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The impact of ski resorts on the environment – and how to fix it
Skiing and snowboarding are great ways to be outdoors during winter. Nevertheless, the impact of ski resorts on the environment is huge: they rely on a complex and energy-demanding infrastructure, with scores of employees and heavy use of water. While many ski-resort owners are switching to environmentally friendly practices such as renewable energy, recycling and composting, some feel that these adjustments fail to mitigate the overall negative effect of ski areas on the environment. What is the solution? Water use One of the problems is the excessive amount of water use in ski resorts. As a result of global climate change, most ski areas experience winters of increasingly shorter duration. If the snow base falls below a certain level, resort managers must use artificial snow-making systems. Artificial snow is made by mixing large volumes of water and high-pressure air, so the process demands an abundance of water and energy. When the water is taken from the local rivers and streams, it has a negative impact on the surrounding ecosystem. Disturbance to Wildlife Alpine habitats above the tree line are already threatened by global climate change, and disturbance from skiers is one more stressor. These disturbances can come from scaring wildlife or harming their habitat by damaging vegetation and compacting soils. An example: the population of black grouse, a creature that lives in the Swiss Alps, is usually found at half its normal density around ski areas. Land use change To create ski trails, a large amount of clear-cutting in forested areas is required. The resulting fragmented landscape negatively impacts habitat quality for many bird and mammal species. Also: wind, light, and disturbance levels increase near the open slopes, reducing habitat quality. To create ski trailers, a large amount of clear-cutting in forested areas is required. The resulting fragmented landscape negatively impacts habitat quality for many bird and mammal species. To create new trailers, ski resorts have to remove woody vegetation. The fastest way to achieve that is with a bulldozer, graded to remove tree stumps and any sort of slope irregularity. This process reduces topsoil depth and causes soil erosion. Also: wind, light, and disturbance levels increase near the open slopes, reducing habitat quality. Fossil fuel energy Resort skiing is an energy-intensive operation, relying on fossil fuels, producing greenhouse gases and contributing to global warming. For example: ski lifts usually run on electricity, and operating a single ski lift for a month requires about the same energy needed to power 3.8 households for a year. Another one: to maintain the surface of the snow on the ski runs, a resort deploys nightly a fleet of trail groomers each operating on about 5 gallons of diesel per hour and producing carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and particulate emissions. A complete estimate of the greenhouse gases emitted in association with resort skiing would need to include those produced by skiers driving or flying to the mountains. Ironically, climate change is affecting most ski regions. As global atmospheric temperatures go up, snowpacks are thinning, and the ski seasons are getting shorter. The solutions The environmental costs associated with resort skiing come in multiple dimensions, and so do the solutions. Many ski resorts have made substantial efforts to minimize their environmental impacts. Solar panels, wind turbines, and small hydro turbines have been deployed to supply renewable energy. Improved waste management and composting programs have been implemented, just like green building technologies have been employed. Forest management efforts have been planned to improve wildlife habitat. But it this enough? What you can do Research, research, research: it is now possible for skiers to gather information about a resort’s sustainability efforts and make informed consumer decisions. An increasing number of outdoor enthusiasts seek snowy slopes by practicing lower-impact forms of skiing. These backcountry skiers and snowboarders use specialized equipment that allows them to make their way up the mountain on their own power, and then to ski down natural terrain that has not been logged or groomed. These skiers have to be self-sufficient and able to mitigate a multitude of mountain-related safety risks. The learning curve is steep, but backcountry skiing has a lighter environmental impact than resort skiing.
Skiing and snowboarding are great ways to be outdoors during winter. Nevertheless, the impact of ski resorts on the environment is huge: they rely on a complex and energy-demanding infrastructure, with scores of employees and heavy use of water. While many ski-resort owners are switching to environmentally friendly practices such as renewable energy, recycling and composting, some feel that these adjustments fail to mitigate the overall negative effect of ski areas on the environment. What is the solution? Water use One of the problems is the excessive amount of water use in ski resorts. As a result of global climate change, most ski areas experience winters of increasingly shorter duration. If the snow base falls below a certain level, resort managers must use artificial snow-making systems. Artificial snow is made by mixing large volumes of water and high-pressure air, so the process demands an abundance of water and energy. When the water is taken from the local rivers and streams, it has a negative impact on the surrounding ecosystem. Disturbance to Wildlife Alpine habitats above the tree line are already threatened by global climate change, and disturbance from skiers is one more stressor. These disturbances can come from scaring wildlife or harming their habitat by damaging vegetation and compacting soils. An example: the population of black grouse, a creature that lives in the Swiss Alps, is usually found at half its normal density around ski areas. Land use change To create ski trails, a large amount of clear-cutting in forested areas is required. The resulting fragmented landscape negatively impacts habitat quality for many bird and mammal species. Also: wind, light, and disturbance levels increase near the open slopes, reducing habitat quality. To create ski trailers, a large amount of clear-cutting in forested areas is required. The resulting fragmented landscape negatively impacts habitat quality for many bird and mammal species. To create new trailers, ski resorts have to remove woody vegetation. The fastest way to achieve that is with a bulldozer, graded to remove tree stumps and any sort of slope irregularity. This process reduces topsoil depth and causes soil erosion. Also: wind, light, and disturbance levels increase near the open slopes, reducing habitat quality. Fossil fuel energy Resort skiing is an energy-intensive operation, relying on fossil fuels, producing greenhouse gases and contributing to global warming. For example: ski lifts usually run on electricity, and operating a single ski lift for a month requires about the same energy needed to power 3.8 households for a year. Another one: to maintain the surface of the snow on the ski runs, a resort deploys nightly a fleet of trail groomers each operating on about 5 gallons of diesel per hour and producing carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and particulate emissions. A complete estimate of the greenhouse gases emitted in association with resort skiing would need to include those produced by skiers driving or flying to the mountains. Ironically, climate change is affecting most ski regions. As global atmospheric temperatures go up, snowpacks are thinning, and the ski seasons are getting shorter. The solutions The environmental costs associated with resort skiing come in multiple dimensions, and so do the solutions. Many ski resorts have made substantial efforts to minimize their environmental impacts. Solar panels, wind turbines, and small hydro turbines have been deployed to supply renewable energy. Improved waste management and composting programs have been implemented, just like green building technologies have been employed. Forest management efforts have been planned to improve wildlife habitat. But it this enough? What you can do Research, research, research: it is now possible for skiers to gather information about a resort’s sustainability efforts and make informed consumer decisions. An increasing number of outdoor enthusiasts seek snowy slopes by practicing lower-impact forms of skiing. These backcountry skiers and snowboarders use specialized equipment that allows them to make their way up the mountain on their own power, and then to ski down natural terrain that has not been logged or groomed. These skiers have to be self-sufficient and able to mitigate a multitude of mountain-related safety risks. The learning curve is steep, but backcountry skiing has a lighter environmental impact than resort skiing.
The impact of ski resorts on the environment – and how to fix it
The impact of ski resorts on the environment – and how to fix it
Recycling asphalt generates massive amount of electricity
REKO has started the construction of a new thermal cleaning installation in Rotterdam that will completely convert 1.2 million tonnes of residual materials into primary raw materials, electricity and heat. The realization of this project involves an investment of 125 million euros. REKO, Recycling Combination REKO B.V, is a producer of sand, gravel and fillers from mineral residues. The company mainly uses asphalt as raw material from road construction and roof leather from utility construction. REKO developed its innovative process specifically intended for the thermal cleaning of these mineral residues. This led to the first thermal cleaning installation that was commissioned by REKO in 2006. In this installation, all harmful substances present in the asphalt burn completely. The thermal cleaning process results in clean sand, gravel and filler - ready for reuse . Also, the installation provides hot waste gases from which energy is recovered in the form of steam, and later on, electricity via a steam turbine. Approximately 30 thousand megawatts of electricity are generated per year: the same amount that approximately 7,500 households on yearly basis. In the past 12 years, 7.2 million tonnes of clean sand and gravel have been produced for the Dutch construction industry. The largest recycle capacity in the world The new installation is considerably more efficient because it uses the most new techniques. Moreover, the 12 years of experience that REKO has gained in the field of thermal cleaning has been incorporated into this installation. The new installation not only uses less energy, but also generates considerably more energy. It can generate electricity for as many as 50,000 households. In addition, the installation is made suitable for supplying heat in addition to electricity. The REKO processing technology is a textbook example for circular economy, in which residual materials are 100% converted into new raw materials. With the new installation, REKO has the largest capacity in the world to fully recycle this type of contaminated building material. Recycling for a European market In the past, coal tar was used as a binder in the production of asphalt, which contains polluting polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, better known as PAHs. In the Netherlands, since 2001, tar-containing asphalt can no longer be used in the production of new asphalt. The tar-containing asphalt granulate must be processed in a way that the polluting components, such as PAHs, are completely destroyed. At the time, the Dutch legislator was the first in Europe with the requirement to permanently remove paks from the chain. This year, the Flemish government followed this example. REKO fulfills the government's objective of removing these harmful substances from the environment . The newest thermal cleaning installation is partly built considering the development of the international market. David Heijkoop, director of REKO: “Due to the size of our installation, in combination with the large-scale recovery of the energy released, we can reduce the costs for our customers. Also, the location of REKO in the port of Rotterdam provides an excellent starting position for the rest of Europe: we can supply over water. When realized that the Netherlands imports 20 million tons of sand and gravel as primary raw materials for construction from abroad every year, it becomes clear that we can partly meet that need," he adds.  REKO will soon be able to supply around 1.5 million tonnes of clean sand and gravel annually. Electricity and heat The thermal cleaning installation uses energy to ignite the combustible components in the asphalt and roof leather. Through the process, four to five times more energy is released then used. In the existing installation, that energy is used to generate electricity. The new installation makes this conversion to electricity much more efficient, and also supplies heat in the form of hot water. The Port of Rotterdam Authority is contributing € 1 million for the realization of this specific part of the installation. The installation will be able to flexibly choose to what extent the energy released during the cleaning process will be converted into heat and / or electricity. When the heat is not required, the installation will convert the energy into electricity. The work on the construction of the new thermal cleaning installation has already started. According to planning, the new installation will be commissioned in mid-2020. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste
REKO has started the construction of a new thermal cleaning installation in Rotterdam that will completely convert 1.2 million tonnes of residual materials into primary raw materials, electricity and heat. The realization of this project involves an investment of 125 million euros. REKO, Recycling Combination REKO B.V, is a producer of sand, gravel and fillers from mineral residues. The company mainly uses asphalt as raw material from road construction and roof leather from utility construction. REKO developed its innovative process specifically intended for the thermal cleaning of these mineral residues. This led to the first thermal cleaning installation that was commissioned by REKO in 2006. In this installation, all harmful substances present in the asphalt burn completely. The thermal cleaning process results in clean sand, gravel and filler - ready for reuse . Also, the installation provides hot waste gases from which energy is recovered in the form of steam, and later on, electricity via a steam turbine. Approximately 30 thousand megawatts of electricity are generated per year: the same amount that approximately 7,500 households on yearly basis. In the past 12 years, 7.2 million tonnes of clean sand and gravel have been produced for the Dutch construction industry. The largest recycle capacity in the world The new installation is considerably more efficient because it uses the most new techniques. Moreover, the 12 years of experience that REKO has gained in the field of thermal cleaning has been incorporated into this installation. The new installation not only uses less energy, but also generates considerably more energy. It can generate electricity for as many as 50,000 households. In addition, the installation is made suitable for supplying heat in addition to electricity. The REKO processing technology is a textbook example for circular economy, in which residual materials are 100% converted into new raw materials. With the new installation, REKO has the largest capacity in the world to fully recycle this type of contaminated building material. Recycling for a European market In the past, coal tar was used as a binder in the production of asphalt, which contains polluting polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, better known as PAHs. In the Netherlands, since 2001, tar-containing asphalt can no longer be used in the production of new asphalt. The tar-containing asphalt granulate must be processed in a way that the polluting components, such as PAHs, are completely destroyed. At the time, the Dutch legislator was the first in Europe with the requirement to permanently remove paks from the chain. This year, the Flemish government followed this example. REKO fulfills the government's objective of removing these harmful substances from the environment . The newest thermal cleaning installation is partly built considering the development of the international market. David Heijkoop, director of REKO: “Due to the size of our installation, in combination with the large-scale recovery of the energy released, we can reduce the costs for our customers. Also, the location of REKO in the port of Rotterdam provides an excellent starting position for the rest of Europe: we can supply over water. When realized that the Netherlands imports 20 million tons of sand and gravel as primary raw materials for construction from abroad every year, it becomes clear that we can partly meet that need," he adds.  REKO will soon be able to supply around 1.5 million tonnes of clean sand and gravel annually. Electricity and heat The thermal cleaning installation uses energy to ignite the combustible components in the asphalt and roof leather. Through the process, four to five times more energy is released then used. In the existing installation, that energy is used to generate electricity. The new installation makes this conversion to electricity much more efficient, and also supplies heat in the form of hot water. The Port of Rotterdam Authority is contributing € 1 million for the realization of this specific part of the installation. The installation will be able to flexibly choose to what extent the energy released during the cleaning process will be converted into heat and / or electricity. When the heat is not required, the installation will convert the energy into electricity. The work on the construction of the new thermal cleaning installation has already started. According to planning, the new installation will be commissioned in mid-2020. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste
Recycling asphalt generates massive amount of electricity
Recycling asphalt generates massive amount of electricity
Smart cities, safe and efficient, but are we being watched?
Information from a library, hospital or public transport exposed? More sustainability , improved mobility, efficiency and safety? Where can you find all of the above in one place? The answer is a smart city. Its purpose is to improve the quality of life by making the town more efficient and by reducing the distance between the citizens and the government. In this article you will read more about the smart city and what it means for our privacy.  Improved technologies Technology is moving forward, devices are becoming smarter, so it is inevitable that in the future we will use electronic devices much more than we do now. To keep the city up and running, the existing technologies need to be upgraded. Otherwise, they cannot meet the specifications and demands of the current system. But what do we want? Investigation shows that we wish for smart transportation, where machines and devices communicate with each other. We want smart buildings, where the windows can open automatically, where there is always a connection with the Internet. That is our future. Are we being watched? Cameras are hanging everywhere to guarantee our safety. But do we feel safe by it? We could get the feeling that we are being watched, every step we take is registered by authorities. Besides cameras, all data is collected. This way, authorities know for example the number of visitors at a certain event or they possess information about citizens for commercial purposes. They may sell this information to third parties. Privacy in a smart city Like mentioned before, cameras are everywhere, and data is collected. What does that mean for our privacy? Who is the gatekeeper to our data? And what if the information is hacked? The more internet data there is, the more fragile we become. Fortunately, with the arrival of the GDPR in May 2018, the rules on the subject are becoming more strict. The citizen must be informed in understandable language, especially when it comes to data traffic in a smart city. Costs savings or costs loss? All these new technologies cost money. To upgrade the existing technologies, we (governments, state or country) need to invest vast amounts of money. However, due to these smart cities , there could be economic benefits coming from the transition towards a smart city, for example when it comes to real estate. Buildings have to deal with endless energy, such as heating and cooling installations, lighting, electrical wiring, communication, lifts, electrical appliances, etcetera. A computer-controlled system regulates, monitors and controls all of this. But this can be done by automated systems. Automated systems can be used for this purpose, and therefore energy consumption can be reduced. For example, the light is turned off at a fixed time, or when nobody is present in the room, ventilation can be regulated on the number of people in the room. This can improve air quality, and will lead to user satisfaction. So yes, at first it will cost money, but in the end, it will save a lot as well. Reducing damages in case of a disaster Smart cities use sensors that are suitable for detecting abnormalities in a town or during an event. In this way, the sensors can inform the authorities if a measurement differs from the limited safety features in a city. This helps the city effectively track everything, and if there is a discrepancy, the authorities are able to act quickly and put an end to the situation so that it does not escalate. Better sustainability in a smart city Smart cities pay extra attention to sustainability, and this is reflected in the fact that they focus on renewable energy sources . If everyone uses a solar-powered system, carbon emissions will be reduced. We can recycle garbage and use the thrown away materials again. Or we may use free rainwater to flush our toilets. We can also apply durability to traffic by using smart transport. For example, to see where there is congestion and possibly change to a better route. We could also use smart traffic lights. All of this will contribute to a better quality of life. That is the ultimate purpose of a smart city: the best possible living circumstances for everybody, to provide a way of life that is the best combination of technology and comfort. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community  
Information from a library, hospital or public transport exposed? More sustainability , improved mobility, efficiency and safety? Where can you find all of the above in one place? The answer is a smart city. Its purpose is to improve the quality of life by making the town more efficient and by reducing the distance between the citizens and the government. In this article you will read more about the smart city and what it means for our privacy.  Improved technologies Technology is moving forward, devices are becoming smarter, so it is inevitable that in the future we will use electronic devices much more than we do now. To keep the city up and running, the existing technologies need to be upgraded. Otherwise, they cannot meet the specifications and demands of the current system. But what do we want? Investigation shows that we wish for smart transportation, where machines and devices communicate with each other. We want smart buildings, where the windows can open automatically, where there is always a connection with the Internet. That is our future. Are we being watched? Cameras are hanging everywhere to guarantee our safety. But do we feel safe by it? We could get the feeling that we are being watched, every step we take is registered by authorities. Besides cameras, all data is collected. This way, authorities know for example the number of visitors at a certain event or they possess information about citizens for commercial purposes. They may sell this information to third parties. Privacy in a smart city Like mentioned before, cameras are everywhere, and data is collected. What does that mean for our privacy? Who is the gatekeeper to our data? And what if the information is hacked? The more internet data there is, the more fragile we become. Fortunately, with the arrival of the GDPR in May 2018, the rules on the subject are becoming more strict. The citizen must be informed in understandable language, especially when it comes to data traffic in a smart city. Costs savings or costs loss? All these new technologies cost money. To upgrade the existing technologies, we (governments, state or country) need to invest vast amounts of money. However, due to these smart cities , there could be economic benefits coming from the transition towards a smart city, for example when it comes to real estate. Buildings have to deal with endless energy, such as heating and cooling installations, lighting, electrical wiring, communication, lifts, electrical appliances, etcetera. A computer-controlled system regulates, monitors and controls all of this. But this can be done by automated systems. Automated systems can be used for this purpose, and therefore energy consumption can be reduced. For example, the light is turned off at a fixed time, or when nobody is present in the room, ventilation can be regulated on the number of people in the room. This can improve air quality, and will lead to user satisfaction. So yes, at first it will cost money, but in the end, it will save a lot as well. Reducing damages in case of a disaster Smart cities use sensors that are suitable for detecting abnormalities in a town or during an event. In this way, the sensors can inform the authorities if a measurement differs from the limited safety features in a city. This helps the city effectively track everything, and if there is a discrepancy, the authorities are able to act quickly and put an end to the situation so that it does not escalate. Better sustainability in a smart city Smart cities pay extra attention to sustainability, and this is reflected in the fact that they focus on renewable energy sources . If everyone uses a solar-powered system, carbon emissions will be reduced. We can recycle garbage and use the thrown away materials again. Or we may use free rainwater to flush our toilets. We can also apply durability to traffic by using smart transport. For example, to see where there is congestion and possibly change to a better route. We could also use smart traffic lights. All of this will contribute to a better quality of life. That is the ultimate purpose of a smart city: the best possible living circumstances for everybody, to provide a way of life that is the best combination of technology and comfort. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/community  
Smart cities, safe and efficient, but are we being watched?
Smart cities, safe and efficient, but are we being watched?
Erik Buell’s futuristic electric motorcycle ‘Fuell’ unveiled
Erik Buell is a world famous motorcycle designer, often considered a pioneer of modern race motorcycle technology, who started off his career as an engineer for Harley-Davidson. From there, he started his own company - Buell Motorcycles - which was eventually, in a full-cycle moment, purchased by his former employer. Harley-Davidson was happy to leave him in charge, which ultimately resulted in a great new innovation being launched just the other week. Prototypes Fuell Flow-1 and Fuell Fluid-1 With a lot of fanfare, Buell introduced his newest electric motorcycle brand, titled ‘Fuell’. And it is not just the design that is extremely flashy and futuristic, the brand also stands out through its introduction of truly tech-infused electric bicycles. For this, Buell has partnered up with Formula-1 boss Frédéric Vasseur and VanguardSpark Motorcycles founder Francois-Xavier Terny.   The first two prototypes of this new electric motorcycle brand were already announced: the Fuell Flow-1 and the Fuell Fluid-1. While the Flow-1 is an actual electric motorcycle, the Fluid-1 is better classified as an e-bike, with its maximum speed of 32 or 45 km/h. Both vehicles would classify as those intended for urban mobility, so mainly meant for use within cities, due to their limited range. The Flow-1 e-motorcycle will be released in 11kW (125cc) and 35 kW (motorcycle license) versions, both of which boast 50 liters of internal storage and an interesting series of innovations (such as a proprietary wheel-motor and a connected dashboard). The Fluid-1 e-bike, on the other hand, is equipped with two removable batteries adding up to 1,000Wh, allowing for a range of up to 200 kilometers. It will also be released in two versions, the Pedelec - with a maximum of 32 km/h - and the S-Pedelec - with a maximum of 45 km/h. When asked for the vision of the Fuell brand, the founders are quick to point at the problem of the saturated cities - including massive issues with pollution, traffic jams and noise. Especially now that there are more and more cities implementing regulations that limits the use of internal combustion engines, e-alternatives are swimming in a blue ocean. Urban mobility facilitated using  e-bikes Fuell is looking to offer a complete and unique selection of all kinds of two wheelers (fully electric, obviously) that are uniquely suited to cater to the market of urban “macro-mobility”. This includes all kind of inner-city journals which require a personal vehicle to cover distances that are greater than 3 miles.   With this, the goal is to ultimately render cars useless for city-traffic, providing a sustainable and green alternative to the polluting four wheelers that are bound to clog up our highways and parking garages. At the same time, it could reduce the strain on public transport - currently overcrowded during rush hours with impatient commuters. Riding electronically for more fun, freedom and emotion With Fuell, the goal is to revive urban travel and inject it with a much needed dose of freedom and emotion. Riders will, as the company advertises, enjoy a truly unique e-riding experience that is different, innovative, upgradeable and attractive; perfectly in line with the needs of tomorrow’s society. The Flow-1 is set to be released in a few years, at a price of just under $11,000 - and the Fluid next year, at about $3,250. So pricing is pretty competitive, with various add-ons available as upgrades. Definitely something to watch out for in the upcoming years.   https://www.whatsorb.com/category/automotive
Erik Buell is a world famous motorcycle designer, often considered a pioneer of modern race motorcycle technology, who started off his career as an engineer for Harley-Davidson. From there, he started his own company - Buell Motorcycles - which was eventually, in a full-cycle moment, purchased by his former employer. Harley-Davidson was happy to leave him in charge, which ultimately resulted in a great new innovation being launched just the other week. Prototypes Fuell Flow-1 and Fuell Fluid-1 With a lot of fanfare, Buell introduced his newest electric motorcycle brand, titled ‘Fuell’. And it is not just the design that is extremely flashy and futuristic, the brand also stands out through its introduction of truly tech-infused electric bicycles. For this, Buell has partnered up with Formula-1 boss Frédéric Vasseur and VanguardSpark Motorcycles founder Francois-Xavier Terny.   The first two prototypes of this new electric motorcycle brand were already announced: the Fuell Flow-1 and the Fuell Fluid-1. While the Flow-1 is an actual electric motorcycle, the Fluid-1 is better classified as an e-bike, with its maximum speed of 32 or 45 km/h. Both vehicles would classify as those intended for urban mobility, so mainly meant for use within cities, due to their limited range. The Flow-1 e-motorcycle will be released in 11kW (125cc) and 35 kW (motorcycle license) versions, both of which boast 50 liters of internal storage and an interesting series of innovations (such as a proprietary wheel-motor and a connected dashboard). The Fluid-1 e-bike, on the other hand, is equipped with two removable batteries adding up to 1,000Wh, allowing for a range of up to 200 kilometers. It will also be released in two versions, the Pedelec - with a maximum of 32 km/h - and the S-Pedelec - with a maximum of 45 km/h. When asked for the vision of the Fuell brand, the founders are quick to point at the problem of the saturated cities - including massive issues with pollution, traffic jams and noise. Especially now that there are more and more cities implementing regulations that limits the use of internal combustion engines, e-alternatives are swimming in a blue ocean. Urban mobility facilitated using  e-bikes Fuell is looking to offer a complete and unique selection of all kinds of two wheelers (fully electric, obviously) that are uniquely suited to cater to the market of urban “macro-mobility”. This includes all kind of inner-city journals which require a personal vehicle to cover distances that are greater than 3 miles.   With this, the goal is to ultimately render cars useless for city-traffic, providing a sustainable and green alternative to the polluting four wheelers that are bound to clog up our highways and parking garages. At the same time, it could reduce the strain on public transport - currently overcrowded during rush hours with impatient commuters. Riding electronically for more fun, freedom and emotion With Fuell, the goal is to revive urban travel and inject it with a much needed dose of freedom and emotion. Riders will, as the company advertises, enjoy a truly unique e-riding experience that is different, innovative, upgradeable and attractive; perfectly in line with the needs of tomorrow’s society. The Flow-1 is set to be released in a few years, at a price of just under $11,000 - and the Fluid next year, at about $3,250. So pricing is pretty competitive, with various add-ons available as upgrades. Definitely something to watch out for in the upcoming years.   https://www.whatsorb.com/category/automotive
Erik Buell’s futuristic electric motorcycle ‘Fuell’ unveiled
Erik Buell’s futuristic electric motorcycle ‘Fuell’ unveiled
Our food system under threat by decline in biodiversity
According to an UN study, the future of our food system is in danger. That’s because the plants, animals and micro-organisms that are the bedrock of food production are in decline. If these critical species are lost, the report says, it "places the future of our food system under severe threat". Because of pollution, climate change and land-use changes, biodiversity is decreasing. How bad is this threat and what can we do about it? The UN report is the first such study of its kind, using date gathered in 91 countries by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). It says. Biodiversity is the diversity of plants, animals and other organisms that provide us with food, fuel and fibre. It includes pollinators like bees, that provide essential services, and worms, mangroves, sea grasses and fungi which work to keep soils fertile and purify the air and water. Biodiversity in a  sustainable way Many of the species that support food and agriculture are under threat or declining. While species friendly policies are increasing, they are not growing quickly enough, scientists say. Around a thousand wild food species, mainly plants, fish and mammals are decreasing in abundance. "Biodiversity is critical for safeguarding global food security, underpinning healthy and nutritious diets, improving rural livelihoods, and enhancing the resilience of people and communities," said FAO's Director-General José Graziano da Silva. "We need to use biodiversity in a sustainable way, so that we can better respond to rising climate change challenges and produce food in a way that doesn't harm our environment." A smaller number of foodstuffs to feed a growing population According to the study, the world is relying on an ever smaller number of foodstuffs to feed a growing population that's expected to rise to around ten billion people by 2050. Of the 6,000 plant species cultivated for food, just nine account for 66% of total crop production. The world's livestock production is based on around 40 species with only a handful providing the vast majority of meat, milk and eggs. The scale of threat to food The lack of biodiversity can leave food production much more vulnerable to shocks, such as outbreaks of disease and pests. The new study highlights a number of examples where the loss of biodiversity is impacting people's lives and diets. The Gambia says that large losses of wild foods have forced communities to turn to industrially processed foods to supplement their diets. Several countries including Ireland, Norway, Poland and Switzerland report declines in bumblebees. In Oman, the loss of pollinator populations due to extreme heat associated with climate change has seen the decline of wild food, including figs and berries. There are several causes for biodiversity loss, such as pollution, population growth and urbanisation and climate change. Other significant drivers of biodiversity loss are overexploitation and overharvesting and changes in land and water use and management. How countries fix the decline The report highlights a number of what it terms "biodiversity friendly practices" that are on the rise. Some 80% of the countries reporting say that they follow one or more of these approaches. Some examples: in Argentina, some 560,000 home gardens and 12,000 school and community gardens have been created and are providing food for an estimated 2.8 million people. In California, farmers are now allowing their rice fields to be flooded after harvest instead of burning them, opening 111,000 hectares of surrogate wetlands and open space for 230 bird species. Farmers in Ghana are planting cassava plants on field margins which produce huge amounts of nectar, attracting bees and other species, leading to higher yields. While these are lauded, the problem according to the FAO is that these changes aren't happening quickly enough. "It is very positive to see that countries are adopting more and more practices that contribute to sustainable food production across the globe. However, sometimes increased adoption is coming from a very low starting point." What you can do As an consumer, you have an enormous power to drive change. Buy sustainably grown products from farmers markets, or boycott foods that are seen to be unsustainable. In the report, it came out strongly that the role of citizens are of an enormous importance. Cover photo by:   Hamish Secrett https://www.whatsorb.com/category/food
According to an UN study, the future of our food system is in danger. That’s because the plants, animals and micro-organisms that are the bedrock of food production are in decline. If these critical species are lost, the report says, it "places the future of our food system under severe threat". Because of pollution, climate change and land-use changes, biodiversity is decreasing. How bad is this threat and what can we do about it? The UN report is the first such study of its kind, using date gathered in 91 countries by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). It says. Biodiversity is the diversity of plants, animals and other organisms that provide us with food, fuel and fibre. It includes pollinators like bees, that provide essential services, and worms, mangroves, sea grasses and fungi which work to keep soils fertile and purify the air and water. Biodiversity in a  sustainable way Many of the species that support food and agriculture are under threat or declining. While species friendly policies are increasing, they are not growing quickly enough, scientists say. Around a thousand wild food species, mainly plants, fish and mammals are decreasing in abundance. "Biodiversity is critical for safeguarding global food security, underpinning healthy and nutritious diets, improving rural livelihoods, and enhancing the resilience of people and communities," said FAO's Director-General José Graziano da Silva. "We need to use biodiversity in a sustainable way, so that we can better respond to rising climate change challenges and produce food in a way that doesn't harm our environment." A smaller number of foodstuffs to feed a growing population According to the study, the world is relying on an ever smaller number of foodstuffs to feed a growing population that's expected to rise to around ten billion people by 2050. Of the 6,000 plant species cultivated for food, just nine account for 66% of total crop production. The world's livestock production is based on around 40 species with only a handful providing the vast majority of meat, milk and eggs. The scale of threat to food The lack of biodiversity can leave food production much more vulnerable to shocks, such as outbreaks of disease and pests. The new study highlights a number of examples where the loss of biodiversity is impacting people's lives and diets. The Gambia says that large losses of wild foods have forced communities to turn to industrially processed foods to supplement their diets. Several countries including Ireland, Norway, Poland and Switzerland report declines in bumblebees. In Oman, the loss of pollinator populations due to extreme heat associated with climate change has seen the decline of wild food, including figs and berries. There are several causes for biodiversity loss, such as pollution, population growth and urbanisation and climate change. Other significant drivers of biodiversity loss are overexploitation and overharvesting and changes in land and water use and management. How countries fix the decline The report highlights a number of what it terms "biodiversity friendly practices" that are on the rise. Some 80% of the countries reporting say that they follow one or more of these approaches. Some examples: in Argentina, some 560,000 home gardens and 12,000 school and community gardens have been created and are providing food for an estimated 2.8 million people. In California, farmers are now allowing their rice fields to be flooded after harvest instead of burning them, opening 111,000 hectares of surrogate wetlands and open space for 230 bird species. Farmers in Ghana are planting cassava plants on field margins which produce huge amounts of nectar, attracting bees and other species, leading to higher yields. While these are lauded, the problem according to the FAO is that these changes aren't happening quickly enough. "It is very positive to see that countries are adopting more and more practices that contribute to sustainable food production across the globe. However, sometimes increased adoption is coming from a very low starting point." What you can do As an consumer, you have an enormous power to drive change. Buy sustainably grown products from farmers markets, or boycott foods that are seen to be unsustainable. In the report, it came out strongly that the role of citizens are of an enormous importance. Cover photo by:   Hamish Secrett https://www.whatsorb.com/category/food
Our food system under threat by decline in biodiversity
Our food system under threat by decline in biodiversity
A world without oil fueled by renewables.  Are we on track?
Just sit back and enjoy that thought for a minute. What if, suddenly, from one day to the next, there would be no more oil? Not a tank, not a gallon, not even a single drop? Aside from the obvious negative implications for those economies that are driven by the black gold, there will be plenty of other side-effects, both positive and negative.   Electric cars fueled by renewable energy sources I’m going to allow myself to indulge in the fantasy and explore ways of how the world will change because of it. Starting with the obvious one: we will no longer be able to fuel up our cars at the gas station down the street. So that will be a shame, leaving that big ol’ Chevy in the garage. Although there are plenty of alternatives.   Sustainable transport will be our go-to means of getting around. Most of us will own an electric car, fuelled by renewable energy sources - perhaps even of the self-driving variety, allowing us to sit back and relax as we are whisked from A to B. Alternatively, you can hop on the electric trains or metros, departing from fully sustainable and hyper-modern stations.   Drones, electric trucks and sustainable freight trains Goods are transported by drones, electric trucks, on sustainable freight trains, and smart container ships. All of which are obviously fitted with state-of-the-art tracking software and sensors, allowing for real-time analysis. Would you want to go on a long journey? There will be electric planes, ready to transport passengers to tropical destinations all around the world. Or you could opt for a sustainable cruise ship or yacht, sailing all the oceans of the world. No matter your destination, no matter your purpose - there will be a suitable means of transportation.   Sounds good? Well, yes. But let’s not ignore the reality of today: most of the mentioned forms of transportation are not even available yet, let alone a feasible option for the short term. The number of gas-guzzling cars far outweighs the number of electric vehicles, meaning that a sudden oil-stop would quite literally have society grinding to a halt. Perhaps we still have an electric scooter or an old-fashioned bike in the garage, although this will not be sufficient to cover large distances.   The unavoidable crash The entire aviation industry will crash - excuse the pun -, leaving those who frequently travel internationally hanging out to dry. As it stands, very few oil-free alternatives are available, quite possibly forcing the big airlines to scramble in their race to find an oil-free passenger plane. Just as it would be for the majority of the cruise- and yachting industry, in fact.   So, while the picture-perfect Jetsons-like vision of the future might sound appealing and admittedly become reality a whole lot sooner if oil were to suddenly disappear, the image for the foreseeable future would be far from rosy. International travel will become extremely difficult, whilst most of us will find ourselves limited in our mobility, having been robbed of our cars and buses. The trains and cars that remain will be far and few between - and most certainly incapable of handling the increased flow of passengers that are still hoping to retain their jobs or pursue an education.   The same goes for a gazillion other aspects of our life, all of which rely on oil. Deny all you want, but it is a painful fact that oil serves as the backbone of our society. Taking it all away would quite literally undermine all that we have built up, which could be disastrous for the world’s economy and set us back decades.   Nuclear power is relatively foolproof To illustrate this, just take a look at the energy needs of the world. Without oil, there is only one real alternative that would be able to meet the needs of the world - nuclear energy. All of the renewable energy sources that are currently available - hydro, wind, solar, geothermal, and wave energy - are nowhere near sufficient to power all of today’s society. Nuclear power is relatively foolproof, extremely clean, and very safe.   So that sounds great - who needs oil for energy generation anyway? Unfortunately, the matter is once again not as easy and smooth as it may seem. While the costs of building nuclear facilities and the lengthy timeline associated with it may have been historical bottlenecks, the major problem is public perception. Spurred on by organisations like Greenpeace, a large proportion of the general population is not in favour of nuclear energy, to say the least, or absolutely frightened by it, at its most extreme. Events like Chernobyl and Fukushima are ingrained within our collective memory, making the general acceptance of nuclear energy a hurdle that will be tricky to overcome. Not to mention the time that it would cost us to actually build enough nuclear power plants to deliver sufficient energy, once again leaving us in a grim, dark place for the first years after having lost our oil overnight. Our lives without oil After all, figuring out how to live our lives without oil will entail even more than 'just' the way we move and generate energy. It will change the way we eat, we live, the way that we dress. Our homes will have to become much greener, as we cannot use as much energy to heat it: insulation and ventilation are the key words, while our home appliances will have to be super efficient. Low-flush toilets, water saving dishwashers, and low-draw lightbulbs will become the new norm.   Our food will be produced locally, changing each season, depending on what is available in our vegetable gardens. The same applies for clothing: fabrics that are available locally will set the norm for our garments, quite possibly including some new innovative techniques to keep us warm (remember the need to save energy in our homes?). Wait, I once again described the ideal situation. Would it really be as simple as making an instant switch to a local economy, where we all live in sustainable homes and only eat the food and wear the clothes that are available at a given time? Without putting up much of a fight? Sustainable alternatives Well, probably not. Chances are that, as the result of an oil crisis, we will turn into cavemen instead - and definitely not in the good way. Instead of resorting to outfits made out of hides and skins of animals and hunting deers and gathering fruits and nuts, we will take our figurative spears and head off to loot the supermarkets. The prospect of food shortages will fuel our primal instincts, leading to chaotic, end-of-world-like situations were people panic and riot, stopping at nothing to get their hands on some food. Similarly, we will try to take our money out of the bank as quickly as possible, foreseeing the imminent crisis that will render our bank credit worthless. Quite useless, actually, as money will quickly lose its value in the world of a plummeting economy anyhow. The rest of this scenario plays out like an apocalyptic movie: our homes, bereft of any sort of energy, will become useless shells as we are no longer able to flush our toilets, watch our tv, heat our rooms, connect to the internet, and cook our food. As our lights quite literally go out, authorities will stand by helplessly as all of their crucial systems are flat on their behind as well, including police, hospitals and armies. Riots will break out and the phrase ‘survival of the fittest’ will be given a whole other meaning. All because of one silly, little, seemingly insignificant resource. Do not despair yet, though. You will be happy to hear that most governments have plans in place to prevent the last scenario from ever happening, starting by reducing their country’s reliance on oil. And although I may have attempted to paint a picture of oil being indispensable, there is evidence to the contrary. Entire countries are going ‘oil-free’, instead opting for a variety of renewable sources of energy to fuel their economies. In particular those countries who do not have much oil of their own are rapidly adjusting, fuelling innovations that can, in turn, be adapted and implemented by other countries as well. The main point? We cannot do it alone. We must do it together, with other countries. Together, we can find ways to live without oil. We can innovate, we can re-new, we can learn. That is, and has always been, the greatest strength of us, human beings.   But in order to avert the doom-scenario I briefly described above, and have a shot at making the dreamy ideal-world scenario I painted before that come true at some point in the future, we have got to take action. Today. Oil is ending - and the sooner we accept this, the earlier we can start looking for sustainable alternatives. This way, we can prevent a situation where we will suddenly find ourselves out of oil tomorrow - and give ourselves the opportunity to have a much smoother, calmer transition to a cleaner world. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
Just sit back and enjoy that thought for a minute. What if, suddenly, from one day to the next, there would be no more oil? Not a tank, not a gallon, not even a single drop? Aside from the obvious negative implications for those economies that are driven by the black gold, there will be plenty of other side-effects, both positive and negative.   Electric cars fueled by renewable energy sources I’m going to allow myself to indulge in the fantasy and explore ways of how the world will change because of it. Starting with the obvious one: we will no longer be able to fuel up our cars at the gas station down the street. So that will be a shame, leaving that big ol’ Chevy in the garage. Although there are plenty of alternatives.   Sustainable transport will be our go-to means of getting around. Most of us will own an electric car, fuelled by renewable energy sources - perhaps even of the self-driving variety, allowing us to sit back and relax as we are whisked from A to B. Alternatively, you can hop on the electric trains or metros, departing from fully sustainable and hyper-modern stations.   Drones, electric trucks and sustainable freight trains Goods are transported by drones, electric trucks, on sustainable freight trains, and smart container ships. All of which are obviously fitted with state-of-the-art tracking software and sensors, allowing for real-time analysis. Would you want to go on a long journey? There will be electric planes, ready to transport passengers to tropical destinations all around the world. Or you could opt for a sustainable cruise ship or yacht, sailing all the oceans of the world. No matter your destination, no matter your purpose - there will be a suitable means of transportation.   Sounds good? Well, yes. But let’s not ignore the reality of today: most of the mentioned forms of transportation are not even available yet, let alone a feasible option for the short term. The number of gas-guzzling cars far outweighs the number of electric vehicles, meaning that a sudden oil-stop would quite literally have society grinding to a halt. Perhaps we still have an electric scooter or an old-fashioned bike in the garage, although this will not be sufficient to cover large distances.   The unavoidable crash The entire aviation industry will crash - excuse the pun -, leaving those who frequently travel internationally hanging out to dry. As it stands, very few oil-free alternatives are available, quite possibly forcing the big airlines to scramble in their race to find an oil-free passenger plane. Just as it would be for the majority of the cruise- and yachting industry, in fact.   So, while the picture-perfect Jetsons-like vision of the future might sound appealing and admittedly become reality a whole lot sooner if oil were to suddenly disappear, the image for the foreseeable future would be far from rosy. International travel will become extremely difficult, whilst most of us will find ourselves limited in our mobility, having been robbed of our cars and buses. The trains and cars that remain will be far and few between - and most certainly incapable of handling the increased flow of passengers that are still hoping to retain their jobs or pursue an education.   The same goes for a gazillion other aspects of our life, all of which rely on oil. Deny all you want, but it is a painful fact that oil serves as the backbone of our society. Taking it all away would quite literally undermine all that we have built up, which could be disastrous for the world’s economy and set us back decades.   Nuclear power is relatively foolproof To illustrate this, just take a look at the energy needs of the world. Without oil, there is only one real alternative that would be able to meet the needs of the world - nuclear energy. All of the renewable energy sources that are currently available - hydro, wind, solar, geothermal, and wave energy - are nowhere near sufficient to power all of today’s society. Nuclear power is relatively foolproof, extremely clean, and very safe.   So that sounds great - who needs oil for energy generation anyway? Unfortunately, the matter is once again not as easy and smooth as it may seem. While the costs of building nuclear facilities and the lengthy timeline associated with it may have been historical bottlenecks, the major problem is public perception. Spurred on by organisations like Greenpeace, a large proportion of the general population is not in favour of nuclear energy, to say the least, or absolutely frightened by it, at its most extreme. Events like Chernobyl and Fukushima are ingrained within our collective memory, making the general acceptance of nuclear energy a hurdle that will be tricky to overcome. Not to mention the time that it would cost us to actually build enough nuclear power plants to deliver sufficient energy, once again leaving us in a grim, dark place for the first years after having lost our oil overnight. Our lives without oil After all, figuring out how to live our lives without oil will entail even more than 'just' the way we move and generate energy. It will change the way we eat, we live, the way that we dress. Our homes will have to become much greener, as we cannot use as much energy to heat it: insulation and ventilation are the key words, while our home appliances will have to be super efficient. Low-flush toilets, water saving dishwashers, and low-draw lightbulbs will become the new norm.   Our food will be produced locally, changing each season, depending on what is available in our vegetable gardens. The same applies for clothing: fabrics that are available locally will set the norm for our garments, quite possibly including some new innovative techniques to keep us warm (remember the need to save energy in our homes?). Wait, I once again described the ideal situation. Would it really be as simple as making an instant switch to a local economy, where we all live in sustainable homes and only eat the food and wear the clothes that are available at a given time? Without putting up much of a fight? Sustainable alternatives Well, probably not. Chances are that, as the result of an oil crisis, we will turn into cavemen instead - and definitely not in the good way. Instead of resorting to outfits made out of hides and skins of animals and hunting deers and gathering fruits and nuts, we will take our figurative spears and head off to loot the supermarkets. The prospect of food shortages will fuel our primal instincts, leading to chaotic, end-of-world-like situations were people panic and riot, stopping at nothing to get their hands on some food. Similarly, we will try to take our money out of the bank as quickly as possible, foreseeing the imminent crisis that will render our bank credit worthless. Quite useless, actually, as money will quickly lose its value in the world of a plummeting economy anyhow. The rest of this scenario plays out like an apocalyptic movie: our homes, bereft of any sort of energy, will become useless shells as we are no longer able to flush our toilets, watch our tv, heat our rooms, connect to the internet, and cook our food. As our lights quite literally go out, authorities will stand by helplessly as all of their crucial systems are flat on their behind as well, including police, hospitals and armies. Riots will break out and the phrase ‘survival of the fittest’ will be given a whole other meaning. All because of one silly, little, seemingly insignificant resource. Do not despair yet, though. You will be happy to hear that most governments have plans in place to prevent the last scenario from ever happening, starting by reducing their country’s reliance on oil. And although I may have attempted to paint a picture of oil being indispensable, there is evidence to the contrary. Entire countries are going ‘oil-free’, instead opting for a variety of renewable sources of energy to fuel their economies. In particular those countries who do not have much oil of their own are rapidly adjusting, fuelling innovations that can, in turn, be adapted and implemented by other countries as well. The main point? We cannot do it alone. We must do it together, with other countries. Together, we can find ways to live without oil. We can innovate, we can re-new, we can learn. That is, and has always been, the greatest strength of us, human beings.   But in order to avert the doom-scenario I briefly described above, and have a shot at making the dreamy ideal-world scenario I painted before that come true at some point in the future, we have got to take action. Today. Oil is ending - and the sooner we accept this, the earlier we can start looking for sustainable alternatives. This way, we can prevent a situation where we will suddenly find ourselves out of oil tomorrow - and give ourselves the opportunity to have a much smoother, calmer transition to a cleaner world. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
A world without oil fueled by renewables.  Are we on track?
A world without oil fueled by renewables. Are we on track?
Sustainable fabric by IKEA and NIKE textile without pollution
Recently, the Netherlands-based textile company DyeCoo announced that they have agreed on long-term collaborations with industry giants Nike and IKEA. This is quite a big step for a company that has a ‘mere’ 15 years of experience in their core business: integrating CO2 technologies in the creation of textiles. Does that sound confusingly brilliant? Well, we are pretty sure that it is. Through their lean and clean production methods, DyeCoo has made it its mission to lead the textile industry to a sustainable future.   Whereas most ‘traditional’ fabric producers rely on heavy chemicals, extensive use of scarce resources like water, and extremely cheap labour in sweatshops; this company from the town of Weesp has developed a 100% water-free and process chemical-free textile processing solution - that has attracted the attention of the before mentioned multinationals. Water-free textile production The CO2 technology has been proudly patented, having proven itself in a industrial setting. It replaces the water needed in the production process with reclaimed CO2. This is used as the dyeing agent in a closed loop process. After it gets pressurised, CO2 turns supercritical (SC-CO2). When this happens, its solvency power increases - which will let the dye dissolve very easily. This high permeability will transport the dyes easily and deeply in fibres, resulting in strikingly vibrant colours.   This entire process is 'dry', without any need to evaporate water. Combined with efficient colour absorption and short batch cycles, this has made the entire technology very energy efficient as well: another factor contributing to the significantly reduced operating costs.   On top of the significantly reduced water and energy needs, the dyeing process that uses CO2 does not require the addition of processed chemicals in order to dissolve the dye. Instead, the technology uses 100% pure dyes, that benefit from a 98% uptake - minimising waste. Actually, the entire production processed is focused on this minimisation of waste - including ( waste ) water and chemicals. This removes the need for water treatment.   Reclaimed materials at the basis Most of the materials used during the dying process, including the CO2, are reclaimed from the existing industrial processes. A brilliant 95% is recycled in the closed loop system. DyeCoo has remained steadfast in its proposal, employing a team of specialised engineers and textile experts to keep the process running smoothly. This includes a variety of personnel, including chemical and mechanical engineers, CO2 specialists, physicists and material experts.   All of this has allowed the company to scale up activities, yet remaining true to its core. The entire chain is optimised for accountability and sustainability, so not just the mechanics of the production process alone, but also the procurement of fabrics and dyes; as well as the handling of the finished product. This has led to an increased focus on implementing best practices throughout the textile chain. Scaling-up as the challenge After proving its technology, DyeCoo has now stepped up and is looking for ways of scaling up. The main selling point, besides the sustainable production process, is the vibrancy of the colours - that really stands out. The use of 100% pure dyestuff allows for those beautiful colours to be added evenly, adding to the high quality standards. Additionally, the company has claimed that it is able to “dye fabric in the middle of the Sahara”: the geographic freedom is unlimited now that the need for water has been eliminated.   Production can be kickstarted literally anywhere on the globe, opening up some great new opportunities - for instance, allowing the production to be performed closer to relevant markets, shortening the lead times, and being more 'lean' altogether. The immense potential has been realised by Nike and IKEA, amongst others. They have actively invested in the technology, which even led to demand for CO2-dyed fabric outgrowing the current supply. Now that the 'big players' have acknowledged that the product generated in a more energy-efficient and generally more sustainable manner does not have to constitute a compromise on quality, revenue or functionality; we will soon start to see the results. Nike already introduced a product line that features the DyeCoo technology, with a bunch of additional products being added in the near future.   It is a great example of how, once suppliers get their heads in the game, small technological improvements can make a world of difference: without having to compromise on product quality or appeal, the greener process makes for a much more sustainable one. And that is great news for all of us. {youtube} https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Recently, the Netherlands-based textile company DyeCoo announced that they have agreed on long-term collaborations with industry giants Nike and IKEA. This is quite a big step for a company that has a ‘mere’ 15 years of experience in their core business: integrating CO2 technologies in the creation of textiles. Does that sound confusingly brilliant? Well, we are pretty sure that it is. Through their lean and clean production methods, DyeCoo has made it its mission to lead the textile industry to a sustainable future.   Whereas most ‘traditional’ fabric producers rely on heavy chemicals, extensive use of scarce resources like water, and extremely cheap labour in sweatshops; this company from the town of Weesp has developed a 100% water-free and process chemical-free textile processing solution - that has attracted the attention of the before mentioned multinationals. Water-free textile production The CO2 technology has been proudly patented, having proven itself in a industrial setting. It replaces the water needed in the production process with reclaimed CO2. This is used as the dyeing agent in a closed loop process. After it gets pressurised, CO2 turns supercritical (SC-CO2). When this happens, its solvency power increases - which will let the dye dissolve very easily. This high permeability will transport the dyes easily and deeply in fibres, resulting in strikingly vibrant colours.   This entire process is 'dry', without any need to evaporate water. Combined with efficient colour absorption and short batch cycles, this has made the entire technology very energy efficient as well: another factor contributing to the significantly reduced operating costs.   On top of the significantly reduced water and energy needs, the dyeing process that uses CO2 does not require the addition of processed chemicals in order to dissolve the dye. Instead, the technology uses 100% pure dyes, that benefit from a 98% uptake - minimising waste. Actually, the entire production processed is focused on this minimisation of waste - including ( waste ) water and chemicals. This removes the need for water treatment.   Reclaimed materials at the basis Most of the materials used during the dying process, including the CO2, are reclaimed from the existing industrial processes. A brilliant 95% is recycled in the closed loop system. DyeCoo has remained steadfast in its proposal, employing a team of specialised engineers and textile experts to keep the process running smoothly. This includes a variety of personnel, including chemical and mechanical engineers, CO2 specialists, physicists and material experts.   All of this has allowed the company to scale up activities, yet remaining true to its core. The entire chain is optimised for accountability and sustainability, so not just the mechanics of the production process alone, but also the procurement of fabrics and dyes; as well as the handling of the finished product. This has led to an increased focus on implementing best practices throughout the textile chain. Scaling-up as the challenge After proving its technology, DyeCoo has now stepped up and is looking for ways of scaling up. The main selling point, besides the sustainable production process, is the vibrancy of the colours - that really stands out. The use of 100% pure dyestuff allows for those beautiful colours to be added evenly, adding to the high quality standards. Additionally, the company has claimed that it is able to “dye fabric in the middle of the Sahara”: the geographic freedom is unlimited now that the need for water has been eliminated.   Production can be kickstarted literally anywhere on the globe, opening up some great new opportunities - for instance, allowing the production to be performed closer to relevant markets, shortening the lead times, and being more 'lean' altogether. The immense potential has been realised by Nike and IKEA, amongst others. They have actively invested in the technology, which even led to demand for CO2-dyed fabric outgrowing the current supply. Now that the 'big players' have acknowledged that the product generated in a more energy-efficient and generally more sustainable manner does not have to constitute a compromise on quality, revenue or functionality; we will soon start to see the results. Nike already introduced a product line that features the DyeCoo technology, with a bunch of additional products being added in the near future.   It is a great example of how, once suppliers get their heads in the game, small technological improvements can make a world of difference: without having to compromise on product quality or appeal, the greener process makes for a much more sustainable one. And that is great news for all of us. {youtube} https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Sustainable fabric by IKEA and NIKE textile without pollution
Sustainable fabric by IKEA and NIKE textile without pollution
Airborne Wind Energy Systems: A new way of energy supply
Everyone uses energy. To keep ourselves alive, we need a certain amount of energy to provide for the human need for food and to do work. Energy, especially electricity, is essential to provide water, food, health care, education, employment and communication. But where does this energy actually come from? And how can we improve it? Problems in the current energy supply The most substantial amount of energy comes from fossil and nuclear fuels, which currently face serious difficulties, such as security of supply, economic affordability, environmental sustainability and disaster risks. In order to cope with these problems, we are looking for a solution to increase renewable energy technologies. For example, in recent decades there has been rapid growth and spread of renewable power plants. Among them, wind generators are the most widespread type of renewable energy. This trend continues and is a positive development. However, this could be different in the near future. There could be a saturation of windy areas inland. For this reason, the current research programmes are aimed at improving the power capacity per unit of land. This translates worldwide into the development of several wind turbines with improved nominal capacity. What are we doing worldwide? Worldwide, people are investigating what could be improved. Since the beginning of 2000, researchers have been looking at offshore installations. At these places located far enough from the coast, wind energy sources are generally larger those on land. Wind energy is stronger and more regular. This allows for more constant use and more accurate production planning. In this context, an entirely new renewable energy sector has emerged in the scientific community: AWE. What is AWE? Awe means Airborne Wind Energy . It is a new way of transforming wind energy. Airborne Wind Energy focuses on capturing wind energy at considerable heights, at least 500 meters! Machines that "capture" this type of power is referred to as Airborne Wind Energy Systems (AWES). The wind at this height is stronger, and the systems provide higher efficiency than the conventional wind turbines . Moreover, they are cheaper, less visible and can be used in places that are difficult to reach. This new way of transforming wind energy can reach layers of wind at enormous heights, utilising strapped wings or aircraft and drones. These are not accessible to traditional wind turbines. Research into these Airborne Wind Energy Systems started in the 1970s, but development has accelerated in the last decade. This new software of wind transformation was developed by researchers from the Carlos III University of Madrid. The Dutch startup Kitepower The focus on wind energy at high altitude is increasing. Researchers are exploring what is possible. The Dutch start-up Kitepower, founded by a research group at TU Delft, is developing an AWES based on kites to generate energy at high altitude. A 100kw system is now being designed that, for example, can replace diesel generators in isolated areas. Producing, transporting and installing wind turbines on land and at sea costs a lot more time and money compared to airborne wind energy solutions. Wind at an altitude of 200-450 meters is stronger and more constant than the wind that captures windmills. Kitepower is developing a power generating kite system for this source of renewable wind energy in the air. These kites are quiet, simple to install and easy to use. Kitepower uses less material than ground-based turbines, and it takes less than an hour to install them. Their kites float through a large part of the air, resulting in very powerful wind speeds. Most people rely on diesel generators, with a high dependency on expensive and logistically demanding diesel supplies. Kitepower offers a more durable, flexible and economical solution. With its logistical flexibility, Kitepower provides an excellent alternative when the conventional power supply is damaged. Kitepower focuses on the transformation of energy in the world. They want a world where renewable energy is accessible and affordable for everyone. Their development is still ongoing and needs some refinement. Hopefully, we will hear more about this in the near future. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
Everyone uses energy. To keep ourselves alive, we need a certain amount of energy to provide for the human need for food and to do work. Energy, especially electricity, is essential to provide water, food, health care, education, employment and communication. But where does this energy actually come from? And how can we improve it? Problems in the current energy supply The most substantial amount of energy comes from fossil and nuclear fuels, which currently face serious difficulties, such as security of supply, economic affordability, environmental sustainability and disaster risks. In order to cope with these problems, we are looking for a solution to increase renewable energy technologies. For example, in recent decades there has been rapid growth and spread of renewable power plants. Among them, wind generators are the most widespread type of renewable energy. This trend continues and is a positive development. However, this could be different in the near future. There could be a saturation of windy areas inland. For this reason, the current research programmes are aimed at improving the power capacity per unit of land. This translates worldwide into the development of several wind turbines with improved nominal capacity. What are we doing worldwide? Worldwide, people are investigating what could be improved. Since the beginning of 2000, researchers have been looking at offshore installations. At these places located far enough from the coast, wind energy sources are generally larger those on land. Wind energy is stronger and more regular. This allows for more constant use and more accurate production planning. In this context, an entirely new renewable energy sector has emerged in the scientific community: AWE. What is AWE? Awe means Airborne Wind Energy . It is a new way of transforming wind energy. Airborne Wind Energy focuses on capturing wind energy at considerable heights, at least 500 meters! Machines that "capture" this type of power is referred to as Airborne Wind Energy Systems (AWES). The wind at this height is stronger, and the systems provide higher efficiency than the conventional wind turbines . Moreover, they are cheaper, less visible and can be used in places that are difficult to reach. This new way of transforming wind energy can reach layers of wind at enormous heights, utilising strapped wings or aircraft and drones. These are not accessible to traditional wind turbines. Research into these Airborne Wind Energy Systems started in the 1970s, but development has accelerated in the last decade. This new software of wind transformation was developed by researchers from the Carlos III University of Madrid. The Dutch startup Kitepower The focus on wind energy at high altitude is increasing. Researchers are exploring what is possible. The Dutch start-up Kitepower, founded by a research group at TU Delft, is developing an AWES based on kites to generate energy at high altitude. A 100kw system is now being designed that, for example, can replace diesel generators in isolated areas. Producing, transporting and installing wind turbines on land and at sea costs a lot more time and money compared to airborne wind energy solutions. Wind at an altitude of 200-450 meters is stronger and more constant than the wind that captures windmills. Kitepower is developing a power generating kite system for this source of renewable wind energy in the air. These kites are quiet, simple to install and easy to use. Kitepower uses less material than ground-based turbines, and it takes less than an hour to install them. Their kites float through a large part of the air, resulting in very powerful wind speeds. Most people rely on diesel generators, with a high dependency on expensive and logistically demanding diesel supplies. Kitepower offers a more durable, flexible and economical solution. With its logistical flexibility, Kitepower provides an excellent alternative when the conventional power supply is damaged. Kitepower focuses on the transformation of energy in the world. They want a world where renewable energy is accessible and affordable for everyone. Their development is still ongoing and needs some refinement. Hopefully, we will hear more about this in the near future. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy
Airborne Wind Energy Systems: A new way of energy supply
Airborne Wind Energy Systems: A new way of energy supply
Climate change; CO2 emissions in Europe don’t matter much
If you really want to do something about climate change, you don’t spent that much effort and energy in Europe but you are going to invest in fast growing developing countries like: Brazil, Nigeria, China and India. “To be honest, the emissions produced in Europe don’t matter that much”, according climate scientist Nic Lewis. Climate change, solar-,  wind energy and 'clean nuclear' We have to look more at developing countries. We have 'to help them' to develop faster in a cleaner direction which involves less pollution, less CO2 emissions and to become richer. In Europe we have the knowledge and expertise now to prevent developing countries making the same mistakes Europe did in the past. We also have to try to limit 'for example' the building boom of Chinese Coal powered electricity plants in Africa. It is better to spend our money to these projects than putting billions in climate policies and subsidies that have hardly any effect in slowing down climate change. Shutting down coal-fired plants would be a good step forward. Also investments in solar-, wind energy and 'clean nuclear' energy or the techniques to  suck CO2 out of the air , would be a great step forwards. The acquired knowledge could be shared with the rest of the world. "The urge politicians are now 'promoting' and impose on their citizens is not necessary," says Nic Lewis. Like the Dutch government is doing at the moment brings a lot of unrest and some groups in financial problems by 'forcing' them making huge investments to isolate their house and install heat exchange pumps. Climate change and it's cause The discussion about the rise of CO2 is still not won. There is still no consensus about the exact reason our climate is changing. According Nic Lewis our climate is less sensitive to CO2 emissions than some models predict. The UN climate panels assumes that there is a link between the global warming since 1850. If you have a good look at the observations made since 1850, the rise of global temperatures has been less fast than expected. Nic Lewis sees only a rise of 1.7 degrees C. while IPCC models show around 3 C. of warming because of the doubling of CO2. The good news Nic Lewis comes with is that we have much more time to keep the rise of global temperatures below 2 C. Work with countries who are the largest CO2 emitters and try first to limit their emissions by helping them with new cleaner techniques, to educate the population and help them get a better and healthier life. Politicians in Brussels and den Hague who are now in such a hurry could be 'punished' soon for their claims if gets clear how much their 'greening efforts' will cost and which limited effect it will have on the total of CO2 emissions and climate change. Cover photo by: denhaagfm.nl https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate
If you really want to do something about climate change, you don’t spent that much effort and energy in Europe but you are going to invest in fast growing developing countries like: Brazil, Nigeria, China and India. “To be honest, the emissions produced in Europe don’t matter that much”, according climate scientist Nic Lewis. Climate change, solar-,  wind energy and 'clean nuclear' We have to look more at developing countries. We have 'to help them' to develop faster in a cleaner direction which involves less pollution, less CO2 emissions and to become richer. In Europe we have the knowledge and expertise now to prevent developing countries making the same mistakes Europe did in the past. We also have to try to limit 'for example' the building boom of Chinese Coal powered electricity plants in Africa. It is better to spend our money to these projects than putting billions in climate policies and subsidies that have hardly any effect in slowing down climate change. Shutting down coal-fired plants would be a good step forward. Also investments in solar-, wind energy and 'clean nuclear' energy or the techniques to  suck CO2 out of the air , would be a great step forwards. The acquired knowledge could be shared with the rest of the world. "The urge politicians are now 'promoting' and impose on their citizens is not necessary," says Nic Lewis. Like the Dutch government is doing at the moment brings a lot of unrest and some groups in financial problems by 'forcing' them making huge investments to isolate their house and install heat exchange pumps. Climate change and it's cause The discussion about the rise of CO2 is still not won. There is still no consensus about the exact reason our climate is changing. According Nic Lewis our climate is less sensitive to CO2 emissions than some models predict. The UN climate panels assumes that there is a link between the global warming since 1850. If you have a good look at the observations made since 1850, the rise of global temperatures has been less fast than expected. Nic Lewis sees only a rise of 1.7 degrees C. while IPCC models show around 3 C. of warming because of the doubling of CO2. The good news Nic Lewis comes with is that we have much more time to keep the rise of global temperatures below 2 C. Work with countries who are the largest CO2 emitters and try first to limit their emissions by helping them with new cleaner techniques, to educate the population and help them get a better and healthier life. Politicians in Brussels and den Hague who are now in such a hurry could be 'punished' soon for their claims if gets clear how much their 'greening efforts' will cost and which limited effect it will have on the total of CO2 emissions and climate change. Cover photo by: denhaagfm.nl https://www.whatsorb.com/category/climate
Climate change; CO2 emissions in Europe don’t matter much
Sustainable luxury: QO is the Tesla among greenhotels
In the hotel of the future, sustainability is the standard. Hotel concept QO makes this standard visible, or actually, invisible: and it’s precisely the intention. Sustainable luxury is reflected in the choice of materials, the restaurant menu and installations. This hotel does not place the responsibility with the guest, but takes it. A patchwork of sliding panels and large windows characterizes the façade of the hotel. Above the glass revolving door of the 'Dutch eatery' that is located on the ground floor, you can read the name Persijn – a very conscious choice. The name refers to the thirteenth-century Amsterdam landowner Jan Persijn van Velsen. Connection is most important to the QO: between hotel visitors and local residents, between building and district and between neighbourhood and city. Forming a sustainable vision; everybody needs to belong "An universal need of people is to belong to a community, whether it's in a shed in Guatemala or in a penthouse in Manhattan," says Xander Bueno de Mesquita. With his innovative vision, the project started about ten years ago. When he returned to the Netherlands after a long-term trip, he decided that he wanted to translate this universal need to belong into a sustainable hotel concept. "I wanted to develop the Tesla among the hotels." A sustainability vision was formed to determine an appropriate sustainability label. Bueno de Mesquita did not want to start his project with the certification, to prevent just finishing a sustainability checklist. LEED Platinum proved to be the best fit: in order to achieve this status, sustainability had to be fully integrated. Do not feed waste! A tight schedule reduced the transport movements from, to and at the construction site. In addition, prefabrication resulted in less waste during construction. Ready-made work packages were delivered and assembled according to a just-in-time principle, 95 percent of the waste that still originated was separated on site. Waste recycling and reduction were also included in the contracts with subcontractors, with the motto: "do not feed waste". In the choice of materials, reuse and distance have also been taken into account. For example, the façade of the former Amsterdam Shell tower was ground into granules and processed into the concrete construction of the QO. At least fifty percent of all material used during construction originates from locations within a radius of 800 kilometres. Waste is one of the cycles that the hotel focuses on. The others are water, energy and food. Shower water once again receives value as flushing water for the toilet and vegetables, herbs and fish are grown in a closed system in the greenhouse. The sustainable vision is also reflected in the hotel menu. It’s 'Dutch cuisine', which emphasizes the use of local products. Seeking the connection The hotel actively seeks the connection with the city and the surrounding area. According to Bueno de Mesquita, this is necessary for a sustainable building: "It's about co-creation with unexpected parties, not only with architects, but also with the neighbourhood." The greenhouse on the roof, for example, can serve as an educational location for the local school. The location of the sustainable hotel is no accident. It fits in with the urban plan of the city of Amsterdam to redevelop the Amstelkwartier district in a sustainable way. A sustainable hotel therefore fits in seamlessly. Nevertheless, sustainability and a hotel environment do not automatically match, says general manager Inge van Weert: "In general, a hotel is a very wasteful environment ."   The management of QO deviates from that standard with its zero waste ambition. To achieve this, the QO makes agreements with partners and suppliers. For example, farmers supply fruit and vegetables in crates that the QO provided. In the rooms the care products are in bags, boxes or large refill containers. With each partner, agreements have been made about what happens when products no longer last. "In about a year or two plant pots can be made from the uniforms." Sustainability should be standard Sustainability is the standard in QO, but not yet in the Netherlands. The hotel demonstrates: sustainability can become the standard with a sustainable vision, perseverance and co-creation with unexpected parties. Without the guest having to notice anything, sustainability comes back everywhere: from the construction drawing to the board. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/architecture
In the hotel of the future, sustainability is the standard. Hotel concept QO makes this standard visible, or actually, invisible: and it’s precisely the intention. Sustainable luxury is reflected in the choice of materials, the restaurant menu and installations. This hotel does not place the responsibility with the guest, but takes it. A patchwork of sliding panels and large windows characterizes the façade of the hotel. Above the glass revolving door of the 'Dutch eatery' that is located on the ground floor, you can read the name Persijn – a very conscious choice. The name refers to the thirteenth-century Amsterdam landowner Jan Persijn van Velsen. Connection is most important to the QO: between hotel visitors and local residents, between building and district and between neighbourhood and city. Forming a sustainable vision; everybody needs to belong "An universal need of people is to belong to a community, whether it's in a shed in Guatemala or in a penthouse in Manhattan," says Xander Bueno de Mesquita. With his innovative vision, the project started about ten years ago. When he returned to the Netherlands after a long-term trip, he decided that he wanted to translate this universal need to belong into a sustainable hotel concept. "I wanted to develop the Tesla among the hotels." A sustainability vision was formed to determine an appropriate sustainability label. Bueno de Mesquita did not want to start his project with the certification, to prevent just finishing a sustainability checklist. LEED Platinum proved to be the best fit: in order to achieve this status, sustainability had to be fully integrated. Do not feed waste! A tight schedule reduced the transport movements from, to and at the construction site. In addition, prefabrication resulted in less waste during construction. Ready-made work packages were delivered and assembled according to a just-in-time principle, 95 percent of the waste that still originated was separated on site. Waste recycling and reduction were also included in the contracts with subcontractors, with the motto: "do not feed waste". In the choice of materials, reuse and distance have also been taken into account. For example, the façade of the former Amsterdam Shell tower was ground into granules and processed into the concrete construction of the QO. At least fifty percent of all material used during construction originates from locations within a radius of 800 kilometres. Waste is one of the cycles that the hotel focuses on. The others are water, energy and food. Shower water once again receives value as flushing water for the toilet and vegetables, herbs and fish are grown in a closed system in the greenhouse. The sustainable vision is also reflected in the hotel menu. It’s 'Dutch cuisine', which emphasizes the use of local products. Seeking the connection The hotel actively seeks the connection with the city and the surrounding area. According to Bueno de Mesquita, this is necessary for a sustainable building: "It's about co-creation with unexpected parties, not only with architects, but also with the neighbourhood." The greenhouse on the roof, for example, can serve as an educational location for the local school. The location of the sustainable hotel is no accident. It fits in with the urban plan of the city of Amsterdam to redevelop the Amstelkwartier district in a sustainable way. A sustainable hotel therefore fits in seamlessly. Nevertheless, sustainability and a hotel environment do not automatically match, says general manager Inge van Weert: "In general, a hotel is a very wasteful environment ."   The management of QO deviates from that standard with its zero waste ambition. To achieve this, the QO makes agreements with partners and suppliers. For example, farmers supply fruit and vegetables in crates that the QO provided. In the rooms the care products are in bags, boxes or large refill containers. With each partner, agreements have been made about what happens when products no longer last. "In about a year or two plant pots can be made from the uniforms." Sustainability should be standard Sustainability is the standard in QO, but not yet in the Netherlands. The hotel demonstrates: sustainability can become the standard with a sustainable vision, perseverance and co-creation with unexpected parties. Without the guest having to notice anything, sustainability comes back everywhere: from the construction drawing to the board. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/architecture
Sustainable luxury: QO is the Tesla among greenhotels
Sustainable luxury: QO is the Tesla among greenhotels
Israeli 3D printed fashion as sustainable works of art
Israeli fashion design have been drawing international attention in recent years. More specifically is the 3D printed fashion that has the wow-factor, not least since Israeli designer Danit Peleg created the world’s first entirely 3D printed fashion collection. Creators in Israel and all over the globe are looking with interest at the limitless possibilities of 3D printed fashion and its multisensorial effects, testing their own imaginative boundaries in a notoriously fickle industry. Also, 3D printing in fashion can be a more sustainable option for designers to safeguard their art while supporting an environmentally conscious ecosystem. Reshaping fashion through 3D printing One of these designers is Ganit Goldstein, whose creations have embraced 3D printing to create remarkable and sustainable, works of art. As a graduate of the prestigious Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem, Goldstein has embarked on a path that seeks to reshape fashion through a unique blend of art and technology. The designer recently launched a collection entitled ‘Between the Layers’, which was created as a graduation project. The collection is made using 3D printing and consists of seven outfits and six pairs of shoes that are made with thermoplastic polyurethane and polylactic acid. The unique pieces in Ganit Goldstein’s fashion collection feature a visual interaction between traditional artistic methods and the dynamic and evolving technologies of artistic expression. Goldstein chose to express this by “fusing additive manufacturing and computer engineering with traditional crafting techniques, such as weaving”, according to her statement. “The technique of 3D layer printing allows me to re-examine which layers can be added and what new connections I can create.” Beautiful ánd waste -averse During her time in an university exchange program in Japan, Goldstein began experimenting with up-cycling and reconstruction techniques, shredding a range of second-hand fabrics and industrial textile leftovers and using a traditional Japanese textile technique called IKAT weaving to create captivating designs. Upon her return to Israel, Goldstein started developing a weaving process using an Orginal Prusa i3 Mk3 3D printer and finished off her designs adding hand-woven layers. Alongside her art-meets-technology mix, Goldstein has been devoting attention to the creation of garments, shoes and jewelry pieces that are not only beautiful but also sustainable and waste-averse. The technique of 3D printing in fashion is a great sustainable tool. “With this technique, we are able to choose exactly which materials to print and how much we need, as well as the precise pattern we want to obtain, without incurring unneeded waste, a notion that is both empowering and impactful,” Goldstein says. The future of 3D printing: personalized and one-of-a-kind Looking ahead, Goldstein says she would like to further explore the use of recycled plastics. “Creating designs from recycled plastic is an ever-growing interest of mine and I would like to create a growing number of designs that utilize this material,” she says. Goldstein has recently been touring the world with her collection of 3D printed clothing and shoes. She predicts that 3D printed fashion “will change the way people design and wear clothes. ‘Personalized’, ‘one-of-a-kind’ pieces that are specifically created for one single person are the future of 3D printed fashion.” Other Israeli 3 D printed fashion pioneers to watch Israel’s forward-looking innovation in the field of 3D printed fashion is inspirational and some creative ideas by a number of Israeli talents have already garnered international attention. Designer Danit Peleg created the world’s first entirely 3D printed fashion collection, which included five full outfits that took over 2,000 hours to print. Noa Raviv, whose work has been displayed in the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art, created a 3D print collection by manipulating digital images using computer modelling software. Israeli textile designer Eden Saadon used a 3D printing pen for a lacy lingerie collection. Also, Nitzan Kish attracted media attention. She has been using 3D tech to create uniquely shaped clothing and jewellery with a special purpose in mind – self-defence, specifically in urban environments. 3D printing can and will be the future in fashion, especially according to the innovative fashion designers in Israel. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Israeli fashion design have been drawing international attention in recent years. More specifically is the 3D printed fashion that has the wow-factor, not least since Israeli designer Danit Peleg created the world’s first entirely 3D printed fashion collection. Creators in Israel and all over the globe are looking with interest at the limitless possibilities of 3D printed fashion and its multisensorial effects, testing their own imaginative boundaries in a notoriously fickle industry. Also, 3D printing in fashion can be a more sustainable option for designers to safeguard their art while supporting an environmentally conscious ecosystem. Reshaping fashion through 3D printing One of these designers is Ganit Goldstein, whose creations have embraced 3D printing to create remarkable and sustainable, works of art. As a graduate of the prestigious Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem, Goldstein has embarked on a path that seeks to reshape fashion through a unique blend of art and technology. The designer recently launched a collection entitled ‘Between the Layers’, which was created as a graduation project. The collection is made using 3D printing and consists of seven outfits and six pairs of shoes that are made with thermoplastic polyurethane and polylactic acid. The unique pieces in Ganit Goldstein’s fashion collection feature a visual interaction between traditional artistic methods and the dynamic and evolving technologies of artistic expression. Goldstein chose to express this by “fusing additive manufacturing and computer engineering with traditional crafting techniques, such as weaving”, according to her statement. “The technique of 3D layer printing allows me to re-examine which layers can be added and what new connections I can create.” Beautiful ánd waste -averse During her time in an university exchange program in Japan, Goldstein began experimenting with up-cycling and reconstruction techniques, shredding a range of second-hand fabrics and industrial textile leftovers and using a traditional Japanese textile technique called IKAT weaving to create captivating designs. Upon her return to Israel, Goldstein started developing a weaving process using an Orginal Prusa i3 Mk3 3D printer and finished off her designs adding hand-woven layers. Alongside her art-meets-technology mix, Goldstein has been devoting attention to the creation of garments, shoes and jewelry pieces that are not only beautiful but also sustainable and waste-averse. The technique of 3D printing in fashion is a great sustainable tool. “With this technique, we are able to choose exactly which materials to print and how much we need, as well as the precise pattern we want to obtain, without incurring unneeded waste, a notion that is both empowering and impactful,” Goldstein says. The future of 3D printing: personalized and one-of-a-kind Looking ahead, Goldstein says she would like to further explore the use of recycled plastics. “Creating designs from recycled plastic is an ever-growing interest of mine and I would like to create a growing number of designs that utilize this material,” she says. Goldstein has recently been touring the world with her collection of 3D printed clothing and shoes. She predicts that 3D printed fashion “will change the way people design and wear clothes. ‘Personalized’, ‘one-of-a-kind’ pieces that are specifically created for one single person are the future of 3D printed fashion.” Other Israeli 3 D printed fashion pioneers to watch Israel’s forward-looking innovation in the field of 3D printed fashion is inspirational and some creative ideas by a number of Israeli talents have already garnered international attention. Designer Danit Peleg created the world’s first entirely 3D printed fashion collection, which included five full outfits that took over 2,000 hours to print. Noa Raviv, whose work has been displayed in the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art, created a 3D print collection by manipulating digital images using computer modelling software. Israeli textile designer Eden Saadon used a 3D printing pen for a lacy lingerie collection. Also, Nitzan Kish attracted media attention. She has been using 3D tech to create uniquely shaped clothing and jewellery with a special purpose in mind – self-defence, specifically in urban environments. 3D printing can and will be the future in fashion, especially according to the innovative fashion designers in Israel. https://www.whatsorb.com/category/fashion
Israeli 3D printed fashion as sustainable works of art
Israeli 3D printed fashion as sustainable works of art
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