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Refueling electric cars in seconds! Is that possible?
At the University of Scotland a team of scientists have developed a liquid battery which can charge electric cars in minutes. The scientist use an ‘exotic rust’, a metal oxide that can be charged when added to water. Now it can take hours to charge an electric car. This new liquid battery could be the way to get rid of fossil fuel cars. Image by: Tim Mossholder, Unsplash The same infrastructure for 'rust liquid' as for petrol The nice thing of this new technique is that refuelling your liquid battery goes the same way as fuelling fossil fuel cars. So no different behaviour is needed at the fuel station. Of course the proto type still has to be scaled but if it works it will be a game changer! At the pump station you need nozzle to withdrawal the spent ‘rust liquid’ where after you need another nozzle to refill the battery with fresh liquid. The range of the liquid would be the same as the conventional fuel. Making the liquid is not so difficult at the moment but scaling up the process is still a challenge. A prototype is upscaled already and is working according plan. Another advantage is that we still can use the existing infrastructure of fuel stations. There even could be a transition time where petrol and liquid battery are both used for a while at the 'fuel station' where after hopefully ‘rust liquid will take over. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/transportation/plug-in
At the University of Scotland a team of scientists have developed a liquid battery which can charge electric cars in minutes. The scientist use an ‘exotic rust’, a metal oxide that can be charged when added to water. Now it can take hours to charge an electric car. This new liquid battery could be the way to get rid of fossil fuel cars. Image by: Tim Mossholder, Unsplash The same infrastructure for 'rust liquid' as for petrol The nice thing of this new technique is that refuelling your liquid battery goes the same way as fuelling fossil fuel cars. So no different behaviour is needed at the fuel station. Of course the proto type still has to be scaled but if it works it will be a game changer! At the pump station you need nozzle to withdrawal the spent ‘rust liquid’ where after you need another nozzle to refill the battery with fresh liquid. The range of the liquid would be the same as the conventional fuel. Making the liquid is not so difficult at the moment but scaling up the process is still a challenge. A prototype is upscaled already and is working according plan. Another advantage is that we still can use the existing infrastructure of fuel stations. There even could be a transition time where petrol and liquid battery are both used for a while at the 'fuel station' where after hopefully ‘rust liquid will take over. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/transportation/plug-in
Refueling electric cars in seconds! Is that possible?
Refueling electric cars in seconds! Is that possible?
THE HEAT IS ON: DROUGHT AND THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE
Last week, some rather disturbing headlines were tossed around in newspapers all around the world. Whilst in the midst of a series of scorching global heatwaves, an international team of scientists warned in a new publication in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that we are headed for a so-called “Hothouse Earth” scenario. According to them, even if the carbon emission reductions as set forth in the Paris Agreement are met - pledging to limit global warming to 2°C -, chances are that this domino effect will be put in motion. WHAT IS THIS “HOTHOUSE EARTH”? The Hothouse Earth refers to a scenario where the earth’s climate eventually stabilises at a global average that lies about 4-5°C above pre-industrial temperatures, causing sea levels to rise as much as 10 to 60 meters compared to their current state. The implications of this change are dire: once the precarious scale of our natural balance tips to the wrong side, abrupt and irreversible chances in our environment will be noticeable. Image by: Paul Morris, Unsplash Most importantly: it will create havoc on the world as we know it today. The permafrost will thaw, the Amazon rainforest will wither, as will the boreal forest. The amount of sea ice will decrease dramatically, along with the snow cover in the northern hemisphere. Along with loss of methane hydrates from the oceans and weakening carbon sinks, this will set a process in motion that, at its worst, will render large areas of the world uninhabitable. Authors are calling for a fundamental societal change in order to maintain a “Stabilized Earth”, as they call it, where temperatures are not higher than 2°C above pre-industrial levels and stable. Not only does this require a cutback in emission of greenhouse gasses, the authors also propose a solution including the enhancement and creation of new biological carbon stores, in the form of better management of forest, agriculture and soil and conservation of natural biodiversity. Image by: Ricardo Chiarini, Unsplash ONGOING WEATHER EFFECTS Just pick up any random newspaper or switch on the television, and it is not hard to find evidence for this theory. The tipping point that these scientists refer to appears to be closer than ever, judging by the sheer number and impact of natural disasters. The summer of 2018 will enter history books as a record-shattering, drought-plagued season. Left and right, national and local heat records were set. Lisbon hit 44°C, while the Mediterranean city of Perpignan recorded a night temperature of 30°C. The USA’s Death Valley boasted a record-breaking average temperature of 42°C in July. Oman was your typical summer holiday destination, providing an agreeable 50°C temperature. The current year is well on pace to become the 4th hottest on record. Image by: Brad Helmink, Unsplash While some might thoroughly enjoy the sunshine and warm summer nights, it is an economical disaster for some industries. The continued drought - already described by some as the worst in the last century - has left farmers and rural communities devastated, as their crops are destroyed and animals dehydrated and malnourished. Most countries issued stern warnings and instructions to prevent any water spillage and losses, causing most to look on helplessly as their lawn colours brown and crops wither away. The upcoming harvest is slated to be an absolute nightmare, with individual farmer’s losses adding up to thousands and thousands of euros. Besides the agricultural devastation, the drought has also led to a number of natural disasters. Only last month, Greece was hit by some of the worst wildfires the world has seen in the 21st century, claiming at least 90 lives and destroying entire cities. Similarly, other areas in Europe and around the world are struggling to prevent wildfires from breaking out and spreading rapidly across the water-deprived areas. California, for example, already victimised by last year’s wildfires, is currently battling a series of raging wildfires that are expected to burn for the remainder of August, making it the largest ever in their history. For the upcoming weeks, rain has been predicted, eliciting cheers of many. They should, however, be careful not to get too excited. As the contrast between the warmer and colder air is so stark, rain and thunderstorms will be similarly extreme. Huge storms, including hail and heavy winds, will pose another danger to us. From lingering drought to sudden flood damage: it only serves to underline the importance of acting now, and calling a halt to climate change before it is too late. I mage by: Craig Whitehead, Unsplash “HOTHOUSE EARTH”: FACT OR FICTION? Some are questioning the methods used in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences publication, calling for some nuance. After all, the assumed domino effect has not been solidly proven, nor has the assumption been tested that the effect could already become irreversible sooner than we think. Although - while the exact tipping point can be debated, along with the stance that climate change can entirely be reversed if only we take drastic action - the basic idea goes unchallenged. Climate change is real. Just look at what is happening to the world today. And as long as there still is hope that irreversible damage can be avoided, we should do everything within our power to make that happen. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate Cover image by: Carlos Alberto Gomez Iniguez, Unsplash
Last week, some rather disturbing headlines were tossed around in newspapers all around the world. Whilst in the midst of a series of scorching global heatwaves, an international team of scientists warned in a new publication in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that we are headed for a so-called “Hothouse Earth” scenario. According to them, even if the carbon emission reductions as set forth in the Paris Agreement are met - pledging to limit global warming to 2°C -, chances are that this domino effect will be put in motion. WHAT IS THIS “HOTHOUSE EARTH”? The Hothouse Earth refers to a scenario where the earth’s climate eventually stabilises at a global average that lies about 4-5°C above pre-industrial temperatures, causing sea levels to rise as much as 10 to 60 meters compared to their current state. The implications of this change are dire: once the precarious scale of our natural balance tips to the wrong side, abrupt and irreversible chances in our environment will be noticeable. Image by: Paul Morris, Unsplash Most importantly: it will create havoc on the world as we know it today. The permafrost will thaw, the Amazon rainforest will wither, as will the boreal forest. The amount of sea ice will decrease dramatically, along with the snow cover in the northern hemisphere. Along with loss of methane hydrates from the oceans and weakening carbon sinks, this will set a process in motion that, at its worst, will render large areas of the world uninhabitable. Authors are calling for a fundamental societal change in order to maintain a “Stabilized Earth”, as they call it, where temperatures are not higher than 2°C above pre-industrial levels and stable. Not only does this require a cutback in emission of greenhouse gasses, the authors also propose a solution including the enhancement and creation of new biological carbon stores, in the form of better management of forest, agriculture and soil and conservation of natural biodiversity. Image by: Ricardo Chiarini, Unsplash ONGOING WEATHER EFFECTS Just pick up any random newspaper or switch on the television, and it is not hard to find evidence for this theory. The tipping point that these scientists refer to appears to be closer than ever, judging by the sheer number and impact of natural disasters. The summer of 2018 will enter history books as a record-shattering, drought-plagued season. Left and right, national and local heat records were set. Lisbon hit 44°C, while the Mediterranean city of Perpignan recorded a night temperature of 30°C. The USA’s Death Valley boasted a record-breaking average temperature of 42°C in July. Oman was your typical summer holiday destination, providing an agreeable 50°C temperature. The current year is well on pace to become the 4th hottest on record. Image by: Brad Helmink, Unsplash While some might thoroughly enjoy the sunshine and warm summer nights, it is an economical disaster for some industries. The continued drought - already described by some as the worst in the last century - has left farmers and rural communities devastated, as their crops are destroyed and animals dehydrated and malnourished. Most countries issued stern warnings and instructions to prevent any water spillage and losses, causing most to look on helplessly as their lawn colours brown and crops wither away. The upcoming harvest is slated to be an absolute nightmare, with individual farmer’s losses adding up to thousands and thousands of euros. Besides the agricultural devastation, the drought has also led to a number of natural disasters. Only last month, Greece was hit by some of the worst wildfires the world has seen in the 21st century, claiming at least 90 lives and destroying entire cities. Similarly, other areas in Europe and around the world are struggling to prevent wildfires from breaking out and spreading rapidly across the water-deprived areas. California, for example, already victimised by last year’s wildfires, is currently battling a series of raging wildfires that are expected to burn for the remainder of August, making it the largest ever in their history. For the upcoming weeks, rain has been predicted, eliciting cheers of many. They should, however, be careful not to get too excited. As the contrast between the warmer and colder air is so stark, rain and thunderstorms will be similarly extreme. Huge storms, including hail and heavy winds, will pose another danger to us. From lingering drought to sudden flood damage: it only serves to underline the importance of acting now, and calling a halt to climate change before it is too late. I mage by: Craig Whitehead, Unsplash “HOTHOUSE EARTH”: FACT OR FICTION? Some are questioning the methods used in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences publication, calling for some nuance. After all, the assumed domino effect has not been solidly proven, nor has the assumption been tested that the effect could already become irreversible sooner than we think. Although - while the exact tipping point can be debated, along with the stance that climate change can entirely be reversed if only we take drastic action - the basic idea goes unchallenged. Climate change is real. Just look at what is happening to the world today. And as long as there still is hope that irreversible damage can be avoided, we should do everything within our power to make that happen. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate Cover image by: Carlos Alberto Gomez Iniguez, Unsplash
THE HEAT IS ON: DROUGHT AND THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE
THE HEAT IS ON: DROUGHT AND THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE
THE PARIS CLIMATE AGREEMENT: NO, WE WON’T MAKE IT.
The conclusion of the Paris Climate Change Conference was met with cheers and smiles of an eclectic mix of high-ranking government officials. World leaders and news outlets appeared ecstatic, praising the unprecedented commitments made by virtually all nations. Finally, some real steps were taken towards calling a halt to global warming. The world was going to unite and battle the issue of man-made climate change together.   As the long-term goal, an upper limit was described of a 2 degrees increase in temperature above pre-industrial levels. With almost all countries pledging to take drastic action to cut back on their emissions, what could possibly go wrong? THE TRUMP EFFECT Well, first of all. One word. Trump. The American president, who has publicly claimed on various occasions that climate change is a ‘hoax’, has worked tirelessly to pretty much rewind all climate-related progress made during the Obama-era. Aside from defunding research and subsidy programs, he has threatened to pull out of the Paris Agreement at several occasions.   Effectively, this means that the leader of one of the largest emitters is showing zero interest in tackling this problem. This attitude is guaranteed to impact other countries as well. After all, why would a small nation bend over backwards in order to cut back on harmful emissions and rapidly increase its share of renewable energy sources, while the ‘big bad neighbour’ happily goes on with its climate-destroying activities?   The activities of truly committed countries will just be a metaphorical drop in the ocean, whereas other nations empty a bucket in that very same ocean, ultimately causing sea levels to rise to dangerous levels.   ROAD TO + 2°C Another problem with the Paris Agreement is that it does not stipulate a fixed goal or end date, nor does it provide any kind of mechanism that enforces countries to set such a firm goal and date. The only conditions put forth are that individual goals should be ‘ ambitious ’, ‘ representing a progression over time ’ and set ‘ the view to achieve the purpose of the Agreement ’. Especially ‘ambitious’ is a condition that is urgently needed if the Agreement is to make an actual difference. For it to not just be a petty, cute way of showing that we care while, in fact, killing all hopes of leaving behind a clean and safe world for generations to come. After all, even the negotiators agreed whilst drafting the Agreement that the target of not going above + 2°C is insufficient. A target of + 1,5°C would be more fitting. Note the exact meaning of ‘fitting’ in this case. It does most certainly not mean that, if the world by some miracle manages to actually stay within this bound, danger is averted and climate change is ‘beat’. As put by former US President Barack Obama: “ Even if we meet every target ... we will only get to part of where we need to go. This agreement will help delay or avoid some of the worst consequences of climate change .” WHAT DO WE NEED? As put so eloquently by Trump’s predecessor, even if all nations actually stand by their promises and cut back their emissions drastically - and that is a huge if! -, we are far from done. Some countries are showing the way by imposing impressive national targets, such as the Scandinavian commitment to renewable energy sources and China’s focus on clean technology and innovation. Yet, despite all good intentions, this does not magically help us reach the Paris goals. None of these countries will actually reach these goals unless they employ a fully integrated approach. Unfortunately it seems as though no government actually has the guts to do so. Aside from their flagship sustainability projects, they are very hesitant to impose unpopular restrictions and limitations on their citizens and businesses alike. And yet this is the only thing that would ensure a safe and liveable world for the future generations. What is needed is a change in mindset. Western countries should drastically alter their consumption behaviour, make sure that all of their people are permeated with the belief that any and all wasteful activities should be avoided or at least mitigated. Similarly, companies should be forced to step away from the relatively cheap fossil fuels and opt for more expensive renewable sources. Without such drastic actions, the Paris Agreement will not be a feasible rescue plan. It will merely be a showpiece to show history that we actually did - attempt to - care. THERE’S ONLY ONE WORLD Sustainability does, and always has, come at a hefty price. Especially if it is done right, not only by giving in to the measures that the public enjoys most (or that bothers them least, it is a fine line). It are exactly the unpopular actions that will make all the difference. And judging by the recent riot over a ban on plastic straws in Europe, we still have a long, long way to go before each and every one of us understands the impact of the way we act today on the world as it will be tomorrow.   There is only one earth. It may sound cliched, but is apparently still not understood. Wake up, world. And take some real action before it is too late. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate Cover image by: Benjamin Sow, Unsplash
The conclusion of the Paris Climate Change Conference was met with cheers and smiles of an eclectic mix of high-ranking government officials. World leaders and news outlets appeared ecstatic, praising the unprecedented commitments made by virtually all nations. Finally, some real steps were taken towards calling a halt to global warming. The world was going to unite and battle the issue of man-made climate change together.   As the long-term goal, an upper limit was described of a 2 degrees increase in temperature above pre-industrial levels. With almost all countries pledging to take drastic action to cut back on their emissions, what could possibly go wrong? THE TRUMP EFFECT Well, first of all. One word. Trump. The American president, who has publicly claimed on various occasions that climate change is a ‘hoax’, has worked tirelessly to pretty much rewind all climate-related progress made during the Obama-era. Aside from defunding research and subsidy programs, he has threatened to pull out of the Paris Agreement at several occasions.   Effectively, this means that the leader of one of the largest emitters is showing zero interest in tackling this problem. This attitude is guaranteed to impact other countries as well. After all, why would a small nation bend over backwards in order to cut back on harmful emissions and rapidly increase its share of renewable energy sources, while the ‘big bad neighbour’ happily goes on with its climate-destroying activities?   The activities of truly committed countries will just be a metaphorical drop in the ocean, whereas other nations empty a bucket in that very same ocean, ultimately causing sea levels to rise to dangerous levels.   ROAD TO + 2°C Another problem with the Paris Agreement is that it does not stipulate a fixed goal or end date, nor does it provide any kind of mechanism that enforces countries to set such a firm goal and date. The only conditions put forth are that individual goals should be ‘ ambitious ’, ‘ representing a progression over time ’ and set ‘ the view to achieve the purpose of the Agreement ’. Especially ‘ambitious’ is a condition that is urgently needed if the Agreement is to make an actual difference. For it to not just be a petty, cute way of showing that we care while, in fact, killing all hopes of leaving behind a clean and safe world for generations to come. After all, even the negotiators agreed whilst drafting the Agreement that the target of not going above + 2°C is insufficient. A target of + 1,5°C would be more fitting. Note the exact meaning of ‘fitting’ in this case. It does most certainly not mean that, if the world by some miracle manages to actually stay within this bound, danger is averted and climate change is ‘beat’. As put by former US President Barack Obama: “ Even if we meet every target ... we will only get to part of where we need to go. This agreement will help delay or avoid some of the worst consequences of climate change .” WHAT DO WE NEED? As put so eloquently by Trump’s predecessor, even if all nations actually stand by their promises and cut back their emissions drastically - and that is a huge if! -, we are far from done. Some countries are showing the way by imposing impressive national targets, such as the Scandinavian commitment to renewable energy sources and China’s focus on clean technology and innovation. Yet, despite all good intentions, this does not magically help us reach the Paris goals. None of these countries will actually reach these goals unless they employ a fully integrated approach. Unfortunately it seems as though no government actually has the guts to do so. Aside from their flagship sustainability projects, they are very hesitant to impose unpopular restrictions and limitations on their citizens and businesses alike. And yet this is the only thing that would ensure a safe and liveable world for the future generations. What is needed is a change in mindset. Western countries should drastically alter their consumption behaviour, make sure that all of their people are permeated with the belief that any and all wasteful activities should be avoided or at least mitigated. Similarly, companies should be forced to step away from the relatively cheap fossil fuels and opt for more expensive renewable sources. Without such drastic actions, the Paris Agreement will not be a feasible rescue plan. It will merely be a showpiece to show history that we actually did - attempt to - care. THERE’S ONLY ONE WORLD Sustainability does, and always has, come at a hefty price. Especially if it is done right, not only by giving in to the measures that the public enjoys most (or that bothers them least, it is a fine line). It are exactly the unpopular actions that will make all the difference. And judging by the recent riot over a ban on plastic straws in Europe, we still have a long, long way to go before each and every one of us understands the impact of the way we act today on the world as it will be tomorrow.   There is only one earth. It may sound cliched, but is apparently still not understood. Wake up, world. And take some real action before it is too late. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate Cover image by: Benjamin Sow, Unsplash
THE PARIS CLIMATE AGREEMENT: NO, WE WON’T MAKE IT.
THE PARIS CLIMATE AGREEMENT: NO, WE WON’T MAKE IT.
Diet Food & Beverages Market: Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin Analysis with Forecasts to 2018-2024.
Diet Food & Beverages Market : Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin Analysis with Forecasts to 2018-2024. The report studies and describes the Diet Food & Beverages Market in terms of value. The market value for the market is provided in terms of USD million from 2018-2024. The geography (North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America and Middle East & Africa) focusing on key countries in each region. It also covers market drivers, restraints, opportunities, challenges, and key issues in Diet Food & Beverages Market. It’s one in every one of the primary steps toward bettering the food environment: making healthy foods and drinks more convenient and affordable. What’s equally important: limiting access to high-calorie, low-nutrient foods its also known as “junk food” and sugary drinks. Since public buildings and facilities serve people of all ages and backgrounds, setting nutrition standards for food offered publicly places or purchased with tax bucks will have an especially broad impact. KEY Benefits like, This report offers a detailed analysis of the dynamic changes undergoing within the world organic food & drinks market from various views., This report provides deep insights into the various opportunities present within the market, Report details about the positioning of the organic food and beverages market size in several geographical segments, This report entails the detailed quantitative analysis of the current market and estimations throughout 2018‐2024, that assist in identifying the prevailing market opportunities to maximize the market, Comprehensive analysis of factors that drive and restrain the growth of the organic food and beverages market trends area unit enclosed, The competitive intelligence of leading makers and distributors of organic food and beverages market mentioned in the report helps in understanding the competitive situation across the geographies. Top players like, Abbott Laboratories, General Mills, Herbalife Ltd., Kellogg Company, Medifast, Inc., Nutrisystem, Inc., PepsiCo, Inc., The Coca Cola Company, The Kraft Heinz Company, Weight Watchers, Inc., Whole Foods Market Inc., Everest, Cargill, Inc., WhiteWave Foods, Danone, United Natural Foods Incorporated, Hain Celestial Group, Dole Food Company, Inc., Dean Foods, Amul, The Hershey Company, Louis Dreyfus Holding BV, Arla Foods, Inc., Nature’s Path Foods, Newman’s Own, Inc., Amy’s Kitchen, Albertsons Companies, Inc., ConAgra Brand, Inc., Kerry Group Plc, The J. M. Smucker Co., Organic Valley Cropp Cooperative, AdeS, Alibaba Group, Archer-Daniels-Midland Co., Associated British Foods Plc, Atkins Nutritionals, Inc, Auchan, other. Product Type, Organic Foods, Organic Beverages. Application, Hospital, Household, Other Region Like, North America(U.S.,Mexico,Canada), Europe(UK, France, Germany, Italy), Asia Pacific(China, Japan, India, Southeast Asia), Latin America(Brazil), The Middle East and Africa( GCC, Africa, Rest of MEA)
Diet Food & Beverages Market : Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin Analysis with Forecasts to 2018-2024. The report studies and describes the Diet Food & Beverages Market in terms of value. The market value for the market is provided in terms of USD million from 2018-2024. The geography (North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America and Middle East & Africa) focusing on key countries in each region. It also covers market drivers, restraints, opportunities, challenges, and key issues in Diet Food & Beverages Market. It’s one in every one of the primary steps toward bettering the food environment: making healthy foods and drinks more convenient and affordable. What’s equally important: limiting access to high-calorie, low-nutrient foods its also known as “junk food” and sugary drinks. Since public buildings and facilities serve people of all ages and backgrounds, setting nutrition standards for food offered publicly places or purchased with tax bucks will have an especially broad impact. KEY Benefits like, This report offers a detailed analysis of the dynamic changes undergoing within the world organic food & drinks market from various views., This report provides deep insights into the various opportunities present within the market, Report details about the positioning of the organic food and beverages market size in several geographical segments, This report entails the detailed quantitative analysis of the current market and estimations throughout 2018‐2024, that assist in identifying the prevailing market opportunities to maximize the market, Comprehensive analysis of factors that drive and restrain the growth of the organic food and beverages market trends area unit enclosed, The competitive intelligence of leading makers and distributors of organic food and beverages market mentioned in the report helps in understanding the competitive situation across the geographies. Top players like, Abbott Laboratories, General Mills, Herbalife Ltd., Kellogg Company, Medifast, Inc., Nutrisystem, Inc., PepsiCo, Inc., The Coca Cola Company, The Kraft Heinz Company, Weight Watchers, Inc., Whole Foods Market Inc., Everest, Cargill, Inc., WhiteWave Foods, Danone, United Natural Foods Incorporated, Hain Celestial Group, Dole Food Company, Inc., Dean Foods, Amul, The Hershey Company, Louis Dreyfus Holding BV, Arla Foods, Inc., Nature’s Path Foods, Newman’s Own, Inc., Amy’s Kitchen, Albertsons Companies, Inc., ConAgra Brand, Inc., Kerry Group Plc, The J. M. Smucker Co., Organic Valley Cropp Cooperative, AdeS, Alibaba Group, Archer-Daniels-Midland Co., Associated British Foods Plc, Atkins Nutritionals, Inc, Auchan, other. Product Type, Organic Foods, Organic Beverages. Application, Hospital, Household, Other Region Like, North America(U.S.,Mexico,Canada), Europe(UK, France, Germany, Italy), Asia Pacific(China, Japan, India, Southeast Asia), Latin America(Brazil), The Middle East and Africa( GCC, Africa, Rest of MEA)
Diet Food & Beverages Market: Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin Analysis with Forecasts to 2018-2024.
Diet Food & Beverages Market: Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin Analysis with Forecasts to 2018-2024.
High speed cycling the Dutch way
  Students from Delft and Amsterdam test high-tech recumbent bike on F-16 landing strip The Human Power Team, a project run by students from TU Delft and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, tested their new aerodynamic recumbent bike, the VeloX 8, last Sunday. The landing strip of Military base Woensdrecht, which is usually the place F-16’s take off, was used by athletes Jennifer Breet and Lieke the Cock to cycle 74 km/h (46 mph) in their bike that was custom made for them by the students. Their goal is to break the world record, currently at 122 km/h (76 mph), this September in the Nevada desert. “We are very proud that we reached 74 km/h today; a very promising result. At the world record attempt, the road will be much longer, which means we have a lot more time to accelerate to our top speed. Besides that, the record run won’t be at sea level, which means there is lower air density and because of that there is less air resistance”. Stephanie Wiechers explains, Team Manager of the Human Power Team and Aerospace Engineering student at TU Delft. Image by: Bas de Meijer High-tech bicycle These kind of speeds are mostly possible because of the streamlined design of the VeloX. “On a regular bike, the wind will slow you down a lot”, Wiechers explains. Because of that, the team has focussed on reducing the air resistance this year. “Months have been spent designing a bike that both suits our athletes perfectly and is as aerodynamic as possible. We came up with a completely new gear changing system, which is much more compact. The result: the smallest bike the team has ever built”. The bicycle resembles a bullet, and does not have a window - everything is done to make sure the aerodynamics are as good as possible. Human Power Team “Cycling at these speeds is not only due to the design of the bike”, Wiechers explains. “The athlete is just as important. It is the combination of human and machine that matters”. The team believes they are as successful as they are because of the cooperation between the movement science students from Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and the engineers from TU Delft. Last year The team of students managed to become world champion in 2017, but did not break the world record. The 121.5 km/h Aniek Rooderkerken reached was just under the world record of 121.8 km/h. This year, the team is working as hard as they can to make sure the record is Dutch hands. Image cover: Bas de Meijer,  http://basfotografie.com http://www.hptdelft.nl/
  Students from Delft and Amsterdam test high-tech recumbent bike on F-16 landing strip The Human Power Team, a project run by students from TU Delft and Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, tested their new aerodynamic recumbent bike, the VeloX 8, last Sunday. The landing strip of Military base Woensdrecht, which is usually the place F-16’s take off, was used by athletes Jennifer Breet and Lieke the Cock to cycle 74 km/h (46 mph) in their bike that was custom made for them by the students. Their goal is to break the world record, currently at 122 km/h (76 mph), this September in the Nevada desert. “We are very proud that we reached 74 km/h today; a very promising result. At the world record attempt, the road will be much longer, which means we have a lot more time to accelerate to our top speed. Besides that, the record run won’t be at sea level, which means there is lower air density and because of that there is less air resistance”. Stephanie Wiechers explains, Team Manager of the Human Power Team and Aerospace Engineering student at TU Delft. Image by: Bas de Meijer High-tech bicycle These kind of speeds are mostly possible because of the streamlined design of the VeloX. “On a regular bike, the wind will slow you down a lot”, Wiechers explains. Because of that, the team has focussed on reducing the air resistance this year. “Months have been spent designing a bike that both suits our athletes perfectly and is as aerodynamic as possible. We came up with a completely new gear changing system, which is much more compact. The result: the smallest bike the team has ever built”. The bicycle resembles a bullet, and does not have a window - everything is done to make sure the aerodynamics are as good as possible. Human Power Team “Cycling at these speeds is not only due to the design of the bike”, Wiechers explains. “The athlete is just as important. It is the combination of human and machine that matters”. The team believes they are as successful as they are because of the cooperation between the movement science students from Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and the engineers from TU Delft. Last year The team of students managed to become world champion in 2017, but did not break the world record. The 121.5 km/h Aniek Rooderkerken reached was just under the world record of 121.8 km/h. This year, the team is working as hard as they can to make sure the record is Dutch hands. Image cover: Bas de Meijer,  http://basfotografie.com http://www.hptdelft.nl/
High speed cycling the Dutch way
High speed cycling the Dutch way
Blockchain for Agriculture: Changing farming as we know it
Farmers are facing one heck of a job. Not only are they tasked with feeding an amazing 7 billion people, going on 10 billion by the time we hit 2050; they also have to do so in increasingly difficult circumstances. Water supplies are becoming increasingly scarce and costly; extreme weather conditions such as extreme heat, drought, storms and hail are destroying crops. Weeds are becoming resistant to herbicides, whereas pests are becoming more and more persistent. All the while, agriculture is seen as one of the major contributors to climate change due to deforestation, reliance on chemicals and methane generation. This puts the feeders of our world in a rather tough spot. They have to deal with the consequences of climate change and the changing environment, all the while finding new ways of preventing more harmful emissions. Agriculture has to ‘man up’ and face the damage that has been done to our world in decades past - and ensure that, utilising scarce resources, no one has to go to bed hungry. In order to make this happen, farmers are increasingly turning to new technology. Image by: John Schnobrich WHAT IS BLOCKCHAIN? One of these technologies that could prove hugely beneficial to agriculture is blockchain. Blockchain is one of these terms that you may have heard buzzing around recently, mostly in connection with Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. Even though these applications seem to have stolen the spotlight, there are applications for blockchain in other industries - such as agriculture - as well. In order to fully understand the benefits of blockchain for agriculture, it is good to first look at the concept of blockchain itself. Blockchain basically functions like a hyper-secure database. Users can add information to it, that consequently gets verified by other users. In order to make changes to earlier entries, the unique code of each entry has to be verified and adjusted. As such, it requires a community of users to update and verify the database. There are no brokers or middlemen, and anyone can check the secure database at any time to record, certify, monitor and transfer assets. APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE Just looking at this description, it is not hard to see why it would be useful to apply this technology to agriculture. Blockchain guarantees a single record, free from manipulation, about everything that is going on at the farm. The inventory, supplies, harvested goods and contracts are locked in a single place. This is a stark contrast to the ‘old’ way of recording all kinds of information on pieces of paper or, at best, in some random Excel files. Aside from the savings in time and effort, blockchain also helps in collecting and organising data. This can, in turn, be put to good use when it comes to finding new ways of improving operational efficiency. MONITORING VALUE CHAIN A second benefit from blockchain would be that it improves communication within the value chain. Especially in the current era of food safety and security it is crucial to be able to recognise and trace where specific food items have come from. In the past, infections and bacteria have severely disrupted entire food industries: fipronil-infected eggs, foot-and-mouth infected cows, pest-ridden crops. Farms that lost all of their livestock because one animal in their area was infected, or a nationwide ban on eggs after some were found to contain infections that could be harmful to humans. All of these nasty consequences could be diminished dramatically if individual products can be traced back to the exact source at any point in the value chain. Image by: Annie Spratt The benefits of monitoring the value chain are not always as dramatic. Just look at the huge and constantly growing market for organic and speciality produce. Growers who can provide verifiable proof that their products are produced in a manner consistent with the strict requirements for those kind of labels, are greatly incentivised. Consumers can rest safely knowing that their organically or otherwise specially grown products are fully in line with their dietary requirements and wishes. A NEW AGRICULTURAL REVOLUTION? There should be no doubt about it: blockchain is a much needed step forward for the agricultural industry. Not only does it help farmers to run their operations more efficiently, which will in turn provide them with greater insights in where innovations can be applied; it also benefits the food value chain as a whole through the tracking of individual crops or products. The end result is something that the ‘new’ world urgently needs: safe, clean and sufficient produce to feed us all. Image by: Elijah O Donell https://www.whatsorb.com/category/gardening---agriculture
Farmers are facing one heck of a job. Not only are they tasked with feeding an amazing 7 billion people, going on 10 billion by the time we hit 2050; they also have to do so in increasingly difficult circumstances. Water supplies are becoming increasingly scarce and costly; extreme weather conditions such as extreme heat, drought, storms and hail are destroying crops. Weeds are becoming resistant to herbicides, whereas pests are becoming more and more persistent. All the while, agriculture is seen as one of the major contributors to climate change due to deforestation, reliance on chemicals and methane generation. This puts the feeders of our world in a rather tough spot. They have to deal with the consequences of climate change and the changing environment, all the while finding new ways of preventing more harmful emissions. Agriculture has to ‘man up’ and face the damage that has been done to our world in decades past - and ensure that, utilising scarce resources, no one has to go to bed hungry. In order to make this happen, farmers are increasingly turning to new technology. Image by: John Schnobrich WHAT IS BLOCKCHAIN? One of these technologies that could prove hugely beneficial to agriculture is blockchain. Blockchain is one of these terms that you may have heard buzzing around recently, mostly in connection with Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. Even though these applications seem to have stolen the spotlight, there are applications for blockchain in other industries - such as agriculture - as well. In order to fully understand the benefits of blockchain for agriculture, it is good to first look at the concept of blockchain itself. Blockchain basically functions like a hyper-secure database. Users can add information to it, that consequently gets verified by other users. In order to make changes to earlier entries, the unique code of each entry has to be verified and adjusted. As such, it requires a community of users to update and verify the database. There are no brokers or middlemen, and anyone can check the secure database at any time to record, certify, monitor and transfer assets. APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE Just looking at this description, it is not hard to see why it would be useful to apply this technology to agriculture. Blockchain guarantees a single record, free from manipulation, about everything that is going on at the farm. The inventory, supplies, harvested goods and contracts are locked in a single place. This is a stark contrast to the ‘old’ way of recording all kinds of information on pieces of paper or, at best, in some random Excel files. Aside from the savings in time and effort, blockchain also helps in collecting and organising data. This can, in turn, be put to good use when it comes to finding new ways of improving operational efficiency. MONITORING VALUE CHAIN A second benefit from blockchain would be that it improves communication within the value chain. Especially in the current era of food safety and security it is crucial to be able to recognise and trace where specific food items have come from. In the past, infections and bacteria have severely disrupted entire food industries: fipronil-infected eggs, foot-and-mouth infected cows, pest-ridden crops. Farms that lost all of their livestock because one animal in their area was infected, or a nationwide ban on eggs after some were found to contain infections that could be harmful to humans. All of these nasty consequences could be diminished dramatically if individual products can be traced back to the exact source at any point in the value chain. Image by: Annie Spratt The benefits of monitoring the value chain are not always as dramatic. Just look at the huge and constantly growing market for organic and speciality produce. Growers who can provide verifiable proof that their products are produced in a manner consistent with the strict requirements for those kind of labels, are greatly incentivised. Consumers can rest safely knowing that their organically or otherwise specially grown products are fully in line with their dietary requirements and wishes. A NEW AGRICULTURAL REVOLUTION? There should be no doubt about it: blockchain is a much needed step forward for the agricultural industry. Not only does it help farmers to run their operations more efficiently, which will in turn provide them with greater insights in where innovations can be applied; it also benefits the food value chain as a whole through the tracking of individual crops or products. The end result is something that the ‘new’ world urgently needs: safe, clean and sufficient produce to feed us all. Image by: Elijah O Donell https://www.whatsorb.com/category/gardening---agriculture
Blockchain for Agriculture: Changing farming as we know it
Blockchain for Agriculture: Changing farming as we know it
MEET THE ECO-FRIENDLY TINY HOUSE BOAT
It is the perfect holiday or retirement plan for many. Waking up to the soothing feeling of waves gently rocking you, brushing your teeth to the sound of seabirds, and having your morning coffee whilst overlooking wide open bodies of water. Spending your days cruising the sea and throwing out your fishing rod. An idyllic fantasy, that all too often remains just that - a fantasy. The costs are too high, and not only the monetary costs. Boats have a huge impact on the environment, and the footprint that they leave is significant. That is, up until now. A trend is emerging in the boating industry where sustainability and green living take center stage. Instead of focusing on luxurious and high-tech solutions, manufacturers start looking at the use of renewables and recyclables. This has led to the launch of a number of particularly interesting products; the tiny house boat. Let’s zoom in on one of those innovations. TINY HOUSE BOAT Earlier this year, Canadian company The Daigno Group released their unique house boat concept ‘Le Koroc’. Prized as an ‘innovative, bold and refined concept’, it seeks to combine boat living with fishing excursions while providing a portable micro chalet or tiny house. The end-result is a small, yet comfortable boat with a decently sized deck and a living cabin, including a small kitchenette area and a bathroom with shower and toilet. It was built by a team of experienced fishermen, nature lovers and wood connoisseurs. This is clearly reflected in all aspects of the boat, with plenty of space for fishing amenities and add-ons, usage of high-quality and eco-friendly wood, and its sustainable production and consumption process. Or so its press release claims. SUSTAINABLE AND RECYCLABLE ‘Le Koroc’ is a good example of the boating industry moving towards greener and ecologically friendlier ways of doing business. Materials used are obtained from sustainable resources. The boat’s light weight - about 2,500 kg - ensures that its energy consumption is limited, both on water and on the road. Transporting the vehicle will therefore not use up valuable energy sources. Besides those two main ‘headlines’, there are more examples of nifty ways through which this sustainable tiny houseboat minimises its ecological footprint. For example, the water used in the shower and in the sinks first gets treated by a dedicated charcoal filtering system before being discharged. Photovoltaic panels on the boat serve to capture solar energy. The energy is stored in two batteries, one of which is used for the fridge and the other to power the LED-lighting on board. LED-lighting that, by the way, ensures lower and safer power consumption. The stove in the kitchenette is fuelled with propane, while customers could opt for a bio-controlled litter toilet. Although these are only some of the ways through which The Daigno Group has chosen for sustainability over profitability, it is clearly indicative of a shift towards eco-friendlier boats. WHY WOULD YOU? For those lucky few that can afford to buy a yacht and use it to cruise the world, sustainability has never been much of a focus point. Eco-friendly boats such as ‘Le Koroc’ are clearly trying to change this in several ways. First of all, due to its small size and simplicity, this generation of boats is very affordable, making that retirement dream mentioned in the beginning of this blog a reality. Secondly, and more importantly, it highlights the importance of finding greener vacation and/or living accommodations. Through its use of sustainable materials, reduced energy consumption, and waste-minimising solutions a whole another target group is reached. Would you still rather dream of that luxurious yacht? This is as good a time as any to remind you once again that luxury and sustainability are not necessarily a trade-off. Just look at ‘Le Koroc’, a handcrafted, personalised, complete and light tiny home-on-the-water. Perhaps you could have both.
It is the perfect holiday or retirement plan for many. Waking up to the soothing feeling of waves gently rocking you, brushing your teeth to the sound of seabirds, and having your morning coffee whilst overlooking wide open bodies of water. Spending your days cruising the sea and throwing out your fishing rod. An idyllic fantasy, that all too often remains just that - a fantasy. The costs are too high, and not only the monetary costs. Boats have a huge impact on the environment, and the footprint that they leave is significant. That is, up until now. A trend is emerging in the boating industry where sustainability and green living take center stage. Instead of focusing on luxurious and high-tech solutions, manufacturers start looking at the use of renewables and recyclables. This has led to the launch of a number of particularly interesting products; the tiny house boat. Let’s zoom in on one of those innovations. TINY HOUSE BOAT Earlier this year, Canadian company The Daigno Group released their unique house boat concept ‘Le Koroc’. Prized as an ‘innovative, bold and refined concept’, it seeks to combine boat living with fishing excursions while providing a portable micro chalet or tiny house. The end-result is a small, yet comfortable boat with a decently sized deck and a living cabin, including a small kitchenette area and a bathroom with shower and toilet. It was built by a team of experienced fishermen, nature lovers and wood connoisseurs. This is clearly reflected in all aspects of the boat, with plenty of space for fishing amenities and add-ons, usage of high-quality and eco-friendly wood, and its sustainable production and consumption process. Or so its press release claims. SUSTAINABLE AND RECYCLABLE ‘Le Koroc’ is a good example of the boating industry moving towards greener and ecologically friendlier ways of doing business. Materials used are obtained from sustainable resources. The boat’s light weight - about 2,500 kg - ensures that its energy consumption is limited, both on water and on the road. Transporting the vehicle will therefore not use up valuable energy sources. Besides those two main ‘headlines’, there are more examples of nifty ways through which this sustainable tiny houseboat minimises its ecological footprint. For example, the water used in the shower and in the sinks first gets treated by a dedicated charcoal filtering system before being discharged. Photovoltaic panels on the boat serve to capture solar energy. The energy is stored in two batteries, one of which is used for the fridge and the other to power the LED-lighting on board. LED-lighting that, by the way, ensures lower and safer power consumption. The stove in the kitchenette is fuelled with propane, while customers could opt for a bio-controlled litter toilet. Although these are only some of the ways through which The Daigno Group has chosen for sustainability over profitability, it is clearly indicative of a shift towards eco-friendlier boats. WHY WOULD YOU? For those lucky few that can afford to buy a yacht and use it to cruise the world, sustainability has never been much of a focus point. Eco-friendly boats such as ‘Le Koroc’ are clearly trying to change this in several ways. First of all, due to its small size and simplicity, this generation of boats is very affordable, making that retirement dream mentioned in the beginning of this blog a reality. Secondly, and more importantly, it highlights the importance of finding greener vacation and/or living accommodations. Through its use of sustainable materials, reduced energy consumption, and waste-minimising solutions a whole another target group is reached. Would you still rather dream of that luxurious yacht? This is as good a time as any to remind you once again that luxury and sustainability are not necessarily a trade-off. Just look at ‘Le Koroc’, a handcrafted, personalised, complete and light tiny home-on-the-water. Perhaps you could have both.
MEET THE ECO-FRIENDLY TINY HOUSE BOAT
MEET THE ECO-FRIENDLY TINY HOUSE BOAT
3D Bioprinting Market Overview | New Investment Opportunities 2018-2024
Comprehensive analysis of the prospects for  Global 3D Bioprinting Market . To receive forecasts of Global 3D Bioprinting Market Research sales in leading country markets from 2018-2024, including leading and emerging country from developed and developing regions. We provide similar reports also such as  Global Wearable Medical Devices Market . Scope of Global 3D Bioprinting Market Reports – 3D bio-printing is a new innovative technology in the field of tissue engineering and involves the identification of the key architectural and compositional components of a target tissue for creating a design that can be utilized by a bio-printer so as to generate that tissue in a laboratory environment. 3D bioprinting technologies have wide range of clinical and research applications and its advent has led to a significant advancement in the manufacture of large bioartificial organs such as the bones, livers, hearts, cartilages and skins with heterogenic compositions. So, during the study of Global 3D Bioprinting market, we have considered 3D Bioprinting products and consumables to analyze the market. Global 3D Bioprinting Market Dynamics  Advancement in technology,  incorporation of IT within the healthcare industry, rising geriatric population base, improving Research & Development activities, rise in demand and supply of organs and tissues, improvement in the healthcare infrastructure are the major key drivers for the growth of the Global 3D Bioprinting Market. 3D bioprinting is rapidly evolving into new therapies and diagnostics. However, high costs and lack of reimbursement facilities by the government are the major restrains of the Global Medical Robotic Market. For instance, bioprinting of live cells using biological materials could reach USD 300,000. Nonetheless, untapped market and availability of low-cost bio-printers may generate new opportunities in forecast period. Global 3D Bioprinting Market Regional Analysis – North America dominates the market with highest market share due to increasing adoption of advanced healthcare services, increasing demand of organ and tissue transplant, increasing scope of bioengineering products. According to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN), in 2016, more than 33,600 transplants were in U.S. Europe is the second largest market across the globe for 3D bioprinting and is driven by advancement in research and development activities and establishment of new key players. Germany is the most involved European country in terms of 3D printing investment, with an advanced marketing strategy strategy through creating links between science and industry. Asia Pacific 3D Bioprinting Market is witnessed with strong growth rate majorly due increasing expenditure on healthcare, advancement in research and development activities. Companies based Japan, South Korea and Taiwan are making strides in applying 3-D printing technology to medical uses, helped by government support for the industry. Key Benefits for Global 3D Bioprinting Market Reports – Global 3D Bioprinting Market report covers in depth historical and forecast analysis. Global 3D Bioprinting Market research report provides detail information about Market Introduction, Market Summary, Global market Revenue (Revenue USD), Market Drivers, Market Restraints, Market Opportunities, Competitive Analysis, Regional and Country Level. Global 3D Bioprinting Market report helps to identify opportunities in marketplace. Global 3D Bioprinting Market report covers extensive analysis of emerging trends and competitive landscape.
Comprehensive analysis of the prospects for  Global 3D Bioprinting Market . To receive forecasts of Global 3D Bioprinting Market Research sales in leading country markets from 2018-2024, including leading and emerging country from developed and developing regions. We provide similar reports also such as  Global Wearable Medical Devices Market . Scope of Global 3D Bioprinting Market Reports – 3D bio-printing is a new innovative technology in the field of tissue engineering and involves the identification of the key architectural and compositional components of a target tissue for creating a design that can be utilized by a bio-printer so as to generate that tissue in a laboratory environment. 3D bioprinting technologies have wide range of clinical and research applications and its advent has led to a significant advancement in the manufacture of large bioartificial organs such as the bones, livers, hearts, cartilages and skins with heterogenic compositions. So, during the study of Global 3D Bioprinting market, we have considered 3D Bioprinting products and consumables to analyze the market. Global 3D Bioprinting Market Dynamics  Advancement in technology,  incorporation of IT within the healthcare industry, rising geriatric population base, improving Research & Development activities, rise in demand and supply of organs and tissues, improvement in the healthcare infrastructure are the major key drivers for the growth of the Global 3D Bioprinting Market. 3D bioprinting is rapidly evolving into new therapies and diagnostics. However, high costs and lack of reimbursement facilities by the government are the major restrains of the Global Medical Robotic Market. For instance, bioprinting of live cells using biological materials could reach USD 300,000. Nonetheless, untapped market and availability of low-cost bio-printers may generate new opportunities in forecast period. Global 3D Bioprinting Market Regional Analysis – North America dominates the market with highest market share due to increasing adoption of advanced healthcare services, increasing demand of organ and tissue transplant, increasing scope of bioengineering products. According to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN), in 2016, more than 33,600 transplants were in U.S. Europe is the second largest market across the globe for 3D bioprinting and is driven by advancement in research and development activities and establishment of new key players. Germany is the most involved European country in terms of 3D printing investment, with an advanced marketing strategy strategy through creating links between science and industry. Asia Pacific 3D Bioprinting Market is witnessed with strong growth rate majorly due increasing expenditure on healthcare, advancement in research and development activities. Companies based Japan, South Korea and Taiwan are making strides in applying 3-D printing technology to medical uses, helped by government support for the industry. Key Benefits for Global 3D Bioprinting Market Reports – Global 3D Bioprinting Market report covers in depth historical and forecast analysis. Global 3D Bioprinting Market research report provides detail information about Market Introduction, Market Summary, Global market Revenue (Revenue USD), Market Drivers, Market Restraints, Market Opportunities, Competitive Analysis, Regional and Country Level. Global 3D Bioprinting Market report helps to identify opportunities in marketplace. Global 3D Bioprinting Market report covers extensive analysis of emerging trends and competitive landscape.
3D Bioprinting Market Overview | New Investment Opportunities 2018-2024
3D Bioprinting Market Overview | New Investment Opportunities 2018-2024
Climate change brings deadly heat waves
In the South of Europe, temperatures could reach almost 50C this weekend. Tourist companies all over the world have warn tourists especially for the Iberian Peninsula where earlier records almost got beaten last weekend. Large parts of Europe expected extreme temperatures the weekend of the 4 th and 5 th of August. And it got hot! Temperatures got close to 50C in Spain and Portugal. So, could we record the highest temperatures ever measured since we start tracking the weather? In the Netherlands the summer of 1976 was the hottest till now. In Greece in 1977 measured 48C in Athene. With the wind coming out of the south a lot of hot air got brought to the South of Europe from the African continent. For people in this area, it is not oncoming to have temperatures around the 40C but for people on holiday from the North of Europe, it was hard to handle. For elderly people these high temperatures brought them in a difficult situation because they are more vulnerable for dehydration and heatstroke. The sustained heat from the last month has brought farmers in great difficulty. Devastated wheat- and corn fields and cows who are held inside their stables because the grassland does not supply enough food anymore. Expected is that many animals need to be slaughtered just because there is not enough hay to feed them next winter time. What makes heatwaves so deadly? The human body functions as best around 37C. Researches have been analysed many historical heatwaves to find out which conditions are the worst to be risky for humans. 36 Countries were included in the investigation with almost 800 heatwaves. They discovered a certain maximum where a heatwave gets deadly. Because all this information finds its origin by ‘real people’ it makes it very credible. Researchers found out how common their conditions are already around the globe. It’s not only about temperature but especially about humidity. One of the most important ‘tools’ our body has to get rid of it’s body heat is sweating. When surrounding air is already saturated with moister it’s getting more difficult for a body to release its heat. Because of the results of the investigation, researches can use future climate models to see how it will play out till the end of this century. Deadly heat will be more common by climate change At the moment around a third of worlds population experiences 20 days or more of deadly heat which will be more than doubled at the end of this century. Producing less Greenhouse gasses will just help a little. It feels that a certain complicated weather meganism has set in motion which can not be stopped by any Paris Agreement or what so ever. The most important issue is that people learn to adapt and that governments stop to focus on small solutions which individuals can bring about but start to ‘force’ large industries to change their polluting habits. The tropics In the tropics there will be in the future in summertime constant temperatures in the danger zone. This causing a lot of death because of heatstroke and a shortage of (clean) drinking water. Also, the food production will be under pressure. For example, if rice does not cool down under a certain temperature at night the grain will grow slower and contains less nutrients. Killer heat caused by climate change Sweden Bushfires are prone at the moment in Sweden because of the high temperatures. About 50 bushfires have been counted which is very unusualy. Normally the temperature sticks around 20C but now it goes all the way up till 32C. Canada In Quebec almost 100 people got killed by the high temperatures in July. Africa In Algeria got Africa’s heat record broken. 51C got reached. Japan Kyoto in japan experienced about 7 days close to 40C. More than 30 people died because of the heat but even more by following heavy rainfall, floods and landslides. It’s hard to deny that ‘something’ is changing and that’s our climate. What ever the reason is; nature, man-made or both we have to learn to deal with it. Climate change is happening. The big question is; will humanity learn to adapt to the new circumstances. Nature will automatically do it. Nature has no economical, political boundaries. Sure, species will disappear, migrate and new ones will emergence. At the end we can ask ourselves, what brought humanity for good to ‘our home’, the Earth. What do you think is necessary to tackle climate change problems? How can we learn to adapt and have the agreements we have made in the past – like the Paris Agreement - any value or are they just ‘nice words’ to keep the mass quit and misinformed? We are currius to your comments. {youtube} https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/climate/general
In the South of Europe, temperatures could reach almost 50C this weekend. Tourist companies all over the world have warn tourists especially for the Iberian Peninsula where earlier records almost got beaten last weekend. Large parts of Europe expected extreme temperatures the weekend of the 4 th and 5 th of August. And it got hot! Temperatures got close to 50C in Spain and Portugal. So, could we record the highest temperatures ever measured since we start tracking the weather? In the Netherlands the summer of 1976 was the hottest till now. In Greece in 1977 measured 48C in Athene. With the wind coming out of the south a lot of hot air got brought to the South of Europe from the African continent. For people in this area, it is not oncoming to have temperatures around the 40C but for people on holiday from the North of Europe, it was hard to handle. For elderly people these high temperatures brought them in a difficult situation because they are more vulnerable for dehydration and heatstroke. The sustained heat from the last month has brought farmers in great difficulty. Devastated wheat- and corn fields and cows who are held inside their stables because the grassland does not supply enough food anymore. Expected is that many animals need to be slaughtered just because there is not enough hay to feed them next winter time. What makes heatwaves so deadly? The human body functions as best around 37C. Researches have been analysed many historical heatwaves to find out which conditions are the worst to be risky for humans. 36 Countries were included in the investigation with almost 800 heatwaves. They discovered a certain maximum where a heatwave gets deadly. Because all this information finds its origin by ‘real people’ it makes it very credible. Researchers found out how common their conditions are already around the globe. It’s not only about temperature but especially about humidity. One of the most important ‘tools’ our body has to get rid of it’s body heat is sweating. When surrounding air is already saturated with moister it’s getting more difficult for a body to release its heat. Because of the results of the investigation, researches can use future climate models to see how it will play out till the end of this century. Deadly heat will be more common by climate change At the moment around a third of worlds population experiences 20 days or more of deadly heat which will be more than doubled at the end of this century. Producing less Greenhouse gasses will just help a little. It feels that a certain complicated weather meganism has set in motion which can not be stopped by any Paris Agreement or what so ever. The most important issue is that people learn to adapt and that governments stop to focus on small solutions which individuals can bring about but start to ‘force’ large industries to change their polluting habits. The tropics In the tropics there will be in the future in summertime constant temperatures in the danger zone. This causing a lot of death because of heatstroke and a shortage of (clean) drinking water. Also, the food production will be under pressure. For example, if rice does not cool down under a certain temperature at night the grain will grow slower and contains less nutrients. Killer heat caused by climate change Sweden Bushfires are prone at the moment in Sweden because of the high temperatures. About 50 bushfires have been counted which is very unusualy. Normally the temperature sticks around 20C but now it goes all the way up till 32C. Canada In Quebec almost 100 people got killed by the high temperatures in July. Africa In Algeria got Africa’s heat record broken. 51C got reached. Japan Kyoto in japan experienced about 7 days close to 40C. More than 30 people died because of the heat but even more by following heavy rainfall, floods and landslides. It’s hard to deny that ‘something’ is changing and that’s our climate. What ever the reason is; nature, man-made or both we have to learn to deal with it. Climate change is happening. The big question is; will humanity learn to adapt to the new circumstances. Nature will automatically do it. Nature has no economical, political boundaries. Sure, species will disappear, migrate and new ones will emergence. At the end we can ask ourselves, what brought humanity for good to ‘our home’, the Earth. What do you think is necessary to tackle climate change problems? How can we learn to adapt and have the agreements we have made in the past – like the Paris Agreement - any value or are they just ‘nice words’ to keep the mass quit and misinformed? We are currius to your comments. {youtube} https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/climate/general
Climate change brings deadly heat waves
Climate change brings deadly heat waves
Say “no” to deforestation - celebrate National Tree Day with WhatsOrb!
This weekend Australia is celebrating National Tree Day – Australia’s largest community tree planting and nature care event. This version the event was introduced in 1996 and since then more than 24 million trees and plants were planted and this year will no doubt increase that number even further. This event isn’t unique to Australia, many other nations have similar events – Arbor Day, National Tree Planting Day and Greenery Day are just few of the names used around the world. Australia is however unique because it is the only country that has several versions of the same holiday – the folks down under also celebrate Arbor Day in June and some regions have a whole Arbor week! While names and dates differ from country to country, the idea behind them all is the same: to inspire people to spend time in nature and teach them the importance of environmental stewardship and looking after our planet. We can’t plant trees online, but we can use this day as an opportunity to learn about one of the biggest causes of deforestation – palm oil. Well, ok, this might have been an overstatement – palm oil itself doesn’t harm the trees, but the unsustainable production methods do. Palm oil is derived from palm fruit that is grown on the African palm oil tree. As the name suggests, these trees originate from Western Africa, but they can prosper anywhere that has plenty of heat and rainfall. Palm oil is produced on 4 of the 6 continents (this excluding Australia and Antarctica), but the vast majority of it, 85% in fact, is produced in Indonesia and Malaysia. The Fastest Forest Destroyer and effects of deforestation In 2008, the Guinness Book of World Records has named Indonesia “The Fastest Forest Destroyer”. This unfortunate record was awarded to Indonesia for destroying approximately 51 square km (20 square miles) of forest per day in the years between 2000 and 2005. By then, the country has already lost 72% of its ancient forests and half of the ones remaining were considered to be under a threat of destruction. Most of this deforestation was linked to palm oil production. Land and forest must be cleared to develop palm oil plantations and with palm oil being in high demand many forests were destroyed to grow this profitable crop. Worse yet, there were no governmental regulations in place to prevent deforestation. Deforestation is a very serious issue and it has many devastating impacts on the environment. When the trees are removed to make way for plantations, the timber and remaining undergrowth are often burned. This releases carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane and nitrogen dioxide, all of which have negative impact on the climate. With fewer trees acting as natural air purifiers, quality of air has also taken a hit, affecting all living creatures in the area. Forests and jungles are also a home to a wide variety of animals. When deforestation occurs, these animals are forced out of their natural habitats, injured and killed. Without the protection of their homes, wildlife becomes vulnerable to attacks from poachers and smugglers. One of the most horrifying examples of this is the orangutan population of Borneo and Sumatra. According to government data, more than 50’000 orangutans have died as a result of deforestation in the last 2 decades. Many herbivores have had their food supplies destroyed due to deforestation and a lot of them were not able to survive. This in turn has forced the carnivores to look for alternative food sources and some of them have ventured out to human villages in their search for nutrition. Animals aren’t the only ones who called these forests their home. Many indigenous people were forced out of their homes and faced with a great uncertainty about their future. They were no longer able to rely on the infrastructure they’ve built, they weren’t able to provide for their families in the same way, their whole lives were different in many basic ways. The palm oil industry has also been linked to human rights violations. Palm oil plantations are a very harsh environment – there’s scorching heat, heavy loads of fruit to carry and sharp thorns on palms that the workers need to climb to harvest the fruits. The workers do not get paid extra for the dangerous jobs they are performing – in fact, many of them are barely able to survive and support their families. Children are also being exploited by the industry and are often unpaid. With there being few other work opportunities in those areas, many feel like they simply have no choice but to continue working on plantations. Taking first steps on a road to a greener future Luckily, Indonesian government has recognised the negative impact that the palm oil industry has had on the country and is now working on turning things around. In 2011 a moratorium was established on issuing new licences to use land designated as primary (untouched) forest and peatland. This moratorium has been extended several times since then and it is expected to remain in force for the next several years.  In addition to the moratorium, Indonesia has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with India on July 16th. According to the Indonesia’s Coordinating Economic Minister Darmin Nasution this cooperation “is expected to strengthen the sustainable trade of palm oil and its generated products in India and Indonesia”. Naturally, it will take some time for the harmful effects of the palm oil industry to be reversed and it isn’t possible to completely restore the country to its original state. But we can be sure of one thing – “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now”. Does your country have a holiday to celebrate trees? Or do you have other tree-related stories you’d like to share? Let us know in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/general
This weekend Australia is celebrating National Tree Day – Australia’s largest community tree planting and nature care event. This version the event was introduced in 1996 and since then more than 24 million trees and plants were planted and this year will no doubt increase that number even further. This event isn’t unique to Australia, many other nations have similar events – Arbor Day, National Tree Planting Day and Greenery Day are just few of the names used around the world. Australia is however unique because it is the only country that has several versions of the same holiday – the folks down under also celebrate Arbor Day in June and some regions have a whole Arbor week! While names and dates differ from country to country, the idea behind them all is the same: to inspire people to spend time in nature and teach them the importance of environmental stewardship and looking after our planet. We can’t plant trees online, but we can use this day as an opportunity to learn about one of the biggest causes of deforestation – palm oil. Well, ok, this might have been an overstatement – palm oil itself doesn’t harm the trees, but the unsustainable production methods do. Palm oil is derived from palm fruit that is grown on the African palm oil tree. As the name suggests, these trees originate from Western Africa, but they can prosper anywhere that has plenty of heat and rainfall. Palm oil is produced on 4 of the 6 continents (this excluding Australia and Antarctica), but the vast majority of it, 85% in fact, is produced in Indonesia and Malaysia. The Fastest Forest Destroyer and effects of deforestation In 2008, the Guinness Book of World Records has named Indonesia “The Fastest Forest Destroyer”. This unfortunate record was awarded to Indonesia for destroying approximately 51 square km (20 square miles) of forest per day in the years between 2000 and 2005. By then, the country has already lost 72% of its ancient forests and half of the ones remaining were considered to be under a threat of destruction. Most of this deforestation was linked to palm oil production. Land and forest must be cleared to develop palm oil plantations and with palm oil being in high demand many forests were destroyed to grow this profitable crop. Worse yet, there were no governmental regulations in place to prevent deforestation. Deforestation is a very serious issue and it has many devastating impacts on the environment. When the trees are removed to make way for plantations, the timber and remaining undergrowth are often burned. This releases carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane and nitrogen dioxide, all of which have negative impact on the climate. With fewer trees acting as natural air purifiers, quality of air has also taken a hit, affecting all living creatures in the area. Forests and jungles are also a home to a wide variety of animals. When deforestation occurs, these animals are forced out of their natural habitats, injured and killed. Without the protection of their homes, wildlife becomes vulnerable to attacks from poachers and smugglers. One of the most horrifying examples of this is the orangutan population of Borneo and Sumatra. According to government data, more than 50’000 orangutans have died as a result of deforestation in the last 2 decades. Many herbivores have had their food supplies destroyed due to deforestation and a lot of them were not able to survive. This in turn has forced the carnivores to look for alternative food sources and some of them have ventured out to human villages in their search for nutrition. Animals aren’t the only ones who called these forests their home. Many indigenous people were forced out of their homes and faced with a great uncertainty about their future. They were no longer able to rely on the infrastructure they’ve built, they weren’t able to provide for their families in the same way, their whole lives were different in many basic ways. The palm oil industry has also been linked to human rights violations. Palm oil plantations are a very harsh environment – there’s scorching heat, heavy loads of fruit to carry and sharp thorns on palms that the workers need to climb to harvest the fruits. The workers do not get paid extra for the dangerous jobs they are performing – in fact, many of them are barely able to survive and support their families. Children are also being exploited by the industry and are often unpaid. With there being few other work opportunities in those areas, many feel like they simply have no choice but to continue working on plantations. Taking first steps on a road to a greener future Luckily, Indonesian government has recognised the negative impact that the palm oil industry has had on the country and is now working on turning things around. In 2011 a moratorium was established on issuing new licences to use land designated as primary (untouched) forest and peatland. This moratorium has been extended several times since then and it is expected to remain in force for the next several years.  In addition to the moratorium, Indonesia has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with India on July 16th. According to the Indonesia’s Coordinating Economic Minister Darmin Nasution this cooperation “is expected to strengthen the sustainable trade of palm oil and its generated products in India and Indonesia”. Naturally, it will take some time for the harmful effects of the palm oil industry to be reversed and it isn’t possible to completely restore the country to its original state. But we can be sure of one thing – “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now”. Does your country have a holiday to celebrate trees? Or do you have other tree-related stories you’d like to share? Let us know in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community/general
Say “no” to deforestation - celebrate National Tree Day with WhatsOrb!
Say “no” to deforestation - celebrate National Tree Day with WhatsOrb!
New study shows a vegan diet is the best way to reduce your footprint
A vegan diet without any animal products appears to be the first and foremost way to reduce your individual ecological footprint, a new study shows. What we choose to eat and drink are strong determinants of human health, and we become more and more aware of the fact that the foods we choose and consume may significantly affect the environment. I’ve been a fulltime vegetarian for over 20 years and it has only been months that I made the switch to being a part-time vegan. Influenced by news reports on global warming and studies that show a plant-based diet is least harmful for the wellbeing of our planet, I’m now replacing my cheese, eggs and dairy ingredients by plant-based alternatives if available. Image by Edgar Castre One of the latest additions to my list of pro vegan studies is an analysis by researchers at the University of Oxford and the Swiss agricultural research institute Agroscope. This study, which was recently published in the journal Science , shows that cutting all meat and dairy products from your diet could reduce your ecological footprint up to 73 per cent. The researchers found that meat and dairy production are responsible for 60 per cent of agriculture’s climate change gas emissions and a vast majority of 83 per cent of used farmland, while the products themselves are providing just 37 per cent of protein levels and a mere 18 per cent of calories worldwide. If everyone would stop eating meat and dairy, global farmland could be reduced by 75 per cent – an area equivalent to the size of the US, Australia, China and the EU combined – and still feed the world! Next to a significant drop of greenhouse gas emissions, it could promote biodiversity and the conservation of endangered animal and plant species.  Multi-folded footprint The study is one of the biggest analyses to date into the damage farming does to the environment: it includes data on nearly 40,000 farms in 119 countries, and examines how 40 major foods (90 per cent of all food that is eaten) impact the environment, taking into account the greenhouse gas emissions as well as water pollution (eutrophication), air pollution (acidification), land use and water consumption. Lead author Joseph Poore from Oxford’s Department of Zoology and the School of Geography and Environment, told The Guardian  that ‘a vegan diet is probably the single biggest way to reduce your environmental impact on planet Earth. The effect is far bigger than cutting down on your flight or buying an electric car, as these would only reduce greenhouse gases’. As if he could read our minds, the scientist added: ‘Avoiding consumption of all animal products delivers even far better environmental benefits than trying to purchase sustainable meat and dairy.’ He and his team found that the most sustainable meat and dairy products still cause much more environmental damage than the highest impact cereal, legumes and vegetables growing. To illustrate: sustainable beef is responsible for 6 times more greenhouse gas emissions and 36 times more land than legumes. The researchers also looked into the different techniques used to produce the same foods and found huge differences in environmental impact. For example, beef cattle raised on deforested land uses 50 times more land than cows that rear on natural pastures. Image by: Annie Spratt And it’s not just livestock and meat products that increase our environmental impact. Aquaculture, assumed to have relatively low emissions, can emit more methane and therefore create more greenhouse gases than cows. Even rice – which takes up about 12 per cent of the global arable area – produces a lot of methane, for which it has one of the biggest plant carbon footprints.  Action starts with awareness The huge diversity in agricultural foods and processes makes it challenging to find solutions to these environmental issues. Two foods that look similar in the shops can have extremely different impacts on the planet, says Poore. This variability isn’t fully reflected in policies aimed at reducing the ecological impact of farming, and apart from sustainability certifications that give guidance regarding matters such as pesticide-free produce and sustainable fishing, consumers are still being offered very little information about the impact of their food choices. Besides keeping track of the latest news and studies, the best advice we can probably receive is to stay aware of the multi-folded impact of our food choices and – for the above-mentioned reasons – to grant more time to a plant-based diet, even if it’s only a few days a week. Cover image by: Brenda Godin https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/food/vegan
A vegan diet without any animal products appears to be the first and foremost way to reduce your individual ecological footprint, a new study shows. What we choose to eat and drink are strong determinants of human health, and we become more and more aware of the fact that the foods we choose and consume may significantly affect the environment. I’ve been a fulltime vegetarian for over 20 years and it has only been months that I made the switch to being a part-time vegan. Influenced by news reports on global warming and studies that show a plant-based diet is least harmful for the wellbeing of our planet, I’m now replacing my cheese, eggs and dairy ingredients by plant-based alternatives if available. Image by Edgar Castre One of the latest additions to my list of pro vegan studies is an analysis by researchers at the University of Oxford and the Swiss agricultural research institute Agroscope. This study, which was recently published in the journal Science , shows that cutting all meat and dairy products from your diet could reduce your ecological footprint up to 73 per cent. The researchers found that meat and dairy production are responsible for 60 per cent of agriculture’s climate change gas emissions and a vast majority of 83 per cent of used farmland, while the products themselves are providing just 37 per cent of protein levels and a mere 18 per cent of calories worldwide. If everyone would stop eating meat and dairy, global farmland could be reduced by 75 per cent – an area equivalent to the size of the US, Australia, China and the EU combined – and still feed the world! Next to a significant drop of greenhouse gas emissions, it could promote biodiversity and the conservation of endangered animal and plant species.  Multi-folded footprint The study is one of the biggest analyses to date into the damage farming does to the environment: it includes data on nearly 40,000 farms in 119 countries, and examines how 40 major foods (90 per cent of all food that is eaten) impact the environment, taking into account the greenhouse gas emissions as well as water pollution (eutrophication), air pollution (acidification), land use and water consumption. Lead author Joseph Poore from Oxford’s Department of Zoology and the School of Geography and Environment, told The Guardian  that ‘a vegan diet is probably the single biggest way to reduce your environmental impact on planet Earth. The effect is far bigger than cutting down on your flight or buying an electric car, as these would only reduce greenhouse gases’. As if he could read our minds, the scientist added: ‘Avoiding consumption of all animal products delivers even far better environmental benefits than trying to purchase sustainable meat and dairy.’ He and his team found that the most sustainable meat and dairy products still cause much more environmental damage than the highest impact cereal, legumes and vegetables growing. To illustrate: sustainable beef is responsible for 6 times more greenhouse gas emissions and 36 times more land than legumes. The researchers also looked into the different techniques used to produce the same foods and found huge differences in environmental impact. For example, beef cattle raised on deforested land uses 50 times more land than cows that rear on natural pastures. Image by: Annie Spratt And it’s not just livestock and meat products that increase our environmental impact. Aquaculture, assumed to have relatively low emissions, can emit more methane and therefore create more greenhouse gases than cows. Even rice – which takes up about 12 per cent of the global arable area – produces a lot of methane, for which it has one of the biggest plant carbon footprints.  Action starts with awareness The huge diversity in agricultural foods and processes makes it challenging to find solutions to these environmental issues. Two foods that look similar in the shops can have extremely different impacts on the planet, says Poore. This variability isn’t fully reflected in policies aimed at reducing the ecological impact of farming, and apart from sustainability certifications that give guidance regarding matters such as pesticide-free produce and sustainable fishing, consumers are still being offered very little information about the impact of their food choices. Besides keeping track of the latest news and studies, the best advice we can probably receive is to stay aware of the multi-folded impact of our food choices and – for the above-mentioned reasons – to grant more time to a plant-based diet, even if it’s only a few days a week. Cover image by: Brenda Godin https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/food/vegan
New study shows a vegan diet is the best way to reduce your footprint
New study shows a vegan diet is the best way to reduce your footprint
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