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Plastic In Oceans: Cheers To The Enzyme Cocktail
Remember those scientists who discovered this marvelous little plastic-eating enzyme, better known as PETase? Are those crazy bits capable of literally eating the much dreaded PET-based materials? No? Well, some scientists found and reproduced an enzyme that is capable of eating plastic. There, you are up to speed. PETase As PET’s Worst Nightmare Now those guys are back - and they have gone next level. They discovered another enzyme that they threw together with their original enzyme is an enzyme cocktail that can digest plastic up to six times faster. This new enzyme was found in the same group of bacteria that enjoys hanging around groups of debris in our oceans and landfills. When combined with PETase, it has proven to be even faster in breaking down plastic. A quick refresher. PETase is capable of breaking down polyethylene terephthalate, better known as PET, into its core parts. What this means could be groundbreaking - as it allows us to create a closed recycling loop for plastics, effectively reducing plastic pollution and pushing back greenhouse gases associated with PET production. PET is used in pretty much everything around us. It can be found in our drinks bottles, clothes, or carpets, to name a few. And as we discard it, it continues to exist all around us. Plastic does not really break down, or well, does so rather slowly. It takes hundreds of years in a usual setting. This is why PETase is so revolutionary. It can do this job in a matter of days and is extremely low-energy, while it can be produced in a lab setting. So, a triple win. Recommended:  Microplastics In Oceans: Is It Harming Us? Meet MHETase: The Partner In Crime Make that a quadruple win, now that a counterpart has been discovered. The PETase’s partner in crime has been given the equally catchy name MHETase, and when the two are combined, they provide even bigger benefits. By putting them together, the PET breakdown speed is doubled. Pretty good already, but if you go that extra mile and engineer a connection between the two, a so-called ‘super-enzyme’ is created that increases this speed threefold.   One of the lead scientists is Professor John McGeehan from the Centre for Enzyme Innovation at the University of Portsmouth, who worked together with his colleague Dr. Gregg Beckham from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. As McGeehan explains, “ Gregg and I were chatting about how PETase attacks the surface of the plastics and MHETase chops things up further, so it seemed natural to see if we could use them together, mimicking what happens in nature." “Our first experiments showed that they did indeed work better together, so we decided to try to physically link them as two Pac-men joined by a piece of string. It took a great deal of work on both sides of the Atlantic. Still, it was worth the effort -- we were delighted to see that our new chimeric enzyme is up to three times faster than the naturally evolved separate enzymes, opening new avenues for further improvements." Cheers To The Enzyme Cocktail   The enzyme cocktail basically digests PET plastic and excrements its ‘building blocks,’ so to speak. These building blocks break down much faster and give rise to a cycle where plastic can be made and re-used in a never-ending loop. This could not just solve the plastic problem; it could also be a major cut in the use of gas and oil. That certainly sounds like something worth their effort. PETase enzymes break down PET molecules into monomeric building blocks. After the researchers’ original work with PETase was published, many heralded it as the next big thing in global plastic pollution while noting that it would not suffice in and of itself. PETase was not fast enough to offer commercial viability to the process. Now that the second enzyme has been added to speed things up, it seems like a major step toward becoming a real solution. Before you go! Recommended:  Solar Panel Recycling: Photovoltaics Rebirth Like to write your article about plastic waste? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Remember those scientists who discovered this marvelous little plastic-eating enzyme, better known as PETase? Are those crazy bits capable of literally eating the much dreaded PET-based materials? No? Well, some scientists found and reproduced an enzyme that is capable of eating plastic. There, you are up to speed. PETase As PET’s Worst Nightmare Now those guys are back - and they have gone next level. They discovered another enzyme that they threw together with their original enzyme is an enzyme cocktail that can digest plastic up to six times faster. This new enzyme was found in the same group of bacteria that enjoys hanging around groups of debris in our oceans and landfills. When combined with PETase, it has proven to be even faster in breaking down plastic. A quick refresher. PETase is capable of breaking down polyethylene terephthalate, better known as PET, into its core parts. What this means could be groundbreaking - as it allows us to create a closed recycling loop for plastics, effectively reducing plastic pollution and pushing back greenhouse gases associated with PET production. PET is used in pretty much everything around us. It can be found in our drinks bottles, clothes, or carpets, to name a few. And as we discard it, it continues to exist all around us. Plastic does not really break down, or well, does so rather slowly. It takes hundreds of years in a usual setting. This is why PETase is so revolutionary. It can do this job in a matter of days and is extremely low-energy, while it can be produced in a lab setting. So, a triple win. Recommended:  Microplastics In Oceans: Is It Harming Us? Meet MHETase: The Partner In Crime Make that a quadruple win, now that a counterpart has been discovered. The PETase’s partner in crime has been given the equally catchy name MHETase, and when the two are combined, they provide even bigger benefits. By putting them together, the PET breakdown speed is doubled. Pretty good already, but if you go that extra mile and engineer a connection between the two, a so-called ‘super-enzyme’ is created that increases this speed threefold.   One of the lead scientists is Professor John McGeehan from the Centre for Enzyme Innovation at the University of Portsmouth, who worked together with his colleague Dr. Gregg Beckham from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. As McGeehan explains, “ Gregg and I were chatting about how PETase attacks the surface of the plastics and MHETase chops things up further, so it seemed natural to see if we could use them together, mimicking what happens in nature." “Our first experiments showed that they did indeed work better together, so we decided to try to physically link them as two Pac-men joined by a piece of string. It took a great deal of work on both sides of the Atlantic. Still, it was worth the effort -- we were delighted to see that our new chimeric enzyme is up to three times faster than the naturally evolved separate enzymes, opening new avenues for further improvements." Cheers To The Enzyme Cocktail   The enzyme cocktail basically digests PET plastic and excrements its ‘building blocks,’ so to speak. These building blocks break down much faster and give rise to a cycle where plastic can be made and re-used in a never-ending loop. This could not just solve the plastic problem; it could also be a major cut in the use of gas and oil. That certainly sounds like something worth their effort. PETase enzymes break down PET molecules into monomeric building blocks. After the researchers’ original work with PETase was published, many heralded it as the next big thing in global plastic pollution while noting that it would not suffice in and of itself. PETase was not fast enough to offer commercial viability to the process. Now that the second enzyme has been added to speed things up, it seems like a major step toward becoming a real solution. Before you go! Recommended:  Solar Panel Recycling: Photovoltaics Rebirth Like to write your article about plastic waste? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Plastic In Oceans: Cheers To The Enzyme Cocktail
Plastic In Oceans: Cheers To The Enzyme Cocktail
Climate Change Fought By The Kingdom of Bhutan
Bhutan is one of the most pristine hotspots of biodiversity in the world. About 72 percent of the country is covered with forest, and with the approval of the population, the government has declared 60 percent of the forests as a protected area. Bhutan's glaciers withdraw because they melt, leading to dangerous flooding and water scarcity despite this attention to the environment. Climate Change Fought By The Kingdom of Bhutan This story is from National Geographic to promote natural research and nature conservation. Both organizations are focused on the joint support of experienced naturalists, guiding novice researchers, and protecting natural wonders. Recommended:  Climate Change: China Floods The Arctic On Fire Bhutan is about Switzerland's size and certainly has no less mountainous - although geographically, it is much more isolated. In the south, landlocked Bhutan borders India, while the mighty Himalayas forms the northern border. Before 1974, Bhutan was completely closed to tourists and most foreigners, and even now, only a handful of paying visitors are admitted at a time. The kingdom can boast a lively and ancient culture and beautiful scenery. The Gangkhar Puensum, according to many, the highest mountain that has never been climbed, rises 7570 meters in the clouds. Apart from an outdoor feeling for adventure, it would help if you had a lot of money to visit this unique principality. Silver firs form dense vegetation in this forest in Bhutan. The Bhutan Constitution guarantees that 60% of the forests in the country will remain protected. The Kingdom Of Bhutan Fought Climate Change. The Slovenian photographer Ciril Jazbec is one of the few lucky people who have visited Bhutan. Recently he traveled through this country, past villages and vast forests, and spoke to the people. The result of his journey is a personal look behind the scenes of a mysterious little country that few foreigners ever get to see. His photographs range from traditional rural scenes that may seem surprisingly modern to outsiders. And because we are talking about Bhutan, we also see imposing mountains with dense, green forests in the background. All in all, his photographs give the impression of a special place that shows two sides: of history and change, of old and new, of adaptation and resilience. Both ancient traditions and renewal characterize this predominantly Buddhist country. It is probably best known for its happy people and beautiful forests, which have escaped the threat of environmental degradation. Jazbec discusses this in more detail. Recommended:  Hurting The Environment: The Palm Oil Paradox Bhutan Must Develop New Infrastructure. At the end of the last century, the Bhutanese government introduced a socio-economic indicator, referred to as 'Gross National Happiness.' The indicator functions as a social thermometer and should prevent the country's economic development from supplanting the population's traditional way of life. The idea was praised all over the world as original and humanitarian. During their work on a rice field in Laya, two peasant women take a break. Last year, Laya was connected to the power grid for the first time. The connection was welcomed because the nearest village is several days' walk away.  But of course, with the introduction of the 'BNG,' not all problems of the country are solved. In the recent World Happiness Report of the UN, Bhutan was 97th place, mainly attributed to income inequality and unemployment. Recommended:  Climate Change: Natural Or man Made? Let's See! Another growing problem is that the country's limited and vulnerable ecosystem is being affected by climate change. Bhutan's glaciers are melting, causing sudden flooding, and the rainy season is becoming increasingly irregular, leading to water shortages in dry seasons. But although little Bhutan cannot be held responsible for the greenhouse gases that blow the rest of the world into the atmosphere, the country reacts by sharpening its own environmental rules - which are already very strict. About sixty percent of the Bhutanese forests are protected areas, and new infrastructure must be developed sustainably. More attention is paid to electric public transport and hybrid cars than to the traditional vehicle fleet development. With this kind of measure, Bhutan not only manages to remain CO2-neutral but even acts as a 'storage place' of CO2: thanks to its vast forests, Bhutan absorbs more CO2 from the air than emissions. The Bhutanese attention to the fight against climate change was emphasized once again last year by the country's prime minister. His message about the ambitious measures that the country would take in light of the changing climate was why the photographer Jazbec visited the country and recorded the population's resilience. "Bhutan really has an extraordinary relationship with the environment," says Jazbec. "I've never seen anything like this before." Fighting Climate Change: Taking Care Of The Environment Jazbec has made photographs of communities facing climate change worldwide, but Bhutan, who, because of his non-disabled people, touched a sensitive chord. When Jazbec visited the kingdom last year, he was shown around by a 'fixer' or local guide, who showed him several villages. One day Jazbec tried to drive a moth off the screen of his laptop. According to the photographer, his fixer was so upset about what he saw that he appealed to his foreign guest. "He told me that all living beings have a soul," says Jazbec. "He accepted the fact that animals need space." Recommended:  Environmental Activism Is For Everyone, Not Just Scientists That feeling comes, of course, partly from the main religion in the country, Buddhism. Jazbec saw that many people in Bhutan were trying to take good care of the environment. Whether they were motivated by their religion, their community, or by a less tangible concept, Jazbec noticed how cautiously people dealt with nature and their animals. As an outsider, he wanted to capture the essence of a country that had long been described as a 'Shangri-La,' an idea that Westerners have always addressed but that they have never been able to grasp. Archery is the national sport of Bhutan and is practiced by young and old.  Photos by Of Ciril Jazbec Before you go! Recommended:  Global Cooling Or Warming: Will It Kill Us? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about climate change? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Bhutan is one of the most pristine hotspots of biodiversity in the world. About 72 percent of the country is covered with forest, and with the approval of the population, the government has declared 60 percent of the forests as a protected area. Bhutan's glaciers withdraw because they melt, leading to dangerous flooding and water scarcity despite this attention to the environment. Climate Change Fought By The Kingdom of Bhutan This story is from National Geographic to promote natural research and nature conservation. Both organizations are focused on the joint support of experienced naturalists, guiding novice researchers, and protecting natural wonders. Recommended:  Climate Change: China Floods The Arctic On Fire Bhutan is about Switzerland's size and certainly has no less mountainous - although geographically, it is much more isolated. In the south, landlocked Bhutan borders India, while the mighty Himalayas forms the northern border. Before 1974, Bhutan was completely closed to tourists and most foreigners, and even now, only a handful of paying visitors are admitted at a time. The kingdom can boast a lively and ancient culture and beautiful scenery. The Gangkhar Puensum, according to many, the highest mountain that has never been climbed, rises 7570 meters in the clouds. Apart from an outdoor feeling for adventure, it would help if you had a lot of money to visit this unique principality. Silver firs form dense vegetation in this forest in Bhutan. The Bhutan Constitution guarantees that 60% of the forests in the country will remain protected. The Kingdom Of Bhutan Fought Climate Change. The Slovenian photographer Ciril Jazbec is one of the few lucky people who have visited Bhutan. Recently he traveled through this country, past villages and vast forests, and spoke to the people. The result of his journey is a personal look behind the scenes of a mysterious little country that few foreigners ever get to see. His photographs range from traditional rural scenes that may seem surprisingly modern to outsiders. And because we are talking about Bhutan, we also see imposing mountains with dense, green forests in the background. All in all, his photographs give the impression of a special place that shows two sides: of history and change, of old and new, of adaptation and resilience. Both ancient traditions and renewal characterize this predominantly Buddhist country. It is probably best known for its happy people and beautiful forests, which have escaped the threat of environmental degradation. Jazbec discusses this in more detail. Recommended:  Hurting The Environment: The Palm Oil Paradox Bhutan Must Develop New Infrastructure. At the end of the last century, the Bhutanese government introduced a socio-economic indicator, referred to as 'Gross National Happiness.' The indicator functions as a social thermometer and should prevent the country's economic development from supplanting the population's traditional way of life. The idea was praised all over the world as original and humanitarian. During their work on a rice field in Laya, two peasant women take a break. Last year, Laya was connected to the power grid for the first time. The connection was welcomed because the nearest village is several days' walk away.  But of course, with the introduction of the 'BNG,' not all problems of the country are solved. In the recent World Happiness Report of the UN, Bhutan was 97th place, mainly attributed to income inequality and unemployment. Recommended:  Climate Change: Natural Or man Made? Let's See! Another growing problem is that the country's limited and vulnerable ecosystem is being affected by climate change. Bhutan's glaciers are melting, causing sudden flooding, and the rainy season is becoming increasingly irregular, leading to water shortages in dry seasons. But although little Bhutan cannot be held responsible for the greenhouse gases that blow the rest of the world into the atmosphere, the country reacts by sharpening its own environmental rules - which are already very strict. About sixty percent of the Bhutanese forests are protected areas, and new infrastructure must be developed sustainably. More attention is paid to electric public transport and hybrid cars than to the traditional vehicle fleet development. With this kind of measure, Bhutan not only manages to remain CO2-neutral but even acts as a 'storage place' of CO2: thanks to its vast forests, Bhutan absorbs more CO2 from the air than emissions. The Bhutanese attention to the fight against climate change was emphasized once again last year by the country's prime minister. His message about the ambitious measures that the country would take in light of the changing climate was why the photographer Jazbec visited the country and recorded the population's resilience. "Bhutan really has an extraordinary relationship with the environment," says Jazbec. "I've never seen anything like this before." Fighting Climate Change: Taking Care Of The Environment Jazbec has made photographs of communities facing climate change worldwide, but Bhutan, who, because of his non-disabled people, touched a sensitive chord. When Jazbec visited the kingdom last year, he was shown around by a 'fixer' or local guide, who showed him several villages. One day Jazbec tried to drive a moth off the screen of his laptop. According to the photographer, his fixer was so upset about what he saw that he appealed to his foreign guest. "He told me that all living beings have a soul," says Jazbec. "He accepted the fact that animals need space." Recommended:  Environmental Activism Is For Everyone, Not Just Scientists That feeling comes, of course, partly from the main religion in the country, Buddhism. Jazbec saw that many people in Bhutan were trying to take good care of the environment. Whether they were motivated by their religion, their community, or by a less tangible concept, Jazbec noticed how cautiously people dealt with nature and their animals. As an outsider, he wanted to capture the essence of a country that had long been described as a 'Shangri-La,' an idea that Westerners have always addressed but that they have never been able to grasp. Archery is the national sport of Bhutan and is practiced by young and old.  Photos by Of Ciril Jazbec Before you go! Recommended:  Global Cooling Or Warming: Will It Kill Us? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about climate change? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Climate Change Fought By The Kingdom of Bhutan
Climate Change Fought By The Kingdom of Bhutan
Halloween And COVID-19: A Dangerous Match
Halloween traditions may look different this year to keep everyone safe from COVID-19. However, there are still plenty of ways families can have fun while avoiding the scare of being exposed to or spreading the virus.  And did you kow that pumpkins and found their orgin probably in Central and South America and Mexico. Halloween And COVID-19: A Dangerous Match Any way you look at it, Halloween will feel a little different this year. From a public health viewpoint, adopting safer ways to celebrate is more likely to ensure that October 31 2020 is still festive and fun, but not a day of superspreading events. Photo by Etsy. A close-up of Light Up Your Life's LED COVID-19 mask for Halloween. The coronavirus pandemic has put many Halloween plans - from haunted houses to trick-or-treating - on hold this year. Perhaps it’s no surprise, then, that some celebrants will be channeling their frustrations into ghoulish costumes inspired by 'the most feared monster out there, COVID-19'. Halloween celebrations should begin with the fundamental precautions we should all be taking with any activity during this pandemic, and it’s more important than ever before that you keep doing what you have been doing: staying home if you are sick, avoiding large gatherings, keeping your distance of six feet from others, wearing a cloth face covering, and washing your hands often. Traditional Halloween activities are fun, but some can increase the risk of getting or spreading COVID-19. You can make the most of it by planning some safe and alternate ways to participate in Halloween-fun activities for your family. Halloween Advice To Protect ‘Visitors’. Make trick-or-treating safer by avoiding contact with trick-or-treaters by staying at least six feet or one and a half meter away from others who do not live with you. If you are handing out treats, give out treats outdoors, if possible. Set up a station with individually bagged treats for kids to take. Wash your hands before handling treats and wear a mask. When trick-or-treating it is important to wear a mask. Make your cloth mask part of your costume. However, a costume mask is not a substitute for a cloth mask and do not wear a costume mask over a cloth mask it can make breathing more difficult. Trump Halloween masks sales are increasing! Halloween Activities And Steps To Protect Yourself From Getting Or Spreading COVID-19 Lower-risk activities could include decorating and carving pumpkins with members of your household or outside with neighbors or friends. You can hold a Halloween treat hunt with household members in and around your house. Hold an outdoor costume parade or contest so everyone can show off their costumes where people are socially distanced. You can also host a socially distanced outdoor Halloween movie night with friends or neighbors or an indoor movie night with your household members. Visit a pumpkin patch or orchard where mask-wearing is encouraged and people are able to maintain six-feet of social distancing. Remember to wash your hands or use hand sanitizer frequently, especially after touching frequently touched surfaces, pumpkins or apples. Go to a one-way, walk-through haunted forest or corn maze. Pumpkins, Squash, Gourds, Where Do They Come From? Pumpkins, squash and gourds are all members of the cucurbitaceae family. They are made up of an extremely diverse group consisting of more than 100 genera and 700 species. History has told us that they have been a source for food and utilitarian objects of all kinds for thousands of years at archaeological digging sights and such. {youtube}                                                                    History of Halloween - Documentary                                          Pumpkins, Squash, Gourds Have One Event In Common: Halloween Hard-shelled squash and gourds, from as far back as what is deemed prehistoric, typically were grown to be utilized as a vessel to hold water or even dry products, such as grains or powders, by removing a section of the neck and hollowing it out by removing the seeds and drying it. Some hard squash varieties also contained a valuable source for food with its thick flesh under the hard skin and still do to this day. It is unknown exactly where the origins of the species started but it is thought that it occurred in the Western Hemisphere, probably in Central and South America and Mexico. Pumpkins Or Squash Popular For Thousands Of Years In the United States, if a squash is round and orange and utilized for pies, fall decorating, or a jack-o-lantern, it is probably called a pumpkin, which has no botanical meaning because they are actually all squash. There are two varieties of squash: summer squash and hard-skinned or winter squash. Zucchini is a form of summer squash. Others are straightneck and crookneck as well as other varieties. Winter squash typically have a harder skin and can be stored for longer periods if kept cool and dry. They include acorn, Hubbard, spaghetti, banana, butternut, cushaw, and others. Gourds For Storing Liquid Hard-shell gourds are green while growing but eventually turn tan when left to dry and cure. These are the ones that have been utilized as vessels for liquids as well as dry materials. In our recent culture, they can be seen to provide birdhouses for various species of birds. Then there are the small decorative gourds, some with green and yellow interesting patterns. Recommended:  Food As A Rowing Boat: The Pumpkin Regatta. Eat Or Beat Them Halloween & Pumpkin time! What can you do at a Halloween party? Eyeball Race. This game is a variation of the classic egg-on-a-spoon relay race Capture the Witch This game may be simple, but it's loads of fun Mummy-Wrapping Race Costume Contest One-House Trick-Or-Treating Jack-O-Lantern Face Crafting Halloween Movie Time Yes, it is almost time for Halloween and that means it is pumpkin time; they are everywhere. If you haven’t seen any then you must be living under a rock because supermarkets, orchard outlets and roadside stands display them prominently at their businesses. Some displays are enormous. There seems to be nothing more satisfying this time of year than seeing huge displays of these orange marvels that range in size from tiny miniatures to giant behemoths and they run the gambit when it comes to shapes. Some are grown specifically for local contests, growing to 400 to 500 pounds and more; babied and even milk-fed through the stem to reach these monstrous sizes. Recommended: Halloween Recipes Pumpkin Waste In UK Hits Scary Heights This Halloween More than 8m squashes likely to be binned after annual lantern carving, study shows. An estimated 10m pumpkins are grown in the UK every year, 95% of which used for ghoulish lanterns.  Britons are expected to generate record levels of food waste over Halloween this year. More than 8m pumpkins – equivalent to more than 18,000 tonnes of edible pumpkin flesh, will be heading for the bin because the majority of consumers will not eat it. What should I cook for Halloween? Our Top Halloween Recipes Pumpkin Cinnamon Rolls Pumpkin Seeds Chicken Pumpkins Mac-o'-Lantern and Cheese Bowls Frankenshake and Bride of Frankenshake Black Magic Cake Mummy Hand Pies Haunted Gingerbread House About 40% of consumers buy fresh pumpkins to hollow out and carve to celebrate Halloween, but 60% of those admit they do not use the flesh, according to research by the stock cube brand Knorr and the environmental charity Hubbub. Halloween has become a big money-spinner for retailers. An estimated 10m pumpkins are grown in the UK every year, 95% of which are hollowed out to create ghoulish lanterns. Meanwhile, the UK’s first commercially brewed beer made from pumpkin flesh that would otherwise go to waste will go on sale at the end of November. Toast Ale, the social enterprise that three years ago launched a beer made from surplus bread, will brew the Belgian-style pumpkin dubbel using squashes collected by volunteers from local farms. It’s all too easy for people to forget that Halloween pumpkins are still food. When they are only used for carving this contributes to food waste in the UK homes every year. Recommended:  Best Sustainable Autumn Life: Exercise, Food, Lifestyle Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Halloween traditions may look different this year to keep everyone safe from COVID-19. However, there are still plenty of ways families can have fun while avoiding the scare of being exposed to or spreading the virus.  And did you kow that pumpkins and found their orgin probably in Central and South America and Mexico. Halloween And COVID-19: A Dangerous Match Any way you look at it, Halloween will feel a little different this year. From a public health viewpoint, adopting safer ways to celebrate is more likely to ensure that October 31 2020 is still festive and fun, but not a day of superspreading events. Photo by Etsy. A close-up of Light Up Your Life's LED COVID-19 mask for Halloween. The coronavirus pandemic has put many Halloween plans - from haunted houses to trick-or-treating - on hold this year. Perhaps it’s no surprise, then, that some celebrants will be channeling their frustrations into ghoulish costumes inspired by 'the most feared monster out there, COVID-19'. Halloween celebrations should begin with the fundamental precautions we should all be taking with any activity during this pandemic, and it’s more important than ever before that you keep doing what you have been doing: staying home if you are sick, avoiding large gatherings, keeping your distance of six feet from others, wearing a cloth face covering, and washing your hands often. Traditional Halloween activities are fun, but some can increase the risk of getting or spreading COVID-19. You can make the most of it by planning some safe and alternate ways to participate in Halloween-fun activities for your family. Halloween Advice To Protect ‘Visitors’. Make trick-or-treating safer by avoiding contact with trick-or-treaters by staying at least six feet or one and a half meter away from others who do not live with you. If you are handing out treats, give out treats outdoors, if possible. Set up a station with individually bagged treats for kids to take. Wash your hands before handling treats and wear a mask. When trick-or-treating it is important to wear a mask. Make your cloth mask part of your costume. However, a costume mask is not a substitute for a cloth mask and do not wear a costume mask over a cloth mask it can make breathing more difficult. Trump Halloween masks sales are increasing! Halloween Activities And Steps To Protect Yourself From Getting Or Spreading COVID-19 Lower-risk activities could include decorating and carving pumpkins with members of your household or outside with neighbors or friends. You can hold a Halloween treat hunt with household members in and around your house. Hold an outdoor costume parade or contest so everyone can show off their costumes where people are socially distanced. You can also host a socially distanced outdoor Halloween movie night with friends or neighbors or an indoor movie night with your household members. Visit a pumpkin patch or orchard where mask-wearing is encouraged and people are able to maintain six-feet of social distancing. Remember to wash your hands or use hand sanitizer frequently, especially after touching frequently touched surfaces, pumpkins or apples. Go to a one-way, walk-through haunted forest or corn maze. Pumpkins, Squash, Gourds, Where Do They Come From? Pumpkins, squash and gourds are all members of the cucurbitaceae family. They are made up of an extremely diverse group consisting of more than 100 genera and 700 species. History has told us that they have been a source for food and utilitarian objects of all kinds for thousands of years at archaeological digging sights and such. {youtube}                                                                    History of Halloween - Documentary                                          Pumpkins, Squash, Gourds Have One Event In Common: Halloween Hard-shelled squash and gourds, from as far back as what is deemed prehistoric, typically were grown to be utilized as a vessel to hold water or even dry products, such as grains or powders, by removing a section of the neck and hollowing it out by removing the seeds and drying it. Some hard squash varieties also contained a valuable source for food with its thick flesh under the hard skin and still do to this day. It is unknown exactly where the origins of the species started but it is thought that it occurred in the Western Hemisphere, probably in Central and South America and Mexico. Pumpkins Or Squash Popular For Thousands Of Years In the United States, if a squash is round and orange and utilized for pies, fall decorating, or a jack-o-lantern, it is probably called a pumpkin, which has no botanical meaning because they are actually all squash. There are two varieties of squash: summer squash and hard-skinned or winter squash. Zucchini is a form of summer squash. Others are straightneck and crookneck as well as other varieties. Winter squash typically have a harder skin and can be stored for longer periods if kept cool and dry. They include acorn, Hubbard, spaghetti, banana, butternut, cushaw, and others. Gourds For Storing Liquid Hard-shell gourds are green while growing but eventually turn tan when left to dry and cure. These are the ones that have been utilized as vessels for liquids as well as dry materials. In our recent culture, they can be seen to provide birdhouses for various species of birds. Then there are the small decorative gourds, some with green and yellow interesting patterns. Recommended:  Food As A Rowing Boat: The Pumpkin Regatta. Eat Or Beat Them Halloween & Pumpkin time! What can you do at a Halloween party? Eyeball Race. This game is a variation of the classic egg-on-a-spoon relay race Capture the Witch This game may be simple, but it's loads of fun Mummy-Wrapping Race Costume Contest One-House Trick-Or-Treating Jack-O-Lantern Face Crafting Halloween Movie Time Yes, it is almost time for Halloween and that means it is pumpkin time; they are everywhere. If you haven’t seen any then you must be living under a rock because supermarkets, orchard outlets and roadside stands display them prominently at their businesses. Some displays are enormous. There seems to be nothing more satisfying this time of year than seeing huge displays of these orange marvels that range in size from tiny miniatures to giant behemoths and they run the gambit when it comes to shapes. Some are grown specifically for local contests, growing to 400 to 500 pounds and more; babied and even milk-fed through the stem to reach these monstrous sizes. Recommended: Halloween Recipes Pumpkin Waste In UK Hits Scary Heights This Halloween More than 8m squashes likely to be binned after annual lantern carving, study shows. An estimated 10m pumpkins are grown in the UK every year, 95% of which used for ghoulish lanterns.  Britons are expected to generate record levels of food waste over Halloween this year. More than 8m pumpkins – equivalent to more than 18,000 tonnes of edible pumpkin flesh, will be heading for the bin because the majority of consumers will not eat it. What should I cook for Halloween? Our Top Halloween Recipes Pumpkin Cinnamon Rolls Pumpkin Seeds Chicken Pumpkins Mac-o'-Lantern and Cheese Bowls Frankenshake and Bride of Frankenshake Black Magic Cake Mummy Hand Pies Haunted Gingerbread House About 40% of consumers buy fresh pumpkins to hollow out and carve to celebrate Halloween, but 60% of those admit they do not use the flesh, according to research by the stock cube brand Knorr and the environmental charity Hubbub. Halloween has become a big money-spinner for retailers. An estimated 10m pumpkins are grown in the UK every year, 95% of which are hollowed out to create ghoulish lanterns. Meanwhile, the UK’s first commercially brewed beer made from pumpkin flesh that would otherwise go to waste will go on sale at the end of November. Toast Ale, the social enterprise that three years ago launched a beer made from surplus bread, will brew the Belgian-style pumpkin dubbel using squashes collected by volunteers from local farms. It’s all too easy for people to forget that Halloween pumpkins are still food. When they are only used for carving this contributes to food waste in the UK homes every year. Recommended:  Best Sustainable Autumn Life: Exercise, Food, Lifestyle Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Halloween And COVID-19: A Dangerous Match
Halloween And COVID-19: A Dangerous Match
SUV Drivers: What Do You Want To Prove? Insanity?
SUV Drivers. Not just the self-proclaimed kings of the road, that pretty much anyone in a more economically-sized car ought to give way to, but also the eyesore for many a climate scientist. Too many people still consider these beasts to be some trophy, showing off how well you are doing to unsuspecting passerby’s; or fancying up your garage. Others claim they need the horsepower, four-wheel drive, and rough exterior for, well, driving on rough terrain. Hard Facts About SUVs Somewhat acceptable if you are living in the outback of Australia or on an American ranch in the heart of Texas. Although that excuse really does not fly if you refer to the urban outback, many of these cars now call their habitat. Some facts first. SUVs have much higher CO2 emissions than regular cars. Fact. They are proven to be less safe than regular cars. Another fact. And they are becoming the poster child of too many car manufacturers, who seem to have had some secret meeting at the end of last year to streamline rather aggressive marketing campaigns, all featuring their latest and hottest models. Recommended:  Solar Team The Netherlands Presents The Solar Car The German business newspaper Handelsblatt articulated it eloquently when referring to ‘SUV insanity’ in their headline of an article questioning the marketing of those big-boy cars. While some of the ads still appeal to that ‘wild’ fantasy, with the cars scaling mountains and driving through rough woodlands, just as many of them actually place the fancy SUVs in the urban jungle. We look at them as they drive through the mysteriously empty streets downtown. These vehicles that should have been completely out of place right there have never looked so right. Big-boy cars and a 'normal' one Calling For A Ban On SUVs Do not let it fool you. It is not right, nor should it ever be considered right. Only recently, the driver of a Porsche Macan SUV lost control and hit the pavement on a busy Berlin intersection. His mishap killed four, including a 3-year-old boy and his Nanna. It is not an isolated incident, as the public outcry that followed showed. People are fed up with those big cars causing problems in their neighborhood.   After this particular instance, hundreds of Berliners came together to call for a total ban on SUVs in the city. Even political leaders got behind them, claiming that “ armor-like SUVs don’t belong in cities ” and calling for “ a nationwide rule allowing local authorities to set size limits .” Statistics Show SUVs Are Not Safe It is funny—most people who buy an SUV claim to do so for safety reasons. As in, they feel safer driving this big car down the highway. Betcha would be surprised to hear that these cars have actually statistically been proven to be less safe than regular cars. This applies to both to occupants of the vehicle and those outside. Fact: you are 11% more likely to die in a crash if you drive an SUV compared to a regular car.   {youtube}                                                                                                     5 Reasons Why SUVs Suck!   Experts have attributed this to a false sense of security, as SUV drivers are notoriously - let’s put it nicely - inattentive drivers. The king of the road analogy once again comes to mind, but the truth is, these drivers often do behave as if nothing or no one could harm them. They are less careful, drive faster, and are more likely to disregard traffic rules.   Recommended:  Peoples Destructive Love Affair With The Car And even if they then crash (which they are more likely to, considering their driving behavior!), the consequences are more severe as well. The height of the car makes it more likely to roll over, in doing so, possibly injuring or killing pedestrians or bikers. Fact: you are almost twice as likely to die when you are being hit by a large engine car. SUVs Are Actually Not Even Cars An even greater surprise is that these SUVs are technically not even cars. As in, they do not have to abide by the same safety standards as other passenger vehicles. They are modeled after trucks and therefore oftentimes not held to the same standards, like standards for height. Thankfully, more and more legislative bodies are realizing this flaw and working hard to fix it. Organizations like Greenpeace are working equally hard to highlight those cars' dangers, recently blocking a shipment of SUVs in Germany. However, they find it hard to get politicians behind their plan for a ban, as the numbers are fuzzy. The type of car involved in accidents does not get disclosed in Europe, which is weird in and of itself, but looking at the United States, it is clear that SUVs would be a frontrunner in this regard.   As the number of SUVs sold grows, so does the number of pedestrian deaths. Just last year, the United States recorded some 6,000 deaths - making it the deadliest year since 1990. That same year, Coincidentally saw a 63% share of SUVs in the total number of passenger vehicles sold.   Making The European Emission Target Hard To Reach Even if you are not hit directly by one of those monster cars, they might come for you in the long run. The notorious gas guzzlers are doing an excellent job in undoing many emission cutting in other industries. Plus, they are all set to undermine one important new law coming into effect in 2021: in which the EU stipulates a target to reduce carbon emissions to 95g/km.   Recommended:  Fossil Fuel Will Dominate Energy Use Through 2050 Most car manufacturers are a few months before 2021 arrives, not even close to hitting this target. As they will face immense fines in just over eight weeks, they are remarkably quick to come up with excuses: pointing at the market moving away from diesel, for instance. And yes, diesel might be lower carbon, it is certainly more toxic than petrol. No excuses here. It is not just the diesel that is the issue. It is the carmaker’s focus on their SUVs. Quick math. Their larger engines and bulk mean that their emissions are roughly 14%, or 16g/km, higher than a similar hatchback. And for an industry looking to cut back on its emissions, this sounds like a firm step in the wrong direction. Before you go! Recommended:  Electric Car Microlino. Italian Charm German Made Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about unnecessary large cars? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
SUV Drivers. Not just the self-proclaimed kings of the road, that pretty much anyone in a more economically-sized car ought to give way to, but also the eyesore for many a climate scientist. Too many people still consider these beasts to be some trophy, showing off how well you are doing to unsuspecting passerby’s; or fancying up your garage. Others claim they need the horsepower, four-wheel drive, and rough exterior for, well, driving on rough terrain. Hard Facts About SUVs Somewhat acceptable if you are living in the outback of Australia or on an American ranch in the heart of Texas. Although that excuse really does not fly if you refer to the urban outback, many of these cars now call their habitat. Some facts first. SUVs have much higher CO2 emissions than regular cars. Fact. They are proven to be less safe than regular cars. Another fact. And they are becoming the poster child of too many car manufacturers, who seem to have had some secret meeting at the end of last year to streamline rather aggressive marketing campaigns, all featuring their latest and hottest models. Recommended:  Solar Team The Netherlands Presents The Solar Car The German business newspaper Handelsblatt articulated it eloquently when referring to ‘SUV insanity’ in their headline of an article questioning the marketing of those big-boy cars. While some of the ads still appeal to that ‘wild’ fantasy, with the cars scaling mountains and driving through rough woodlands, just as many of them actually place the fancy SUVs in the urban jungle. We look at them as they drive through the mysteriously empty streets downtown. These vehicles that should have been completely out of place right there have never looked so right. Big-boy cars and a 'normal' one Calling For A Ban On SUVs Do not let it fool you. It is not right, nor should it ever be considered right. Only recently, the driver of a Porsche Macan SUV lost control and hit the pavement on a busy Berlin intersection. His mishap killed four, including a 3-year-old boy and his Nanna. It is not an isolated incident, as the public outcry that followed showed. People are fed up with those big cars causing problems in their neighborhood.   After this particular instance, hundreds of Berliners came together to call for a total ban on SUVs in the city. Even political leaders got behind them, claiming that “ armor-like SUVs don’t belong in cities ” and calling for “ a nationwide rule allowing local authorities to set size limits .” Statistics Show SUVs Are Not Safe It is funny—most people who buy an SUV claim to do so for safety reasons. As in, they feel safer driving this big car down the highway. Betcha would be surprised to hear that these cars have actually statistically been proven to be less safe than regular cars. This applies to both to occupants of the vehicle and those outside. Fact: you are 11% more likely to die in a crash if you drive an SUV compared to a regular car.   {youtube}                                                                                                     5 Reasons Why SUVs Suck!   Experts have attributed this to a false sense of security, as SUV drivers are notoriously - let’s put it nicely - inattentive drivers. The king of the road analogy once again comes to mind, but the truth is, these drivers often do behave as if nothing or no one could harm them. They are less careful, drive faster, and are more likely to disregard traffic rules.   Recommended:  Peoples Destructive Love Affair With The Car And even if they then crash (which they are more likely to, considering their driving behavior!), the consequences are more severe as well. The height of the car makes it more likely to roll over, in doing so, possibly injuring or killing pedestrians or bikers. Fact: you are almost twice as likely to die when you are being hit by a large engine car. SUVs Are Actually Not Even Cars An even greater surprise is that these SUVs are technically not even cars. As in, they do not have to abide by the same safety standards as other passenger vehicles. They are modeled after trucks and therefore oftentimes not held to the same standards, like standards for height. Thankfully, more and more legislative bodies are realizing this flaw and working hard to fix it. Organizations like Greenpeace are working equally hard to highlight those cars' dangers, recently blocking a shipment of SUVs in Germany. However, they find it hard to get politicians behind their plan for a ban, as the numbers are fuzzy. The type of car involved in accidents does not get disclosed in Europe, which is weird in and of itself, but looking at the United States, it is clear that SUVs would be a frontrunner in this regard.   As the number of SUVs sold grows, so does the number of pedestrian deaths. Just last year, the United States recorded some 6,000 deaths - making it the deadliest year since 1990. That same year, Coincidentally saw a 63% share of SUVs in the total number of passenger vehicles sold.   Making The European Emission Target Hard To Reach Even if you are not hit directly by one of those monster cars, they might come for you in the long run. The notorious gas guzzlers are doing an excellent job in undoing many emission cutting in other industries. Plus, they are all set to undermine one important new law coming into effect in 2021: in which the EU stipulates a target to reduce carbon emissions to 95g/km.   Recommended:  Fossil Fuel Will Dominate Energy Use Through 2050 Most car manufacturers are a few months before 2021 arrives, not even close to hitting this target. As they will face immense fines in just over eight weeks, they are remarkably quick to come up with excuses: pointing at the market moving away from diesel, for instance. And yes, diesel might be lower carbon, it is certainly more toxic than petrol. No excuses here. It is not just the diesel that is the issue. It is the carmaker’s focus on their SUVs. Quick math. Their larger engines and bulk mean that their emissions are roughly 14%, or 16g/km, higher than a similar hatchback. And for an industry looking to cut back on its emissions, this sounds like a firm step in the wrong direction. Before you go! Recommended:  Electric Car Microlino. Italian Charm German Made Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about unnecessary large cars? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
SUV Drivers: What Do You Want To Prove? Insanity?
SUV Drivers: What Do You Want To Prove? Insanity?
Pope Francis Believes In Hydrogen. Heavenly!
Pope Francis was recently presented with a hydrogen-powered Toyota Mirai gift specially modified for his mobility needs from the Catholic Bishops' Conference of Japan (CBCJ). The car is one of two Mirai vehicles specially made by Toyota and donated to the CBCJ for the pontiff's mobility needs. Pope Francis Believes In Hydrogen. The New Popemobile The new official Popemobile has a length of 5.1 meters and a height of 2.7 meters - including the specially installed roof. The white super-structure installed at the back of the car allows the Pope to be easily visible to people while sitting and standing. The new Popemobile features an open-air dome contrary to the bulletproof glass dome used in the previous Popemobiles. The rear of the car also features a heightened seat custom-made for the Holy Father.   {youtube}                    All New 2021 Toyota Mirai Popemobile - Hydrogen-powered Mirai popemobile for Pope Francis   The Toyota Mirai is the first mass-produced hydrogen-powered sedan and was first launched in 2014. It is the ultimate zero-emission car powered by a hydrogen fuel cell system, enabling a range of around 500km while emitting only water. Recommended:  Tesla Model S Converted: Meet The Hydrogen Hesla 'Mirai' in Japanese means 'future.' The car gets a futuristic design language with the aerodynamic exterior styling. Its hydrogen fuel-cell system falls in line with the Pope's vision of climate change and safeguards the earth. Cover photo by Gregorio Borgia Before you go! Recommended:  BMW 2020: iHydrogen NEXT Eco Ready In 2022? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about hydrogen cars? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Pope Francis was recently presented with a hydrogen-powered Toyota Mirai gift specially modified for his mobility needs from the Catholic Bishops' Conference of Japan (CBCJ). The car is one of two Mirai vehicles specially made by Toyota and donated to the CBCJ for the pontiff's mobility needs. Pope Francis Believes In Hydrogen. The New Popemobile The new official Popemobile has a length of 5.1 meters and a height of 2.7 meters - including the specially installed roof. The white super-structure installed at the back of the car allows the Pope to be easily visible to people while sitting and standing. The new Popemobile features an open-air dome contrary to the bulletproof glass dome used in the previous Popemobiles. The rear of the car also features a heightened seat custom-made for the Holy Father.   {youtube}                    All New 2021 Toyota Mirai Popemobile - Hydrogen-powered Mirai popemobile for Pope Francis   The Toyota Mirai is the first mass-produced hydrogen-powered sedan and was first launched in 2014. It is the ultimate zero-emission car powered by a hydrogen fuel cell system, enabling a range of around 500km while emitting only water. Recommended:  Tesla Model S Converted: Meet The Hydrogen Hesla 'Mirai' in Japanese means 'future.' The car gets a futuristic design language with the aerodynamic exterior styling. Its hydrogen fuel-cell system falls in line with the Pope's vision of climate change and safeguards the earth. Cover photo by Gregorio Borgia Before you go! Recommended:  BMW 2020: iHydrogen NEXT Eco Ready In 2022? Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about hydrogen cars? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Pope Francis Believes In Hydrogen. Heavenly!
Electric Scooters You Can’t Resist
Scooters. Quite the eyesore for many - particularly when they are loud, parked on the pavement, or simply obnoxiously ignoring all traffic and common decency rules. Their departure is usually accompanied by a black cloud of foul-smelling residue, something that has many shaking their head in disgust. In some areas, older scooters are already forbidden, as the threat, they pose to the environment is painfully obvious. Electric Scooters: Clean, Quiet, Sustainable Now that we got that out of the way, there is a new wave of scooters that you will not be able to resist. It is fully electric - so clean, quiet, and sustainable. And it is your golden ticket to beat the morning rush hour and traffic headaches in the city center. Electric scooters are not just a fun toy for the rich kids in town; they could help us a great deal if we want our transportation to become more sustainable. Even better, there is plenty for you to choose from. Let’s take a look at the most obvious contenders. Recommended:  Electric Scooter Start-Ups Hype: The Netherlands Electric Scooter:  Carota Design If you wonder why it has such a striking resemblance to BMW’s Concept Link from 2017, wonder no longer. It was designed that way. The matte-finish metal panels will instantly give you that BMW-feel. The boot-storage is somewhat limited, as the cantilever seat somewhat imposes on its space, but you have a dedicated space for your helmet to the side. Fun extra: the seat also dubs as your taillight, in the form of a thin arc along the back and side, while your headlights are edge-lit details on the front. Vespa 98 Conceptual Scooter Time to get wow-ed by the creation of Mightyseed, the Vespa 98. This conceptual scooter has a traditional retro look and feels and a lot of modern gadgets and gizmos. This is clearly visible in the handles, LED-lights, and all kinds of sensors to alert the rider to nearby traffic - which will, or so the design team claims, replace the traditional rearview mirrors. Vespa scooter concept Recommended:  Sexy Electric Vehicle: Vespa Meets Tesla And Apple Stator, The Self-Balancing Scooter Worried about falling over? Worry no longer, thanks to the self-balancing scooter that gives you a huge burst of power. The 1000W battery hidden in the rear wheel can get you moving at up to 40 km/h. A cool bike that does what it says and says what it does: its design is simple, nothing unnecessary, or flashy here. Especially the handlebars stand out in simplicity - made out of a single tube, housing an intuitive control module.   Stator, the scooter which balances you and itself. Pocket Rocket State Of The Art Scooter Not exactly a name one would associate with a state-of-the-art scooter, but hear me out for a second. The triangle shape makes it instantly eye-catching, while there is an impressive amount of technology and design hidden away in its pretty bare structure. If you want something unique, this might be your ride.   Pocket Rocket scooter Vespa By Artem: Scooter Of The Future Prefer the old-school Vespa, but not convinced by the Vespa 98? Then Vespa by Artem might be for you, which is basically Artem Smirnov’s interpretation of the Vespa of the future. Spoiler alert, it does not have many of the Vespa bike's distinctive characteristics, although that is not something to be alarmed by. It does look more like an e-bike than a scooter. That may alarm you.   The futuristic Vespa Scooter design. Artem Smirnov’s interpretation. Recommended:  Futuristic e-Bike, Boat, Camper Makes Headlines Carota Classic E-Bike Speaking of e-bikes-turned-e-scooters, Carota has you covered. This design is funky and unique, very Harley Davidson-esque, while still being lean enough to classify as an e-bike. It is virtually silent, powered by the V-twin engine right beneath your seat. Paddle no more, hello Harley Davidson charm.   Carota e-bike with a Harley look. Recommended:  Electric Bike Rayvolt X One: A Different eBike Upholding Simple Scooter The vision of Ekaterina Tiholova was clear: let’s keep it simple. She came up with a plain and simple scooter, consisting of a simple black base, with two bulbous wheels underneath. Some color accents are used to spice it up a bit, and ta-dah, we proudly present - the Upholding. Electric scooter 'flat-pack'! Dyson Moovo Dyson might be most well-known as the producer of vacuum cleaners. This is not all they do, though. The Moovo is modeled after Dyson’s best-known designs, featuring clean lines. This makes the whole thing rather sophisticated and aesthetically pleasing while incorporating some cool tech. What about the handlebar that functions as a controller for the screen displaying information about your trip or features of the scooter? Easy to love, it really is. The Dyson 'mini' scooter Ather 450 Electric Scooter The Indian company Ather is working hard at creating a market for its electric scooter. They already set up 30 charging points for its scooter throughout the city of Bengaluru. They are aiming high, and for a good reason - their product will be Indian’s first electric scooter. Potentially a revolution in a country dominated by scooters. Its top speed is 80 km/h, with a range of 75 km on a full battery. Plus, it is quite handsome to look at: its design is edgy, almost Stormtrooper-like. It also has a smart touchscreen connected to the bespoke app. Ather 450 Electric Scooter from India Z-Scooter Last but not least, Z-Scooter is something fun and surprising. It is the lovechild of a scooter and a Segway, meant for recreational trips: it looks striking and can reach 20 km/h for some 35 km per charge. You accelerate by leaning forward and decelerate by leaning backward, and you can go left and right by turning the handles. What other options do you need?   The Z-Scooter, Amazing! Electric Scooters: Get Into It The options available in the market are diverse and continue to improve, becoming smaller, leaner, and smarter. They are the best alternative for our urban transportation needs - not only will you be able to avoid traffic, but parking is also easy, and pollution is non-existent. What do you say? It is about time to get excited about electric scooters. Before you go! Recommended:  Harley Davidson LiveWire Electric Bike Drives Like A Tesla Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about your electric bike or the ideas you have about them? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Scooters. Quite the eyesore for many - particularly when they are loud, parked on the pavement, or simply obnoxiously ignoring all traffic and common decency rules. Their departure is usually accompanied by a black cloud of foul-smelling residue, something that has many shaking their head in disgust. In some areas, older scooters are already forbidden, as the threat, they pose to the environment is painfully obvious. Electric Scooters: Clean, Quiet, Sustainable Now that we got that out of the way, there is a new wave of scooters that you will not be able to resist. It is fully electric - so clean, quiet, and sustainable. And it is your golden ticket to beat the morning rush hour and traffic headaches in the city center. Electric scooters are not just a fun toy for the rich kids in town; they could help us a great deal if we want our transportation to become more sustainable. Even better, there is plenty for you to choose from. Let’s take a look at the most obvious contenders. Recommended:  Electric Scooter Start-Ups Hype: The Netherlands Electric Scooter:  Carota Design If you wonder why it has such a striking resemblance to BMW’s Concept Link from 2017, wonder no longer. It was designed that way. The matte-finish metal panels will instantly give you that BMW-feel. The boot-storage is somewhat limited, as the cantilever seat somewhat imposes on its space, but you have a dedicated space for your helmet to the side. Fun extra: the seat also dubs as your taillight, in the form of a thin arc along the back and side, while your headlights are edge-lit details on the front. Vespa 98 Conceptual Scooter Time to get wow-ed by the creation of Mightyseed, the Vespa 98. This conceptual scooter has a traditional retro look and feels and a lot of modern gadgets and gizmos. This is clearly visible in the handles, LED-lights, and all kinds of sensors to alert the rider to nearby traffic - which will, or so the design team claims, replace the traditional rearview mirrors. Vespa scooter concept Recommended:  Sexy Electric Vehicle: Vespa Meets Tesla And Apple Stator, The Self-Balancing Scooter Worried about falling over? Worry no longer, thanks to the self-balancing scooter that gives you a huge burst of power. The 1000W battery hidden in the rear wheel can get you moving at up to 40 km/h. A cool bike that does what it says and says what it does: its design is simple, nothing unnecessary, or flashy here. Especially the handlebars stand out in simplicity - made out of a single tube, housing an intuitive control module.   Stator, the scooter which balances you and itself. Pocket Rocket State Of The Art Scooter Not exactly a name one would associate with a state-of-the-art scooter, but hear me out for a second. The triangle shape makes it instantly eye-catching, while there is an impressive amount of technology and design hidden away in its pretty bare structure. If you want something unique, this might be your ride.   Pocket Rocket scooter Vespa By Artem: Scooter Of The Future Prefer the old-school Vespa, but not convinced by the Vespa 98? Then Vespa by Artem might be for you, which is basically Artem Smirnov’s interpretation of the Vespa of the future. Spoiler alert, it does not have many of the Vespa bike's distinctive characteristics, although that is not something to be alarmed by. It does look more like an e-bike than a scooter. That may alarm you.   The futuristic Vespa Scooter design. Artem Smirnov’s interpretation. Recommended:  Futuristic e-Bike, Boat, Camper Makes Headlines Carota Classic E-Bike Speaking of e-bikes-turned-e-scooters, Carota has you covered. This design is funky and unique, very Harley Davidson-esque, while still being lean enough to classify as an e-bike. It is virtually silent, powered by the V-twin engine right beneath your seat. Paddle no more, hello Harley Davidson charm.   Carota e-bike with a Harley look. Recommended:  Electric Bike Rayvolt X One: A Different eBike Upholding Simple Scooter The vision of Ekaterina Tiholova was clear: let’s keep it simple. She came up with a plain and simple scooter, consisting of a simple black base, with two bulbous wheels underneath. Some color accents are used to spice it up a bit, and ta-dah, we proudly present - the Upholding. Electric scooter 'flat-pack'! Dyson Moovo Dyson might be most well-known as the producer of vacuum cleaners. This is not all they do, though. The Moovo is modeled after Dyson’s best-known designs, featuring clean lines. This makes the whole thing rather sophisticated and aesthetically pleasing while incorporating some cool tech. What about the handlebar that functions as a controller for the screen displaying information about your trip or features of the scooter? Easy to love, it really is. The Dyson 'mini' scooter Ather 450 Electric Scooter The Indian company Ather is working hard at creating a market for its electric scooter. They already set up 30 charging points for its scooter throughout the city of Bengaluru. They are aiming high, and for a good reason - their product will be Indian’s first electric scooter. Potentially a revolution in a country dominated by scooters. Its top speed is 80 km/h, with a range of 75 km on a full battery. Plus, it is quite handsome to look at: its design is edgy, almost Stormtrooper-like. It also has a smart touchscreen connected to the bespoke app. Ather 450 Electric Scooter from India Z-Scooter Last but not least, Z-Scooter is something fun and surprising. It is the lovechild of a scooter and a Segway, meant for recreational trips: it looks striking and can reach 20 km/h for some 35 km per charge. You accelerate by leaning forward and decelerate by leaning backward, and you can go left and right by turning the handles. What other options do you need?   The Z-Scooter, Amazing! Electric Scooters: Get Into It The options available in the market are diverse and continue to improve, becoming smaller, leaner, and smarter. They are the best alternative for our urban transportation needs - not only will you be able to avoid traffic, but parking is also easy, and pollution is non-existent. What do you say? It is about time to get excited about electric scooters. Before you go! Recommended:  Harley Davidson LiveWire Electric Bike Drives Like A Tesla Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about your electric bike or the ideas you have about them? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Electric Scooters You Can’t Resist
No CO2 Thanks To The Diesel Engine
Wait, what? As with so many sustainability-related matters, this sounds like a true juxtaposition. How could a diesel engine, a notorious polluter, be responsible for any kind of reduction in CO2 emissions? Well, you have got to thank some researchers from the KU Leuven and the University of Antwerp for this seemingly weird hypothesis.   No CO2: Fertilizer The Belgian scientists were looking at one of the most polluting processes on earth: the production of ammonia, a key ingredient for - amongst others - fertiliser. This bad boy is responsible for some two percent of our global CO2 emissions. As we will continue to use fertiliser, potentially even more so in the future as we need to feed more mouths while dealing with worsening soil conditions, they wanted to see if they could figure out a way of producing ammonia without the harmful CO2 emissions.   Creating Greener Ammonia Guess what they found? Using a technique first pioneered in diesel-powered cars, they can now do so. As an additional bonus, the system they propose can easily be implemented on a small-scale, so that farmers can start producing their own fertiliser with nothing more than a couple of solar panels and this installation, modelled after the diesel engine. Hero Agri fertilizers. To understand how this installation works, it is time for a quick chems lesson. In order to produce ammonia for fertiliser, quite a bit of hydrogen is required - which is made using natural gas. On top of that, the splitting of a nitrogen molecule requires a lot of heat - once again, generated using fossil fuels.   Plasma Reactor To The Rescue The installation proposed by these scientists goes about the splitting of this nitrogen molecule in a different manner. Instead of using high pressure and a high temperature, they do so in a plasma reactor. Granted, the production of plasma also requires a lot of energy, but this can easily be generated in a renewable fashion. Think wind, of solar. When the plasma is properly used, it serves to split nitrogen molecules from the air. As a part of this process, the molecule responds by creating oxygen. And ta-dah, NOx is born. One of the key components of ammonia. So far, pretty nifty, but how does this relate to the diesel engine? Recommended:  Algae-Based Bioreactor: It Loves Swallowing CO2 Hang on, I am getting there. The second part of this process is the one that has been borrowed from the automotive industry. In order to somewhat reduce the harmful effect of exhaust fumes, there is a filter installed in the exhaust of (diesel-powered) cars. This piece actively converts the polluting NOx to nitrogen. As professor Johan Martens, one of the lead scientists, explains: “ By slightly adjusting the filter, it starts to produce ammonia instead of nitrogen. When using it in the car, this would be an unwanted side-effect of a malfunctioning filter. However, for our purposes, it is perfect .” In short? This filter ensures that the NOx produced in the plasma reactor will work together with hydrogen to produce ammonia. Hydrogen Must Become Greener You got me here. By mentioning the ‘h’ word, it shows that there is a flaw. The process still uses hydrogen, which can - for now - only be produced using natural gas. In order to make this process of fertiliser-production fully sustainable, the hydrogen will also have to be produced in a green fashion.   Recommended:  Breaking News! Hydrogen Cheaply Produced By Solar In Belgium While all technologies for creating green hydrogen are still in their infant stage, the researchers are not worried about it. They claim their invention is mostly for small-scale use, meaning that only very small amounts of hydrogen are needed. At the same time, the KU Leuven University is working on ways of creating hydrogen using water from the air and solar energy, proving that it can be done. Photo by Tractebel Greener Fertiliser Production The small scale is what makes this project so interesting. It could allow small farming business to produce their own fertiliser, which will be advantageous to both farmer and society as a whole. “ As a farm, you can generate enough green energy to make this work ,” scientists claim - while also pointing at the opportunities for such a technology in developing nations. In those regions, it is hard to get access to fertiliser, as it will have to be shipped and travel great distances. Only one of those installations in a community could therefore already prove to be a game changer.   Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change: Water Scarcity, Hunger, Agriculture, And Food Do you like this article about agrivoltaics, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write and publish your article about growing food or solar energy? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Wait, what? As with so many sustainability-related matters, this sounds like a true juxtaposition. How could a diesel engine, a notorious polluter, be responsible for any kind of reduction in CO2 emissions? Well, you have got to thank some researchers from the KU Leuven and the University of Antwerp for this seemingly weird hypothesis.   No CO2: Fertilizer The Belgian scientists were looking at one of the most polluting processes on earth: the production of ammonia, a key ingredient for - amongst others - fertiliser. This bad boy is responsible for some two percent of our global CO2 emissions. As we will continue to use fertiliser, potentially even more so in the future as we need to feed more mouths while dealing with worsening soil conditions, they wanted to see if they could figure out a way of producing ammonia without the harmful CO2 emissions.   Creating Greener Ammonia Guess what they found? Using a technique first pioneered in diesel-powered cars, they can now do so. As an additional bonus, the system they propose can easily be implemented on a small-scale, so that farmers can start producing their own fertiliser with nothing more than a couple of solar panels and this installation, modelled after the diesel engine. Hero Agri fertilizers. To understand how this installation works, it is time for a quick chems lesson. In order to produce ammonia for fertiliser, quite a bit of hydrogen is required - which is made using natural gas. On top of that, the splitting of a nitrogen molecule requires a lot of heat - once again, generated using fossil fuels.   Plasma Reactor To The Rescue The installation proposed by these scientists goes about the splitting of this nitrogen molecule in a different manner. Instead of using high pressure and a high temperature, they do so in a plasma reactor. Granted, the production of plasma also requires a lot of energy, but this can easily be generated in a renewable fashion. Think wind, of solar. When the plasma is properly used, it serves to split nitrogen molecules from the air. As a part of this process, the molecule responds by creating oxygen. And ta-dah, NOx is born. One of the key components of ammonia. So far, pretty nifty, but how does this relate to the diesel engine? Recommended:  Algae-Based Bioreactor: It Loves Swallowing CO2 Hang on, I am getting there. The second part of this process is the one that has been borrowed from the automotive industry. In order to somewhat reduce the harmful effect of exhaust fumes, there is a filter installed in the exhaust of (diesel-powered) cars. This piece actively converts the polluting NOx to nitrogen. As professor Johan Martens, one of the lead scientists, explains: “ By slightly adjusting the filter, it starts to produce ammonia instead of nitrogen. When using it in the car, this would be an unwanted side-effect of a malfunctioning filter. However, for our purposes, it is perfect .” In short? This filter ensures that the NOx produced in the plasma reactor will work together with hydrogen to produce ammonia. Hydrogen Must Become Greener You got me here. By mentioning the ‘h’ word, it shows that there is a flaw. The process still uses hydrogen, which can - for now - only be produced using natural gas. In order to make this process of fertiliser-production fully sustainable, the hydrogen will also have to be produced in a green fashion.   Recommended:  Breaking News! Hydrogen Cheaply Produced By Solar In Belgium While all technologies for creating green hydrogen are still in their infant stage, the researchers are not worried about it. They claim their invention is mostly for small-scale use, meaning that only very small amounts of hydrogen are needed. At the same time, the KU Leuven University is working on ways of creating hydrogen using water from the air and solar energy, proving that it can be done. Photo by Tractebel Greener Fertiliser Production The small scale is what makes this project so interesting. It could allow small farming business to produce their own fertiliser, which will be advantageous to both farmer and society as a whole. “ As a farm, you can generate enough green energy to make this work ,” scientists claim - while also pointing at the opportunities for such a technology in developing nations. In those regions, it is hard to get access to fertiliser, as it will have to be shipped and travel great distances. Only one of those installations in a community could therefore already prove to be a game changer.   Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change: Water Scarcity, Hunger, Agriculture, And Food Do you like this article about agrivoltaics, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write and publish your article about growing food or solar energy? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
No CO2 Thanks To The Diesel Engine
No CO2 Thanks To The Diesel Engine
Energy Storage In Bricks: Your Home As Powerhouse
This research could clear the way for inexpensive storage of renewable energy by using a supercapacitor. The brick of the house has been converted into a battery that can collect electricity, creating the possibility that someday buildings will actually become powerhouses. Energy Storage In Bricks New technology uses the porous nature of baked red bricks. They fill them with small nanofibres of a conductive plastic that can retain energy. So, the first bricks will store sufficient electricity to power small lights. If the capacity could be more, they would be a cheap alternative to lithium-ion batteries. Energy bricks are supercapacitors, they store electricity as a substantial static charge. They charge and discharge way faster than batteries. {youtube}                                        Regular bricks can be transformed into energy storage devices Scientists around the world are working on increasing the energy density of supercapacitors. They also want to raise the charging speed of batteries. Finding new ways to store electricity is essential in fighting the climate crisis. We can store renewable energy until we need it. Recommended:  Great Renewable Energy Storage: Compressed Air Energy Storage: Food For Thought “A solar cell on the roof of your house has to store electricity somewhere and typically we use batteries,” said Julio D’Arcy, at Washington University in St Louis, US, who was part of the research team. “What we have done is provide a new ‘food-for-thought’ option, but we’re not there yet.” The energy density of bricks is only 1 percent of that of lithium-ion batteries, mentioned the journal Nature Communications. To store more charge in the brick, you can add materials like metal oxides, according to D'Arcy.  They hope to have the same energy density as lithium-ion batteries soon. "This technology is much cheaper than lithium-ion batteries," says D'Arcy. Recommended:  Hydrogen Energy Storage: A Remarkable Innovation Dan Brett, a professor of electrochemical engineering at the University College London, UK, says: "Heat is the main consideration when thinking about energy storage in the fabric of any building." The study demonstrates the potential for storing energy. Powerhouse, Power Bricks  Scientists made tiny prototypes of power bricks, using chemical vapors. They wanted a reaction of them with the red iron oxide in the bricks and then form a plastic nanofibre network. They used a special plastic, named Pedot. It is a perfect conductor of electricity. The reactions showed a difference from red stones to dark blue. Another advantage of the supercapacitors is that they charge and discharge tremendously fast. The power bricks can be circulated 10,000 times before their capacity is significantly reduced. Energy Storage: Electricity Researchers demonstrated using an epoxy resin that a wall with connected power bricks would need an insulating coating not to get a shock. The bricks would even work underwater. The reactivity used to produce the power stones can have a slight dampening effect on their structural qualities, Arcy said, but the bricks were most often used today in houses as decorative facades. Richard McMahon, a professor of power electronics at the University of Warwick, UK, said that the study was fascinating. "Energy storage is essential, especially electricity. They showed an interesting demonstration of a possibility, but it is not even practical applicable yet." Storing significant amounts of electricity is and remains a challenge; that's why we keep on looking for alternatives. There is a company that uses gravity to store energy through stacking giant bricks into a tower. Then they release the energy by dropping the stones back to the ground.  Similar things are researched as well. Scientists are also compressing air into a liquid to store energy. They use a significant factory in Manchester, UK, to test this experiment. Before you go! Recommended:  Home Solar Energy Storage By Nissan Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about renewable energy storage? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
This research could clear the way for inexpensive storage of renewable energy by using a supercapacitor. The brick of the house has been converted into a battery that can collect electricity, creating the possibility that someday buildings will actually become powerhouses. Energy Storage In Bricks New technology uses the porous nature of baked red bricks. They fill them with small nanofibres of a conductive plastic that can retain energy. So, the first bricks will store sufficient electricity to power small lights. If the capacity could be more, they would be a cheap alternative to lithium-ion batteries. Energy bricks are supercapacitors, they store electricity as a substantial static charge. They charge and discharge way faster than batteries. {youtube}                                        Regular bricks can be transformed into energy storage devices Scientists around the world are working on increasing the energy density of supercapacitors. They also want to raise the charging speed of batteries. Finding new ways to store electricity is essential in fighting the climate crisis. We can store renewable energy until we need it. Recommended:  Great Renewable Energy Storage: Compressed Air Energy Storage: Food For Thought “A solar cell on the roof of your house has to store electricity somewhere and typically we use batteries,” said Julio D’Arcy, at Washington University in St Louis, US, who was part of the research team. “What we have done is provide a new ‘food-for-thought’ option, but we’re not there yet.” The energy density of bricks is only 1 percent of that of lithium-ion batteries, mentioned the journal Nature Communications. To store more charge in the brick, you can add materials like metal oxides, according to D'Arcy.  They hope to have the same energy density as lithium-ion batteries soon. "This technology is much cheaper than lithium-ion batteries," says D'Arcy. Recommended:  Hydrogen Energy Storage: A Remarkable Innovation Dan Brett, a professor of electrochemical engineering at the University College London, UK, says: "Heat is the main consideration when thinking about energy storage in the fabric of any building." The study demonstrates the potential for storing energy. Powerhouse, Power Bricks  Scientists made tiny prototypes of power bricks, using chemical vapors. They wanted a reaction of them with the red iron oxide in the bricks and then form a plastic nanofibre network. They used a special plastic, named Pedot. It is a perfect conductor of electricity. The reactions showed a difference from red stones to dark blue. Another advantage of the supercapacitors is that they charge and discharge tremendously fast. The power bricks can be circulated 10,000 times before their capacity is significantly reduced. Energy Storage: Electricity Researchers demonstrated using an epoxy resin that a wall with connected power bricks would need an insulating coating not to get a shock. The bricks would even work underwater. The reactivity used to produce the power stones can have a slight dampening effect on their structural qualities, Arcy said, but the bricks were most often used today in houses as decorative facades. Richard McMahon, a professor of power electronics at the University of Warwick, UK, said that the study was fascinating. "Energy storage is essential, especially electricity. They showed an interesting demonstration of a possibility, but it is not even practical applicable yet." Storing significant amounts of electricity is and remains a challenge; that's why we keep on looking for alternatives. There is a company that uses gravity to store energy through stacking giant bricks into a tower. Then they release the energy by dropping the stones back to the ground.  Similar things are researched as well. Scientists are also compressing air into a liquid to store energy. They use a significant factory in Manchester, UK, to test this experiment. Before you go! Recommended:  Home Solar Energy Storage By Nissan Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about renewable energy storage? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Energy Storage In Bricks: Your Home As Powerhouse
Electric Car Road Trips: The Ultimate Guide
Electric car road trips. Which electric car should you choose? You have to find an electric car suitable for your needs. Not all-electric cars are a perfect fit for road tripping. Take a few steps into consideration before purchasing an electric of a plug-in hybrid instead. This article is full of battery degradation information and tips & tricks on coping best with your EV-battery! A Road-Trip Capable Electric Car: The Criteria Buy a car that can meet up your needs with an appropriate range for road tripping. Do not purchase a model with an 80-mile range if you plan to take only 500+ mile road trips. If you do not mind stopping a few times to charge, the BMW i3 is an option. Do you want to avoid frequently charging? Think of a Tesla or Chevrolet Bolt. They are great for long-distance. Photo by 'Share Me.' BMW i3 Consider A Plug-In Hybrid Or Range-Extended Vehicle You may consider an electric car which is not entirely electric. You have two options: the range-extended electric vehicles and the plug-in hybrids. The latter have large batteries which can be charged externally. Generally, they have an electric action range of 15 to 50 miles and a full-size gas tank. But they do not have the whole electric driving experience. Then you have the range-extended electric cars, which are entirely electric with a small gas motor. The motor charges the car's battery to provide additional range while driving long distances. The range-extended vehicles give you the full-electric driving experience. Also, they have a fast charger and other EV-specific technology features. For a long time, the Toyota Yaris was the only supermini to come with a hybrid option, making it one of the cheapest ways to get a ‘hybrid’ badge. A Fiesta will excite keen drivers much more than the Yaris, but the hybrid is easy to drive and feels perfectly comfortable on a long motorway trip. Around 50mpg is promised, starting to look a little low, seeing as the Fiesta’s turbo petrol engines can manage this figure. The Yaris has an excellent reputation for reliability and a host of safety features, such as autonomous emergency braking, fitted as standard. DC Fast Charging Is Key For A Sane Road Trip Only buy a car, including DC fast charging, if you plan to take a road trip. For example, the BMW i3 can charge up to 80 percent in 45 minutes. They charge 50kw per hour. A vehicle without this option, but they only charge around 11kW per hour. So, this will take a lot of time when on-the-go. If you have to wait an hour to drive again, your trip will be extended. Luckily, most new electric cars are equipped with fast charging. Ensure you will get all the information to know if you're dealing with a new or older model. What is DC fast charging? “DC” refers to “direct current,” the type of power that batteries use. EVs have “onboard chargers” inside the car that convert AC power to DC for the battery. DC fast chargers convert AC power to DC within the charging station and deliver DC power directly to the battery, which is why they charge faster.   {youtube}                                              5 New Battery Technologies That Could CHANGE EVERYTHING   Recommended:  Tesla Battery Day: It Blows My Mind Check Battery Degradation When Buying A Used Car What can 6,000 electric vehicles tell us about EV battery health? Compare the average battery degradation for different vehicle makes and model years. How long does an electric car battery last? Use the free  EV Battery Degradation Tool  to compare the average battery degradation over time for different vehicle makes and model years. The importance of EV batteries If you’re thinking about buying an electric vehicle (EV), there are some important factors to consider. These three questions are probably at the top of your list: How much will the EV cost? What is its range? How long will the battery last? From a life-cycle perspective, battery performance and health really are the key to it all. As the battery is an EV’s most expensive component, the degree of degradation will affect the vehicle’s residual value (which helps answer the cost question from above), and will also have a direct impact on the maximum usable range over time. How long will an EV battery last? You might have noticed that it is tough to get a straight answer to questions about an EV’s battery lifespan. What you may find instead are assurances that the warranty covers batteries should something go wrong. Typically, battery coverage is 8 years or 100,000 miles, but this will vary by manufacturer and country. Warranties are reassuring, and so too is the fact that battery costs are decreasing significantly year over year. Since 2010, the price of an average Lithium-ion battery pack has dropped by over 80%. An automaker’s guarantee of their battery technology and the promise of decreasing costs should inspire some confidence. However, most of us would find more comfort knowing how quickly our batteries are expected to degrade and how to minimize this loss. What is EV battery degradation? Battery degradation is a natural process that permanently reduces the amount of energy a battery can store or the amount of power it can deliver. The batteries in EVs can generally deliver more power than the powertrain components can handle. As a result, power degradation is rarely observable in EVs, and only the loss of the battery’s ability to store energy matters. A battery’s condition is called its state of health (SOH) . Batteries start their life with 100% SOH, and over time they deteriorate. For example, a 60 kWh battery with 90% SOH would effectively act like a 54 kWh battery. Keep in mind; this is not the same as vehicle range (the distance the vehicle can travel on those kWhs), which will fluctuate on a daily or trip-by-trip basis, depending on several factors including charge level, topography, temperature, auxiliary use, driving habits, and passenger or cargo load. Common factors impacting Lithium-ion battery health: Time High temperatures Operating at a high and low state of charge High electric current Usage (energy cycles) While there has been plenty of research done on battery health, there has been very little data following EVs' real-world performance over time, let alone comparisons across different makes and models. Until now. Introducing the EV Battery Degradation Tool Geotab created the EV Battery Degradation Tool to assess how batteries have been holding up and consider the relative importance of EV battery life's above factors under real-world conditions. We analyzed the battery health of 6,300 fleet and consumer EVs, representing 1.8 million days of data. From the telematics data processed, we have gained insight into how real-world conditions influence electric vehicles' battery health, providing aggregated average degradation data for 21 distinct vehicle models, representing 64 makes, models, and years. Notes about the tool: The degradation curves displayed below are the average trend line from the data analyzed. These graphs can offer insight into average battery health over time, but should not be interpreted as a precise prediction for any specific vehicle. A subset of vehicle makes, models, and years are not available in the visualization tool – we have excluded vehicles with insufficient data, so don’t be alarmed if your car of choice is missing. Get started with the tool. For more information and to use the tool, see the  Electric Vehicle Battery Degradation Tool  page.  Key takeaways High levels of sustained battery health observed First and foremost, based on data from over 6,000 electric vehicles, spanning all the major makes and models, batteries are exhibiting high levels of sustained health. If the observed degradation rates are maintained, the vast majority of batteries will outlast the vehicle's usable life. Like us, health declines with age. As you might expect, the older a vehicle is, the more likely its battery has deteriorated. However, when looking at the average decline across all vehicles, the loss is arguably minor, at 2.3% per year. This means that if you purchase an EV today with a 150-mile range, losing about 17 miles of accessible range after five years is unlikely to impact your day-to-day needs. Is EV battery degradation linear? While this tool shows more or less linear degradation, as a general rule, EV batteries are expected to decline non-linearly: an initial drop, which then continues to decline but at a far more moderate pace. Towards the end of its life, a battery will see a final significant drop, as seen below. Tesla battery degradation data-points chart Why do some vehicle models seem to, on average, degrade faster than others? Two potential contributors are: battery chemistry thermal management of the battery pack. While EVs use Lithium-ion batteries, there are many different variations of Lithium-ion chemistries (the most prominent difference being the materials used for the electrodes). A battery’s chemical make-up will influence how it responds to stress. In addition to cell chemistry, temperature control techniques differ across vehicle models. A major distinction is if the battery pack is cooled and/or heated by air or by liquid. Let’s compare a vehicle with a liquid cooling system to one with a passive air cooling system: the 2015 Tesla Model S and the 2015 Nissan Leaf, respectively. The Leaf has an average degradation rate of 4.2%, while the Model S is 2.3%. Good thermal management means better protection against degradation. State of Charge (SOC) and the buffer effect Another anticipated reason for the differences in battery health between manufacturers is how SOC is controlled. Operating a battery at near full or empty has implications on battery health. Many manufacturers add a buffer to limit this effect, effectively preventing access to the SOC's extreme ends. In addition to the protection buffers at the top end and bottom end of the battery range, many vehicles provide the EV owner the option to stop normal daily charging at a level below 100%. Did you know? Removing extremes is not only done for battery health but also for safe vehicle operation. The battery wouldn’t accept or deliver full power at the extreme ends, and the driving experience would be impacted. In essence, a battery at 100% isn’t completely charged from a pure battery chemistry standpoint. Similarly, 0% isn’t empty. Since the vehicle owner cannot access these parts of the battery range for safety and battery life reasons, many are likely unaware of it. Thanks to over-the-air software upgrades, it’s possible that the size of the buffer can change over time, as discovered by some Tesla owners in 2019, when they noticed a decrease in their top range. Tesla confirmed the upgrade was “to protect the battery and improve longevity.” Besides, some automakers have adjustable-charge ceilings, where the user can pre-set at what point the battery stops charging (e.g., they can tell the vehicle to stop charging at 75% instead of 100%). This owner-discretionary region (B in the graphic above) works in combination with the non-discretionary buffer (A) to limit battery operation in areas of higher degradation. In later updates to the degradation tool, we intend to include the impact of the owner’s operation within this discretionary (B) region and the resulting impact on degradation rates. Let’s consider an example: The Chevrolet Volt, especially the early model years, has comparatively large top and bottom protection buffers (regions A and D) that dynamically change as the battery ages. While the larger buffers mean less energy for driving, it should result in a longer-lasting battery pack. Given the larger SOC buffers, liquid thermal management, and dynamic (decreasing) buffer size, slower than average degradation rates should be expected on the Volt. What additional factors appear to influence battery health? Based on the telematics data available, we evaluated battery degradation by different factors the vehicles were exposed to and see any correlation with health decline. These factors included: Use Extreme climates Charging type High vehicle use does not equal higher battery degradation. One exciting piece of information we were able to glean from the data was that vehicles with high use did not show significantly higher battery degradation. This should come as welcome news since you don’t get the benefit of an EV if it’s just sitting in the fleet yard. The takeaway? Don’t be afraid to put your EVs in high-use duty cycles. As long as they are within their daily driving range, their battery life won’t be negatively impacted. One caveat: if high use requires routine DC fast charging, be sure to read the section on the impact of charging type. Vehicles driven in hot temperatures show a faster decline in battery SOH. A battery exposed to scorching temperatures will be prone to more damage, but by how much? Will an EV in Arizona have a different battery life than the same car driven in Norway? To find out, we grouped the vehicles based on the following climate conditions: Temperate:  Fewer than 5 days per year over 80 F (27 C) or under 23 F (-5 C). Hot: More than 5 days per year over 80 F (27 C). Heat and cold weather also impacts your day-to-day range. To understand how to take a look at our  Temperature Tool for EV Range . Taking a look at charge type We were able to look at the predominant charging level used for the EVs in our system. North American EV charging stations are categorized into three common types: Level 1: 120 volt – a regular home outlet in North America. Level 2: 240 volt – typical for home or fleet charging. Direct current fast charger: DCFC – for faster top-ups. Charging in most of Europe is referred to as AC charging (which is generally equivalent to Level 2 in North America) and DC charging (DCFC, as described above). While Level 2 is often cited as the optimal way to charge an EV, the difference in battery health between cars that routinely charged on Level 2 as compared to those who used Level 1 appeared to be observable but was not beyond the level of statistical significance. The use of DCFCs, however, does appear to impact the speed that batteries degrade. Rapidly charging a battery means high currents resulting in high temperatures, both known to strain batteries. In fact, many automakers suggest limiting the use of DCFC to prolong their vehicles’ battery life. Here we look at all battery electric vehicles in the same climate group (we chose to look at the most susceptible group – those operating in extreme climate conditions), and categorized them based on how frequently they used a DCFC: Never, occasionally (1–3 times per month) and frequently (more than 3 times per month). The difference between those vehicles that never used DCFC and those that occasionally used seasonal or hot climates was notable. While there may be other factors at play (we want to stress that this wasn’t a controlled experiment), charging via lower power Level 2 charging should be prioritized. Tips to prolong your EV battery’s life While battery degradation varies by model and external conditions – such as climate and charging type – most vehicles on the road, have not experienced a significant decline. In fact, overall degradation has been very modest, with an average capacity loss of just 2.3% per year. Under the ideal climate and charging conditions, the loss is 1.6%. While some things are out of an operator’s control, there are ways you can extend the life of your EV’s battery. Some tips for operating your EVs: Avoid keeping your car sitting with a full or empty charge. Ideally, keep your SOC between 20–80% particularly when leaving it for longer periods, and only charge it fully for long-distance trips. Minimize fast charging (DCFC). Some high-use duty cycles will need a faster charge, but if your vehicle sits overnight, level 2 should be sufficient for the majority of your charging needs. Climate is out of an operator’s control, but do what you can to avoid scorching temperatures, such as choosing shade when parked on hot days. High-use is not a concern, so fleets shouldn’t hesitate to put them to work. An EV isn’t useful sitting idle in the fleet yard, and putting on more miles per vehicle is overall a better fleet management practice. Final thought Don’t sweat the small stuff. As vehicles come out with larger battery packs, losing some capacity may not impact your day-to-day driving needs, and shouldn’t overshadow the many benefits EVs have to offer. How To Plan A Road Trip With An Electric Car Road tripping with an electric vehicle is different than with a gas car. You have to plan more. If you know how to do it, it's okay. Plan Your Route Around Fast Chargers First, you have to know where you can charge your car. Plan your road trip around available public chargers, near expressways, highways, and other roads. The thing is, you will spend more battery once you accelerate or going up hills. So, take into consideration that you will need a 10 percent buffer. Try to stick to fast chargers once you're on the road, you have to wait 30 - 40 minutes, and you're back on the road again, without any problems. Plan your trips manually or use an app like PlugShare. The app is a crowdsources directory with all available chargers near your location. It will save you a lot of time. Look For Hotels With Charge Points Save time during your trip is possible to stay at hotels which offer to charge your electric car. Nowadays, it is used more often. Generally, they are Level 2 chargers, so make sure to load your vehicle during your sleep. If the hotel does not have charging, ask the hotel staff if they have an outdoor plug to charge your car. Most electric vehicles have a Level 1 wall charger, which you can use with any standard wall socket. Which Apps To Use To Find Public Chargers What is the best way to find public chargers? In the United States, you have different charging networks, like ChargePoint and Electrify America. In Europe, we know Chargemap. You can buy a Chargemap pass, which allows you to charge your electric car on most European charging networks. You will find thousands of compatible charging stations near your location. PlugShare For Most Public Chargers PlugShare is a powered electric charger app in the community. Use this app to see which chargers are networked, non-networked, and home chargers open to the public. You can filter the chargers by connector type, speed, and if you have to pay for using them. The app can help you plan your trip and find chargers along the way. Type in your origin and destination and the app will show you all the chargers nearby. The app ChargePoint is also an advantage for the Tesla owners because it will show you all Tesla Destination Chargers, Superchargers, and all compatible chargers. Click on PlugShare for charging points in your country -ChargePoint+ Has Chargers Around The World ChargePoint is one of the largest charging networks in the World, which offers chargers Level 2 and 3. You will find them in the big cities and on a few major highways. You can use the app to pay for charging. Note: not all chargers shown in the app are public. Click on -ChargePoint+ for charging points in your country. Electrify America For DC Fast Chargers On Highways Electrify America chargers has a significant network of fast chargers near large highways (near Walmart, Targets, and other shopping centers). Prices are reasonable, and you will get a discount by signing up for a membership ($4 per month). Using the chargers is super easy, and the costs are billed to your credit card. A disadvantage is that a few stations are unreliable. Some chargers can be out of service. Click on Electrify America  to download the app. Carwow UK Electric Car Charging Point Finder. An interactive Electric Car charging point finder tool to help EV and hybrid car owners find the nearest electric vehicle charging stations. Click on:  nearest electric vehicle charging station Coming Soon: EV Passport For Unlimited Charging Soon to come: EV Passport for electric car owners. With the passport, you charge up your vehicle unlimited for only $39 per month. You can check your battery status directly from your phone. Earn Bonus Miles On Electric Car Charging Once you're on the road, you usually have to pay for charging your car. So why not earn some miles while charging it? Most chargers do not have a code 'travel,' so you need to have a credit card to earn these miles. There a few of these cards on the market: The Blue Business®️ Plus Credit Card from American Express (On the first $50,000 in purchase per year, you will get 2x Membership Rewards points; then 1x, giving you a 4% return based on TPG's valuation) Chase Freedom Unlimited (1.5% cash back/1.5x Ultimate Rewards points for a 3% return based on TPG's valuation) Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card (On all purchases, you will get 2x miles, that will give you a 2.8% return based on TPG's valuations) If you fill in a credit card request, you can use it to pay for charging your electric car. Bottom Line Road tripping with an electric vehicle is way different from a gas car, but you still have a lot of fun. You will save money, so you can see more during your trip or stay in fancier hotels. Also, consider the range and think of a 10 percent buffer with your battery. Plan your charge points on your trip so that you can enjoy your trip stress-free! Cover photo by Jannes Glas Before you go! Recommended:  Tesla Electric Cybertruck: Explorer’s Best Friend Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about electric cars? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Electric car road trips. Which electric car should you choose? You have to find an electric car suitable for your needs. Not all-electric cars are a perfect fit for road tripping. Take a few steps into consideration before purchasing an electric of a plug-in hybrid instead. This article is full of battery degradation information and tips & tricks on coping best with your EV-battery! A Road-Trip Capable Electric Car: The Criteria Buy a car that can meet up your needs with an appropriate range for road tripping. Do not purchase a model with an 80-mile range if you plan to take only 500+ mile road trips. If you do not mind stopping a few times to charge, the BMW i3 is an option. Do you want to avoid frequently charging? Think of a Tesla or Chevrolet Bolt. They are great for long-distance. Photo by 'Share Me.' BMW i3 Consider A Plug-In Hybrid Or Range-Extended Vehicle You may consider an electric car which is not entirely electric. You have two options: the range-extended electric vehicles and the plug-in hybrids. The latter have large batteries which can be charged externally. Generally, they have an electric action range of 15 to 50 miles and a full-size gas tank. But they do not have the whole electric driving experience. Then you have the range-extended electric cars, which are entirely electric with a small gas motor. The motor charges the car's battery to provide additional range while driving long distances. The range-extended vehicles give you the full-electric driving experience. Also, they have a fast charger and other EV-specific technology features. For a long time, the Toyota Yaris was the only supermini to come with a hybrid option, making it one of the cheapest ways to get a ‘hybrid’ badge. A Fiesta will excite keen drivers much more than the Yaris, but the hybrid is easy to drive and feels perfectly comfortable on a long motorway trip. Around 50mpg is promised, starting to look a little low, seeing as the Fiesta’s turbo petrol engines can manage this figure. The Yaris has an excellent reputation for reliability and a host of safety features, such as autonomous emergency braking, fitted as standard. DC Fast Charging Is Key For A Sane Road Trip Only buy a car, including DC fast charging, if you plan to take a road trip. For example, the BMW i3 can charge up to 80 percent in 45 minutes. They charge 50kw per hour. A vehicle without this option, but they only charge around 11kW per hour. So, this will take a lot of time when on-the-go. If you have to wait an hour to drive again, your trip will be extended. Luckily, most new electric cars are equipped with fast charging. Ensure you will get all the information to know if you're dealing with a new or older model. What is DC fast charging? “DC” refers to “direct current,” the type of power that batteries use. EVs have “onboard chargers” inside the car that convert AC power to DC for the battery. DC fast chargers convert AC power to DC within the charging station and deliver DC power directly to the battery, which is why they charge faster.   {youtube}                                              5 New Battery Technologies That Could CHANGE EVERYTHING   Recommended:  Tesla Battery Day: It Blows My Mind Check Battery Degradation When Buying A Used Car What can 6,000 electric vehicles tell us about EV battery health? Compare the average battery degradation for different vehicle makes and model years. How long does an electric car battery last? Use the free  EV Battery Degradation Tool  to compare the average battery degradation over time for different vehicle makes and model years. The importance of EV batteries If you’re thinking about buying an electric vehicle (EV), there are some important factors to consider. These three questions are probably at the top of your list: How much will the EV cost? What is its range? How long will the battery last? From a life-cycle perspective, battery performance and health really are the key to it all. As the battery is an EV’s most expensive component, the degree of degradation will affect the vehicle’s residual value (which helps answer the cost question from above), and will also have a direct impact on the maximum usable range over time. How long will an EV battery last? You might have noticed that it is tough to get a straight answer to questions about an EV’s battery lifespan. What you may find instead are assurances that the warranty covers batteries should something go wrong. Typically, battery coverage is 8 years or 100,000 miles, but this will vary by manufacturer and country. Warranties are reassuring, and so too is the fact that battery costs are decreasing significantly year over year. Since 2010, the price of an average Lithium-ion battery pack has dropped by over 80%. An automaker’s guarantee of their battery technology and the promise of decreasing costs should inspire some confidence. However, most of us would find more comfort knowing how quickly our batteries are expected to degrade and how to minimize this loss. What is EV battery degradation? Battery degradation is a natural process that permanently reduces the amount of energy a battery can store or the amount of power it can deliver. The batteries in EVs can generally deliver more power than the powertrain components can handle. As a result, power degradation is rarely observable in EVs, and only the loss of the battery’s ability to store energy matters. A battery’s condition is called its state of health (SOH) . Batteries start their life with 100% SOH, and over time they deteriorate. For example, a 60 kWh battery with 90% SOH would effectively act like a 54 kWh battery. Keep in mind; this is not the same as vehicle range (the distance the vehicle can travel on those kWhs), which will fluctuate on a daily or trip-by-trip basis, depending on several factors including charge level, topography, temperature, auxiliary use, driving habits, and passenger or cargo load. Common factors impacting Lithium-ion battery health: Time High temperatures Operating at a high and low state of charge High electric current Usage (energy cycles) While there has been plenty of research done on battery health, there has been very little data following EVs' real-world performance over time, let alone comparisons across different makes and models. Until now. Introducing the EV Battery Degradation Tool Geotab created the EV Battery Degradation Tool to assess how batteries have been holding up and consider the relative importance of EV battery life's above factors under real-world conditions. We analyzed the battery health of 6,300 fleet and consumer EVs, representing 1.8 million days of data. From the telematics data processed, we have gained insight into how real-world conditions influence electric vehicles' battery health, providing aggregated average degradation data for 21 distinct vehicle models, representing 64 makes, models, and years. Notes about the tool: The degradation curves displayed below are the average trend line from the data analyzed. These graphs can offer insight into average battery health over time, but should not be interpreted as a precise prediction for any specific vehicle. A subset of vehicle makes, models, and years are not available in the visualization tool – we have excluded vehicles with insufficient data, so don’t be alarmed if your car of choice is missing. Get started with the tool. For more information and to use the tool, see the  Electric Vehicle Battery Degradation Tool  page.  Key takeaways High levels of sustained battery health observed First and foremost, based on data from over 6,000 electric vehicles, spanning all the major makes and models, batteries are exhibiting high levels of sustained health. If the observed degradation rates are maintained, the vast majority of batteries will outlast the vehicle's usable life. Like us, health declines with age. As you might expect, the older a vehicle is, the more likely its battery has deteriorated. However, when looking at the average decline across all vehicles, the loss is arguably minor, at 2.3% per year. This means that if you purchase an EV today with a 150-mile range, losing about 17 miles of accessible range after five years is unlikely to impact your day-to-day needs. Is EV battery degradation linear? While this tool shows more or less linear degradation, as a general rule, EV batteries are expected to decline non-linearly: an initial drop, which then continues to decline but at a far more moderate pace. Towards the end of its life, a battery will see a final significant drop, as seen below. Tesla battery degradation data-points chart Why do some vehicle models seem to, on average, degrade faster than others? Two potential contributors are: battery chemistry thermal management of the battery pack. While EVs use Lithium-ion batteries, there are many different variations of Lithium-ion chemistries (the most prominent difference being the materials used for the electrodes). A battery’s chemical make-up will influence how it responds to stress. In addition to cell chemistry, temperature control techniques differ across vehicle models. A major distinction is if the battery pack is cooled and/or heated by air or by liquid. Let’s compare a vehicle with a liquid cooling system to one with a passive air cooling system: the 2015 Tesla Model S and the 2015 Nissan Leaf, respectively. The Leaf has an average degradation rate of 4.2%, while the Model S is 2.3%. Good thermal management means better protection against degradation. State of Charge (SOC) and the buffer effect Another anticipated reason for the differences in battery health between manufacturers is how SOC is controlled. Operating a battery at near full or empty has implications on battery health. Many manufacturers add a buffer to limit this effect, effectively preventing access to the SOC's extreme ends. In addition to the protection buffers at the top end and bottom end of the battery range, many vehicles provide the EV owner the option to stop normal daily charging at a level below 100%. Did you know? Removing extremes is not only done for battery health but also for safe vehicle operation. The battery wouldn’t accept or deliver full power at the extreme ends, and the driving experience would be impacted. In essence, a battery at 100% isn’t completely charged from a pure battery chemistry standpoint. Similarly, 0% isn’t empty. Since the vehicle owner cannot access these parts of the battery range for safety and battery life reasons, many are likely unaware of it. Thanks to over-the-air software upgrades, it’s possible that the size of the buffer can change over time, as discovered by some Tesla owners in 2019, when they noticed a decrease in their top range. Tesla confirmed the upgrade was “to protect the battery and improve longevity.” Besides, some automakers have adjustable-charge ceilings, where the user can pre-set at what point the battery stops charging (e.g., they can tell the vehicle to stop charging at 75% instead of 100%). This owner-discretionary region (B in the graphic above) works in combination with the non-discretionary buffer (A) to limit battery operation in areas of higher degradation. In later updates to the degradation tool, we intend to include the impact of the owner’s operation within this discretionary (B) region and the resulting impact on degradation rates. Let’s consider an example: The Chevrolet Volt, especially the early model years, has comparatively large top and bottom protection buffers (regions A and D) that dynamically change as the battery ages. While the larger buffers mean less energy for driving, it should result in a longer-lasting battery pack. Given the larger SOC buffers, liquid thermal management, and dynamic (decreasing) buffer size, slower than average degradation rates should be expected on the Volt. What additional factors appear to influence battery health? Based on the telematics data available, we evaluated battery degradation by different factors the vehicles were exposed to and see any correlation with health decline. These factors included: Use Extreme climates Charging type High vehicle use does not equal higher battery degradation. One exciting piece of information we were able to glean from the data was that vehicles with high use did not show significantly higher battery degradation. This should come as welcome news since you don’t get the benefit of an EV if it’s just sitting in the fleet yard. The takeaway? Don’t be afraid to put your EVs in high-use duty cycles. As long as they are within their daily driving range, their battery life won’t be negatively impacted. One caveat: if high use requires routine DC fast charging, be sure to read the section on the impact of charging type. Vehicles driven in hot temperatures show a faster decline in battery SOH. A battery exposed to scorching temperatures will be prone to more damage, but by how much? Will an EV in Arizona have a different battery life than the same car driven in Norway? To find out, we grouped the vehicles based on the following climate conditions: Temperate:  Fewer than 5 days per year over 80 F (27 C) or under 23 F (-5 C). Hot: More than 5 days per year over 80 F (27 C). Heat and cold weather also impacts your day-to-day range. To understand how to take a look at our  Temperature Tool for EV Range . Taking a look at charge type We were able to look at the predominant charging level used for the EVs in our system. North American EV charging stations are categorized into three common types: Level 1: 120 volt – a regular home outlet in North America. Level 2: 240 volt – typical for home or fleet charging. Direct current fast charger: DCFC – for faster top-ups. Charging in most of Europe is referred to as AC charging (which is generally equivalent to Level 2 in North America) and DC charging (DCFC, as described above). While Level 2 is often cited as the optimal way to charge an EV, the difference in battery health between cars that routinely charged on Level 2 as compared to those who used Level 1 appeared to be observable but was not beyond the level of statistical significance. The use of DCFCs, however, does appear to impact the speed that batteries degrade. Rapidly charging a battery means high currents resulting in high temperatures, both known to strain batteries. In fact, many automakers suggest limiting the use of DCFC to prolong their vehicles’ battery life. Here we look at all battery electric vehicles in the same climate group (we chose to look at the most susceptible group – those operating in extreme climate conditions), and categorized them based on how frequently they used a DCFC: Never, occasionally (1–3 times per month) and frequently (more than 3 times per month). The difference between those vehicles that never used DCFC and those that occasionally used seasonal or hot climates was notable. While there may be other factors at play (we want to stress that this wasn’t a controlled experiment), charging via lower power Level 2 charging should be prioritized. Tips to prolong your EV battery’s life While battery degradation varies by model and external conditions – such as climate and charging type – most vehicles on the road, have not experienced a significant decline. In fact, overall degradation has been very modest, with an average capacity loss of just 2.3% per year. Under the ideal climate and charging conditions, the loss is 1.6%. While some things are out of an operator’s control, there are ways you can extend the life of your EV’s battery. Some tips for operating your EVs: Avoid keeping your car sitting with a full or empty charge. Ideally, keep your SOC between 20–80% particularly when leaving it for longer periods, and only charge it fully for long-distance trips. Minimize fast charging (DCFC). Some high-use duty cycles will need a faster charge, but if your vehicle sits overnight, level 2 should be sufficient for the majority of your charging needs. Climate is out of an operator’s control, but do what you can to avoid scorching temperatures, such as choosing shade when parked on hot days. High-use is not a concern, so fleets shouldn’t hesitate to put them to work. An EV isn’t useful sitting idle in the fleet yard, and putting on more miles per vehicle is overall a better fleet management practice. Final thought Don’t sweat the small stuff. As vehicles come out with larger battery packs, losing some capacity may not impact your day-to-day driving needs, and shouldn’t overshadow the many benefits EVs have to offer. How To Plan A Road Trip With An Electric Car Road tripping with an electric vehicle is different than with a gas car. You have to plan more. If you know how to do it, it's okay. Plan Your Route Around Fast Chargers First, you have to know where you can charge your car. Plan your road trip around available public chargers, near expressways, highways, and other roads. The thing is, you will spend more battery once you accelerate or going up hills. So, take into consideration that you will need a 10 percent buffer. Try to stick to fast chargers once you're on the road, you have to wait 30 - 40 minutes, and you're back on the road again, without any problems. Plan your trips manually or use an app like PlugShare. The app is a crowdsources directory with all available chargers near your location. It will save you a lot of time. Look For Hotels With Charge Points Save time during your trip is possible to stay at hotels which offer to charge your electric car. Nowadays, it is used more often. Generally, they are Level 2 chargers, so make sure to load your vehicle during your sleep. If the hotel does not have charging, ask the hotel staff if they have an outdoor plug to charge your car. Most electric vehicles have a Level 1 wall charger, which you can use with any standard wall socket. Which Apps To Use To Find Public Chargers What is the best way to find public chargers? In the United States, you have different charging networks, like ChargePoint and Electrify America. In Europe, we know Chargemap. You can buy a Chargemap pass, which allows you to charge your electric car on most European charging networks. You will find thousands of compatible charging stations near your location. PlugShare For Most Public Chargers PlugShare is a powered electric charger app in the community. Use this app to see which chargers are networked, non-networked, and home chargers open to the public. You can filter the chargers by connector type, speed, and if you have to pay for using them. The app can help you plan your trip and find chargers along the way. Type in your origin and destination and the app will show you all the chargers nearby. The app ChargePoint is also an advantage for the Tesla owners because it will show you all Tesla Destination Chargers, Superchargers, and all compatible chargers. Click on PlugShare for charging points in your country -ChargePoint+ Has Chargers Around The World ChargePoint is one of the largest charging networks in the World, which offers chargers Level 2 and 3. You will find them in the big cities and on a few major highways. You can use the app to pay for charging. Note: not all chargers shown in the app are public. Click on -ChargePoint+ for charging points in your country. Electrify America For DC Fast Chargers On Highways Electrify America chargers has a significant network of fast chargers near large highways (near Walmart, Targets, and other shopping centers). Prices are reasonable, and you will get a discount by signing up for a membership ($4 per month). Using the chargers is super easy, and the costs are billed to your credit card. A disadvantage is that a few stations are unreliable. Some chargers can be out of service. Click on Electrify America  to download the app. Carwow UK Electric Car Charging Point Finder. An interactive Electric Car charging point finder tool to help EV and hybrid car owners find the nearest electric vehicle charging stations. Click on:  nearest electric vehicle charging station Coming Soon: EV Passport For Unlimited Charging Soon to come: EV Passport for electric car owners. With the passport, you charge up your vehicle unlimited for only $39 per month. You can check your battery status directly from your phone. Earn Bonus Miles On Electric Car Charging Once you're on the road, you usually have to pay for charging your car. So why not earn some miles while charging it? Most chargers do not have a code 'travel,' so you need to have a credit card to earn these miles. There a few of these cards on the market: The Blue Business®️ Plus Credit Card from American Express (On the first $50,000 in purchase per year, you will get 2x Membership Rewards points; then 1x, giving you a 4% return based on TPG's valuation) Chase Freedom Unlimited (1.5% cash back/1.5x Ultimate Rewards points for a 3% return based on TPG's valuation) Capital One® Venture® Rewards Credit Card (On all purchases, you will get 2x miles, that will give you a 2.8% return based on TPG's valuations) If you fill in a credit card request, you can use it to pay for charging your electric car. Bottom Line Road tripping with an electric vehicle is way different from a gas car, but you still have a lot of fun. You will save money, so you can see more during your trip or stay in fancier hotels. Also, consider the range and think of a 10 percent buffer with your battery. Plan your charge points on your trip so that you can enjoy your trip stress-free! Cover photo by Jannes Glas Before you go! Recommended:  Tesla Electric Cybertruck: Explorer’s Best Friend Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about electric cars? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Electric Car Road Trips: The Ultimate Guide
Coronavirus Hates Social Distancing
Social Distancing brought a lot of innovations. Some far fetched some acceptable annoying. Jajaxed came with a 'beach belt kit.'   Christophe Gernigon, French designer and interior decorator, designed a curvilinear bell to help to space the tables and Mediamatic ETEN introduced: Serres Sépparées (separate greenhouses). Coronavirus Lockdown Unlocked The designers are moving around the world to look for useful solutions to create social distancing with objects other than devastating plexiglass plates. After the greenhouses on the canals of Amsterdam, it is the turn of Christophe Gernigon, French interior designer and decorator who has worked in the sector for more than 20 years with experiences in Carré Blanc (home textiles), Maison Sarah Lavoine et Arts & Influences ( Brussels concept store) and creator of Designer Particulier. Recommended:  Which Sustainable Food Keeps Your Immune System Running? Lockdown Unlocked: Safe Eating In a stunt to encourage social distancing, a German restaurant gave its diners hats with pool noodles upon its reopening. Cafe & Konditorei Rothe in Schwerin, Germany, reopened last week as the country begins to lift certain coronavirus restrictions. It posted a photo of its diners on Facebook, showing them in straw hats with colorful pool noodles pointing in three different directions to encourage social distancing from all sides (cover photo). Customers sitting outside Cafe & Konditorei Rothe in Schwerin , Germany, all wore straw hats with two swimming pool noddles taped to the top as the cafe makes sure they do not mock social distancing. Safe Eating: Plexiglass Playing on the words plexiglass and eat (eating), he created Plex'Eat, a suspension with a disc that has a diameter of 80 centimeters to which a curved and shaped bell-shaped plexiglass plate is fixed. The wave-cut in the photos distributed on the site is positioned on the back of the bell to avoid the feeling of total closure and to allow diners, even non-cohabitants, to eat at the same table without too much distance. But a simple rotation could allow cohabiting diners not also to have to worry about raising their voices to talk to each other. Recommended:  Lock-down? Stay Healthy With This Body Workout At Home Lockdown Unlocked: The Idea From Music I was worried about the restaurateurs. So I thought of a device that would allow you to rediscover conviviality around a table, but without taking risks. All the spacing solutions for restaurant customers I've seen so far have the appearance of prison parlors. The prototype is much more pleasant than the plexiglass plates that have started to swarm on the tables of Italian restaurants. The idea of ​​the plexiglass bell was born from an armchair in a concept store in Asia that was equipped with a bell to listen to music. The object is not yet in production, but there is already the interest of some plexiglass producers to verify the feasibility and start manufacturing and marketing. Recommended:  Heat Waves And COVID-19: A Killers Mix On Its Way Pandemic Safe Eating: From ‘Quarantine Greenhouses’ to ‘Sneezing Fences,’ As COVID-19 restrictions ease, restaurateurs are considering new ways to accommodate physical distancing. Outfitted in face shields and holding long wooden planks in gloved hands, servers slide meals into mini-greenhouses lining Amsterdam’s waterfront. A pandemic riff on private dining rooms - chambres séparées in French - a Dutch restaurant has dubbed its experiment Serres Sépparées (separate greenhouses). {youtube}                                         Mediamatic ETEN  trials greenhouses to shield diners from coronavirus More like dining in a fishbowl than a behind-closed-doors experience, the ETEN restaurant at Amsterdam’s Mediamatic art center  is putting a playful spin on protective barriers. Big enough for up to three people to gather around a candlelit table, these transparent enclosures serve as an example of what dining during relaxed COVID-19 containment measures could look like. Coronavirus Lockdown Unlocked: Greenhouses The five greenhouses, which artist Diana Scherer created for her ‘Spectrum Crops Findings in Colour’ project, overlook the Oosterdok harbor. They are quite small, so we worried it would feel claustrophobic, but the consensus is that they feel very cozy and intimate. Restaurants in the Netherlands will open their door again on the 1 st of June only if the Governments think it is saved to do so and with ‘a lot of’ restrictions. Unlocked: Safe Mediamatic ETEN Mediamatic ETEN, a plant-based restaurant in Amsterdam, is putting a playful spin on protective barriers. Mediamatic calls its greenhouse model ‘new safe hospitality.’ Set in the context of COVID-19, Serres Séparées is indeed novel. The pandemic presents particular demands, and for restaurants, devising ways for guests and staff to maintain a safe distance at all times is crucial. Recommended:  Tiny House Becomes Solar Water Collecting Off-grid Egg Coronavirus Lockdown Unlocked: London, South Korea, Sweden, Canada Although we’ve seen this style of private-yet-public dining before - from pre-pandemic pods on the banks of London’s River Thames to glass domes along Ottawa’s Rideau Canal -  it holds promise for businesses navigating the current crisis. As COVID-19 restrictions ease, restaurateurs are considering new ways to accommodate physical distancing. In South Korean dining halls, for example, plexiglass partitions separating seated guests are commonplace. A rural Swedish restaurant, Stedsans in the Woods, announced plans to install a clear ‘sneezing fence’ on communal tables so you can talk to and see people on the other side of the table without being sneezed on. Recommended:  Sustainable Arctic Architecture: A Geodesic Dome In Canada, most restaurateurs are questioning their ability to reopen at all, let alone contemplating ways to fund glass greenhouses or other private dining options. Lack of capital is a significant issue. The biggest concern is 70 percent of people are worried (about whether) they have enough money to reopen. That’s going to be one thing that stands in the way of any innovation. Even if restaurants are permitted to operate at 50 percent capacity, he adds, most will struggle to resume dine-in service. In addition to regular operating costs, there will likely be increased staffing requirements to cover enhanced cleaning and crowd control. Kitchens will have to be reconfigured to allow for physical distancing among staff. All of this will need to be accomplished with half the number of tables they usually rely on to generate revenue. With the restrictions still being on, it’s going to be hard for anybody to make any investments in things like you see in other countries. Once we’re through this, hopefully, they’ll find a way to counteract the effects of the virus, and people will be able to start assembling again. That’s when our industry will bounce back. That’s when you’ll see the real innovation and the actual resilience of our sector.” Keep Distance On The Beach The Jajaxd Collective has introduced the ‘beach belt’ kit, which helps people keep the specified social distance on the beach. Since the beach becomes a trendy destination for areas with hot summer weather, the studio wanted to ease the general uncertainty, allowing people to enjoy the sand and sea. Foto by  JAJA x D.  Keep Distance Scream The Signs: Your Holiday 2.0 Social Distancing: Impossible Fashion The fashion world has responded to the request of social distancing by coming up with rather funny but impossible costumes. Funny or not, they help you to keep a distance and don’t allow anybody to come close! The costumes remind people that keeping a distance is a ‘serious matter’ and, at the same time, can trigger smiles and ‘discussion.’ The petticoat dress by multiply office In the swimming pool, you can wear a floating device that fits around your body like a ‘pancake.’ Swimming will be hard, but at least you can keep half of your body cool while keeping people on a distance. Keep Distance: Shoes With A 'Message' Shoes made by Grigore Lup, Spain. Social Distancing: Recreation  These socially distancing circles can be seen in Domino Park in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. When the pandemic hit Elblag, Poland, and forced the closure of the city’s  contemporary art gallery, Director  Adriana Kotynska, an architect, came up with an innovative solution to safely attract visitors to its public outdoor space. She turned the gallery’s overgrown lawn into a green checkerboard, mowing the grass in a pattern to create individual social isolation zones. Tram Concept With Social Distancing Solutions. Italian architect Arturo Tedeschi has designed a tram concept for the city of Milan called Passerella, which is equipped with discreet social distancing solutions. Designed as a modern take on the classic ATM Class 1500 tram, which was first introduced to the city in 1929, the Passerella reinterprets the style and proportions of the first model numbered 1503. Design Arturo Tedeschi Along with updating its form, Tedeschi added technologies and adaptations for life following the coronavirus pandemic. Its interior features plexiglass shields to separate individual seats and circle-shaped markers on the floor to act as discreet signals of where travelers should stand to keep a safe distance. Design Arturo Tedeschi Frank Kunert's older work, Privacy, has taken on new meaning in today's context Kunert said social distancing has also caused him to look at older pieces in a new light, such as the 2017 piece simply titled Privacy where a round dining table is divided into individual dining booths. "Many of my scenes match our so-called 'new normal' which isn't all that surprising," he said. "I'm driven by the topic of communication and society." Several other creatives have turned to model-making as an artistic outlet during the pandemic. Photo by Angela Weiss. People dine in plastic tents to enable coronavirus social distancing at a restaurant in Manhattan.  Before you go! Recommended:  Urban Mobility: Friendliest Bike Cities Worldwide Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about COVID-19 or social distancing measures? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Social Distancing brought a lot of innovations. Some far fetched some acceptable annoying. Jajaxed came with a 'beach belt kit.'   Christophe Gernigon, French designer and interior decorator, designed a curvilinear bell to help to space the tables and Mediamatic ETEN introduced: Serres Sépparées (separate greenhouses). Coronavirus Lockdown Unlocked The designers are moving around the world to look for useful solutions to create social distancing with objects other than devastating plexiglass plates. After the greenhouses on the canals of Amsterdam, it is the turn of Christophe Gernigon, French interior designer and decorator who has worked in the sector for more than 20 years with experiences in Carré Blanc (home textiles), Maison Sarah Lavoine et Arts & Influences ( Brussels concept store) and creator of Designer Particulier. Recommended:  Which Sustainable Food Keeps Your Immune System Running? Lockdown Unlocked: Safe Eating In a stunt to encourage social distancing, a German restaurant gave its diners hats with pool noodles upon its reopening. Cafe & Konditorei Rothe in Schwerin, Germany, reopened last week as the country begins to lift certain coronavirus restrictions. It posted a photo of its diners on Facebook, showing them in straw hats with colorful pool noodles pointing in three different directions to encourage social distancing from all sides (cover photo). Customers sitting outside Cafe & Konditorei Rothe in Schwerin , Germany, all wore straw hats with two swimming pool noddles taped to the top as the cafe makes sure they do not mock social distancing. Safe Eating: Plexiglass Playing on the words plexiglass and eat (eating), he created Plex'Eat, a suspension with a disc that has a diameter of 80 centimeters to which a curved and shaped bell-shaped plexiglass plate is fixed. The wave-cut in the photos distributed on the site is positioned on the back of the bell to avoid the feeling of total closure and to allow diners, even non-cohabitants, to eat at the same table without too much distance. But a simple rotation could allow cohabiting diners not also to have to worry about raising their voices to talk to each other. Recommended:  Lock-down? Stay Healthy With This Body Workout At Home Lockdown Unlocked: The Idea From Music I was worried about the restaurateurs. So I thought of a device that would allow you to rediscover conviviality around a table, but without taking risks. All the spacing solutions for restaurant customers I've seen so far have the appearance of prison parlors. The prototype is much more pleasant than the plexiglass plates that have started to swarm on the tables of Italian restaurants. The idea of ​​the plexiglass bell was born from an armchair in a concept store in Asia that was equipped with a bell to listen to music. The object is not yet in production, but there is already the interest of some plexiglass producers to verify the feasibility and start manufacturing and marketing. Recommended:  Heat Waves And COVID-19: A Killers Mix On Its Way Pandemic Safe Eating: From ‘Quarantine Greenhouses’ to ‘Sneezing Fences,’ As COVID-19 restrictions ease, restaurateurs are considering new ways to accommodate physical distancing. Outfitted in face shields and holding long wooden planks in gloved hands, servers slide meals into mini-greenhouses lining Amsterdam’s waterfront. A pandemic riff on private dining rooms - chambres séparées in French - a Dutch restaurant has dubbed its experiment Serres Sépparées (separate greenhouses). {youtube}                                         Mediamatic ETEN  trials greenhouses to shield diners from coronavirus More like dining in a fishbowl than a behind-closed-doors experience, the ETEN restaurant at Amsterdam’s Mediamatic art center  is putting a playful spin on protective barriers. Big enough for up to three people to gather around a candlelit table, these transparent enclosures serve as an example of what dining during relaxed COVID-19 containment measures could look like. Coronavirus Lockdown Unlocked: Greenhouses The five greenhouses, which artist Diana Scherer created for her ‘Spectrum Crops Findings in Colour’ project, overlook the Oosterdok harbor. They are quite small, so we worried it would feel claustrophobic, but the consensus is that they feel very cozy and intimate. Restaurants in the Netherlands will open their door again on the 1 st of June only if the Governments think it is saved to do so and with ‘a lot of’ restrictions. Unlocked: Safe Mediamatic ETEN Mediamatic ETEN, a plant-based restaurant in Amsterdam, is putting a playful spin on protective barriers. Mediamatic calls its greenhouse model ‘new safe hospitality.’ Set in the context of COVID-19, Serres Séparées is indeed novel. The pandemic presents particular demands, and for restaurants, devising ways for guests and staff to maintain a safe distance at all times is crucial. Recommended:  Tiny House Becomes Solar Water Collecting Off-grid Egg Coronavirus Lockdown Unlocked: London, South Korea, Sweden, Canada Although we’ve seen this style of private-yet-public dining before - from pre-pandemic pods on the banks of London’s River Thames to glass domes along Ottawa’s Rideau Canal -  it holds promise for businesses navigating the current crisis. As COVID-19 restrictions ease, restaurateurs are considering new ways to accommodate physical distancing. In South Korean dining halls, for example, plexiglass partitions separating seated guests are commonplace. A rural Swedish restaurant, Stedsans in the Woods, announced plans to install a clear ‘sneezing fence’ on communal tables so you can talk to and see people on the other side of the table without being sneezed on. Recommended:  Sustainable Arctic Architecture: A Geodesic Dome In Canada, most restaurateurs are questioning their ability to reopen at all, let alone contemplating ways to fund glass greenhouses or other private dining options. Lack of capital is a significant issue. The biggest concern is 70 percent of people are worried (about whether) they have enough money to reopen. That’s going to be one thing that stands in the way of any innovation. Even if restaurants are permitted to operate at 50 percent capacity, he adds, most will struggle to resume dine-in service. In addition to regular operating costs, there will likely be increased staffing requirements to cover enhanced cleaning and crowd control. Kitchens will have to be reconfigured to allow for physical distancing among staff. All of this will need to be accomplished with half the number of tables they usually rely on to generate revenue. With the restrictions still being on, it’s going to be hard for anybody to make any investments in things like you see in other countries. Once we’re through this, hopefully, they’ll find a way to counteract the effects of the virus, and people will be able to start assembling again. That’s when our industry will bounce back. That’s when you’ll see the real innovation and the actual resilience of our sector.” Keep Distance On The Beach The Jajaxd Collective has introduced the ‘beach belt’ kit, which helps people keep the specified social distance on the beach. Since the beach becomes a trendy destination for areas with hot summer weather, the studio wanted to ease the general uncertainty, allowing people to enjoy the sand and sea. Foto by  JAJA x D.  Keep Distance Scream The Signs: Your Holiday 2.0 Social Distancing: Impossible Fashion The fashion world has responded to the request of social distancing by coming up with rather funny but impossible costumes. Funny or not, they help you to keep a distance and don’t allow anybody to come close! The costumes remind people that keeping a distance is a ‘serious matter’ and, at the same time, can trigger smiles and ‘discussion.’ The petticoat dress by multiply office In the swimming pool, you can wear a floating device that fits around your body like a ‘pancake.’ Swimming will be hard, but at least you can keep half of your body cool while keeping people on a distance. Keep Distance: Shoes With A 'Message' Shoes made by Grigore Lup, Spain. Social Distancing: Recreation  These socially distancing circles can be seen in Domino Park in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. When the pandemic hit Elblag, Poland, and forced the closure of the city’s  contemporary art gallery, Director  Adriana Kotynska, an architect, came up with an innovative solution to safely attract visitors to its public outdoor space. She turned the gallery’s overgrown lawn into a green checkerboard, mowing the grass in a pattern to create individual social isolation zones. Tram Concept With Social Distancing Solutions. Italian architect Arturo Tedeschi has designed a tram concept for the city of Milan called Passerella, which is equipped with discreet social distancing solutions. Designed as a modern take on the classic ATM Class 1500 tram, which was first introduced to the city in 1929, the Passerella reinterprets the style and proportions of the first model numbered 1503. Design Arturo Tedeschi Along with updating its form, Tedeschi added technologies and adaptations for life following the coronavirus pandemic. Its interior features plexiglass shields to separate individual seats and circle-shaped markers on the floor to act as discreet signals of where travelers should stand to keep a safe distance. Design Arturo Tedeschi Frank Kunert's older work, Privacy, has taken on new meaning in today's context Kunert said social distancing has also caused him to look at older pieces in a new light, such as the 2017 piece simply titled Privacy where a round dining table is divided into individual dining booths. "Many of my scenes match our so-called 'new normal' which isn't all that surprising," he said. "I'm driven by the topic of communication and society." Several other creatives have turned to model-making as an artistic outlet during the pandemic. Photo by Angela Weiss. People dine in plastic tents to enable coronavirus social distancing at a restaurant in Manhattan.  Before you go! Recommended:  Urban Mobility: Friendliest Bike Cities Worldwide Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about COVID-19 or social distancing measures? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Coronavirus Hates Social Distancing
Coronavirus Hates Social Distancing
The Weirdest Container Homes In The World
Shipping containers are pretty nifty. They can haul some impressive loads, from nuclear waste to life-saving medicines and from endangered snakes to IKEA-furniture. Each will go in a specific container, controlled for temperature, humidity, ventilation, shielding, and whatnot. All to travel the world in a boat or on a train, to their ultimate destination - where they get unloaded and loaded up with their next load. Always on the move, always full. The Weirdest Container Homes: Cargotecture Or, at least, that used to be their destiny. That was until a smart builder came around, looked at the empty shipping containers, and decided that they would actually be pretty great as a dwelling. Someone’s small, smart home, or perhaps a mobile office or shop. To be transported anywhere where affordable space is needed, only to be used and perhaps re-located if the need is fulfilled. It has been done long enough for it to be given a name. Cargotecture, or the art of transforming cargo containers for architectural purposes. And it goes much further than simply using old shipping containers and upcycle them to create cost-efficient, secure buildings. Quite the contrary, architects are now trying their hand at incorporating shipping containers in their most prestigious projects. So far, we have seen pretty unique container homes, alongside container schools, portable hotels, and restaurants, but also bridges, hospitals, theatres, student housing, offices, and much more. It is no wonder that they have become so popular, as they are readily available, require very little building effort, are able to withstand the test of time, plus they are very safe - being flood-proof and fire-proof. Want to get inspired by looking at what is already out there? Here are some examples of innovative shipping container projects. Container Homes Amsterdam: 'Keetwonen' Keetwonen, or ‘shack living’, is the single largest complex of shipping container buildings in the world. It is located in Amsterdam, consisting of 1,034 containers - all meant for student housing in the overcrowded city. Redondo Beach Container Home, California One of the typical poster children of container-living can be found right on a Pacific Ocean beachfront location. Its construction required eight shipping containers for a two-story, 278 m2 home with 4 (container) bedrooms with bathrooms. Port-A-Bach Container Home, New Zealand The Port-A-Bach is created by the New Zealand company Atelierworkshop. It wanted to create affordable holiday homes. This is why this project is so innovative: it is not only self-contained, it also has fold-out walls - and it can be transported to any location you’d like. Recommended:  Tiny Houses From Shipping Containers. A Trend? Cúbica Container Houme, Costa Rica In the gorgeous nature of Costa Rica, tourists are delighted to find their vacation home in the Cúbica Container House. It is positively tiny, at 15 m2, but sleeps four people, who can enjoy gorgeous views from the rooftop. Mill Junction Silos Johannesburg Taking a lesson from Amsterdam, the South African property developer City used both shipping containers and grain silos to create student accommodation. The 10 stories of the grain silo base were topped with four stories of shipping containers. In total, this created 375 apartments in a tower that is now a prominent part of the city’s skyline. The Bonsai Container Skyscraper, Zurich In Switzerland, the Freitag company created its unique flagship store out of 19 old, well-used containers. After reinforcing and stacking them, a marvelous looking skyscraper unfolded - that has pledged to do well for the environment through low-impact solutions for heating, ventilation, and water use. Trump Container Cadde, Istanbul Yes, there is a Trump Towers in Istanbul. And it is gorgeous - or at least, its roof is. On its roof terrace, a Turkish bazaar was re-created using shipping containers. These are used for commercial purposes and decorated in a breathtakingly authentic manner. The gardens that surround the containers are a sight to behold, as well. Recommended:  Grimshaw Designs Tiny House ‘The Peak’: Australia Container City, Cholula Cholula, Mexico is a few hours away from Mexico City, with very little to speak for itself. With the build of their Container City, the locals sure were not about to accept this status. The shipping container structure is a true marvel, combining galleries, restaurants, bars, stores, apartments, and offices in one tiny - and very sustainable - ‘city’. Recommended:  Tiny House With Multi-Functional Design KontenerART, Poznań Another container city can be found in the Polish city of Poznań. KontenerART was founded by a collective of independent artists and is dedicated to showing ‘art’. There are film screenings, concerts, workshops, and art exhibitions. Plus, it offers free space to both local and international artists. Snoozebox Portable Hotel, Northamptonshire Snoozebox, how is that for a fitting name for a container that you can sleep in? In Northamptonshire in England, the Snoozebox system operates from the Silverstone racing circuit. Basically, people can order their so-called ‘pods’ for accommodation for all kinds of events. These pods include airconditioning, heating, bathrooms, and several bunk beds. Ship Away: Containers Of Hope In Costa Rico The applications are there. Let them inspire you - and consider ways of re-using old shipping containers for your own building projects. They are not just cutting-edge. They are also greener, safer, and often much cheaper. What more could you ask for? In the past, we took a brief look at Containers of Hope during our feature on shipping container homes, but this remarkable project by Benjamin Garcia Saxe Architecture definitely deserves more attention. Built on a budget of just $40,000, this creative dwelling allowed the Peralta family to live debt-free in their ideal setting: surrounded by fields, their horses, and just 20 minutes from San Jose, Costa Rica. Before you go! Recommended:  Tiny Houses Tips And Tricks: Minimalistic Living Experience Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about Tiny Houses or Container Houses? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
Shipping containers are pretty nifty. They can haul some impressive loads, from nuclear waste to life-saving medicines and from endangered snakes to IKEA-furniture. Each will go in a specific container, controlled for temperature, humidity, ventilation, shielding, and whatnot. All to travel the world in a boat or on a train, to their ultimate destination - where they get unloaded and loaded up with their next load. Always on the move, always full. The Weirdest Container Homes: Cargotecture Or, at least, that used to be their destiny. That was until a smart builder came around, looked at the empty shipping containers, and decided that they would actually be pretty great as a dwelling. Someone’s small, smart home, or perhaps a mobile office or shop. To be transported anywhere where affordable space is needed, only to be used and perhaps re-located if the need is fulfilled. It has been done long enough for it to be given a name. Cargotecture, or the art of transforming cargo containers for architectural purposes. And it goes much further than simply using old shipping containers and upcycle them to create cost-efficient, secure buildings. Quite the contrary, architects are now trying their hand at incorporating shipping containers in their most prestigious projects. So far, we have seen pretty unique container homes, alongside container schools, portable hotels, and restaurants, but also bridges, hospitals, theatres, student housing, offices, and much more. It is no wonder that they have become so popular, as they are readily available, require very little building effort, are able to withstand the test of time, plus they are very safe - being flood-proof and fire-proof. Want to get inspired by looking at what is already out there? Here are some examples of innovative shipping container projects. Container Homes Amsterdam: 'Keetwonen' Keetwonen, or ‘shack living’, is the single largest complex of shipping container buildings in the world. It is located in Amsterdam, consisting of 1,034 containers - all meant for student housing in the overcrowded city. Redondo Beach Container Home, California One of the typical poster children of container-living can be found right on a Pacific Ocean beachfront location. Its construction required eight shipping containers for a two-story, 278 m2 home with 4 (container) bedrooms with bathrooms. Port-A-Bach Container Home, New Zealand The Port-A-Bach is created by the New Zealand company Atelierworkshop. It wanted to create affordable holiday homes. This is why this project is so innovative: it is not only self-contained, it also has fold-out walls - and it can be transported to any location you’d like. Recommended:  Tiny Houses From Shipping Containers. A Trend? Cúbica Container Houme, Costa Rica In the gorgeous nature of Costa Rica, tourists are delighted to find their vacation home in the Cúbica Container House. It is positively tiny, at 15 m2, but sleeps four people, who can enjoy gorgeous views from the rooftop. Mill Junction Silos Johannesburg Taking a lesson from Amsterdam, the South African property developer City used both shipping containers and grain silos to create student accommodation. The 10 stories of the grain silo base were topped with four stories of shipping containers. In total, this created 375 apartments in a tower that is now a prominent part of the city’s skyline. The Bonsai Container Skyscraper, Zurich In Switzerland, the Freitag company created its unique flagship store out of 19 old, well-used containers. After reinforcing and stacking them, a marvelous looking skyscraper unfolded - that has pledged to do well for the environment through low-impact solutions for heating, ventilation, and water use. Trump Container Cadde, Istanbul Yes, there is a Trump Towers in Istanbul. And it is gorgeous - or at least, its roof is. On its roof terrace, a Turkish bazaar was re-created using shipping containers. These are used for commercial purposes and decorated in a breathtakingly authentic manner. The gardens that surround the containers are a sight to behold, as well. Recommended:  Grimshaw Designs Tiny House ‘The Peak’: Australia Container City, Cholula Cholula, Mexico is a few hours away from Mexico City, with very little to speak for itself. With the build of their Container City, the locals sure were not about to accept this status. The shipping container structure is a true marvel, combining galleries, restaurants, bars, stores, apartments, and offices in one tiny - and very sustainable - ‘city’. Recommended:  Tiny House With Multi-Functional Design KontenerART, Poznań Another container city can be found in the Polish city of Poznań. KontenerART was founded by a collective of independent artists and is dedicated to showing ‘art’. There are film screenings, concerts, workshops, and art exhibitions. Plus, it offers free space to both local and international artists. Snoozebox Portable Hotel, Northamptonshire Snoozebox, how is that for a fitting name for a container that you can sleep in? In Northamptonshire in England, the Snoozebox system operates from the Silverstone racing circuit. Basically, people can order their so-called ‘pods’ for accommodation for all kinds of events. These pods include airconditioning, heating, bathrooms, and several bunk beds. Ship Away: Containers Of Hope In Costa Rico The applications are there. Let them inspire you - and consider ways of re-using old shipping containers for your own building projects. They are not just cutting-edge. They are also greener, safer, and often much cheaper. What more could you ask for? In the past, we took a brief look at Containers of Hope during our feature on shipping container homes, but this remarkable project by Benjamin Garcia Saxe Architecture definitely deserves more attention. Built on a budget of just $40,000, this creative dwelling allowed the Peralta family to live debt-free in their ideal setting: surrounded by fields, their horses, and just 20 minutes from San Jose, Costa Rica. Before you go! Recommended:  Tiny Houses Tips And Tricks: Minimalistic Living Experience Did you find this an interesting article, or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your article about Tiny Houses or Container Houses? Send your writing & scribble with a photo to  hansvanderbroek@whatsorb.com , and we will write an interesting article based on your input.
The Weirdest Container Homes In The World
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