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The e-bike Mamachari is Japan’s moms favorite smart idea
If you are lucky enough to live in an area where biking is encouraged and a widespread activity, you will surely have witnessed the forced versatility of this mode of transportation. Entire households can fit on the small frame of this iron horse; pets, several children, suitcases and boxes included. Those skilled in biking can juggle umbrellas, smartphones and backpacks seemingly without difficulties, while still somehow paying attention to the surrounding traffic as well. Now, if you are even luckier to have visited Japan in recent years, you might recognise the term Mamachari. Loosely translated at ‘mom-bikes’, this ingenious piece of engineering has taken the notion of bike-travel and combined it with all the much needed features that make our daily life a lot easier.   Still ‘just an e-bike’, but much more than that While the Mamachari, that are a common sight in virtually all regions in the Asian country, might appear to be a no-frills, purely functional object at a first glance; those who dare to look closer will be stunned by its possibilities. Without any real difficulties, it can be transformed into a grocery getter, an easy commuter bike, a pizza delivery service or a taxi ride for your kids to school.   Various western manufacturers have jumped on the bandwagon and introduced their own version of the iconic Japanese bicycle. Take the Cero One. This self-proclaimed cargo bike is uncompromising in its ambition to match and possibly even improve the mom-bike. Yet it has paid significant attention to the design as well. Most people will not even discern this cargo bike from the regular ones driving down the street. Equipped with handy baskets and rackets The large rear wheel does not only make for a cool look, it also supports the extra weight that the bike can carry. This extra weight can be stored in a wide collection of modular baskets and rackets, adding up to some 12 pieces in total that are designed to fit any kind of carry-on luggage. When this heavy load gets too much, you will be happy to find out that the built-in electric motor can take you on a trip of up to 93 miles. As for its purpose? Japanese designer Kiyoshi Iwai claims that “ [the] goal was to design and build a modern version of the Japanese Mamachari, a practical utility bike that could be used by almost anyone as a replacement for a car in their daily lives .”   Cycling towards a better environment So, in short, the goal is to find a sustainable car replacement. While some people might be hesitant to go for a grocery run on their two-wheeler, anticipating the heavy bags on the return trip, the Cero One wants to take away those concerns. It wants to replace the car and other polluting means of transportation for daily chores such as picking up the kids, delivering pizzas or mail, or commuting to work.   Or, as Iwai puts it: “ The CERO One allows urban dwellers to do almost anything they'd do in a car, but more quickly and efficiently. A powerful electric motor and wide range of accessories make the bike perfect for getting around town as well as carrying almost anything, whether that's groceries, pizza for delivery or precious cargo .” Biking for a more  sustainable way of living And even though it has an electric motor, it technically still is a bike - meaning that it will be better for your health as well. Biking is a stress-relieving, fun way of getting around. It allows you to enjoy the outdoors whilst working on a sustainable, healthy lifestyle that includes sufficient exercise. You can take part in bike races, or even enjoy the very therapeutic activity of bike repairs. Even more importantly, when taking your kids to school on a bike, you will teach them that it is not normal to be chauffeured around by car everywhere they go.   These values of sustainability, health and exercise will become more and more valuable in years to come. Why not get a head start by finding your own smart utility bike? Mamachari is not just an object. It is a way of living, a statement that shares your values with the world. Whether you are a mom, a dad, or a young professional making his way through town: it will make your life better. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/transportation/cycling
If you are lucky enough to live in an area where biking is encouraged and a widespread activity, you will surely have witnessed the forced versatility of this mode of transportation. Entire households can fit on the small frame of this iron horse; pets, several children, suitcases and boxes included. Those skilled in biking can juggle umbrellas, smartphones and backpacks seemingly without difficulties, while still somehow paying attention to the surrounding traffic as well. Now, if you are even luckier to have visited Japan in recent years, you might recognise the term Mamachari. Loosely translated at ‘mom-bikes’, this ingenious piece of engineering has taken the notion of bike-travel and combined it with all the much needed features that make our daily life a lot easier.   Still ‘just an e-bike’, but much more than that While the Mamachari, that are a common sight in virtually all regions in the Asian country, might appear to be a no-frills, purely functional object at a first glance; those who dare to look closer will be stunned by its possibilities. Without any real difficulties, it can be transformed into a grocery getter, an easy commuter bike, a pizza delivery service or a taxi ride for your kids to school.   Various western manufacturers have jumped on the bandwagon and introduced their own version of the iconic Japanese bicycle. Take the Cero One. This self-proclaimed cargo bike is uncompromising in its ambition to match and possibly even improve the mom-bike. Yet it has paid significant attention to the design as well. Most people will not even discern this cargo bike from the regular ones driving down the street. Equipped with handy baskets and rackets The large rear wheel does not only make for a cool look, it also supports the extra weight that the bike can carry. This extra weight can be stored in a wide collection of modular baskets and rackets, adding up to some 12 pieces in total that are designed to fit any kind of carry-on luggage. When this heavy load gets too much, you will be happy to find out that the built-in electric motor can take you on a trip of up to 93 miles. As for its purpose? Japanese designer Kiyoshi Iwai claims that “ [the] goal was to design and build a modern version of the Japanese Mamachari, a practical utility bike that could be used by almost anyone as a replacement for a car in their daily lives .”   Cycling towards a better environment So, in short, the goal is to find a sustainable car replacement. While some people might be hesitant to go for a grocery run on their two-wheeler, anticipating the heavy bags on the return trip, the Cero One wants to take away those concerns. It wants to replace the car and other polluting means of transportation for daily chores such as picking up the kids, delivering pizzas or mail, or commuting to work.   Or, as Iwai puts it: “ The CERO One allows urban dwellers to do almost anything they'd do in a car, but more quickly and efficiently. A powerful electric motor and wide range of accessories make the bike perfect for getting around town as well as carrying almost anything, whether that's groceries, pizza for delivery or precious cargo .” Biking for a more  sustainable way of living And even though it has an electric motor, it technically still is a bike - meaning that it will be better for your health as well. Biking is a stress-relieving, fun way of getting around. It allows you to enjoy the outdoors whilst working on a sustainable, healthy lifestyle that includes sufficient exercise. You can take part in bike races, or even enjoy the very therapeutic activity of bike repairs. Even more importantly, when taking your kids to school on a bike, you will teach them that it is not normal to be chauffeured around by car everywhere they go.   These values of sustainability, health and exercise will become more and more valuable in years to come. Why not get a head start by finding your own smart utility bike? Mamachari is not just an object. It is a way of living, a statement that shares your values with the world. Whether you are a mom, a dad, or a young professional making his way through town: it will make your life better. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/transportation/cycling
The e-bike Mamachari is Japan’s moms favorite smart idea
The e-bike Mamachari is Japan’s moms favorite smart idea
Cruise the world on solar power alone on the Silent 55 yacht
Humans have always been drawn to the water on our planet. To the lakes, the rivers, the seas all around us. Not surprising, considering how important this liquid substance is to our daily lives. Yet at times it may be a bit… much. Just think about those individuals who are so fond of boating and sailing that they embark on all kinds of wild oceanic adventures. From crossing the Pacific and Atlantic to sailing around the world, there seems to be an undeniable appeal to exploring the best our earth has to offer from the water. The richest-of-the-rich have added an extra layer to this with their expensive yachting hobbies. Huge ships that are best described as floating palaces grace the most gorgeous seas and coasts, entertaining guests and cruising coastal hot-spots. The ecological price of yachting These expensive hobbies do however carry a higher price tag than merely the one attached to its hull upon purchase. Large boats are notorious polluters, that use up scarce resources and fuels in its operation and frequently leave a trail of waste and pollution in its wake. The use of renewable energy for boating is still in its infancy. This is exactly why we are so excited to discover initiatives that are dedicated to making ocean-travel more sustainable, while not taking away the luxury and pleasure it brings along. Take the Silent 55, a solar-powered yacht that can cruise for weeks at a time on solar energy alone. A prototype of carbon-neutral yachts using renewable  energy Ok, let’s nuance the previous statement a bit. It is not like you can actually keep on going continuously for weeks at a time at top speed, using nothing but renewable energy. According to its manufacturer, the Silent 55 can cruise for up to 160 km per day. The energy needs are directly derived from its 30 high-efficiency photovoltaic solar panels. These panels deliver peaks around 10 kilowatts into an inverter and charge the battery.   Unfortunately the manufacturer has not revealed any specifications with regard to the capacity or size of this battery. The critical solar energy connoisseur will recognise that the numbers mentioned above are not exactly spectacular. The amount of solar energy generated seems low, especially when offsetting it to the options the manufacturer provides for engine power: respectively at 2x135 kW (E-Power configuration) and 2x 30 kW (cruiser configuration).   Frugality is key to saving the planet : go easy on the engine   Founder Michael Köhler does, however, insist that this is sufficient to cruise at a ‘normal’ speed for hours at a time, although he recommends a reduced speed in the evenings and at night. In order to reach optimum efficiency, it seems important to cut back your use of other on-board appliances that require energy, and go easy on the throttles.   If you are afraid that you will quite literally end up dead in the water, several add-ons are available that may offer some much needed support. For those who are not entirely opposed to coughing out some extra CO2 in the atmosphere, a diesel generator can be added that will provide some 100 kW.   For those who prefer the natural approach and insist on renewable energy sources only, the inclusion of a mast and sails is the way to go. A particularly intriguing option is the ‘sky sail’, which is basically a large kite that will be let up in the air to an altitude of 150 meters. This way, it can take advantage of the high-altitude winds while its shadow does not interfere with the solar panels’ capacity to soak up direct sunlight. Comfortable and customisable living on-board While the concept of powering the yacht by solar panels is promising, the inventors were clearly more concerned with the technology than with its design. While the top deck is completely taken over by the solar panels, you have ample space to relax on the main deck. Inside, you can enjoy some 40 square meters of living space and a variety of options for sleeping quarters (up to 3 bedrooms, each with en-suite bathroom). For some €1.4 million this eco-friendly yacht can be yours. Quite a steal, considering the lower costs of fuel and maintenance. Although the interior might not be for you if you are used to ‘regular’ yachts with over-the-top-bling and accessories. For those of you, we recommend looking into the larger versions (19,5 meters and 24 meters respectively) that Silent Yachts is working on. Gives you just that little extra space for a grand kitchen or media room. https://www.whatsorb.com/transportation/-solar-catamaran-makes--green--tourism-just-shine-a-little-more-
Humans have always been drawn to the water on our planet. To the lakes, the rivers, the seas all around us. Not surprising, considering how important this liquid substance is to our daily lives. Yet at times it may be a bit… much. Just think about those individuals who are so fond of boating and sailing that they embark on all kinds of wild oceanic adventures. From crossing the Pacific and Atlantic to sailing around the world, there seems to be an undeniable appeal to exploring the best our earth has to offer from the water. The richest-of-the-rich have added an extra layer to this with their expensive yachting hobbies. Huge ships that are best described as floating palaces grace the most gorgeous seas and coasts, entertaining guests and cruising coastal hot-spots. The ecological price of yachting These expensive hobbies do however carry a higher price tag than merely the one attached to its hull upon purchase. Large boats are notorious polluters, that use up scarce resources and fuels in its operation and frequently leave a trail of waste and pollution in its wake. The use of renewable energy for boating is still in its infancy. This is exactly why we are so excited to discover initiatives that are dedicated to making ocean-travel more sustainable, while not taking away the luxury and pleasure it brings along. Take the Silent 55, a solar-powered yacht that can cruise for weeks at a time on solar energy alone. A prototype of carbon-neutral yachts using renewable  energy Ok, let’s nuance the previous statement a bit. It is not like you can actually keep on going continuously for weeks at a time at top speed, using nothing but renewable energy. According to its manufacturer, the Silent 55 can cruise for up to 160 km per day. The energy needs are directly derived from its 30 high-efficiency photovoltaic solar panels. These panels deliver peaks around 10 kilowatts into an inverter and charge the battery.   Unfortunately the manufacturer has not revealed any specifications with regard to the capacity or size of this battery. The critical solar energy connoisseur will recognise that the numbers mentioned above are not exactly spectacular. The amount of solar energy generated seems low, especially when offsetting it to the options the manufacturer provides for engine power: respectively at 2x135 kW (E-Power configuration) and 2x 30 kW (cruiser configuration).   Frugality is key to saving the planet : go easy on the engine   Founder Michael Köhler does, however, insist that this is sufficient to cruise at a ‘normal’ speed for hours at a time, although he recommends a reduced speed in the evenings and at night. In order to reach optimum efficiency, it seems important to cut back your use of other on-board appliances that require energy, and go easy on the throttles.   If you are afraid that you will quite literally end up dead in the water, several add-ons are available that may offer some much needed support. For those who are not entirely opposed to coughing out some extra CO2 in the atmosphere, a diesel generator can be added that will provide some 100 kW.   For those who prefer the natural approach and insist on renewable energy sources only, the inclusion of a mast and sails is the way to go. A particularly intriguing option is the ‘sky sail’, which is basically a large kite that will be let up in the air to an altitude of 150 meters. This way, it can take advantage of the high-altitude winds while its shadow does not interfere with the solar panels’ capacity to soak up direct sunlight. Comfortable and customisable living on-board While the concept of powering the yacht by solar panels is promising, the inventors were clearly more concerned with the technology than with its design. While the top deck is completely taken over by the solar panels, you have ample space to relax on the main deck. Inside, you can enjoy some 40 square meters of living space and a variety of options for sleeping quarters (up to 3 bedrooms, each with en-suite bathroom). For some €1.4 million this eco-friendly yacht can be yours. Quite a steal, considering the lower costs of fuel and maintenance. Although the interior might not be for you if you are used to ‘regular’ yachts with over-the-top-bling and accessories. For those of you, we recommend looking into the larger versions (19,5 meters and 24 meters respectively) that Silent Yachts is working on. Gives you just that little extra space for a grand kitchen or media room. https://www.whatsorb.com/transportation/-solar-catamaran-makes--green--tourism-just-shine-a-little-more-
Cruise the world on solar power alone on the Silent 55 yacht
Cruise the world on solar power alone on the Silent 55 yacht
A geodesic dome: sustainable Arctic Circle living in style
The Arctic Circle is not exactly known for its pleasant living conditions. The temperatures are more often than not lingering around the freezing point. The winter is long and dark, while the summer is short and still rather cool. Only very few animal and plant species are able to survive in those harsh conditions, making it an even tougher place to live.   The Hjertefølger family took on the challenge of living in this place where the nearest neighbour might be dozens of miles away. Mom, dad, and four kids have spent the last three years in a hand-built cob house, protected by a huge, geodesic glass dome. Inside, the family can live comfortably during the year, while growing their own food as well. Sounds futuristic? Well, it sure it! Meet the Arctic Nature House of the Hjertefølgers The house of the Hjertefølgers is located in the north of Norway , on an island called Sandhornøya. A gorgeous, rough environment, for sure, that is shrouded in darkness for the majority in the year. This puts a great strain on any building. As such, the family came up with their treasured project, that took over two years to design and build.   The end result? The Naturhuset, or Nature House, is self-sustaining and powered by solar energy, consisting of three storeys and boasting five bedrooms. Along with this, a large irrigated outdoor garden was designed to guarantee a stable supply of food. These crops will be able to grow in the toughest of winters, as they are placed under a massive, 25-foot-high glass dome. Even fruits and vegetables that are not normally suited for the climate thrive in this environment. Green, eco-friendly and  sustainable architecture All aspects of this building have been designed in such a way that they are as eco-friendly and carbon neutral as possible. For instance, the family composts and re-uses water to water the plants. Additionally, the solar system on the roof ensure that, for those summer months in which the sun is actually out and shining, it fully operates on renewable energy sources.   Mother Ingrid has been a driving force behind this new family home. She calls herself a permaculturalist, vegan and yoga practitioner and prides herself on a carbon-neutral lifestyle - that she is happy to pass on to her children. And although most would not consider the Arctic Circle to be the best place to raise a family, she is happy they did: “ The house works as we intended and planned. We love the house; it has a soul of its own and it feels very personal. What surprises us is the fact that we built ourselves anew as we built the house. The process changed us, shaped us .” Further technical details Ingrid is not exactly exaggerating when she claims that she and her family built the house from scratch. It truly is a labour of love, built out of cob. This mixture of earth, straw and sand is an ancient-old, natural material; that is allegedly able to withstand fire and earthquakes - all while being cheap and energy-efficient.   As for the dome, this has been constructed using 360 panels of 6-millimeter thick glass. At this thickness, it is capable of withstanding the heavy winds and snowfall that the area is infamous for. These glass panels are placed in a recycled aluminium frame, chosen for its lifespan of over 100 years, its low maintenance costs and its structural integrity. To top it off, the solar system covering the dome generates sufficient renewable energy to meet the house’s needs. Why the dome-home is such a great idea Normally, people would be discouraged from taking on the challenge of building a house on or near the Arctic Circle. Not only is the delivery of building materials an absolute headache, the energy needs of such a process are substantial. Yet the movement where people opt for homes under a dome is commendable and promising. The greenhouse-dome will mitigate the worst of temperatures and keep heating costs down, a notorious pitfall for Arctic houses. At the same time, it allows households to grow their own produce, using the excess heat stored in the dome. Homegrown, local products are always preferable to imported fruits and vegetables - another promising movement to drive down energy costs.   And if this does not ring true - then consider the great pictures you can share on your Instagram account. Just ask Ingrid (@im_hjerte). https://www.whatsorb.com/category/architecture
The Arctic Circle is not exactly known for its pleasant living conditions. The temperatures are more often than not lingering around the freezing point. The winter is long and dark, while the summer is short and still rather cool. Only very few animal and plant species are able to survive in those harsh conditions, making it an even tougher place to live.   The Hjertefølger family took on the challenge of living in this place where the nearest neighbour might be dozens of miles away. Mom, dad, and four kids have spent the last three years in a hand-built cob house, protected by a huge, geodesic glass dome. Inside, the family can live comfortably during the year, while growing their own food as well. Sounds futuristic? Well, it sure it! Meet the Arctic Nature House of the Hjertefølgers The house of the Hjertefølgers is located in the north of Norway , on an island called Sandhornøya. A gorgeous, rough environment, for sure, that is shrouded in darkness for the majority in the year. This puts a great strain on any building. As such, the family came up with their treasured project, that took over two years to design and build.   The end result? The Naturhuset, or Nature House, is self-sustaining and powered by solar energy, consisting of three storeys and boasting five bedrooms. Along with this, a large irrigated outdoor garden was designed to guarantee a stable supply of food. These crops will be able to grow in the toughest of winters, as they are placed under a massive, 25-foot-high glass dome. Even fruits and vegetables that are not normally suited for the climate thrive in this environment. Green, eco-friendly and  sustainable architecture All aspects of this building have been designed in such a way that they are as eco-friendly and carbon neutral as possible. For instance, the family composts and re-uses water to water the plants. Additionally, the solar system on the roof ensure that, for those summer months in which the sun is actually out and shining, it fully operates on renewable energy sources.   Mother Ingrid has been a driving force behind this new family home. She calls herself a permaculturalist, vegan and yoga practitioner and prides herself on a carbon-neutral lifestyle - that she is happy to pass on to her children. And although most would not consider the Arctic Circle to be the best place to raise a family, she is happy they did: “ The house works as we intended and planned. We love the house; it has a soul of its own and it feels very personal. What surprises us is the fact that we built ourselves anew as we built the house. The process changed us, shaped us .” Further technical details Ingrid is not exactly exaggerating when she claims that she and her family built the house from scratch. It truly is a labour of love, built out of cob. This mixture of earth, straw and sand is an ancient-old, natural material; that is allegedly able to withstand fire and earthquakes - all while being cheap and energy-efficient.   As for the dome, this has been constructed using 360 panels of 6-millimeter thick glass. At this thickness, it is capable of withstanding the heavy winds and snowfall that the area is infamous for. These glass panels are placed in a recycled aluminium frame, chosen for its lifespan of over 100 years, its low maintenance costs and its structural integrity. To top it off, the solar system covering the dome generates sufficient renewable energy to meet the house’s needs. Why the dome-home is such a great idea Normally, people would be discouraged from taking on the challenge of building a house on or near the Arctic Circle. Not only is the delivery of building materials an absolute headache, the energy needs of such a process are substantial. Yet the movement where people opt for homes under a dome is commendable and promising. The greenhouse-dome will mitigate the worst of temperatures and keep heating costs down, a notorious pitfall for Arctic houses. At the same time, it allows households to grow their own produce, using the excess heat stored in the dome. Homegrown, local products are always preferable to imported fruits and vegetables - another promising movement to drive down energy costs.   And if this does not ring true - then consider the great pictures you can share on your Instagram account. Just ask Ingrid (@im_hjerte). https://www.whatsorb.com/category/architecture
A geodesic dome: sustainable Arctic Circle living in style
A geodesic dome: sustainable Arctic Circle living in style
Five minutes to midnight: climate change action fighting the clock
Right, we finally managed to wrap our heads around the concept that climate change is undeniable and real. And that we have to take action if we are to avert the majority of negative side-effects that this environmental disease, so to speak, brings along. So far, so good. Unfortunately, the close reader will quickly realise the fallacy here.   Yes, we have - some notable exceptions aside - largely agreed on the validity and reality of global warming. The Paris Climate Agreement and Poland COP24 are testament to this. Yet we somehow seem unable to turn this around to actual, hard-hitting action.   Lots of written words. Millions and millions of them, to be exact - these included. Lots of vague promises and pledges. Some half-hearted initiatives of the largest polluting countries and companies, that are all too easily mistaken for a publicity ploy instead. Yet the real urgency seems to be sorely lacking. Take the antibiotics or sit it out? Let’s draw the obvious comparison to your own, personal health. You feel miserable and after some days of calling in sick and staying in bed, there is no real improvement in your situation. You drag yourself to the GP, who claims that you have got a nasty case of the flu, which has led to pneumonia. He prescribes some antibiotics and urges you to take them twice a day for two weeks, to ensure that it does not get worse.   You consider yourself lucky that you are not living back in medieval times, when this ailment would often be considered a death sentence, and haul yourself to the pharmacy and back to bed. Time to take on this bug and get rid of it once and for all. Perhaps you’ll even consider giving up your precious cigarettes to give your lungs some much-needed relief. After all, you’ll still be needing them for the next decades. Why do we refuse the obvious  global warming medicine? So, what is the difference between our personal health vs the health of our environment? There must be one, as we somehow refuse the obvious medicine for global warming that will clear our earth’s lungs of the accumulated poison. We gladly accept the Doc’s explanation that the earth is sick, we’ve even decided on a course of action - to reduce our CO2 emissions, live more sustainably - yet we somehow forego the visit to the pharmacy. As of now, any action is mostly driven by young companies, aspiring eco-engineers and entrepreneurs. Some conscious households and communities, perhaps the odd lobbyist and politician. While we applaud their enthusiasm, most of us lack the real drive. Our minds do not seem to want to accept the small sacrifices we must bring if we are to enjoy this world for just a little while longer. The clock is ticking for climate change action Here is the reality check. If we do not cut our global carbon emissions in half in the next 12 years, we will not be able to avert the worst consequences of global warming. Fact.   And yet, while we read this, our minds already go in overdrive to find excuses for not taking action today, right now. It is a biological result of evolution, dating back to our ancestors living in caves. Their worries were pretty much focused on the present. Hunt. Escape from that sabre tooth tiger. Mate. Sleep. Repeat.   Do you think any of them worried about their retirement plans and next year’s elections? You bet they did not.   We are only human and this is how we have been trained to act and think for centuries and centuries. Our tendency to look towards the future and start worrying about tomorrow is still relatively new and fresh, with most of us still struggling to adjust.   What to change to avoid further climate change? The climate change lobby should therefore focus much more on playing to the psyche of people. It should explore why we are so hesitant regarding this perceived change and how we can turn this around to work in our favour. After all, there is nothing more astounding than human’s capability to adjust and overcome - the exact trait that has led to our survival over time. We have got to tackle the perception that we, as individuals, hold no control over this situation anyhow. So why bother?   Additionally, we’ve got to accept that even the smallest activities that we perform on a daily basis are malignant, such as stepping into our gas-guzzling car to take the kids to school. We have to stop undervaluing the impact of climate change on our lives. It may not be visible right now, but it sure will be in a decade of two.   Most importantly, we’ve got to educate ourselves and others. Ignorance is not a pretty trait in anyone, and in this case might even prove to be our downfall. We should stop telling people that they have to sacrifice and give up some comfort. Instead, start telling them about great new initiatives. Educate them about their personal emissions, open their eyes to their own actions. Get them excited about being a part of a massive movement that will clear our earth’s lungs.   Tell them that they will be the hero that saved the earth’s life. We hold the antibiotics that the earth so direly needs. We just got to start ingesting it. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate
Right, we finally managed to wrap our heads around the concept that climate change is undeniable and real. And that we have to take action if we are to avert the majority of negative side-effects that this environmental disease, so to speak, brings along. So far, so good. Unfortunately, the close reader will quickly realise the fallacy here.   Yes, we have - some notable exceptions aside - largely agreed on the validity and reality of global warming. The Paris Climate Agreement and Poland COP24 are testament to this. Yet we somehow seem unable to turn this around to actual, hard-hitting action.   Lots of written words. Millions and millions of them, to be exact - these included. Lots of vague promises and pledges. Some half-hearted initiatives of the largest polluting countries and companies, that are all too easily mistaken for a publicity ploy instead. Yet the real urgency seems to be sorely lacking. Take the antibiotics or sit it out? Let’s draw the obvious comparison to your own, personal health. You feel miserable and after some days of calling in sick and staying in bed, there is no real improvement in your situation. You drag yourself to the GP, who claims that you have got a nasty case of the flu, which has led to pneumonia. He prescribes some antibiotics and urges you to take them twice a day for two weeks, to ensure that it does not get worse.   You consider yourself lucky that you are not living back in medieval times, when this ailment would often be considered a death sentence, and haul yourself to the pharmacy and back to bed. Time to take on this bug and get rid of it once and for all. Perhaps you’ll even consider giving up your precious cigarettes to give your lungs some much-needed relief. After all, you’ll still be needing them for the next decades. Why do we refuse the obvious  global warming medicine? So, what is the difference between our personal health vs the health of our environment? There must be one, as we somehow refuse the obvious medicine for global warming that will clear our earth’s lungs of the accumulated poison. We gladly accept the Doc’s explanation that the earth is sick, we’ve even decided on a course of action - to reduce our CO2 emissions, live more sustainably - yet we somehow forego the visit to the pharmacy. As of now, any action is mostly driven by young companies, aspiring eco-engineers and entrepreneurs. Some conscious households and communities, perhaps the odd lobbyist and politician. While we applaud their enthusiasm, most of us lack the real drive. Our minds do not seem to want to accept the small sacrifices we must bring if we are to enjoy this world for just a little while longer. The clock is ticking for climate change action Here is the reality check. If we do not cut our global carbon emissions in half in the next 12 years, we will not be able to avert the worst consequences of global warming. Fact.   And yet, while we read this, our minds already go in overdrive to find excuses for not taking action today, right now. It is a biological result of evolution, dating back to our ancestors living in caves. Their worries were pretty much focused on the present. Hunt. Escape from that sabre tooth tiger. Mate. Sleep. Repeat.   Do you think any of them worried about their retirement plans and next year’s elections? You bet they did not.   We are only human and this is how we have been trained to act and think for centuries and centuries. Our tendency to look towards the future and start worrying about tomorrow is still relatively new and fresh, with most of us still struggling to adjust.   What to change to avoid further climate change? The climate change lobby should therefore focus much more on playing to the psyche of people. It should explore why we are so hesitant regarding this perceived change and how we can turn this around to work in our favour. After all, there is nothing more astounding than human’s capability to adjust and overcome - the exact trait that has led to our survival over time. We have got to tackle the perception that we, as individuals, hold no control over this situation anyhow. So why bother?   Additionally, we’ve got to accept that even the smallest activities that we perform on a daily basis are malignant, such as stepping into our gas-guzzling car to take the kids to school. We have to stop undervaluing the impact of climate change on our lives. It may not be visible right now, but it sure will be in a decade of two.   Most importantly, we’ve got to educate ourselves and others. Ignorance is not a pretty trait in anyone, and in this case might even prove to be our downfall. We should stop telling people that they have to sacrifice and give up some comfort. Instead, start telling them about great new initiatives. Educate them about their personal emissions, open their eyes to their own actions. Get them excited about being a part of a massive movement that will clear our earth’s lungs.   Tell them that they will be the hero that saved the earth’s life. We hold the antibiotics that the earth so direly needs. We just got to start ingesting it. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate
Five minutes to midnight: climate change action fighting the clock
Five minutes to midnight: climate change action fighting the clock
Smart design: combining greater sustainability with higher efficiency
Design has a great impact on our society. Not only will it please our eye when done right, it also has the unique potential to host sustainable and healthy communities. Nothing can hurt the environment more than a poorly designed building: both in terms of sustainability and liveability.   Now that the urban population is growing exponentially, hand in hand with the overall number of people on our world, we need to think carefully about how to make sure we all ‘fit’. By 2050, another staggering two billion people are expected to move to a global city. There has to be a way to get all of them a proper home and sufficient facilities and amenities. In anticipation of this enormous change, designers and architects are working tirelessly to come up with buildings that use the available space effectively, to ensure that they use fewer resources and will be much more sustainable - while guaranteeing optimal comfort and quality of life. And in order to do so, a few trends can be identified: the driving forces behind smart design. Use of data to anticipate climate change While no-one knows exactly how climate change will affect our world, we do know that it will do so. Therefore, buildings must be built with the entire notion of global warming in mind. A concept called climate resilience plays a very important role in this. It describes the way in which we are able to adapt to climate change, or to bounce back after weather-related disasters.   So, how can we guarantee climate resilience without actually knowing what this would entail? A major headache for architects, yet at the same time one of their greatest opportunities. Those who are able to figure out a strategy for incorporating this in their design will be one step ahead of the competition.   Data plays an important role in this. Data on pollution levels, data on extreme weather events, historical trends in combination with projected sea levels and other weather-related statistics: they will help to document climate change. This, in turn, helps us to improve our designed answer. We can design buildings that tackle the root issues of climate change while being prepared for its consequences. Planning for resilience Concretely speaking, the effects of all this are best seen in the planning of our cities and buildings. Each city faces its own set of challenges in the face of changing weather patterns and the rising sea level; and the mass migration and resource scarcity that may result from this.   This is where policy and design meet in a unique feat of city-planning, that takes into account how certain areas can be kept secure, while the prevailing culture is protected and honoured - all while behaviour change is encouraged that will help cities respond to challenges and disasters.   Restricting carbon emissions A known fact is that about half of all greenhouse gas emissions are directly related to that share of the world that has been built by us, also known as the built environment. So, we should be very mindful of the impact of those objects and areas that we have built - and consider their impact on the larger environment. Especially now that the latest projections of the UN estimate that some additional 2.5 trillion square feet of new spaces will have to be built over the course of the next 40 years. This roughly adds up to a brand new New York City that has to be erected every single month during these 40 years. An amazing number, that will seriously jeopardise our environment if we do not take drastic measures to amp up the sustainability of the energy and materials that we use for this; and carefully consider where to build. Once we minimise the impact of the building on the environment, and clearly mapping out where our energy is needed the most, we can cut back on overall emissions by simply planning and working sustainably.   Designing and constructing for a changing world The far majority - about 75% - of the world’s population will be living in urban areas. We are occupying increasingly smaller amounts of space in the most crowded areas, clustering together. While this may bring along challenges, its also gives us the unique opportunity to design for the changing world. Buildings with zero or negative emissions, focused on climate resilience, and using sustainable and energy-efficient constructions: careful planning can make a world of difference in the way we build a different world. https://www.whatsorb.com/architecture/category/architecture
Design has a great impact on our society. Not only will it please our eye when done right, it also has the unique potential to host sustainable and healthy communities. Nothing can hurt the environment more than a poorly designed building: both in terms of sustainability and liveability.   Now that the urban population is growing exponentially, hand in hand with the overall number of people on our world, we need to think carefully about how to make sure we all ‘fit’. By 2050, another staggering two billion people are expected to move to a global city. There has to be a way to get all of them a proper home and sufficient facilities and amenities. In anticipation of this enormous change, designers and architects are working tirelessly to come up with buildings that use the available space effectively, to ensure that they use fewer resources and will be much more sustainable - while guaranteeing optimal comfort and quality of life. And in order to do so, a few trends can be identified: the driving forces behind smart design. Use of data to anticipate climate change While no-one knows exactly how climate change will affect our world, we do know that it will do so. Therefore, buildings must be built with the entire notion of global warming in mind. A concept called climate resilience plays a very important role in this. It describes the way in which we are able to adapt to climate change, or to bounce back after weather-related disasters.   So, how can we guarantee climate resilience without actually knowing what this would entail? A major headache for architects, yet at the same time one of their greatest opportunities. Those who are able to figure out a strategy for incorporating this in their design will be one step ahead of the competition.   Data plays an important role in this. Data on pollution levels, data on extreme weather events, historical trends in combination with projected sea levels and other weather-related statistics: they will help to document climate change. This, in turn, helps us to improve our designed answer. We can design buildings that tackle the root issues of climate change while being prepared for its consequences. Planning for resilience Concretely speaking, the effects of all this are best seen in the planning of our cities and buildings. Each city faces its own set of challenges in the face of changing weather patterns and the rising sea level; and the mass migration and resource scarcity that may result from this.   This is where policy and design meet in a unique feat of city-planning, that takes into account how certain areas can be kept secure, while the prevailing culture is protected and honoured - all while behaviour change is encouraged that will help cities respond to challenges and disasters.   Restricting carbon emissions A known fact is that about half of all greenhouse gas emissions are directly related to that share of the world that has been built by us, also known as the built environment. So, we should be very mindful of the impact of those objects and areas that we have built - and consider their impact on the larger environment. Especially now that the latest projections of the UN estimate that some additional 2.5 trillion square feet of new spaces will have to be built over the course of the next 40 years. This roughly adds up to a brand new New York City that has to be erected every single month during these 40 years. An amazing number, that will seriously jeopardise our environment if we do not take drastic measures to amp up the sustainability of the energy and materials that we use for this; and carefully consider where to build. Once we minimise the impact of the building on the environment, and clearly mapping out where our energy is needed the most, we can cut back on overall emissions by simply planning and working sustainably.   Designing and constructing for a changing world The far majority - about 75% - of the world’s population will be living in urban areas. We are occupying increasingly smaller amounts of space in the most crowded areas, clustering together. While this may bring along challenges, its also gives us the unique opportunity to design for the changing world. Buildings with zero or negative emissions, focused on climate resilience, and using sustainable and energy-efficient constructions: careful planning can make a world of difference in the way we build a different world. https://www.whatsorb.com/architecture/category/architecture
Smart design: combining greater sustainability with higher efficiency
Smart design: combining greater sustainability with higher efficiency
The brand new electric Harley Davidson LiveWire is ready to hit the road
If you ask people how transport will be today and in the future many will say; electric! Either battery powered partly fossil & electric (the hybrid), with solar panels or hydrogen? Today, Harley Davidson started to take pre-orders for the electric LiveWire, electric motorcycle. It will not be easy to get current motor cycles drivers enthusiastic for the Harley LiveWire. First of all the dark sound the original Harley’s produce is missing. Second there is no need anymore to have tattoos or leatherjackets with emblems to make any impression. The Harley Davidson LiveWire, the new Tesla of motorbikes Like Tesla, Harley Davidson will show people with the LiveWire that an all-electric motor cycle is even more fun to ride than the petrol version. The Harley Livewire will go from 0 to 100 km/h in 3.5 seconds. That’s pretty fast. It will cover about 180 km’s on one charge with the current battery pack. The housing of the lithium ion cells sits between the riders knees with cast-aluminium fins which look like an air cooled engine. The heaviest parts like the engine and the battery pack are situated low to keep the bike balanced. The Harley Davidson LiveWire; twist & go! On the old Harley Davidson bikes is a clutch and gear to be taken care of but with the Harley Davidson LiveWire it’s just like an electric car; twist and go! Because many electric cars make ‘no sound’ the Harley Davidson LimeWire has a ‘noise’ added which warns people it’s presents. The sound increases in volume and pitch with the speed. Shall we have a ride on the magnificent Harley Davidson LiveWire which shows that electric engines not only belong to electric cars. {youtube} https://www.whatsorb.com/transportation/audi-s-electric-tesla-killer-is-already-rolling-of-the-production-line
If you ask people how transport will be today and in the future many will say; electric! Either battery powered partly fossil & electric (the hybrid), with solar panels or hydrogen? Today, Harley Davidson started to take pre-orders for the electric LiveWire, electric motorcycle. It will not be easy to get current motor cycles drivers enthusiastic for the Harley LiveWire. First of all the dark sound the original Harley’s produce is missing. Second there is no need anymore to have tattoos or leatherjackets with emblems to make any impression. The Harley Davidson LiveWire, the new Tesla of motorbikes Like Tesla, Harley Davidson will show people with the LiveWire that an all-electric motor cycle is even more fun to ride than the petrol version. The Harley Livewire will go from 0 to 100 km/h in 3.5 seconds. That’s pretty fast. It will cover about 180 km’s on one charge with the current battery pack. The housing of the lithium ion cells sits between the riders knees with cast-aluminium fins which look like an air cooled engine. The heaviest parts like the engine and the battery pack are situated low to keep the bike balanced. The Harley Davidson LiveWire; twist & go! On the old Harley Davidson bikes is a clutch and gear to be taken care of but with the Harley Davidson LiveWire it’s just like an electric car; twist and go! Because many electric cars make ‘no sound’ the Harley Davidson LimeWire has a ‘noise’ added which warns people it’s presents. The sound increases in volume and pitch with the speed. Shall we have a ride on the magnificent Harley Davidson LiveWire which shows that electric engines not only belong to electric cars. {youtube} https://www.whatsorb.com/transportation/audi-s-electric-tesla-killer-is-already-rolling-of-the-production-line
The brand new electric Harley Davidson LiveWire is ready to hit the road
Carbon-negative fuel set: burning the world to a better place
A new fuel, made entirely out of elephant grass, recently made headlines after announcing to have developed a potentially major breakthrough solution in combatting climate change. The company is NextFuel, and their home base is Austria - and their fabrication process includes dried elephant grass that is fed into a sealed rotary drum.   It was officially presented at the COP24 climate summit in Poland, aiming to help countries in their   attempt to decarbonise their heavily polluting industries, including the transportation and heat sectors. How is NextFuel made? NextFuel, as the product is called as well, is made by dried elephant grass that is put in a sealed rotary drum. At this stage, all oxygen is removed and the material will be divided into fuel and waste. This only takes some thirty minutes. All waste (mainly gasses) is re-used in the manufacturing plant for the generation of heat of power locally. After that, the fuel part is densified and pressed into briquettes. Next, they will be moved to a cooler. At that stage they are ready to be sold and used in the production of heat or electricity. NextFuel says that these briquettes are perfectly suitable for use in a coal plant, even without having to significantly alter the processes or machines used.   What are the benefits of NextFuel? The main difference? This form of fuel is nowhere near as polluting as the ones that are typically used in coal plants. Or as NextFuel’s chief executive, mr Stefano Romano, proudly claimed: “ For the first time in the history of mankind, we have the ability to produce a cheap and clean copy of fossil fuel.” In an interesting example, NextFuel has calculated that if a cement factory runs on coal-fired power and heat, having this replaced by their alternative fuel will lead to a massive reduction in their annual carbon footprint of 105%. And no, this is not a typo and we do know how percentages work - it will actually render the process carbon negative. Romano explained the workings of this: “ Elephant grass needs a lot of CO2 to grow, and also stores some of this in its roots below ground. In that way, it captures so much carbon from the atmosphere that it can make our entire process carbon-negative in a matter of months. ” The importance of cleaner fuels Stern warnings that we will not hit the targets as set in the  Paris climate agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals have already been given. A large portion of this shortfall can be attributed to the lack of progress made in these highly pollution transportation and heat sectors. This requires quick action on the side of companies active in these industries.   Thankfully, quite a few of them have taken up the challenge. Take British Airways, proponent of the widely polluting aviation industry. They came up with the Future of Fuels challenge, that offers a £25,000 prize to those who come up with an innovative, low-carbon jet fuel; that is capable of powering a long-haul commercial flight for up to 300 customers, while generating no or negative emissions. BA is also working together with the renewable fuel startup Velocys, with the ultimate goal of finding a jet fuel that can be made from household waste , killing two birds with one stone: recycling effectively and cutting back on emissions. Their competitor Virgin Atlantic is working on similar initiatives, including one that fuels jets with recycled industrial waste gases. It is a low-carbon alternative, co-developed by the innovative firm LanzaTech, that has the capacity to partially power a commercial flight from London to Orlando, Florida. In doing so, it cuts back 70% of its emissions when compared to regular jet fuel. Where will it lead? The signs are promising, with various large polluters clearly taking their responsibility and doing their part in creating a fuel that will reduce, if not completely remove, their carbon footprint. As for NextFuel, they are facing a bright - and clean - future as well: production of their innovative clean fuel has been scaled up, following funds received from the European Union.   After that, NextFuel is hoping to power its first two large-scale projects at the end of next year - a cement plant in Africa, and a manufacturing facility in South America. If those implementations are successful, expectations are that a large number of facilities and producers will move to these kind of fuels. Not only will it help them meet the stringent targets set, it will also clean up their production in a significant manner. Reason enough to give the elephant grass a try. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
A new fuel, made entirely out of elephant grass, recently made headlines after announcing to have developed a potentially major breakthrough solution in combatting climate change. The company is NextFuel, and their home base is Austria - and their fabrication process includes dried elephant grass that is fed into a sealed rotary drum.   It was officially presented at the COP24 climate summit in Poland, aiming to help countries in their   attempt to decarbonise their heavily polluting industries, including the transportation and heat sectors. How is NextFuel made? NextFuel, as the product is called as well, is made by dried elephant grass that is put in a sealed rotary drum. At this stage, all oxygen is removed and the material will be divided into fuel and waste. This only takes some thirty minutes. All waste (mainly gasses) is re-used in the manufacturing plant for the generation of heat of power locally. After that, the fuel part is densified and pressed into briquettes. Next, they will be moved to a cooler. At that stage they are ready to be sold and used in the production of heat or electricity. NextFuel says that these briquettes are perfectly suitable for use in a coal plant, even without having to significantly alter the processes or machines used.   What are the benefits of NextFuel? The main difference? This form of fuel is nowhere near as polluting as the ones that are typically used in coal plants. Or as NextFuel’s chief executive, mr Stefano Romano, proudly claimed: “ For the first time in the history of mankind, we have the ability to produce a cheap and clean copy of fossil fuel.” In an interesting example, NextFuel has calculated that if a cement factory runs on coal-fired power and heat, having this replaced by their alternative fuel will lead to a massive reduction in their annual carbon footprint of 105%. And no, this is not a typo and we do know how percentages work - it will actually render the process carbon negative. Romano explained the workings of this: “ Elephant grass needs a lot of CO2 to grow, and also stores some of this in its roots below ground. In that way, it captures so much carbon from the atmosphere that it can make our entire process carbon-negative in a matter of months. ” The importance of cleaner fuels Stern warnings that we will not hit the targets as set in the  Paris climate agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals have already been given. A large portion of this shortfall can be attributed to the lack of progress made in these highly pollution transportation and heat sectors. This requires quick action on the side of companies active in these industries.   Thankfully, quite a few of them have taken up the challenge. Take British Airways, proponent of the widely polluting aviation industry. They came up with the Future of Fuels challenge, that offers a £25,000 prize to those who come up with an innovative, low-carbon jet fuel; that is capable of powering a long-haul commercial flight for up to 300 customers, while generating no or negative emissions. BA is also working together with the renewable fuel startup Velocys, with the ultimate goal of finding a jet fuel that can be made from household waste , killing two birds with one stone: recycling effectively and cutting back on emissions. Their competitor Virgin Atlantic is working on similar initiatives, including one that fuels jets with recycled industrial waste gases. It is a low-carbon alternative, co-developed by the innovative firm LanzaTech, that has the capacity to partially power a commercial flight from London to Orlando, Florida. In doing so, it cuts back 70% of its emissions when compared to regular jet fuel. Where will it lead? The signs are promising, with various large polluters clearly taking their responsibility and doing their part in creating a fuel that will reduce, if not completely remove, their carbon footprint. As for NextFuel, they are facing a bright - and clean - future as well: production of their innovative clean fuel has been scaled up, following funds received from the European Union.   After that, NextFuel is hoping to power its first two large-scale projects at the end of next year - a cement plant in Africa, and a manufacturing facility in South America. If those implementations are successful, expectations are that a large number of facilities and producers will move to these kind of fuels. Not only will it help them meet the stringent targets set, it will also clean up their production in a significant manner. Reason enough to give the elephant grass a try. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
Carbon-negative fuel set: burning the world to a better place
Carbon-negative fuel set: burning the world to a better place
The Climate Change Act: the 10-year anniversary
Back in 2008, the Climate Change Act was passed as part of the strategy of the United Kingdom to drastically reduce its emission of greenhouse gases. It was quite ambitious, to say the least - with the opening line already clearly stating who is to take care of its execution: "It is the duty of the Secretary of State to ensure that the net UK carbon account for the year 2050 is at least 80% lower than the baseline.” This baseline is 1990, making it a rather significant change. It would, after all, enable the country to transform into a low carbon economy. For this purpose, it allows the ministers to introduce all measures that they deem necessary to reach the set targets. The Act also led to the creation of a Committee on Climate Change, that acts as an advisory body to the government.   Even more dramatically, there are only two possible outcomes: either the targets are met, or the Government will be taken to court.   The pledges of the Climate Change Act Initially, the idea was that a 60% cut in emissions would have to be realised, based on a report of the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution. This report claimed that, if adopted by other countries, a 60% reduction would suffice in reducing the atmospheric carbon dioxide to below 550 parts per million. This number was deemed sufficient for withholding the worst consequences of global warming, that will follow if global temperatures are to rise with more than 2°C. However, another assessment indicated that even at a level of 550 ppm, the threshold of 2°C would be exceeded. Quite a few  environmental organisations and political parties argued that the 60% target would not be sufficient, and instead proposed a greater cut of anywhere between 80% to 100%. While some might think that this is a far-reaching goal, it should be noted that this does not include emissions from the entire aviation and shipping industry. As these are the largest polluters, the net effect on total emissions would only be somewhere in the range of 35-50%. Even though this does not sound nearly as impressive, it would still be a great first step towards making the world more sustainable. Making it a reality We are already ten years underway since the establishment of the Act. This anniversary is a great checkpoint to see how much progress has been made, and check whether the UK is still on track to meet its targets.   At a first glance, it looks as if everything is going well. The country has been considerate in setting carbon budgets, and with this, effectively encouraged innovation and awareness. Especially the move towards generating more renewable energy is very promising. While it took almost two decades for Britain to build its first 5GW of wind capacity, they realised the latest 5GW in merely two years. A major improvement. Less than a year ago, an important milestone was reached; after the share of  renewable energy skyrocketed to a high of 30% of the energy generation in the country. This does, however, not deny that there is still a long way to go. In 2017, a report indicated that the overall energy consumption still used a whopping 80% of fossil fuel. The share of wind, solar and hydro energy was only 3%. It illustrates the great potential for cutting back emissions. So yes, the increase in renewables has been remarkable, but it is nowhere near the targets as set forth in the Act and the levels that should be reached in 2050.   The looming clouds Alongside the still dominant position of fossil fuels, there are some other clouds that have been cast over this otherwise relatively blue sky. There is a possibility that, in the future, the government will start exploiting flexibilities in the Act to help them meet the set carbon targets. As such, the government could use the fact that the targets were exceeded in previous years and use this to sit back and relax, missing the targets for the next period but justifying this by offsetting it against the earlier overachievement.   It sounds like a technicality, but this loophole could cause the government to take a backseat instead of pushing the boundaries. The target should be looked at as the bare minimum required, not the end-goal in itself.   Secondly, recent insights have led to even stricter targets for the reduction that should be achieved if climate change is to be countered effectively. In the Paris Climate Accord, it has been pointed out that, to be on the safe side, global temperatures should not increase with more than 1.5°C, rather than the 2°C quoted before. For this to be a feasible option, the world needs to have a net zero economy by 2050 and the reduction in carbon emissions should be almost double of what will be brought forth by the Climate Change Act. What is next? Even though the recommendations of the Paris Climate Accord are not set in stone, and therefore do not render the Act obsolete as of now, it should be noted that predictions are that more should be done than is currently established. Therefore, the successes already achieved should be celebrated, after which they should encourage the government to push even further and find ways to exceed expectations - rather than lean back and pride themselves on compliance.   https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate
Back in 2008, the Climate Change Act was passed as part of the strategy of the United Kingdom to drastically reduce its emission of greenhouse gases. It was quite ambitious, to say the least - with the opening line already clearly stating who is to take care of its execution: "It is the duty of the Secretary of State to ensure that the net UK carbon account for the year 2050 is at least 80% lower than the baseline.” This baseline is 1990, making it a rather significant change. It would, after all, enable the country to transform into a low carbon economy. For this purpose, it allows the ministers to introduce all measures that they deem necessary to reach the set targets. The Act also led to the creation of a Committee on Climate Change, that acts as an advisory body to the government.   Even more dramatically, there are only two possible outcomes: either the targets are met, or the Government will be taken to court.   The pledges of the Climate Change Act Initially, the idea was that a 60% cut in emissions would have to be realised, based on a report of the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution. This report claimed that, if adopted by other countries, a 60% reduction would suffice in reducing the atmospheric carbon dioxide to below 550 parts per million. This number was deemed sufficient for withholding the worst consequences of global warming, that will follow if global temperatures are to rise with more than 2°C. However, another assessment indicated that even at a level of 550 ppm, the threshold of 2°C would be exceeded. Quite a few  environmental organisations and political parties argued that the 60% target would not be sufficient, and instead proposed a greater cut of anywhere between 80% to 100%. While some might think that this is a far-reaching goal, it should be noted that this does not include emissions from the entire aviation and shipping industry. As these are the largest polluters, the net effect on total emissions would only be somewhere in the range of 35-50%. Even though this does not sound nearly as impressive, it would still be a great first step towards making the world more sustainable. Making it a reality We are already ten years underway since the establishment of the Act. This anniversary is a great checkpoint to see how much progress has been made, and check whether the UK is still on track to meet its targets.   At a first glance, it looks as if everything is going well. The country has been considerate in setting carbon budgets, and with this, effectively encouraged innovation and awareness. Especially the move towards generating more renewable energy is very promising. While it took almost two decades for Britain to build its first 5GW of wind capacity, they realised the latest 5GW in merely two years. A major improvement. Less than a year ago, an important milestone was reached; after the share of  renewable energy skyrocketed to a high of 30% of the energy generation in the country. This does, however, not deny that there is still a long way to go. In 2017, a report indicated that the overall energy consumption still used a whopping 80% of fossil fuel. The share of wind, solar and hydro energy was only 3%. It illustrates the great potential for cutting back emissions. So yes, the increase in renewables has been remarkable, but it is nowhere near the targets as set forth in the Act and the levels that should be reached in 2050.   The looming clouds Alongside the still dominant position of fossil fuels, there are some other clouds that have been cast over this otherwise relatively blue sky. There is a possibility that, in the future, the government will start exploiting flexibilities in the Act to help them meet the set carbon targets. As such, the government could use the fact that the targets were exceeded in previous years and use this to sit back and relax, missing the targets for the next period but justifying this by offsetting it against the earlier overachievement.   It sounds like a technicality, but this loophole could cause the government to take a backseat instead of pushing the boundaries. The target should be looked at as the bare minimum required, not the end-goal in itself.   Secondly, recent insights have led to even stricter targets for the reduction that should be achieved if climate change is to be countered effectively. In the Paris Climate Accord, it has been pointed out that, to be on the safe side, global temperatures should not increase with more than 1.5°C, rather than the 2°C quoted before. For this to be a feasible option, the world needs to have a net zero economy by 2050 and the reduction in carbon emissions should be almost double of what will be brought forth by the Climate Change Act. What is next? Even though the recommendations of the Paris Climate Accord are not set in stone, and therefore do not render the Act obsolete as of now, it should be noted that predictions are that more should be done than is currently established. Therefore, the successes already achieved should be celebrated, after which they should encourage the government to push even further and find ways to exceed expectations - rather than lean back and pride themselves on compliance.   https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate
The Climate Change Act: the 10-year anniversary
The Climate Change Act: the 10-year anniversary
The future of farming: finding a better way to feed the world
If there is one thing that most people will readily agree on, it must be that the way that we currently feed ourselves is highly ineffective. Polluting. And, at the same time, incapable of providing sufficient food for the ever-growing population of the world. Agriculture has become synonymous with a best effort, especially now that many in the developed nations are facing a hefty shortage of qualified personnel and resources, while developing countries are overexploiting the land and human resources. What is wrong with agriculture ? Even though some will try to nuance the above, it should - if anything - be amplified and emphasised at any given opportunity. The current state of farming is alarming and should worry all of us. While it is putting a huge strain on the environment and the world as a whole, it is painfully incapable of meeting demand. Something that must be changed if we are hoping to still be around in another couple of hundred years. The growing demand for food and produce, coupled with painfully ineffective farming methods, have led to a continuous expansion of farmlands. In doing so, valuable land is wasted - including tropical rainforests and rare, irreplaceable habitats of endangered or near-extinct species. At the same time, the nitrogen pollution is far exceeding all set limits and rendering us dangerously close to becoming extinct as a species as well. Bringing forth an agricultural revolution: coming up with new ideas As such, considering the risks of climate change, the agricultural industry should be taking a good hard look at itself. Thankfully, plenty of innovative minds have already come together to find new, sustainable ideas of re-organising farming. Some of those ideas are merely improving the current state of agriculture, while others are looking to completely re-do the way that we use the earth to feed ourselves. Improving the current state of  farming affairs through automation As for the first, merely improving the current way of farming, new technological innovations are involved. This is often described as technologies that will bring about the “fourth industrial revolution”, marrying various physical, digital and biological domains. Examples, championed by institutions such as the World Economic Forum, include next generation biotechnology innovations that seek to re-engineer plants, crops and animals.   Another huge pillar is precision farming, that seeks to optimise the use of water and pesticides. Smart systems and all kind of robots and autonomous vehicles will tackle the shortage of qualified personnel while ensuring that the entire food chain is traceable and transparant. At the same time, this allows for real-time farming that closely monitors and adjusts the land to minimise waste and prevent loss of crops. Drones will pollinate crops and distribute nutrients when and where needed. A smart tractor can take over a farmer’s job and prepare the soil, seed, weed, fertilise and harvest much more effectively. The internet of things can be used in combination with blockchain to increase accountability while manufacturing synthetic foods, that can be used to personalise our nutrition. All in, it serves an agricultural industry that feeds more people while being less labour-intensive. Nothing new, yet better. And quite possibly an easier pill to swallow for the industry leaders. Radically changing the way that we farm Another proposal that is gaining steam is a radical solution that proposes a decentralised system (as opposed to the technological advances being driven from large companies). This uses the local, natural ecosystem to balance out nature, while producing sustainably. In this view, farming systems are based on the interaction between plants, crops, animals and the environment. Effectively, this would mean that trees and shrubs might be planted amongst or around crops. That there would be a variety of crops and other plants placed in their natural habitat, reducing the need for artificial interference. This time, biodiversity would be agriculture’s greatest friend, using the natural habitat to deal with pests and increase the yield without damaging the soil. This idea is often referred to as ‘agroecology’. These natural ecosystems are circular, matching the production of both crops and energy with a sufficient water and waste management system. The nurturing and creation of such agroecology areas is performed by local communities and allied researchers, taking the control of the food back to the people. Quite different from the idea of automation, that will lay control over the world’s food stock in the hands of a selected few. It is time to take action No matter what side you are on, it is important to realise that the time to act is today. Thankfully, most people seem to agree on this, with a selection of government officials and representatives from the civil society and private sector soon meeting in the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization to discuss the future of farming.   The most hotly debated issue will be this question on who should be in control of farming: a selected few, who will drive innovation that will lead to robots producing artificial food for us, or in the hands of the local communities, who will find ways of farming in harmony with nature through circular systems embedded in the ecosystem. No matter what, it should be clear that, at least to some degree, we should all have a say in the future of our food. Those who have control over all the food in the world will find themselves in a dangerous position of power that should never have existed in the first place. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/gardening---agriculture
If there is one thing that most people will readily agree on, it must be that the way that we currently feed ourselves is highly ineffective. Polluting. And, at the same time, incapable of providing sufficient food for the ever-growing population of the world. Agriculture has become synonymous with a best effort, especially now that many in the developed nations are facing a hefty shortage of qualified personnel and resources, while developing countries are overexploiting the land and human resources. What is wrong with agriculture ? Even though some will try to nuance the above, it should - if anything - be amplified and emphasised at any given opportunity. The current state of farming is alarming and should worry all of us. While it is putting a huge strain on the environment and the world as a whole, it is painfully incapable of meeting demand. Something that must be changed if we are hoping to still be around in another couple of hundred years. The growing demand for food and produce, coupled with painfully ineffective farming methods, have led to a continuous expansion of farmlands. In doing so, valuable land is wasted - including tropical rainforests and rare, irreplaceable habitats of endangered or near-extinct species. At the same time, the nitrogen pollution is far exceeding all set limits and rendering us dangerously close to becoming extinct as a species as well. Bringing forth an agricultural revolution: coming up with new ideas As such, considering the risks of climate change, the agricultural industry should be taking a good hard look at itself. Thankfully, plenty of innovative minds have already come together to find new, sustainable ideas of re-organising farming. Some of those ideas are merely improving the current state of agriculture, while others are looking to completely re-do the way that we use the earth to feed ourselves. Improving the current state of  farming affairs through automation As for the first, merely improving the current way of farming, new technological innovations are involved. This is often described as technologies that will bring about the “fourth industrial revolution”, marrying various physical, digital and biological domains. Examples, championed by institutions such as the World Economic Forum, include next generation biotechnology innovations that seek to re-engineer plants, crops and animals.   Another huge pillar is precision farming, that seeks to optimise the use of water and pesticides. Smart systems and all kind of robots and autonomous vehicles will tackle the shortage of qualified personnel while ensuring that the entire food chain is traceable and transparant. At the same time, this allows for real-time farming that closely monitors and adjusts the land to minimise waste and prevent loss of crops. Drones will pollinate crops and distribute nutrients when and where needed. A smart tractor can take over a farmer’s job and prepare the soil, seed, weed, fertilise and harvest much more effectively. The internet of things can be used in combination with blockchain to increase accountability while manufacturing synthetic foods, that can be used to personalise our nutrition. All in, it serves an agricultural industry that feeds more people while being less labour-intensive. Nothing new, yet better. And quite possibly an easier pill to swallow for the industry leaders. Radically changing the way that we farm Another proposal that is gaining steam is a radical solution that proposes a decentralised system (as opposed to the technological advances being driven from large companies). This uses the local, natural ecosystem to balance out nature, while producing sustainably. In this view, farming systems are based on the interaction between plants, crops, animals and the environment. Effectively, this would mean that trees and shrubs might be planted amongst or around crops. That there would be a variety of crops and other plants placed in their natural habitat, reducing the need for artificial interference. This time, biodiversity would be agriculture’s greatest friend, using the natural habitat to deal with pests and increase the yield without damaging the soil. This idea is often referred to as ‘agroecology’. These natural ecosystems are circular, matching the production of both crops and energy with a sufficient water and waste management system. The nurturing and creation of such agroecology areas is performed by local communities and allied researchers, taking the control of the food back to the people. Quite different from the idea of automation, that will lay control over the world’s food stock in the hands of a selected few. It is time to take action No matter what side you are on, it is important to realise that the time to act is today. Thankfully, most people seem to agree on this, with a selection of government officials and representatives from the civil society and private sector soon meeting in the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization to discuss the future of farming.   The most hotly debated issue will be this question on who should be in control of farming: a selected few, who will drive innovation that will lead to robots producing artificial food for us, or in the hands of the local communities, who will find ways of farming in harmony with nature through circular systems embedded in the ecosystem. No matter what, it should be clear that, at least to some degree, we should all have a say in the future of our food. Those who have control over all the food in the world will find themselves in a dangerous position of power that should never have existed in the first place. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/gardening---agriculture
The future of farming: finding a better way to feed the world
The future of farming: finding a better way to feed the world
Australian hype: carbon-neutral houses made of recycled materials
The other week, a new Australian project caught our attention. A self-proclaimed feminist architecture studio called Whispering Smith came up with the very first prototype of their brainchild. This House A, as the first of its kind is lovingly called, is built as a hybrid between an apartment and a house. With its 753 square feet, it is definitely making the most of the land on which it is situated. Increasing popularity of small and tiny houses It is only the latest fad on a wave of small and tiny house projects. The obsession with creating small(er) living spaces has swept the globe, with people from Austria to Australia coming up with innovative, cutting-edge designs for their own version of a small home. Not only are they much more sustainable and cost-effective, they also have significantly lower heating and water bills. Another argument for downsizing could be that it forces people to cut back on its possessions and only keep those items that they really need - which should, according to popular theories, allow them to live happier and fuller lives as there is less clutter in their lives holding them down. Apartment-house made of recycled materials As for House A, which was built to accommodate the directors of the architecture studio developing it, a focus on recycling seemed to be the main focus. Its small size is optimised for building on small lots, while using various recycled materials to constructing the house - including whitewashed brick, timber, cabinetry and 65-percent-recycled-slag and concrete tilt-up panels.   A location near Perth, Australia was carefully chosen for this project. The house was built in a neighbourhood that is known for its dedication to sustainability: House A was the first of three carbon-neutral residences that were to be built here. And even though it only measures 70 square meters, it feels remarkably comfortable: its three compact levels include a full-sized garage underground and two living floors.   Simple and basic interior Even the interior fits the mentality of scaling down and recycling. Its palette is monochromatic and industrious in its execution, meaning that small flaws and imperfections are still visible rather than hidden away. At the same time, the building is constructed in an open space kind of setting, with minimal use of walls and doors to separate spaces.   This gives the interior an effortless flow, in which spaces blend together effortlessly. This includes the outdoor space, which can easily be added to the house through moveable walls and sliding doors. Perth normally has a climate that allows for this luxurious blending of indoor and outdoor living, which only adds to the spacious feel of the home.   The appeal of House A and other tiny houses Even though the advantages of living small are obvious, there are quite a few who wonder what the actual appeal of such a lifestyle is. Yet the developers are convinced that this movement in small living is going to make a huge difference in the lives of the new generation: “ House A embodies our desire to build something relevant for our generation. A lot of younger people and downsizers don't have a lot of stuff or are having children much later and we are using our homes for all kinds of things, from starting businesses or hosting a long table dinner for 20. We wanted to build a prototype house that did all of these things, while being affordable, sustainable and made from really beautiful, long lasting materials, and we thought the best way was just to design and build it ourselves. ” Other sustainable measures Apart from mostly using recycled materials for its construction and attention paid to the way in which spaces interact with themselves and the outdoors, more measures have been implemented in House A that serve a greater purpose. For instance, an underground rainwater-collecting tank provides water for most of the house. Solar panels offset the electricity needs, and an indoor clothes-drying line provides a natural way of drying laundry - removing the need for mechanical solutions, such as an actual dryer.   All of these measures add up to a carbon neutral way of living, while the home’s garden might even elevate its status to being carbon negative. The garden space is a sanctuary for native plant species to grown and blossom, allowing local bird species to thrive. This makes it a great outdoor space that respects its environment while being a great space to relax for the human inhabitants. House A is definitely ranking up there with other small and tiny house projects. It is innovative, yet nifty and very sustainable. Plus, it definitely pleases the eye - if you are into bare and minimalistic living, that is.
The other week, a new Australian project caught our attention. A self-proclaimed feminist architecture studio called Whispering Smith came up with the very first prototype of their brainchild. This House A, as the first of its kind is lovingly called, is built as a hybrid between an apartment and a house. With its 753 square feet, it is definitely making the most of the land on which it is situated. Increasing popularity of small and tiny houses It is only the latest fad on a wave of small and tiny house projects. The obsession with creating small(er) living spaces has swept the globe, with people from Austria to Australia coming up with innovative, cutting-edge designs for their own version of a small home. Not only are they much more sustainable and cost-effective, they also have significantly lower heating and water bills. Another argument for downsizing could be that it forces people to cut back on its possessions and only keep those items that they really need - which should, according to popular theories, allow them to live happier and fuller lives as there is less clutter in their lives holding them down. Apartment-house made of recycled materials As for House A, which was built to accommodate the directors of the architecture studio developing it, a focus on recycling seemed to be the main focus. Its small size is optimised for building on small lots, while using various recycled materials to constructing the house - including whitewashed brick, timber, cabinetry and 65-percent-recycled-slag and concrete tilt-up panels.   A location near Perth, Australia was carefully chosen for this project. The house was built in a neighbourhood that is known for its dedication to sustainability: House A was the first of three carbon-neutral residences that were to be built here. And even though it only measures 70 square meters, it feels remarkably comfortable: its three compact levels include a full-sized garage underground and two living floors.   Simple and basic interior Even the interior fits the mentality of scaling down and recycling. Its palette is monochromatic and industrious in its execution, meaning that small flaws and imperfections are still visible rather than hidden away. At the same time, the building is constructed in an open space kind of setting, with minimal use of walls and doors to separate spaces.   This gives the interior an effortless flow, in which spaces blend together effortlessly. This includes the outdoor space, which can easily be added to the house through moveable walls and sliding doors. Perth normally has a climate that allows for this luxurious blending of indoor and outdoor living, which only adds to the spacious feel of the home.   The appeal of House A and other tiny houses Even though the advantages of living small are obvious, there are quite a few who wonder what the actual appeal of such a lifestyle is. Yet the developers are convinced that this movement in small living is going to make a huge difference in the lives of the new generation: “ House A embodies our desire to build something relevant for our generation. A lot of younger people and downsizers don't have a lot of stuff or are having children much later and we are using our homes for all kinds of things, from starting businesses or hosting a long table dinner for 20. We wanted to build a prototype house that did all of these things, while being affordable, sustainable and made from really beautiful, long lasting materials, and we thought the best way was just to design and build it ourselves. ” Other sustainable measures Apart from mostly using recycled materials for its construction and attention paid to the way in which spaces interact with themselves and the outdoors, more measures have been implemented in House A that serve a greater purpose. For instance, an underground rainwater-collecting tank provides water for most of the house. Solar panels offset the electricity needs, and an indoor clothes-drying line provides a natural way of drying laundry - removing the need for mechanical solutions, such as an actual dryer.   All of these measures add up to a carbon neutral way of living, while the home’s garden might even elevate its status to being carbon negative. The garden space is a sanctuary for native plant species to grown and blossom, allowing local bird species to thrive. This makes it a great outdoor space that respects its environment while being a great space to relax for the human inhabitants. House A is definitely ranking up there with other small and tiny house projects. It is innovative, yet nifty and very sustainable. Plus, it definitely pleases the eye - if you are into bare and minimalistic living, that is.
Australian hype: carbon-neutral houses made of recycled materials
Australian hype: carbon-neutral houses made of recycled materials
How to make your company carbon neutral: let your business make the world a better place
Although most CEO’s and business owners will agree that they are actually trying to leave their footprints on the world, as this will be a testament to the value that their company adds to the life of customers, there is one footprint that they’d like to get rid of. This would be their carbon footprint, or the impact that running their operations has on the environment at large.   It seems as if customers have developed a rather significant soft spot for companies who are - or who claim to be - committed to ‘doing the right thing’. Greening up their activities, making their supply chain more transparant and printing their business cards on recycled paper: as long as it can be sold as a ‘sustainable practice’, it will be employed, and promoted heavily to boot. For a very good reason, too. Companies who give back are generally enjoying a higher stock price and higher profits than those who usually forgo investments in their corporate social responsibility. Thus, it is hardly surprising that a growing number of businesses have announced their ambitions to become carbon neutral.   A real-life company that has already wiped out its carbon footprint Yet becoming carbon neutral is something that is much easier said than done, as most who have attempted to do so will wholeheartedly agree on. There are, however, some who have already managed to do so. Take the architect practice of Luigi Rosselli Architects, based in Sydney, Australia. Not only have they designed their practice to take full advantage of carbon neutrality, they are definitely walking the talk.   The company has made a business out of designing energy-efficient buildings for its customers, who are eager to jump on the carbon neutral bandwagon as well. Its portfolio includes elegant residential places that usually focus on off-form concrete, that appear to seamlessly blend in to the landscape - being completely in tune with its environment. But even more importantly, the company has dedicated itself to being fully carbon neutral. The entire practice micromanages all of its employees’ behaviours and activities. This ranges from the way that the employees travel to and from work, to the amount of paper that is used and wasted.   How does it work, a  carbon neutral company? The company’s founder Luigi Rosselli recently gave an interview to Archinect Features, in which he highlighted the ways in which the company has managed to achieve carbon neutrality. He explains how the company first focused on the energy that was used on a day-to-day basis. All of this is generated by solar panels.   At the same time, the amount of energy needed is reduced drastically by the smart office design, where the building houses all kind of passive cooling measures: including a terracotta tile rise soleil that reflects the hot sun, and large windows that can be opened for cross ventilation. Another huge issue that was tackled upfront is that of waste reduction. Printing is restricted and only done when there is no other option, and even then still done on recycled paper (double sided, obviously). Besides paper, single use plastics and disposable coffee cups are also largely banned. Instead, workers are using paper crockery and reusable containers for their lunches, whether they bring it from home or pick it up from one of the local, organic cafes in the area. Packaging and other soft plastic materials are diligently recycled, while  food leftovers and coffee grounds are used as fertiliser for the gorgeous roof terrace garden and street level planting. Some more ways of achieving a carbon neutral status A large share of most companies’ carbon footprint is made up of transportation - in particular, that of its employees travelling to and from work. Rosselli introduced a system that heavily encourages its workers to use public transportation or to go to work on foot or by bike. For this purpose, the office is conveniently located close to a major transport hub and boasts various easily accessible facilities for storing bikes. Any air travel required is offset directly when booking, through the airline. And at the end of each year, a complete inventory is made: how much energy was consumed, how much waste was generated, and what was the impact of transportation and travelling? The remainder is usually offset through carbon credits. Or, according to Rosselli: “We are always innovating and looking for proactive ways to reduce our carbon footprint so that we can eventually almost eliminate this stage of the process.” This is a great effort that should be applauded. Even if other companies would only take on a fraction of this attitude, perhaps only focusing on reducing the transportation needs of its employees, it could already make a big difference. It never is a zero-sum game, and it definitely is not now: companies should, if anything, consider the positive example it will set for others to follow. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/circular-econ-
Although most CEO’s and business owners will agree that they are actually trying to leave their footprints on the world, as this will be a testament to the value that their company adds to the life of customers, there is one footprint that they’d like to get rid of. This would be their carbon footprint, or the impact that running their operations has on the environment at large.   It seems as if customers have developed a rather significant soft spot for companies who are - or who claim to be - committed to ‘doing the right thing’. Greening up their activities, making their supply chain more transparant and printing their business cards on recycled paper: as long as it can be sold as a ‘sustainable practice’, it will be employed, and promoted heavily to boot. For a very good reason, too. Companies who give back are generally enjoying a higher stock price and higher profits than those who usually forgo investments in their corporate social responsibility. Thus, it is hardly surprising that a growing number of businesses have announced their ambitions to become carbon neutral.   A real-life company that has already wiped out its carbon footprint Yet becoming carbon neutral is something that is much easier said than done, as most who have attempted to do so will wholeheartedly agree on. There are, however, some who have already managed to do so. Take the architect practice of Luigi Rosselli Architects, based in Sydney, Australia. Not only have they designed their practice to take full advantage of carbon neutrality, they are definitely walking the talk.   The company has made a business out of designing energy-efficient buildings for its customers, who are eager to jump on the carbon neutral bandwagon as well. Its portfolio includes elegant residential places that usually focus on off-form concrete, that appear to seamlessly blend in to the landscape - being completely in tune with its environment. But even more importantly, the company has dedicated itself to being fully carbon neutral. The entire practice micromanages all of its employees’ behaviours and activities. This ranges from the way that the employees travel to and from work, to the amount of paper that is used and wasted.   How does it work, a  carbon neutral company? The company’s founder Luigi Rosselli recently gave an interview to Archinect Features, in which he highlighted the ways in which the company has managed to achieve carbon neutrality. He explains how the company first focused on the energy that was used on a day-to-day basis. All of this is generated by solar panels.   At the same time, the amount of energy needed is reduced drastically by the smart office design, where the building houses all kind of passive cooling measures: including a terracotta tile rise soleil that reflects the hot sun, and large windows that can be opened for cross ventilation. Another huge issue that was tackled upfront is that of waste reduction. Printing is restricted and only done when there is no other option, and even then still done on recycled paper (double sided, obviously). Besides paper, single use plastics and disposable coffee cups are also largely banned. Instead, workers are using paper crockery and reusable containers for their lunches, whether they bring it from home or pick it up from one of the local, organic cafes in the area. Packaging and other soft plastic materials are diligently recycled, while  food leftovers and coffee grounds are used as fertiliser for the gorgeous roof terrace garden and street level planting. Some more ways of achieving a carbon neutral status A large share of most companies’ carbon footprint is made up of transportation - in particular, that of its employees travelling to and from work. Rosselli introduced a system that heavily encourages its workers to use public transportation or to go to work on foot or by bike. For this purpose, the office is conveniently located close to a major transport hub and boasts various easily accessible facilities for storing bikes. Any air travel required is offset directly when booking, through the airline. And at the end of each year, a complete inventory is made: how much energy was consumed, how much waste was generated, and what was the impact of transportation and travelling? The remainder is usually offset through carbon credits. Or, according to Rosselli: “We are always innovating and looking for proactive ways to reduce our carbon footprint so that we can eventually almost eliminate this stage of the process.” This is a great effort that should be applauded. Even if other companies would only take on a fraction of this attitude, perhaps only focusing on reducing the transportation needs of its employees, it could already make a big difference. It never is a zero-sum game, and it definitely is not now: companies should, if anything, consider the positive example it will set for others to follow. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/circular-econ-
How to make your company carbon neutral: let your business make the world a better place
How to make your company carbon neutral: let your business make the world a better place
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