researchers alike, we have not yet come up with sustainable and effective conservation plans to save the dozens of coffee plant species at risk of going extinct. The ones that are currently in place are highly inadequate and often even polluting of their own.   As Aaron Davis, a coffee specialist and frequently credited author of research papers on the topic admits: “Ultimately, we need to reverse deforestation and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.”  Yet the big puzzle remains: how to save the planet and coffee at the same time? A potential solution for saving our coffee It might seem depressing, but stay with me - as there are potentially viable ideas and innovations that focus on retaining at least a significant part of the currently existing species. These largely focus on the world’s most widely consumed coffee species, being our favourites Arabica and Robusta. The largest risk threatening these species is that they are rather finicky and fragile. Arabica, for instance, is a slow grower and enjoys a place in the shade of trees, preferably at higher altitudes - which is why they are mostly produced in or near mountains. Robusta is not much better, also requiring a specific ecosystem to live in and  climate to thrive in. Building up genetic resistance As all of these ecosystems are likely to change as the result of global warming, the key to saving your favourite latte is the adaptation of the crops to allow them to be more sustainable to their new environment. The Arabica and Robusta plants can be made more resistant by letting them borrow certain traits from their wild coffee-relatives, of which - let’s look at the glass half-full - some 40% are decidedly not yet at risk.   Why are these safe, for now at least? Well, they might possess a certain pest-resistant gene, they might be unappealing to destructive insects, or they might be better suited for warmer or colder climates. A trait that could be passed on to our favourite coffee species. Through breeding, hybrids can be developed that will give us the same - or similar - flavour, while being easier to grow. So, it is basically gene-editing, to find out which wild coffee species are best combined with Arabica and Robusta. Science at its best, that will once again come around to save the planet. It seems like a win-win situation: saving coffee while not negatively impacting the environment. It might even have a positive impact on your health as well, as the wild coffee species that will be interbred with generally have a lower sugar and caffeine count. Sounds like a perfect solution - that is, unless you strongly dislike your brew decaffeinated. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/gardening-agriculture
Most of us thoroughly enjoy our cup of coffee in the morning. It wakes us up to a bright new world and it warms us up on chilly days, prepping us for a full day of work ahead. How ironic that this little habit might just lead to permanently warming up any chilly days and eventually us not having any world to wake up to. And if this is not yet bad enough, all of these adverse weather effects might ultimately lead to you not having any more coffee to drink. Why? Recently, scientists put out a warning stating that the majority of coffee species are at risk of extinction, as the sole result of climate change. They estimate the number of species that might go extinct at 60 percent - or higher. This is bad news for more than one reason, as it might trigger a sequence that ultimately leads to the end of coffee as we know it today. Or force us to save it by taking very unsustainable actions. The hard numbers of climate change Research is hard to refute. And research is exactly what lies at the basis of the coffee vs. climate change debate. It found that climate change has already been affecting two of the most frequently consumed coffee species, being the C. Arabica (better known as Arabica coffee) and C. Capephonara, otherwise known as Robusta coffee.   Of the remaining 124 wild coffee species, it has been found that at least 60 percent will go extinct if global warming is not addressed properly. And while not all of these are heavily consumed species, they are important for keeping up the diversity in the plant-family. Once diversity in coffee species dwindles, it will become harder to find hybrids that are capable of resisting extreme weather events and pests - side-effects of global warming.   The facts above are basically just the first trigger in a causal chain that will lead to more and more coffee species dying out as they are not able to fulfil to the first rule of Darwinism: adapt or die. The only alternative will be using up scarce resources and huge amounts of energy to artificially keep our nation’s favourite beverage alive. Which will leave the world in an even worse situation as it is in today. Finding sustainable conservation plans You might as well make yourself another cup of cappuccino at this point, because it is not getting any better. Despite pleas and warning cries from coffee producers and researchers alike, we have not yet come up with sustainable and effective conservation plans to save the dozens of coffee plant species at risk of going extinct. The ones that are currently in place are highly inadequate and often even polluting of their own.   As Aaron Davis, a coffee specialist and frequently credited author of research papers on the topic admits: “Ultimately, we need to reverse deforestation and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.”  Yet the big puzzle remains: how to save the planet and coffee at the same time? A potential solution for saving our coffee It might seem depressing, but stay with me - as there are potentially viable ideas and innovations that focus on retaining at least a significant part of the currently existing species. These largely focus on the world’s most widely consumed coffee species, being our favourites Arabica and Robusta. The largest risk threatening these species is that they are rather finicky and fragile. Arabica, for instance, is a slow grower and enjoys a place in the shade of trees, preferably at higher altitudes - which is why they are mostly produced in or near mountains. Robusta is not much better, also requiring a specific ecosystem to live in and  climate to thrive in. Building up genetic resistance As all of these ecosystems are likely to change as the result of global warming, the key to saving your favourite latte is the adaptation of the crops to allow them to be more sustainable to their new environment. The Arabica and Robusta plants can be made more resistant by letting them borrow certain traits from their wild coffee-relatives, of which - let’s look at the glass half-full - some 40% are decidedly not yet at risk.   Why are these safe, for now at least? Well, they might possess a certain pest-resistant gene, they might be unappealing to destructive insects, or they might be better suited for warmer or colder climates. A trait that could be passed on to our favourite coffee species. Through breeding, hybrids can be developed that will give us the same - or similar - flavour, while being easier to grow. So, it is basically gene-editing, to find out which wild coffee species are best combined with Arabica and Robusta. Science at its best, that will once again come around to save the planet. It seems like a win-win situation: saving coffee while not negatively impacting the environment. It might even have a positive impact on your health as well, as the wild coffee species that will be interbred with generally have a lower sugar and caffeine count. Sounds like a perfect solution - that is, unless you strongly dislike your brew decaffeinated. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/gardening-agriculture
Your cup of coffee will destroy the planet while the planet destroys your coffee
Your cup of coffee will destroy the planet while the planet destroys your coffee
Climate change versus the rich and famous in a nutshell
David Attenborough talked about the urgency which is needed to tackle  climate change  in Davos (Switzerland) but he could not convince his audience. Many private jets landed in Davos with the ‘elite’ from around the world. They would lecture the massa bout the fact that they are more worried than ever about climate change. What? So a great amount of privileged enjoy unlimeted wealth while many lack basic resources. While inequality is part of life it is the scale, the high levels of inequality which is worrying. One of the reasons is that the rich and wealthy get tax benefits and worse don’t pay tax in countries where they have businesses. Also there are the taxs-heavens. Maybe the last are in a certain way legal at least it is unethical. Environmental issues  versus philantropic organisations In combination with environmental issues on a large scale billions of people don’t get what they are entiteled to. Often you see these elite starting their philantropic organisations to offer some relief to pressing issues while if they would pay their employees a healthy salary and pay taxs the way it should in the countries where it belongs the problems would be much less. This way philantropic organisation would hardly be nessecary. Mr. Rutger Bregman (historian and author of Utopia for Realists; How We Can Build the Ideal World: from the Netherlands, criticised the event in Davos for its focus on philanthropy rather than tax avoidance and the need for fair taxation to reduce poverty. {youtube} By: Hans van der Broek https://www.whatsorb.com/community/consumerism--a-society-built-on-exploitation  
David Attenborough talked about the urgency which is needed to tackle  climate change  in Davos (Switzerland) but he could not convince his audience. Many private jets landed in Davos with the ‘elite’ from around the world. They would lecture the massa bout the fact that they are more worried than ever about climate change. What? So a great amount of privileged enjoy unlimeted wealth while many lack basic resources. While inequality is part of life it is the scale, the high levels of inequality which is worrying. One of the reasons is that the rich and wealthy get tax benefits and worse don’t pay tax in countries where they have businesses. Also there are the taxs-heavens. Maybe the last are in a certain way legal at least it is unethical. Environmental issues  versus philantropic organisations In combination with environmental issues on a large scale billions of people don’t get what they are entiteled to. Often you see these elite starting their philantropic organisations to offer some relief to pressing issues while if they would pay their employees a healthy salary and pay taxs the way it should in the countries where it belongs the problems would be much less. This way philantropic organisation would hardly be nessecary. Mr. Rutger Bregman (historian and author of Utopia for Realists; How We Can Build the Ideal World: from the Netherlands, criticised the event in Davos for its focus on philanthropy rather than tax avoidance and the need for fair taxation to reduce poverty. {youtube} By: Hans van der Broek https://www.whatsorb.com/community/consumerism--a-society-built-on-exploitation  
Climate change versus the rich and famous in a nutshell
Climate Change makes the Polar Vortex life threatening cold
Climate change makes the Polar Vortex even worse! In the Midwest from the US the temperatures will drop till -46C or lower. Warming shelters are open and officials fear that many people who live on the streets will not survive. The current blast of Artic air from the Polar Vortex brought temperatures to a dangerous low. Many schools are closed in the Midwest area as well as more than 1000 flights are canceled. Snow has fallen as much as 60 cm to 1.80 m in Illinois. In some area people got killed already by the extreme cold. The Polar Vortex going more south of the US Normaly the Polar Vortex stays around the North Pole but now it has going down all the way to the south of the United States. Recently 72% of polled Americans say that climate change is important to them outnumbering them who don’t believe in climate change by five to one. Climate change used to be something of the future but is hitting people, the world now hard. It is here and now and we have to learn to adapt to it and find ways to decrease our global footprint. Climate change  reduces the amount of ice in the Artic Sea The term Polar Vortex is nothing new. It appeared already in 1853 in an article written by E. Littell’s, Living Age. It is a large area of cold air and low pressure surrounding the South and the North poles. The flow is counter clockwise which keeps normally the cold air close to the poles. In wintertime in the Northern Hemisphere the Vortex gets less stable and lowers more south. Because of climate change and global warming some investigators have suggested that this has reduced the Artic sea ice. For this reason Artic cold air can go more south. So the contradictory conclusion can be made that global warming can cause extreme cold. {youtube} https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate
Climate change makes the Polar Vortex even worse! In the Midwest from the US the temperatures will drop till -46C or lower. Warming shelters are open and officials fear that many people who live on the streets will not survive. The current blast of Artic air from the Polar Vortex brought temperatures to a dangerous low. Many schools are closed in the Midwest area as well as more than 1000 flights are canceled. Snow has fallen as much as 60 cm to 1.80 m in Illinois. In some area people got killed already by the extreme cold. The Polar Vortex going more south of the US Normaly the Polar Vortex stays around the North Pole but now it has going down all the way to the south of the United States. Recently 72% of polled Americans say that climate change is important to them outnumbering them who don’t believe in climate change by five to one. Climate change used to be something of the future but is hitting people, the world now hard. It is here and now and we have to learn to adapt to it and find ways to decrease our global footprint. Climate change  reduces the amount of ice in the Artic Sea The term Polar Vortex is nothing new. It appeared already in 1853 in an article written by E. Littell’s, Living Age. It is a large area of cold air and low pressure surrounding the South and the North poles. The flow is counter clockwise which keeps normally the cold air close to the poles. In wintertime in the Northern Hemisphere the Vortex gets less stable and lowers more south. Because of climate change and global warming some investigators have suggested that this has reduced the Artic sea ice. For this reason Artic cold air can go more south. So the contradictory conclusion can be made that global warming can cause extreme cold. {youtube} https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate
Climate Change makes the Polar Vortex life threatening cold
These promising e-scooter start-ups are taking over the Netherlands
Did you already spot them down the streets of your hometown? Perhaps you’ve recognised them whizzing past you, or seen them parked on the sidewalks. We’re talking about the e-scooter: this concept is taking over the Netherlands in 2019 – and beyond. The electric scooter frenzy is sky-rocketing, the demand for alternate energy is growing as days pass by. E-scooter: the perfect sustainable city transport The growing popularity of e-scooters is due to the compact body, with the small motor attached with the battery pack. Over time, without any doubt, these electric scooters have evolved into a significantly inexpensive, secure and dependable way of transportation for an tremendous amount of people. We are not the only ones to see this, the investment in micro-mobility start-ups went beyond one billion euros in 2018, according to research from DealRoom. Notably, the electric scooter craze began with Santa Monica-based Bird, which raised its Series-A in October 2017. The report also stated that consumers spend over 1,1 trillion dollar a year on transportation. But what about the Netherlands? These promising e-scooter start-ups are ready to take on Europe. Get ready to hit the road, e-scooter style! Felyx: solving current urban mobility issues  Felyx, based in the bicycle capital of the world (Amsterdam), offers shared e-scooters to solve current urban mobility issues. With over 400 e-scooters that you can locate and activate through an app, Felyx is well on their way to boost the Dutch sharing economy while being sustainable. Sharing is caring: Dott Dott is on a mission to improve European city life. The dockless e-scooters (and bikes) can be shared and are a convenient for short-distance travel. Sharing is caring! Dott, based in Amsterdam, has a most experienced team in mobility and tech in Europe. The start-up raised an initial investment of €20 million, co-led by EQT Ventures and Naspers. Dutch Tesla on Two Wheels; Etergo  Etergo is an automotive company that develops AppScooter, an electric smart vehicle, also known as the ‘Dutch Tesla on Two Wheels’. With Etergo’s e-scooter, you can stream music and take calls without even pulling out the smartphone. With a 7-inch LED touchscreen and the handlebar controls, you’re fully equipped to handle your digital activities. It is the world’s first scooter to run Android apps. The ultimate purpose of this e-scooter is to minimize distractions while travelling. Swheels2Go, an  e-scooter sharing platform SwheelS2Go is introducing sustainable, accessible, affordable, and reliable solutions for urban area's. With their e-scooter sharing platform SwheelS2Go, this start-up is effectively contributing to the environment. Book your e-scooter through the SwheelS2Go app and use the scan code to start your journey. Simple2Go, Sustainable2Go: SwheelS2Go Trikelet: ride and fold! Trikelet offers an e-scooter that is intuitive to ride and fold. It fits under the seat of the train, for instance, and in most of the luggage compartments – it looks like a fancy suitcase, that you can roll along to all your destinations. This e-scooter has no local emission and noise, furthermore, the materials used to build this scooter can be recycled as well. Bird: from California to the Netherlands E-scooter start-up Bird is headquartered in California, but plans to expand across the Netherlands. Founded by former Uber and Lyft executive, Travis VanderZanden, this start-up aims to make cities more livable by reducing car usage, traffic, and carbon emissions. Moreover, it provides a fleet of electric, shared scooters that can be accessed via smartphone. Reduce your carbon footprint. Technology from VOI  VOI Technology is bringing shared electric scooters to the streets of Europe. If you want to reduce your carbon footprint, just jump on a VOI scooter and ride to your destination – all free from emissions. Right now you can find the e-scooter in cities like Stockholm, Paris and Lisboa, but the Netherlands are next. E-bike GiGI, easy-to-fold and handle This Dutch start-up developed an alternative to the folding bike : an easy-to-handle, lightweight, practical, smart and contemporary Li-ion battery powered folding scooter. You can easily take the GiGi e-bike on the train and it’s simple to fold for indoor storage. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
Did you already spot them down the streets of your hometown? Perhaps you’ve recognised them whizzing past you, or seen them parked on the sidewalks. We’re talking about the e-scooter: this concept is taking over the Netherlands in 2019 – and beyond. The electric scooter frenzy is sky-rocketing, the demand for alternate energy is growing as days pass by. E-scooter: the perfect sustainable city transport The growing popularity of e-scooters is due to the compact body, with the small motor attached with the battery pack. Over time, without any doubt, these electric scooters have evolved into a significantly inexpensive, secure and dependable way of transportation for an tremendous amount of people. We are not the only ones to see this, the investment in micro-mobility start-ups went beyond one billion euros in 2018, according to research from DealRoom. Notably, the electric scooter craze began with Santa Monica-based Bird, which raised its Series-A in October 2017. The report also stated that consumers spend over 1,1 trillion dollar a year on transportation. But what about the Netherlands? These promising e-scooter start-ups are ready to take on Europe. Get ready to hit the road, e-scooter style! Felyx: solving current urban mobility issues  Felyx, based in the bicycle capital of the world (Amsterdam), offers shared e-scooters to solve current urban mobility issues. With over 400 e-scooters that you can locate and activate through an app, Felyx is well on their way to boost the Dutch sharing economy while being sustainable. Sharing is caring: Dott Dott is on a mission to improve European city life. The dockless e-scooters (and bikes) can be shared and are a convenient for short-distance travel. Sharing is caring! Dott, based in Amsterdam, has a most experienced team in mobility and tech in Europe. The start-up raised an initial investment of €20 million, co-led by EQT Ventures and Naspers. Dutch Tesla on Two Wheels; Etergo  Etergo is an automotive company that develops AppScooter, an electric smart vehicle, also known as the ‘Dutch Tesla on Two Wheels’. With Etergo’s e-scooter, you can stream music and take calls without even pulling out the smartphone. With a 7-inch LED touchscreen and the handlebar controls, you’re fully equipped to handle your digital activities. It is the world’s first scooter to run Android apps. The ultimate purpose of this e-scooter is to minimize distractions while travelling. Swheels2Go, an  e-scooter sharing platform SwheelS2Go is introducing sustainable, accessible, affordable, and reliable solutions for urban area's. With their e-scooter sharing platform SwheelS2Go, this start-up is effectively contributing to the environment. Book your e-scooter through the SwheelS2Go app and use the scan code to start your journey. Simple2Go, Sustainable2Go: SwheelS2Go Trikelet: ride and fold! Trikelet offers an e-scooter that is intuitive to ride and fold. It fits under the seat of the train, for instance, and in most of the luggage compartments – it looks like a fancy suitcase, that you can roll along to all your destinations. This e-scooter has no local emission and noise, furthermore, the materials used to build this scooter can be recycled as well. Bird: from California to the Netherlands E-scooter start-up Bird is headquartered in California, but plans to expand across the Netherlands. Founded by former Uber and Lyft executive, Travis VanderZanden, this start-up aims to make cities more livable by reducing car usage, traffic, and carbon emissions. Moreover, it provides a fleet of electric, shared scooters that can be accessed via smartphone. Reduce your carbon footprint. Technology from VOI  VOI Technology is bringing shared electric scooters to the streets of Europe. If you want to reduce your carbon footprint, just jump on a VOI scooter and ride to your destination – all free from emissions. Right now you can find the e-scooter in cities like Stockholm, Paris and Lisboa, but the Netherlands are next. E-bike GiGI, easy-to-fold and handle This Dutch start-up developed an alternative to the folding bike : an easy-to-handle, lightweight, practical, smart and contemporary Li-ion battery powered folding scooter. You can easily take the GiGi e-bike on the train and it’s simple to fold for indoor storage. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation
These promising e-scooter start-ups are taking over the Netherlands
These promising e-scooter start-ups are taking over the Netherlands
Get updates on environmental sustainability in your mailbox every month.