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Bamboo traffic signs will help us make our cities safer and more sustainable
  As consumers, we are often aware of how sustainable are the items we use every day – our food, clothing, skincare and other items have special labels to let us know that they are environmentally friendly and fair trade. But what about common objects that surround us outside of our homes? HR Groep in collaboration with MOSO International have introduced a new product line –traffic signs made out of bamboo – that is aiming to make our streets a bit more green. Why bamboo? Bamboo is one of the fastest growing sustainable resources in the world. A single bamboo plant consists of multiple stems. Every year, new shoots sprout from them. On average, 20-25% of the stems can be harvested in a sustainable plantation or commercial forest every year. Due to the rapid growth rate, this can happen without the number of stems per hectare decreasing! Deforestation is averted as a result of selective logging, keeping the plants alive and healthy. In fact, this means of harvesting the mature stems actually improves overall yield and quality of the commercial forest.Another great thing about bamboo is that it absorbs large quantities of CO2 as it grows. This, combined with ease of recycling, makes it more sustainable than aluminium and carbon neutral throughout its entire life cycle. And, naturally, high CO2 absorption rates help combat global warming! Lastly, bamboo’s properties are comparable to – or even superior to – hardwood. It is a very strong material that can be used in a multitude of ways – it can be fully recycled into things such as chipboard, or used in biomass power plants to generate green energy. This, combined with bamboo’s growth rates, makes it a more attractive crop for many farmers that can provide them with a steady annual income. What makes the bamboo sign unique? For the usage of bamboo as an information carrier, multiple layers of bamboo are glued together. The result is a remarkably resilient, scratchproof product that will neither rip nor deform.HR Groep uses their Ultimate Signing™ technology to make these signs even more sustainable. Ultimate Signing™ is a special UV printing method that is more long lasting than traditional foils. It provides a better viewing angle that improves visibility and thus helps make our roads safer! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation https://www.hrgroep.nl/ https://www.moso.eu/nl/producten/bamboo-unlimited/bamboo-ultimate-verkeersbord
  As consumers, we are often aware of how sustainable are the items we use every day – our food, clothing, skincare and other items have special labels to let us know that they are environmentally friendly and fair trade. But what about common objects that surround us outside of our homes? HR Groep in collaboration with MOSO International have introduced a new product line –traffic signs made out of bamboo – that is aiming to make our streets a bit more green. Why bamboo? Bamboo is one of the fastest growing sustainable resources in the world. A single bamboo plant consists of multiple stems. Every year, new shoots sprout from them. On average, 20-25% of the stems can be harvested in a sustainable plantation or commercial forest every year. Due to the rapid growth rate, this can happen without the number of stems per hectare decreasing! Deforestation is averted as a result of selective logging, keeping the plants alive and healthy. In fact, this means of harvesting the mature stems actually improves overall yield and quality of the commercial forest.Another great thing about bamboo is that it absorbs large quantities of CO2 as it grows. This, combined with ease of recycling, makes it more sustainable than aluminium and carbon neutral throughout its entire life cycle. And, naturally, high CO2 absorption rates help combat global warming! Lastly, bamboo’s properties are comparable to – or even superior to – hardwood. It is a very strong material that can be used in a multitude of ways – it can be fully recycled into things such as chipboard, or used in biomass power plants to generate green energy. This, combined with bamboo’s growth rates, makes it a more attractive crop for many farmers that can provide them with a steady annual income. What makes the bamboo sign unique? For the usage of bamboo as an information carrier, multiple layers of bamboo are glued together. The result is a remarkably resilient, scratchproof product that will neither rip nor deform.HR Groep uses their Ultimate Signing™ technology to make these signs even more sustainable. Ultimate Signing™ is a special UV printing method that is more long lasting than traditional foils. It provides a better viewing angle that improves visibility and thus helps make our roads safer! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/transportation https://www.hrgroep.nl/ https://www.moso.eu/nl/producten/bamboo-unlimited/bamboo-ultimate-verkeersbord
Bamboo traffic signs will help us make our cities safer and more sustainable
Bamboo traffic signs will help us make our cities safer and more sustainable
Please support my petition about climate change awareness and look at my promotion of Citizens
Please "check out" my petition drawing attention to the threat of a climate-engineered future.https://secure.avaaz.org/en/petition/UN_SecretaryGeneral_Ban_Kimoon_Improve_Climate_Change_Impact_Awareness/(see NASA You-Tube referenced near the end, long but good).Facebook "Like" is good, but to sign please go to the AVAAZ petition site & Please SHARE. I am also encouraging all my friends to join and be active in Citizens’ Climate Lobby.“If you want to join the fight to save the planet, to save creation for your grandchildren, there is no more effective step you could take than becoming a member of this group.” Dr James Hansen We help generate political will to address climate change with the required urgency through correctly pricing carbon.US based now growing in internationally. Hope you Sign the petition and Join CCL http://citizensclimatelobby.org/ .
Please "check out" my petition drawing attention to the threat of a climate-engineered future.https://secure.avaaz.org/en/petition/UN_SecretaryGeneral_Ban_Kimoon_Improve_Climate_Change_Impact_Awareness/(see NASA You-Tube referenced near the end, long but good).Facebook "Like" is good, but to sign please go to the AVAAZ petition site & Please SHARE. I am also encouraging all my friends to join and be active in Citizens’ Climate Lobby.“If you want to join the fight to save the planet, to save creation for your grandchildren, there is no more effective step you could take than becoming a member of this group.” Dr James Hansen We help generate political will to address climate change with the required urgency through correctly pricing carbon.US based now growing in internationally. Hope you Sign the petition and Join CCL http://citizensclimatelobby.org/ .
Please support my petition about climate change awareness and look at my promotion of Citizens
Please support my petition about climate change awareness and look at my promotion of Citizens' Climate Lobby
Blockchain technology is set to change agricultural trade
Agricultural trade plays an important role in global food security and is a major part of many countries’ economies. And yet, this is a sector where it is common for trades to be merely verbal agreements or have various brokers, agencies and traders act as mediators. A French start-up called Ositrade is looking to change that with the help of blockchain technology. Last month, Ositrade has launched their new online market place that allows producers, buyers and manufacturers to connect with each other directly and conduct transactions in a transparent and safe manner. Moreover, it changes the way that administration and documentation of such deals is handled, therefore making it more efficient for all parties. The founder of this platform believes that it could not only make trading easier, but also revolutionise the sector and raise the quality of all French production. This will be made possible by cutting out the middlemen and providing more data on each of the parties involved in a transaction. This increased transparency, as well as the security of the platform, will guard against fraud and promote stronger relationships. In order to make this a reality, Ositrade has partnered up with Hyperledger, an umbrella project of open source blockchains and related tools that was started by the Linux Foundation. More sustainable and ethical practices Ositrade platform offers a multitude of functions to its users, including automatically generated contract templates, cloud storage for relevant documents and certificates and various filtering possibilities. One of the most important filters according to Ositrade is the geolocation filter. By helping companies find partners that are close to their location, Ositrade aims to improve logistics and push the supply chains towards more sustainable and ethical practices. At the moment Ositrade is only available in France, but they are aiming to expand to the rest of the EU by 2019 and go global in 2020. Do you think using blockchain technology can change the agricultural sector? Share your opinion with us in the comments below!
Agricultural trade plays an important role in global food security and is a major part of many countries’ economies. And yet, this is a sector where it is common for trades to be merely verbal agreements or have various brokers, agencies and traders act as mediators. A French start-up called Ositrade is looking to change that with the help of blockchain technology. Last month, Ositrade has launched their new online market place that allows producers, buyers and manufacturers to connect with each other directly and conduct transactions in a transparent and safe manner. Moreover, it changes the way that administration and documentation of such deals is handled, therefore making it more efficient for all parties. The founder of this platform believes that it could not only make trading easier, but also revolutionise the sector and raise the quality of all French production. This will be made possible by cutting out the middlemen and providing more data on each of the parties involved in a transaction. This increased transparency, as well as the security of the platform, will guard against fraud and promote stronger relationships. In order to make this a reality, Ositrade has partnered up with Hyperledger, an umbrella project of open source blockchains and related tools that was started by the Linux Foundation. More sustainable and ethical practices Ositrade platform offers a multitude of functions to its users, including automatically generated contract templates, cloud storage for relevant documents and certificates and various filtering possibilities. One of the most important filters according to Ositrade is the geolocation filter. By helping companies find partners that are close to their location, Ositrade aims to improve logistics and push the supply chains towards more sustainable and ethical practices. At the moment Ositrade is only available in France, but they are aiming to expand to the rest of the EU by 2019 and go global in 2020. Do you think using blockchain technology can change the agricultural sector? Share your opinion with us in the comments below!
Blockchain technology is set to change agricultural trade
Blockchain technology is set to change agricultural trade
Wastewater farming – a forced risk that could become a solution
It is no secret that world’s population has grown very rapidly in the past decades. This has put a lot of pressure on natural resources, especially when it comes to the most important one of them all – water. With it becoming more and more scarce, we are now turning to reusing waste water and for some farming communities it has become the only solution – but it is much more dangerous than they realise. Naturally, nobody would want to drink waste water and yet it seems like less of a concern when it comes to watering our plants with it. It is true that wastewater can provide plants with important nutrients and act as a natural fertiliser, however when untreated it can also introduce heavy metals, organic contaminants, pathogens or antibiotic-resistant bacteria into our food. So why do some communities still take the risk of using it? The answer is very simple – untreated wastewater is free. In some areas this is the only way a farmer can afford irrigation, while in others it is simply a way of increasing profits. According to the World Health Organisation nearly 10% of the world’s population relies on food grown on waste water, but in reality the true extent of the problem is unknown due to lack of regulations and checks in some developing countries. How untreated wastewater farming puts everyone at risk The Mezquital Valley in Mexico is a textbook example of the problem. Lack of appropriate water treatment facilities and rapid expansion of Mexico City has forced local farmers to use untreated wastewater for irrigation. High prices of pre-treated water made unsafe practices the only way that produce could be grown at a low cost. Affordable produce came at a very high price – it cost the population their health. Mezquital Valley has the highest incidence of kidney cancer in the region, as well as very high rates of helminith and severe gastrointestinal diseases. As using untreated waste water has been practiced in this region for more than a 100 years, many generations of locals were affected and it is likely that future generations will be affected as well. A controversial solution Luckily, the government has recognized the issue and a new water treatment plant called Atotonilco plant has been in the works since 2010. It is expected to be able to provide enough water for irrigation of 80,000 hectares of land. While many see this as a great step forward, there are some that don’t want to see this project finished – the farmers themselves. Switching to treated water would require them to switch to using fertilizers and agrochemicals, which will increase costs. Many farmers are concerned that they will not be able to sustain these additional costs and would thus have to quit the trade that has been passed down in their family for many generations. Most of them also downplay the risks of using untreated water, claiming that their families haven’t suffered from it – in fact, some wash their hands with that water before eating. This is a conflict that will be hard to resolve in a way that would leave both sides of it happy – the farmers want to see no reduction in the amount of water they get or how much organic material it contains, while the government wants to see a drastic improvement in water quality. Is there still hope? Unfortunately, experience has shown that even the latest technology does not eliminate all of the risks of using wastewater. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria and other pollutants can still find ways to pass through these treatment systems and pose a serious thread to human health. This can make developing countries less likely to invest in plants such as the Atotonilco one as they are incredibly costly (according to the company behind the plant’s contruction, it has required an investment of more than 560 million euros so far, which is nearly 650 million USD) and their limitations might seem insufficient by some. World Health Organisation has been campaigning for safer waste water use in farming for many decades and various solutions are being developed for low-income countries. They work with experts across various industries to define safe practice guidelines and offer low-cost options that, while imperfect, will reduce health risks for both farmers and locals. Mezquital Valley’s situation has illustrated that we cannot avoid using wastewater for farming and that more needs to be done to make it safer. New technology, governmental regulations and policies and educating communities about risks are all needed for us to be sustainable without risking more in the process. Have you heard of other communities affected by using untreated wastewater for farming? What other steps do you think can be taken to make the practice safer for everyone? We would love to hear your opinion in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/gardening---agriculture
It is no secret that world’s population has grown very rapidly in the past decades. This has put a lot of pressure on natural resources, especially when it comes to the most important one of them all – water. With it becoming more and more scarce, we are now turning to reusing waste water and for some farming communities it has become the only solution – but it is much more dangerous than they realise. Naturally, nobody would want to drink waste water and yet it seems like less of a concern when it comes to watering our plants with it. It is true that wastewater can provide plants with important nutrients and act as a natural fertiliser, however when untreated it can also introduce heavy metals, organic contaminants, pathogens or antibiotic-resistant bacteria into our food. So why do some communities still take the risk of using it? The answer is very simple – untreated wastewater is free. In some areas this is the only way a farmer can afford irrigation, while in others it is simply a way of increasing profits. According to the World Health Organisation nearly 10% of the world’s population relies on food grown on waste water, but in reality the true extent of the problem is unknown due to lack of regulations and checks in some developing countries. How untreated wastewater farming puts everyone at risk The Mezquital Valley in Mexico is a textbook example of the problem. Lack of appropriate water treatment facilities and rapid expansion of Mexico City has forced local farmers to use untreated wastewater for irrigation. High prices of pre-treated water made unsafe practices the only way that produce could be grown at a low cost. Affordable produce came at a very high price – it cost the population their health. Mezquital Valley has the highest incidence of kidney cancer in the region, as well as very high rates of helminith and severe gastrointestinal diseases. As using untreated waste water has been practiced in this region for more than a 100 years, many generations of locals were affected and it is likely that future generations will be affected as well. A controversial solution Luckily, the government has recognized the issue and a new water treatment plant called Atotonilco plant has been in the works since 2010. It is expected to be able to provide enough water for irrigation of 80,000 hectares of land. While many see this as a great step forward, there are some that don’t want to see this project finished – the farmers themselves. Switching to treated water would require them to switch to using fertilizers and agrochemicals, which will increase costs. Many farmers are concerned that they will not be able to sustain these additional costs and would thus have to quit the trade that has been passed down in their family for many generations. Most of them also downplay the risks of using untreated water, claiming that their families haven’t suffered from it – in fact, some wash their hands with that water before eating. This is a conflict that will be hard to resolve in a way that would leave both sides of it happy – the farmers want to see no reduction in the amount of water they get or how much organic material it contains, while the government wants to see a drastic improvement in water quality. Is there still hope? Unfortunately, experience has shown that even the latest technology does not eliminate all of the risks of using wastewater. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria and other pollutants can still find ways to pass through these treatment systems and pose a serious thread to human health. This can make developing countries less likely to invest in plants such as the Atotonilco one as they are incredibly costly (according to the company behind the plant’s contruction, it has required an investment of more than 560 million euros so far, which is nearly 650 million USD) and their limitations might seem insufficient by some. World Health Organisation has been campaigning for safer waste water use in farming for many decades and various solutions are being developed for low-income countries. They work with experts across various industries to define safe practice guidelines and offer low-cost options that, while imperfect, will reduce health risks for both farmers and locals. Mezquital Valley’s situation has illustrated that we cannot avoid using wastewater for farming and that more needs to be done to make it safer. New technology, governmental regulations and policies and educating communities about risks are all needed for us to be sustainable without risking more in the process. Have you heard of other communities affected by using untreated wastewater for farming? What other steps do you think can be taken to make the practice safer for everyone? We would love to hear your opinion in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/gardening---agriculture
Wastewater farming – a forced risk that could become a solution
Wastewater farming – a forced risk that could become a solution
Solar power without panels on your roof
The need for solar energy The urge for energy is getting bigger every day and the old fossils fuels are polluting and over time will run out. So why not start using solar power in a simple way. Thus, to be more sustainable and getting used to organize your live without gas, oil or coal generated energy To collect solar power by solar panels is not possible for everyone. For some its too expensive to buy panels, some have no roof to install them. And even when people have a roof it is not always pointing in the right direction. Fortunate there is still more and more small-scale techniques where solar cells are integrated. There are a lot of innovative ways to harvest solar power without the need of expensive solar panels. Solar Powered Bike If your bike is standing still it will be charged by solar cells. When in use, the battery and the solar cells will supply the energy for the engine when in motion. There are bikes which run on solar power and don’t require peddling because they run on the solar power which is absorbed. Solar bikes store the generated electricity in batteries. The stored electricity can be used to power the bike but it also can be used to charge small electric devices like: phones and tablets. Of course, phones are nowadays often used to navigate while biking. Solar Lights Lights and especially LED lights don't use a lot of electricity. Therefor it is not necessary to install solar panels. Many of these solar lights are used in developing countries, where there is no grid or if there is no money to install solar panels. Often it are lights combined with solar cells. They can be charged at daytime and some of the solar lights go on for ten hours. There are also solar lights which are specially developed for use outside. Some are even provided with a motion sensor which can be used for security. It only lights up when motion is detected. Solar Power Plug Its a small box which is portable. It can be mounted on a wall or window. There is an outlet where you can plug in electronical devices. The box itself exists out of solar cells and a battery. Because the box is portable you can take it anywhere the recharge your low voltage equipment. 'Power on the go'. Solar Powered Backpacks We all like to travel and because of all the electric gadgets we nowadays have we need also electricity. Some backpacks are provided with solar cells so you can carry your stuff and generate electricity at the same time. The backpacks are waterproof and you can charge your phone or tablet while 'on the move' There are also solar backpacks which have an integrated battery. So even in the evening you have electricity for a light and to get connected with the outside world. Solar Cookers Solar Cookers Cooking costs a lot of energy. Besides in many countries people still use wood or charcoal. Solar cookers make it possible to cook without using above or gas or electricity. There are many different kinds of solar cookers. Box cookers with solar panels on the side which absorb the heat. Photo by: Hans van der BroekThe parabola designed cookers are very efficient. You put a pan in the centre of the mirror and all solar energy gets concentred in the middle where the pan with water or food is. With a little sun it will start cooking already very fast. You also can put a metal plate in the centre for barbequing. Cooking generally cost an enormous amount of energy and using these solar cookers saves lots of electric energy, gas and wood. So, no use of fossil fuels, less pollution and thus better for the environment.Photo by: Hans van der Broek Solar Water Heaters There are solar water heaters in all kind of versions and sizes. There are which have oil or water filled tubes. The oil filled tubes stay longer warm and their heat release lasts longer. When mounted on a roof in the sun it will generate hot water as long as the sun shines. Its already common use in tropical countries for industrial and residential use. Portable Solar Generator If you need more electricity than just for charging your phone or tablet you can buy a solar generator. You can combine this generator with small solar panels. Together you have a powerful self-sufficient electricity system. Of course, the unite are supplied with different outputs from USB to 2020 Volt. Lights, electric tools, cool-boxes, laptops, smartphones and other equipment can be supplied with energy with this 'portable socket' Solar Powered Water Pumps Solar water pumps are ideal to use in remote areas. There are portable ones and pumps which can be fitted permanently. With these pumps it is not necessary to install wiring which can be dangerous in certain situations and expensive. Of course, the ones with only solar panels stop at sunset but the ones with a battery can run up to five hours after being charged fully at daytime. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/energy/solar  
The need for solar energy The urge for energy is getting bigger every day and the old fossils fuels are polluting and over time will run out. So why not start using solar power in a simple way. Thus, to be more sustainable and getting used to organize your live without gas, oil or coal generated energy To collect solar power by solar panels is not possible for everyone. For some its too expensive to buy panels, some have no roof to install them. And even when people have a roof it is not always pointing in the right direction. Fortunate there is still more and more small-scale techniques where solar cells are integrated. There are a lot of innovative ways to harvest solar power without the need of expensive solar panels. Solar Powered Bike If your bike is standing still it will be charged by solar cells. When in use, the battery and the solar cells will supply the energy for the engine when in motion. There are bikes which run on solar power and don’t require peddling because they run on the solar power which is absorbed. Solar bikes store the generated electricity in batteries. The stored electricity can be used to power the bike but it also can be used to charge small electric devices like: phones and tablets. Of course, phones are nowadays often used to navigate while biking. Solar Lights Lights and especially LED lights don't use a lot of electricity. Therefor it is not necessary to install solar panels. Many of these solar lights are used in developing countries, where there is no grid or if there is no money to install solar panels. Often it are lights combined with solar cells. They can be charged at daytime and some of the solar lights go on for ten hours. There are also solar lights which are specially developed for use outside. Some are even provided with a motion sensor which can be used for security. It only lights up when motion is detected. Solar Power Plug Its a small box which is portable. It can be mounted on a wall or window. There is an outlet where you can plug in electronical devices. The box itself exists out of solar cells and a battery. Because the box is portable you can take it anywhere the recharge your low voltage equipment. 'Power on the go'. Solar Powered Backpacks We all like to travel and because of all the electric gadgets we nowadays have we need also electricity. Some backpacks are provided with solar cells so you can carry your stuff and generate electricity at the same time. The backpacks are waterproof and you can charge your phone or tablet while 'on the move' There are also solar backpacks which have an integrated battery. So even in the evening you have electricity for a light and to get connected with the outside world. Solar Cookers Solar Cookers Cooking costs a lot of energy. Besides in many countries people still use wood or charcoal. Solar cookers make it possible to cook without using above or gas or electricity. There are many different kinds of solar cookers. Box cookers with solar panels on the side which absorb the heat. Photo by: Hans van der BroekThe parabola designed cookers are very efficient. You put a pan in the centre of the mirror and all solar energy gets concentred in the middle where the pan with water or food is. With a little sun it will start cooking already very fast. You also can put a metal plate in the centre for barbequing. Cooking generally cost an enormous amount of energy and using these solar cookers saves lots of electric energy, gas and wood. So, no use of fossil fuels, less pollution and thus better for the environment.Photo by: Hans van der Broek Solar Water Heaters There are solar water heaters in all kind of versions and sizes. There are which have oil or water filled tubes. The oil filled tubes stay longer warm and their heat release lasts longer. When mounted on a roof in the sun it will generate hot water as long as the sun shines. Its already common use in tropical countries for industrial and residential use. Portable Solar Generator If you need more electricity than just for charging your phone or tablet you can buy a solar generator. You can combine this generator with small solar panels. Together you have a powerful self-sufficient electricity system. Of course, the unite are supplied with different outputs from USB to 2020 Volt. Lights, electric tools, cool-boxes, laptops, smartphones and other equipment can be supplied with energy with this 'portable socket' Solar Powered Water Pumps Solar water pumps are ideal to use in remote areas. There are portable ones and pumps which can be fitted permanently. With these pumps it is not necessary to install wiring which can be dangerous in certain situations and expensive. Of course, the ones with only solar panels stop at sunset but the ones with a battery can run up to five hours after being charged fully at daytime. https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/energy/solar  
Solar power without panels on your roof
Solar power without panels on your roof
Circular fashion - sustainability to become the biggest trend of the century
For centuries, humans have used clothing as a way to express themselves and underline their status in society. Aristocracy was constantly chasing new rare materials, continuing world exploration made exotic fabrics very sought after and when new emerald green arsenic fabric dye was developed in 1814 in Europe for some it became (quite literally) to die for.  These days fashion became much more attainable. Thanks to the fast fashion trend and clothing giants like Primark, H&M and Zara anyone can look like they stepped right off the runway without spending a fortune. But with clothing prices being so low and fashion changing so often, it can sometimes feel like it is easier to buy a brand new garment rather than fix one that has slight signs of wear. This current “Take-Make-Dispose” system puts pressure on economies around the world, requires consumption of a very significant amount of already-limited resources and increases pollution.  According to Ellen McArthur Foundation, if nothing changes in the way that the current clothing supply chain system operates then by 2050 our non-renewable resource consumption will increase threefold and our oceans will have a whopping 22 million tons of microfiber added to them over the span of the next 32 years. This is something that neither nature nor economy can sustain and luckily many apparel, shoe and accessories manufacturers are already looking to better the industry. So what is circular fashion? Circular fashion is a term that was coined in 2014 and it combines the concepts of circular economy and sustainable fashion. The key principles of circular fashion define a system where wearable items are designed, sourced, produced, used and recycled in such a way that the materials can be reused over and over for production of new items with minimal environmental impact and high degree of social responsibility.  This also means eliminating many toxic materials from our clothing, making sure it will last for a long time and encouraging sharing among multiple users.   Over the past 4 years a lot has been done to being the switch to this more sustainable approach. Many big brands have pledged to increase use of recycled textiles and use more sustainable practices and materials. Slowing down fast fashion H&M is a company that is normally seen as one of the biggest names in fast fashion, however they are actually the ones who have been trying to popularize circular fashion – in fact, they might have been the first ones to use the term! They have committed to following sustainable and ethical practices in every step of the apparel creation process and they offer customers incentives such as discounts for bringing in their old clothing to be reused and recycled. G-Star Raw have also shown their dedication to increasing sustainability and social responsibility throughout their supply chain. They have not only been focusing on their own products, but are collaborating with other companies to help push the industry towards using more environmentally friendly materials and practices. They continue to innovate and one of their most prominent innovations was Bionic Yarn, a comfortable and durable material that is made out of ocean plastic. Not only does this material help find a great use for the plastic that is collected from the ocean, but it also minimizes the release of plastic microfibers back into the oceans.   Another company who is trying to make a change is MudJeans. This is a European company that has pioneered a “Lease a Jeans” business model. It is simple: you pick a pair of jeans, pay a monthly fee for a year and then you can either chose to keep the jeans, send them back to MudJeans or lease another pair. The jeans that are returned to the company get recycled and turned into new pieces of clothing. According to MudJeans, their innovative business model and manufacturing technologies help them cut water usage by 78% per pair compared to average jeans manufacturers. New professionals to raise the sustainability bar With such acceleration in adoption of circular fashion, there is a need for more intra- and entrepreneurs who have the skills necessary to build and run businesses with sustainable goals at their core. The Amsterdam Fashion Institute is the first one to offer a Circular Fashion Master’s. According to Leslie Holden, Head of design and of the Master of Fashion Enterprise, this programme is essential to safeguarding the long-term future of the fashion industry. And in the UK the online retail giant Asos has just announced that it will be partnering with London College of Fashion’s Centre for Sustainable Fashion to run a pilot training programme on circular fashion! The Netherlands is one of the countries that are really set to push the circular fashion movement forward – throughout February and March the first edition of The Circular Fashion Games took place in Eindhoven and Amsterdam. Sponsored by C&A Foundation, this event saw 40 students, scientists, designers and entrepreneurs from different countries present their innovations for the fashion industry, which ranged from new ways to spread awareness of sustainability in fashion to introducing new technologies that would allow use of other materials in textiles. This event helped bring industry leaders together with the new players and from what we’ve heard, one of the winners might be working with G-Star Raw in the future. We are looking forward to the second edition of the Games and are hoping to see it go global! Do you know of other companies in the fashion industry that are introducing interesting sustainable innovations? What changes would you like to see when it comes to how our clothes are made? Share your thoughts and ideas with us in the comments!
For centuries, humans have used clothing as a way to express themselves and underline their status in society. Aristocracy was constantly chasing new rare materials, continuing world exploration made exotic fabrics very sought after and when new emerald green arsenic fabric dye was developed in 1814 in Europe for some it became (quite literally) to die for.  These days fashion became much more attainable. Thanks to the fast fashion trend and clothing giants like Primark, H&M and Zara anyone can look like they stepped right off the runway without spending a fortune. But with clothing prices being so low and fashion changing so often, it can sometimes feel like it is easier to buy a brand new garment rather than fix one that has slight signs of wear. This current “Take-Make-Dispose” system puts pressure on economies around the world, requires consumption of a very significant amount of already-limited resources and increases pollution.  According to Ellen McArthur Foundation, if nothing changes in the way that the current clothing supply chain system operates then by 2050 our non-renewable resource consumption will increase threefold and our oceans will have a whopping 22 million tons of microfiber added to them over the span of the next 32 years. This is something that neither nature nor economy can sustain and luckily many apparel, shoe and accessories manufacturers are already looking to better the industry. So what is circular fashion? Circular fashion is a term that was coined in 2014 and it combines the concepts of circular economy and sustainable fashion. The key principles of circular fashion define a system where wearable items are designed, sourced, produced, used and recycled in such a way that the materials can be reused over and over for production of new items with minimal environmental impact and high degree of social responsibility.  This also means eliminating many toxic materials from our clothing, making sure it will last for a long time and encouraging sharing among multiple users.   Over the past 4 years a lot has been done to being the switch to this more sustainable approach. Many big brands have pledged to increase use of recycled textiles and use more sustainable practices and materials. Slowing down fast fashion H&M is a company that is normally seen as one of the biggest names in fast fashion, however they are actually the ones who have been trying to popularize circular fashion – in fact, they might have been the first ones to use the term! They have committed to following sustainable and ethical practices in every step of the apparel creation process and they offer customers incentives such as discounts for bringing in their old clothing to be reused and recycled. G-Star Raw have also shown their dedication to increasing sustainability and social responsibility throughout their supply chain. They have not only been focusing on their own products, but are collaborating with other companies to help push the industry towards using more environmentally friendly materials and practices. They continue to innovate and one of their most prominent innovations was Bionic Yarn, a comfortable and durable material that is made out of ocean plastic. Not only does this material help find a great use for the plastic that is collected from the ocean, but it also minimizes the release of plastic microfibers back into the oceans.   Another company who is trying to make a change is MudJeans. This is a European company that has pioneered a “Lease a Jeans” business model. It is simple: you pick a pair of jeans, pay a monthly fee for a year and then you can either chose to keep the jeans, send them back to MudJeans or lease another pair. The jeans that are returned to the company get recycled and turned into new pieces of clothing. According to MudJeans, their innovative business model and manufacturing technologies help them cut water usage by 78% per pair compared to average jeans manufacturers. New professionals to raise the sustainability bar With such acceleration in adoption of circular fashion, there is a need for more intra- and entrepreneurs who have the skills necessary to build and run businesses with sustainable goals at their core. The Amsterdam Fashion Institute is the first one to offer a Circular Fashion Master’s. According to Leslie Holden, Head of design and of the Master of Fashion Enterprise, this programme is essential to safeguarding the long-term future of the fashion industry. And in the UK the online retail giant Asos has just announced that it will be partnering with London College of Fashion’s Centre for Sustainable Fashion to run a pilot training programme on circular fashion! The Netherlands is one of the countries that are really set to push the circular fashion movement forward – throughout February and March the first edition of The Circular Fashion Games took place in Eindhoven and Amsterdam. Sponsored by C&A Foundation, this event saw 40 students, scientists, designers and entrepreneurs from different countries present their innovations for the fashion industry, which ranged from new ways to spread awareness of sustainability in fashion to introducing new technologies that would allow use of other materials in textiles. This event helped bring industry leaders together with the new players and from what we’ve heard, one of the winners might be working with G-Star Raw in the future. We are looking forward to the second edition of the Games and are hoping to see it go global! Do you know of other companies in the fashion industry that are introducing interesting sustainable innovations? What changes would you like to see when it comes to how our clothes are made? Share your thoughts and ideas with us in the comments!
Circular fashion - sustainability to become the biggest trend of the century
Circular fashion - sustainability to become the biggest trend of the century
Mount Everest’s garbage problem has reached its peak
Mount Everest – the highest mountain above sea level, a lifelong goal for many climbers and one of the Seven Wonders of the Natural World. But it turns out these days it isn’t quite as magnificent up close and humans are the ones to blame. In 1953, a famed explorer Sir Edmund Hillary was the first to reach the 8,848-metre peak. Since then, thousands of people have attempted the journey and it has led to a real tragedy – the once pure nature is now littered with trash and excrement that were left behind. Garbage policies and fines The situation is so dire that Tibet and Nepal have introduced special policies and fines to encourage the climbers to not only clean up their own trash, but also help collect what adventurers before them left behind. Both require each of the climbers to collect at least 8kgs(17,4 lbs) of trash and human waste, with Tibet fining those who fell short $100 for each kilogram not collected and Nepal retaining a $4,000 per team deposit that was paid before the climb. While these penalties seem substantial, they are not substantial enough – many clumbers pay up to $100,000 for their journey and these fines just don’t make a significant dent in the budget. Another important aspect is that Mount Everest is one of the most challenging treks in the world where many have perished. This can make some climbers face a choice between spending their energy on getting down safely or bringing back their own trash and it is hard to argue for the latter. While we’d think that things like discarded food packaging and gear would be the main problem, it is actually the faeces that are making the biggest stink. The excrements that were left behind in unlined ice pits get washed down by the melting snow and then start running down the slope. This not only creates foul-smelling piles of human waste, but also poses a health risk to those dependent on water from rivers that are fed by the glaciers. Unfortunately, even the human waste collected responsibly ends up in dumpsites that are only marginally safer. Long-term solutions are in sight Luckily, the problem of the “highest trash dump in the world” is not being taken lightly and while Eco Everest expeditions and teams of locals venture out to clean up the mountain, experts around the world are looking for better long-term solutions. Mount Everest Biogas Project is hoping to create a biogas plant that will convert human waste into renewable fuel. This will help clean up the dumpsites, minimize health risks for locals and provide them with a new, clean fuel for cooking and heating to reduce dependence on wood and thus curtail deforestation. This will certainly help make this area much more sustainable and preserve the beauty of one of the most breath-taking sights in the world (and will make it smell a lot nicer too!). Have you heard of any other initiatives that are focused on cleaning up Mt. Everest? Or are there perhaps other mountains that are in dire need of attention? Share your thoughts with us in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste Cover photo by: Mari Partyka
Mount Everest – the highest mountain above sea level, a lifelong goal for many climbers and one of the Seven Wonders of the Natural World. But it turns out these days it isn’t quite as magnificent up close and humans are the ones to blame. In 1953, a famed explorer Sir Edmund Hillary was the first to reach the 8,848-metre peak. Since then, thousands of people have attempted the journey and it has led to a real tragedy – the once pure nature is now littered with trash and excrement that were left behind. Garbage policies and fines The situation is so dire that Tibet and Nepal have introduced special policies and fines to encourage the climbers to not only clean up their own trash, but also help collect what adventurers before them left behind. Both require each of the climbers to collect at least 8kgs(17,4 lbs) of trash and human waste, with Tibet fining those who fell short $100 for each kilogram not collected and Nepal retaining a $4,000 per team deposit that was paid before the climb. While these penalties seem substantial, they are not substantial enough – many clumbers pay up to $100,000 for their journey and these fines just don’t make a significant dent in the budget. Another important aspect is that Mount Everest is one of the most challenging treks in the world where many have perished. This can make some climbers face a choice between spending their energy on getting down safely or bringing back their own trash and it is hard to argue for the latter. While we’d think that things like discarded food packaging and gear would be the main problem, it is actually the faeces that are making the biggest stink. The excrements that were left behind in unlined ice pits get washed down by the melting snow and then start running down the slope. This not only creates foul-smelling piles of human waste, but also poses a health risk to those dependent on water from rivers that are fed by the glaciers. Unfortunately, even the human waste collected responsibly ends up in dumpsites that are only marginally safer. Long-term solutions are in sight Luckily, the problem of the “highest trash dump in the world” is not being taken lightly and while Eco Everest expeditions and teams of locals venture out to clean up the mountain, experts around the world are looking for better long-term solutions. Mount Everest Biogas Project is hoping to create a biogas plant that will convert human waste into renewable fuel. This will help clean up the dumpsites, minimize health risks for locals and provide them with a new, clean fuel for cooking and heating to reduce dependence on wood and thus curtail deforestation. This will certainly help make this area much more sustainable and preserve the beauty of one of the most breath-taking sights in the world (and will make it smell a lot nicer too!). Have you heard of any other initiatives that are focused on cleaning up Mt. Everest? Or are there perhaps other mountains that are in dire need of attention? Share your thoughts with us in the comments! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/waste Cover photo by: Mari Partyka
Mount Everest’s garbage problem has reached its peak
Mount Everest’s garbage problem has reached its peak
A tiny house shaped as the Lunar-lander! Would you like to live in it?
For over 35 years I have been designing composite catamarans and trimarans. I was trained originally as a land architect. I have long wondered how much boatbuilding could teach homebuilding. A fusion of boatbuilding and homebuilding can in fact provide many advantages. The Lunar-Lander tiny house. Photo by: Kurt Hughes A fusion of boatbuilding and homebuilding  At work, I design what are basically houses that are designed to leap off of a 25’ wave at 30 miles per hour. You think any code compliant homes could fly off of a 25’ cliff at 30 mph even once, much less all day long? Probably when you think of boat building, you think of a 25 Bayliner powerboat. Wrong. They are built from polyester and chopped fiberglass. The polyester burns hellaciously and the chopped strand matt is only good for about 20,000 psi bending strength. Boatbuilding as I do it means epoxy, which is self-extinguishing, and triaxial knitted laminates which have bending strengths of up to 70,000 psi or about twice that of A36 steel. I have homebuilding experience also. Including with factory built homes. The mission was to design a habitable dwelling with the latest marine composite technology, providing creature comforts with low impact on the land and high amazement factor. It is waterproof, airtight (but with air to air heat exchanger ventilation) resistant to vermin, mold and insects. It needs no roofing nor siding. Lets explore something new! Why not just build a composite cube? It would be simpler, and not “weird” looking. Easy. A cube is not interesting. Cube has been done before. Lets explore something new. The lunar lander is not only an interesting configuration, but an homage to a time when people did new things. Innovators were prized, not feared. And more, the actual Apollo astronauts trained some 25 miles from where this project is sited. What happened to the courage to innovate?  Inside find an open space, with external modules for bath, galley, breakfast nook and storage. On top is a clear geodesic dome so the light can stream in down all around. A foam/glass cover will be used to keep extreme heat or cold out of the dome. Down inside is a soft lounging pit and bed. On one side is an outside deck. The systems are placed in the hexagonal ring that the living space rests on.Inside the 'Lunar-Lander'. Photo Kurt Hughes The Lunar Lander can rest comfortably on drastic, uneven terrain, with virtually no environmental footprint. These off-the-grid outposts will use the latest marine technology to afford a strong, light, and easily maintained structure.Construction is plywood/epoxy/core/fiberglass. There is no framing, no headers, no joists.  The insulating SIP sandwich panels do it all.  They are all bonded together with biaxial roving, a fiberglass with the same strength as A36 steel.Inside the 'Lunar-Lander'. Photo Kurt Hughes If this were production, or if I had a larger budget, it would be entirely fiberglass and core. The core is both for insulation and structure. It is vacuum bagged between the plywood faces. Everything is encapsulated in epoxy and sheathed in fiberglass cloth. After the prototype Lunar Lander is built, as a proof of concept, a line of other larger models may follow. Story and photo's by: Kurt Hughes https://www.businessinsider.nl/lunar-lander-tiny-home-2018-6/?international=true&r=US http://www.homecrux.com/kurt-hughes-lunar-lander-tiny-home-looks-like-apollo-replica/89122/ https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/architecture/tinyhouses
For over 35 years I have been designing composite catamarans and trimarans. I was trained originally as a land architect. I have long wondered how much boatbuilding could teach homebuilding. A fusion of boatbuilding and homebuilding can in fact provide many advantages. The Lunar-Lander tiny house. Photo by: Kurt Hughes A fusion of boatbuilding and homebuilding  At work, I design what are basically houses that are designed to leap off of a 25’ wave at 30 miles per hour. You think any code compliant homes could fly off of a 25’ cliff at 30 mph even once, much less all day long? Probably when you think of boat building, you think of a 25 Bayliner powerboat. Wrong. They are built from polyester and chopped fiberglass. The polyester burns hellaciously and the chopped strand matt is only good for about 20,000 psi bending strength. Boatbuilding as I do it means epoxy, which is self-extinguishing, and triaxial knitted laminates which have bending strengths of up to 70,000 psi or about twice that of A36 steel. I have homebuilding experience also. Including with factory built homes. The mission was to design a habitable dwelling with the latest marine composite technology, providing creature comforts with low impact on the land and high amazement factor. It is waterproof, airtight (but with air to air heat exchanger ventilation) resistant to vermin, mold and insects. It needs no roofing nor siding. Lets explore something new! Why not just build a composite cube? It would be simpler, and not “weird” looking. Easy. A cube is not interesting. Cube has been done before. Lets explore something new. The lunar lander is not only an interesting configuration, but an homage to a time when people did new things. Innovators were prized, not feared. And more, the actual Apollo astronauts trained some 25 miles from where this project is sited. What happened to the courage to innovate?  Inside find an open space, with external modules for bath, galley, breakfast nook and storage. On top is a clear geodesic dome so the light can stream in down all around. A foam/glass cover will be used to keep extreme heat or cold out of the dome. Down inside is a soft lounging pit and bed. On one side is an outside deck. The systems are placed in the hexagonal ring that the living space rests on.Inside the 'Lunar-Lander'. Photo Kurt Hughes The Lunar Lander can rest comfortably on drastic, uneven terrain, with virtually no environmental footprint. These off-the-grid outposts will use the latest marine technology to afford a strong, light, and easily maintained structure.Construction is plywood/epoxy/core/fiberglass. There is no framing, no headers, no joists.  The insulating SIP sandwich panels do it all.  They are all bonded together with biaxial roving, a fiberglass with the same strength as A36 steel.Inside the 'Lunar-Lander'. Photo Kurt Hughes If this were production, or if I had a larger budget, it would be entirely fiberglass and core. The core is both for insulation and structure. It is vacuum bagged between the plywood faces. Everything is encapsulated in epoxy and sheathed in fiberglass cloth. After the prototype Lunar Lander is built, as a proof of concept, a line of other larger models may follow. Story and photo's by: Kurt Hughes https://www.businessinsider.nl/lunar-lander-tiny-home-2018-6/?international=true&r=US http://www.homecrux.com/kurt-hughes-lunar-lander-tiny-home-looks-like-apollo-replica/89122/ https://www.whatsorb.com/solution/architecture/tinyhouses
A tiny house shaped as the Lunar-lander! Would you like to live in it?
A tiny house shaped as the Lunar-lander! Would you like to live in it?
Does your company need a Corporate Social Responsibility report?
In 2017, study completed by Cone Communications in the US has revealed that nearly 60% of Americans are hopeful that businesses will be the driving force behind social and environmental change in absence of government regulation. 87% of the respondents said that they would purchase from a company that supports a cause that’s close to their heart. We hear more and more about “Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) ” – but why do we only hear about it in relation to big corporations? After all, 99% of all businesses fall into the Small and Medium Enterprise (SME) category. So why not use that power to fulfil expectations and help incite socially responsible change?SuperGreen Solutions  is a company that wants to help SMEs do just that. They have partnered up with United Nations to “identify and remove the barriers preventing SMEs from pursuing sustainable business practices”. Leading businesses into a greener future A true expert in their field, SuperGreen Solutions knows all about the challenges and concerns that SMEs face. One of such concerns is naturally the cost of going green – many companies believe that being environmentally responsible would cost them a lot of money and generate little return on investment. However, according to SuperGreen Solutions’ website their Green Compass Sustainability Award program allows businesses to increase their sales and margins by 20%, reduce their employee turnover by 50% and significantly increase employee morale and loyalty (by 55% and 38% respectively). These impressive numbers indicate that our awareness of sustainability overall has not only increased, but has become a major factor affecting our purchasing decisions. Now, what if your business is already using sustainable practices? Well, then there is one important thing you need to do: let everyone know!If you got it, flaunt it If you don’t talk about it, nobody will know. It’s a basic principle, but it’s something that small and medium businesses often forget about when it comes to socially responsible policies and their contribution to the environment. However, many companies have been accused of “greenwashing” – falsely advertising that an organization's products, aims or policies are environmentally friendly. So how can one distinguish companies that are “the real deal” from the “greenwashers”? Luckily for consumers, more and more companies are embracing transparency and publishing their CSR reports and including a separate “Environmental responsibility” section on their websites. There are also third-party certifications that will indicate just how sincere a business is about their sustainable practices. The companies that issue these certifications are constantly reviewing the company’s practices to ensure that they are keeping to their environmental policies, so if a company holds such certification this can help build a lot of trust with the consumers. Make your small business the force behind a big change The Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) offers a simple guideline  for companies that would like to start communicating their sustainability performance, but don’t know where to start. The process consists of just 5 phases: Prepare, Connect, Define, Monitor and Report. Your report could become the first step towards a big change and put you on the forefront of the green movement. Does your company have a corporate social responsibility program? Do you actively communicate it to all of your stakeholders? Let us know in the comment section down below! By: Ariana Murzina http://www.conecomm.com/research-blog/2017-csr-studyhttps://supergreensolutions.com/https://www.globalreporting.org/resourcelibrary/Ready-to-Report-SME-booklet-online.pdf
In 2017, study completed by Cone Communications in the US has revealed that nearly 60% of Americans are hopeful that businesses will be the driving force behind social and environmental change in absence of government regulation. 87% of the respondents said that they would purchase from a company that supports a cause that’s close to their heart. We hear more and more about “Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) ” – but why do we only hear about it in relation to big corporations? After all, 99% of all businesses fall into the Small and Medium Enterprise (SME) category. So why not use that power to fulfil expectations and help incite socially responsible change?SuperGreen Solutions  is a company that wants to help SMEs do just that. They have partnered up with United Nations to “identify and remove the barriers preventing SMEs from pursuing sustainable business practices”. Leading businesses into a greener future A true expert in their field, SuperGreen Solutions knows all about the challenges and concerns that SMEs face. One of such concerns is naturally the cost of going green – many companies believe that being environmentally responsible would cost them a lot of money and generate little return on investment. However, according to SuperGreen Solutions’ website their Green Compass Sustainability Award program allows businesses to increase their sales and margins by 20%, reduce their employee turnover by 50% and significantly increase employee morale and loyalty (by 55% and 38% respectively). These impressive numbers indicate that our awareness of sustainability overall has not only increased, but has become a major factor affecting our purchasing decisions. Now, what if your business is already using sustainable practices? Well, then there is one important thing you need to do: let everyone know!If you got it, flaunt it If you don’t talk about it, nobody will know. It’s a basic principle, but it’s something that small and medium businesses often forget about when it comes to socially responsible policies and their contribution to the environment. However, many companies have been accused of “greenwashing” – falsely advertising that an organization's products, aims or policies are environmentally friendly. So how can one distinguish companies that are “the real deal” from the “greenwashers”? Luckily for consumers, more and more companies are embracing transparency and publishing their CSR reports and including a separate “Environmental responsibility” section on their websites. There are also third-party certifications that will indicate just how sincere a business is about their sustainable practices. The companies that issue these certifications are constantly reviewing the company’s practices to ensure that they are keeping to their environmental policies, so if a company holds such certification this can help build a lot of trust with the consumers. Make your small business the force behind a big change The Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) offers a simple guideline  for companies that would like to start communicating their sustainability performance, but don’t know where to start. The process consists of just 5 phases: Prepare, Connect, Define, Monitor and Report. Your report could become the first step towards a big change and put you on the forefront of the green movement. Does your company have a corporate social responsibility program? Do you actively communicate it to all of your stakeholders? Let us know in the comment section down below! By: Ariana Murzina http://www.conecomm.com/research-blog/2017-csr-studyhttps://supergreensolutions.com/https://www.globalreporting.org/resourcelibrary/Ready-to-Report-SME-booklet-online.pdf
Does your company need a Corporate Social Responsibility report?
Does your company need a Corporate Social Responsibility report?
The sun is strong enough to let solar panels shine
The Dutch sun is strong enough for roofs to generate electricityThe Netherlands might be known for wooden shoes and beautiful flowers yet Michiel Mensink went a different direction. His start-up Exasun will make the nation known for its sunlight based panels. Since Michiel and Jan Jaap van Os established Exasun in 2012, they've created solar panels that are no less than twice as strong as customary sun powered panels, produce more electricity for less money and they look better. Made in the Netherlands. Sustainability has always been a passion for us," says Michiel, who has known Jan Jaap since meeting him in college more than 20 years ago. "Our objective was to make panels that make solar panels less expensive than the use of coal. The considerable thing is that we're near that goal now." Presently Exasun will have the capacity to step up its production five-fold on account of a multi-million-euro investment from 2 Dutch banks and a Dutch government innovation fund . Panels, tiles and rooftops Photo by: Jonathan Mast "Exasun offers a stylishly and monetarily appealing answer for putting homes and structures in the Netherlands and Europe on more sustainable footing." Other than solar panels, Exasun makes solar rooftop tiles. These come in dark and orange-red and can be introduced between existing rooftop tiles, which is normal for Dutch homes.  Another item is a whole sunlight based board rooftop, utilized as a part of recently fabricated homes. These are both more proficient and more pleasant looking options for customary solar panels. The whole rooftop is comprised of Exasun's sun based panels. "Current sunlight based modules are regularly somewhat ugly," said Michiel. "Our items have a greatly improved appearance, you don't see they're sunlight based modules. They additionally last longer than some other modules, as they're more robust against flame and hail." It took four to five years of innovative work to get this head begin, said Michiel. Presently, Exasun will utilize the venture to present a completely mechanized production line in the not so distant future, with a five-fold increased production capacity. The capacity will be scaled up more in 2019. "I trust Exasun will turn into a commonly recognized name in Europe for individuals who need the best answer for sun oriented on their rooftop or building." https://www.ing.com/Newsroom/All-news/Tulips-windmills-and...-solar-panels.htm Cover photo by: Aquiles Carattino
The Dutch sun is strong enough for roofs to generate electricityThe Netherlands might be known for wooden shoes and beautiful flowers yet Michiel Mensink went a different direction. His start-up Exasun will make the nation known for its sunlight based panels. Since Michiel and Jan Jaap van Os established Exasun in 2012, they've created solar panels that are no less than twice as strong as customary sun powered panels, produce more electricity for less money and they look better. Made in the Netherlands. Sustainability has always been a passion for us," says Michiel, who has known Jan Jaap since meeting him in college more than 20 years ago. "Our objective was to make panels that make solar panels less expensive than the use of coal. The considerable thing is that we're near that goal now." Presently Exasun will have the capacity to step up its production five-fold on account of a multi-million-euro investment from 2 Dutch banks and a Dutch government innovation fund . Panels, tiles and rooftops Photo by: Jonathan Mast "Exasun offers a stylishly and monetarily appealing answer for putting homes and structures in the Netherlands and Europe on more sustainable footing." Other than solar panels, Exasun makes solar rooftop tiles. These come in dark and orange-red and can be introduced between existing rooftop tiles, which is normal for Dutch homes.  Another item is a whole sunlight based board rooftop, utilized as a part of recently fabricated homes. These are both more proficient and more pleasant looking options for customary solar panels. The whole rooftop is comprised of Exasun's sun based panels. "Current sunlight based modules are regularly somewhat ugly," said Michiel. "Our items have a greatly improved appearance, you don't see they're sunlight based modules. They additionally last longer than some other modules, as they're more robust against flame and hail." It took four to five years of innovative work to get this head begin, said Michiel. Presently, Exasun will utilize the venture to present a completely mechanized production line in the not so distant future, with a five-fold increased production capacity. The capacity will be scaled up more in 2019. "I trust Exasun will turn into a commonly recognized name in Europe for individuals who need the best answer for sun oriented on their rooftop or building." https://www.ing.com/Newsroom/All-news/Tulips-windmills-and...-solar-panels.htm Cover photo by: Aquiles Carattino
The sun is strong enough to let solar panels shine
The sun is strong enough to let solar panels shine
On June 15th we celebrate Global Wind Day. Organised by European Wind Energy Association and Global Wind Energy Council, this is the day to learn all about wind energy, one of the most promising sustainable energy sources, and discover its true potential. So please allow us to take you on a tour through history of wind energy from ancient times to present day and even take a sneak peek into the future! How and when did we start using wind energy? Wind is a very powerful force of nature. It can uproot trees, blow off roofs and, given enough time, it can build and destroy mountains. So it is only natural that humans have been looking for ways to harness this energy and use it to their advantage. The first use of wind energy came in form of sailing. Scientists have discovered ceramics from the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture in Eastern Europe that depicted sailboats as early as 6000 BC. Ancient Egyptians, Mesopotamians and proto-Austronesian people have also been known to actively use sailboats in the ancient times. Then came along Heron of Alexandria, ‘the greatest experimentalist of antiquity’. He invented the first wind wheel in 1st century AD to operate an organ – this was the earliest known example of a wind-powered machine. While archaeologists cannot yet say when or where the first windmills were built, there is evidence of the Persians using windmills around 500-900 AD. Windmills were used to pump seawater for salt making by year 1000 AD in both China and Sicily. Heron's Wind Wheel In Europe windmills started to appear around 12th century. They were used extensively for food production as their operation was not disrupted by winter in the way water mills’ was. The Dutch have later taken existing windmill designs and adapted them for draining lakes and marshes. If not for wind-powered mills, the Netherlands would’ve looked very different today – it is estimated that a whopping 17% of the country is land that was reclaimed from the sea and lakes! First wind turbine was built by Professor James Blyth in Scotland in July 1887. It was used to charge accumulators that provided electricity to light Blyth’s cottage, effectively making his cottage the first house in the world to have its electricity come from this green source. First wind turbine was built by Professor James Blyth in Scotland in July 1887 A favourite on the rise Naturally, many improvements were made to Professor’s design over the last 130 years. Sleek, horizontal axis turbines with are a far cry from Blyth’s vertical axis construction that looks like something from a sci-fi movie (even though it was made way before those even existed!). Wind energy is currently one of the most important sources of renewable energy. More than 90 countries use wind energy and with wind power being the fastest growing energy source in the world more countries are expected to adopt it in the coming years. China is world leader in wind energy adoption rate, and while wind power currently accounts only for 4% of nation’s total energy consumption this is likely to rapidly change in the upcoming years. On the other hand Denmark and Portugal have more than 40% of their electricity supplied by wind power – in fact, in March 2018 Portugal’s renewable energy sources generated 103,6% of mainland electricity consumption! The US is also adopting wind energy at a fast pace. So why is wind energy becoming so popular? It all has to do with our favourite word here at WhatsOrb – Sustainability.  Wind isn’t a resource the world can ever run out of and this fact alone already gives makes it much more advantageous from both environmental and economic perspectives compared to the more traditional energy sources like oil, natural gas and coal. But that isn’t the only benefit of switching over to wind power. Air pollution is the fourth largest threat to human health globally and energy production is the biggest source of it by far. Wind turbines, on the other hand, do not produce any emissions that can cause pollution and are thus much better for the environment. They also don’t require any water for cooling, which allows them to be used in water-stressed regions without causing further harm. All of these factors make wind energy very attractive and with costs getting lower and lower as technology gets perfected we can only expect it to become more popular in the years to come. What the future holds Wind energy offers a lot of benefits and with more and more plants being built every year it is clear that it will play a significant role in world’s power supply. Naturally, this means we will see more exciting developments in the technology and, hopefully, more uses for it. One of such developments was unveiled by GE this March. It is called Haliade-X and it promises to become the world’s most powerful offshore wind turbine to date. It will be 260m(853ft) tall, which is as tall as San Francisco’s Transamerica Pyramid! Haliade-X also promises to be able to generate energy even at lower wind speeds and its simplified design will allow for easier repairs, allowing it to provide green energy at a lower cost. The Halliade-X, promises to become the world’s most powerful offshore wind turbine to date Another project to watch is SUMR (Segmented Ultralight Morphing Rotor) Wind, a collaboration between leading industry experts and universities that is even more ambitious than that of GE. Their goal is to perfect existing turbine design in every aspect and allow for creation of massive turbines that will be taller than the Eiffel Tower. These turbines are expected to reduce costs of offshore energy by as much as 50% by 2025. While GE’s and SUMR Wind’s projects are all about improving the existing tech, Makani Power is a company that is looking to introduce a new way of harvesting wind energy. Their energy kites can soar to 300m(984ft) and fly autonomously in loops, which allows it to generate high amounts of power in a very efficient manner. They are going to do flight tests in Hawaii this year and we are looking forward to seeing the results! Are there any cool wind power-related projects you’ve seen lately? Share them with us in the comments – we are ready to be blown away! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy By: Ariana Murzina
On June 15th we celebrate Global Wind Day. Organised by European Wind Energy Association and Global Wind Energy Council, this is the day to learn all about wind energy, one of the most promising sustainable energy sources, and discover its true potential. So please allow us to take you on a tour through history of wind energy from ancient times to present day and even take a sneak peek into the future! How and when did we start using wind energy? Wind is a very powerful force of nature. It can uproot trees, blow off roofs and, given enough time, it can build and destroy mountains. So it is only natural that humans have been looking for ways to harness this energy and use it to their advantage. The first use of wind energy came in form of sailing. Scientists have discovered ceramics from the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture in Eastern Europe that depicted sailboats as early as 6000 BC. Ancient Egyptians, Mesopotamians and proto-Austronesian people have also been known to actively use sailboats in the ancient times. Then came along Heron of Alexandria, ‘the greatest experimentalist of antiquity’. He invented the first wind wheel in 1st century AD to operate an organ – this was the earliest known example of a wind-powered machine. While archaeologists cannot yet say when or where the first windmills were built, there is evidence of the Persians using windmills around 500-900 AD. Windmills were used to pump seawater for salt making by year 1000 AD in both China and Sicily. Heron's Wind Wheel In Europe windmills started to appear around 12th century. They were used extensively for food production as their operation was not disrupted by winter in the way water mills’ was. The Dutch have later taken existing windmill designs and adapted them for draining lakes and marshes. If not for wind-powered mills, the Netherlands would’ve looked very different today – it is estimated that a whopping 17% of the country is land that was reclaimed from the sea and lakes! First wind turbine was built by Professor James Blyth in Scotland in July 1887. It was used to charge accumulators that provided electricity to light Blyth’s cottage, effectively making his cottage the first house in the world to have its electricity come from this green source. First wind turbine was built by Professor James Blyth in Scotland in July 1887 A favourite on the rise Naturally, many improvements were made to Professor’s design over the last 130 years. Sleek, horizontal axis turbines with are a far cry from Blyth’s vertical axis construction that looks like something from a sci-fi movie (even though it was made way before those even existed!). Wind energy is currently one of the most important sources of renewable energy. More than 90 countries use wind energy and with wind power being the fastest growing energy source in the world more countries are expected to adopt it in the coming years. China is world leader in wind energy adoption rate, and while wind power currently accounts only for 4% of nation’s total energy consumption this is likely to rapidly change in the upcoming years. On the other hand Denmark and Portugal have more than 40% of their electricity supplied by wind power – in fact, in March 2018 Portugal’s renewable energy sources generated 103,6% of mainland electricity consumption! The US is also adopting wind energy at a fast pace. So why is wind energy becoming so popular? It all has to do with our favourite word here at WhatsOrb – Sustainability.  Wind isn’t a resource the world can ever run out of and this fact alone already gives makes it much more advantageous from both environmental and economic perspectives compared to the more traditional energy sources like oil, natural gas and coal. But that isn’t the only benefit of switching over to wind power. Air pollution is the fourth largest threat to human health globally and energy production is the biggest source of it by far. Wind turbines, on the other hand, do not produce any emissions that can cause pollution and are thus much better for the environment. They also don’t require any water for cooling, which allows them to be used in water-stressed regions without causing further harm. All of these factors make wind energy very attractive and with costs getting lower and lower as technology gets perfected we can only expect it to become more popular in the years to come. What the future holds Wind energy offers a lot of benefits and with more and more plants being built every year it is clear that it will play a significant role in world’s power supply. Naturally, this means we will see more exciting developments in the technology and, hopefully, more uses for it. One of such developments was unveiled by GE this March. It is called Haliade-X and it promises to become the world’s most powerful offshore wind turbine to date. It will be 260m(853ft) tall, which is as tall as San Francisco’s Transamerica Pyramid! Haliade-X also promises to be able to generate energy even at lower wind speeds and its simplified design will allow for easier repairs, allowing it to provide green energy at a lower cost. The Halliade-X, promises to become the world’s most powerful offshore wind turbine to date Another project to watch is SUMR (Segmented Ultralight Morphing Rotor) Wind, a collaboration between leading industry experts and universities that is even more ambitious than that of GE. Their goal is to perfect existing turbine design in every aspect and allow for creation of massive turbines that will be taller than the Eiffel Tower. These turbines are expected to reduce costs of offshore energy by as much as 50% by 2025. While GE’s and SUMR Wind’s projects are all about improving the existing tech, Makani Power is a company that is looking to introduce a new way of harvesting wind energy. Their energy kites can soar to 300m(984ft) and fly autonomously in loops, which allows it to generate high amounts of power in a very efficient manner. They are going to do flight tests in Hawaii this year and we are looking forward to seeing the results! Are there any cool wind power-related projects you’ve seen lately? Share them with us in the comments – we are ready to be blown away! https://www.whatsorb.com/category/energy By: Ariana Murzina
'Do you celebrate Global Wind Day on June 15th?'
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