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Futuristic Cars Tokyo Show 2019: Will You Ever Drive them?
The Tokyo Motor Show is one of the best places to catch a glimpse of the latest concept cars and drivable prototypes. The theme for this year's show is 'Open Future' with an emphasis on new mobility vehicles, autonomous driving and - hurrah! - flying cars. Unfortunate you will not get a chance to ride them but at least you can admire them! Futuristic Cars Tokyo Show 2019: Here Are Five Exciting Concepts  The Tokyo Motor Show is a biennial auto  show hosted by the Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association (JAMA). Starting all the way back in 1954, it has become one of the premiere auto shows for futurists, with concept cars typically outnumbering production models. (Although their are plenty of the latter on display too.) In 2019, JAMA has taken the crystal gazing to a new level - the Aomi Exhibition Hall has been transformed into a futuristic cityscape where attendees will interact with actual physical prototypes designed by the wold's leading car manufacturers. The Tokyo Motor Show doesn't kick off until October 24, but here are a few previously announced concepts we're excited to learn more about at the show. Lunar Exploration Vehicle One of the coolest aspects of the Tokyo Motor Show is getting to see vehicles that will never appear in a dealership's showroom. Chief among these is the Manned Pressurised Rover, a new prototype developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) in partnership with Toyota. Powered by fuel cell technology , it will be used to explore the moon's polar regions with a tentative launch date of 2029. Recommended:  Hydrogen-Powered Energy Observer Reaches London: The Future Over the course of the three-year joint research period, JAXA and Toyota will manufacture, test, and evaluate a range of prototypes, the first of which can be experienced at the 2019 Tokyo Motor Show. NEC Flying Concept Car Tokyo Motor Show attendees will be able to check out NEC's "near-future type flying vehicle" - a prototype flying car developed and built at the company's Akibo Plant. NEC reckons its new mobility solution will seamlessly connect the ground to the sky. As you can see from the above photo, the design is strikingly similar to a remote-controlled drone - it even has an autonomous flight mode. {youtube}                                                Futuristic Cars Tokyo Show 2019: Will You Ever Drive them?                                              Flying car prototype tested in Japan and hovers above ground The vehicle, which has successfully completed a series of "levitation tests", measures 3.9 metres in length, 3.7 metres in width and 1.3 metres in height. It's also remarkably light for its size, weighing in at around 150kg. The prototype is part of a government-endorsed initiative to ease the burden on road traffic in Japan. NEC - which is not a car company - will be licencing the technology to third parties including Japanese drone manufacturer Cartivator. What year will flying cars come out? Shortly after its debut, we can expect to see Airbus's flying electric taxis shuttling people through the air, Toyota's flying car carrying the 2020 Olympic torch, and AirSpaceX's autonomous flying taxis debut in 2026 The Futuristic Car Toyota LQ You can tell this is a concept car just by looking it. The LQ is the latest iteration of Toyota's self-driving, electric-powered hatchback of the future. (It was formerly dubbed the 'Concept-I'.) The car has it own artificial intelligence assistant named Yui which will reportedly be able to sense the driver's emotional state and alertness. (Hopefully it will utter an understated "...Dude." when you're road raging). According to Toyota, Yui will have a wide range of "human-machine interactions" at its disposal, including in-seat functions designed to increase alertness or reduce stress, in-vehicle illumination, air conditioning and a fragrance dispenser(!) You can also put it in charge of your music playlist and chat to it about a range of topics. In other words, it's basically K.I.T.T. from Nigtrider. In addition to a digital pal, the LQ will come with an autonomous driving system equivalent to SAE Level 4. This means it can practically drive itself. Autonomus Driving Panasonic SPACe_L Autonomous driving is set to play a huge role at this year's Tokyo Motor Show. One of the more intriguing concepts is Panasonic's SPACe_L which looks like something out of 2001: A Space Odyssey. Previously unveiled at CES 2019, the vehicle contains a highly customisable interior that can shift between different 'atmospheres' ranging from “Living Room” to 'Business'. As we have noted in the past, the self-driving cars of the future are expected to look nothing like the cars of today. For example, it will be possible to install seats that swivel around so that the passengers are all facing each other because nobody is driving. You could also have video conferencing equipment built into the dash and touch screens or LED panels instead of windows. Panasonic reckons we'll be seeing cars like this around 2030. At the rate this technology is developing, we think that's a pretty conservative estimate. How much do autonomous cars cost? Developing self-driving cars is of course, very expensive. Fully autonomous tech could add at least $100,000 ( € 87,700) to the price of a vehicle, while even semi-autonomous features like Tesla's Autopilot and Cadillac's Super Cruise already add $5,000 (€4,400) and $10,000 (8,975), respectively, to the base vehicle cost. Tiny Electric cars! In addition to concept cars of the future, the Tokyo Motor Show will also be showing off plenty of models that are almost ready for prime time. This includes a bevy of new electric vehicles. Among the new battery-powered vehicles set to debut at this year's show is the Toyota Ultra-Compact BEV. As we previously reported, this is a ridiculously cute two-seater designed for regular, short-distance trips. It has a maximum speed of 60 km/h and can be driven for approximately 100 km on a single charge. Think of it as a mobility device for the elderly, but on steroids. Lexus, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Suzuki and Suburu will also be showing off hybrid- and battery-powered vehicles this year. In fact, most of the models at the show are powered by some form of electrification. It's where the future of the auto industry is unquestionably heading. (Accept it, petrol heads.) Before you go! Recommended:  Solar And Hydrogen Boats Win The Future: France, Monaco Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
The Tokyo Motor Show is one of the best places to catch a glimpse of the latest concept cars and drivable prototypes. The theme for this year's show is 'Open Future' with an emphasis on new mobility vehicles, autonomous driving and - hurrah! - flying cars. Unfortunate you will not get a chance to ride them but at least you can admire them! Futuristic Cars Tokyo Show 2019: Here Are Five Exciting Concepts  The Tokyo Motor Show is a biennial auto  show hosted by the Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association (JAMA). Starting all the way back in 1954, it has become one of the premiere auto shows for futurists, with concept cars typically outnumbering production models. (Although their are plenty of the latter on display too.) In 2019, JAMA has taken the crystal gazing to a new level - the Aomi Exhibition Hall has been transformed into a futuristic cityscape where attendees will interact with actual physical prototypes designed by the wold's leading car manufacturers. The Tokyo Motor Show doesn't kick off until October 24, but here are a few previously announced concepts we're excited to learn more about at the show. Lunar Exploration Vehicle One of the coolest aspects of the Tokyo Motor Show is getting to see vehicles that will never appear in a dealership's showroom. Chief among these is the Manned Pressurised Rover, a new prototype developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) in partnership with Toyota. Powered by fuel cell technology , it will be used to explore the moon's polar regions with a tentative launch date of 2029. Recommended:  Hydrogen-Powered Energy Observer Reaches London: The Future Over the course of the three-year joint research period, JAXA and Toyota will manufacture, test, and evaluate a range of prototypes, the first of which can be experienced at the 2019 Tokyo Motor Show. NEC Flying Concept Car Tokyo Motor Show attendees will be able to check out NEC's "near-future type flying vehicle" - a prototype flying car developed and built at the company's Akibo Plant. NEC reckons its new mobility solution will seamlessly connect the ground to the sky. As you can see from the above photo, the design is strikingly similar to a remote-controlled drone - it even has an autonomous flight mode. {youtube}                                                Futuristic Cars Tokyo Show 2019: Will You Ever Drive them?                                              Flying car prototype tested in Japan and hovers above ground The vehicle, which has successfully completed a series of "levitation tests", measures 3.9 metres in length, 3.7 metres in width and 1.3 metres in height. It's also remarkably light for its size, weighing in at around 150kg. The prototype is part of a government-endorsed initiative to ease the burden on road traffic in Japan. NEC - which is not a car company - will be licencing the technology to third parties including Japanese drone manufacturer Cartivator. What year will flying cars come out? Shortly after its debut, we can expect to see Airbus's flying electric taxis shuttling people through the air, Toyota's flying car carrying the 2020 Olympic torch, and AirSpaceX's autonomous flying taxis debut in 2026 The Futuristic Car Toyota LQ You can tell this is a concept car just by looking it. The LQ is the latest iteration of Toyota's self-driving, electric-powered hatchback of the future. (It was formerly dubbed the 'Concept-I'.) The car has it own artificial intelligence assistant named Yui which will reportedly be able to sense the driver's emotional state and alertness. (Hopefully it will utter an understated "...Dude." when you're road raging). According to Toyota, Yui will have a wide range of "human-machine interactions" at its disposal, including in-seat functions designed to increase alertness or reduce stress, in-vehicle illumination, air conditioning and a fragrance dispenser(!) You can also put it in charge of your music playlist and chat to it about a range of topics. In other words, it's basically K.I.T.T. from Nigtrider. In addition to a digital pal, the LQ will come with an autonomous driving system equivalent to SAE Level 4. This means it can practically drive itself. Autonomus Driving Panasonic SPACe_L Autonomous driving is set to play a huge role at this year's Tokyo Motor Show. One of the more intriguing concepts is Panasonic's SPACe_L which looks like something out of 2001: A Space Odyssey. Previously unveiled at CES 2019, the vehicle contains a highly customisable interior that can shift between different 'atmospheres' ranging from “Living Room” to 'Business'. As we have noted in the past, the self-driving cars of the future are expected to look nothing like the cars of today. For example, it will be possible to install seats that swivel around so that the passengers are all facing each other because nobody is driving. You could also have video conferencing equipment built into the dash and touch screens or LED panels instead of windows. Panasonic reckons we'll be seeing cars like this around 2030. At the rate this technology is developing, we think that's a pretty conservative estimate. How much do autonomous cars cost? Developing self-driving cars is of course, very expensive. Fully autonomous tech could add at least $100,000 ( € 87,700) to the price of a vehicle, while even semi-autonomous features like Tesla's Autopilot and Cadillac's Super Cruise already add $5,000 (€4,400) and $10,000 (8,975), respectively, to the base vehicle cost. Tiny Electric cars! In addition to concept cars of the future, the Tokyo Motor Show will also be showing off plenty of models that are almost ready for prime time. This includes a bevy of new electric vehicles. Among the new battery-powered vehicles set to debut at this year's show is the Toyota Ultra-Compact BEV. As we previously reported, this is a ridiculously cute two-seater designed for regular, short-distance trips. It has a maximum speed of 60 km/h and can be driven for approximately 100 km on a single charge. Think of it as a mobility device for the elderly, but on steroids. Lexus, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Suzuki and Suburu will also be showing off hybrid- and battery-powered vehicles this year. In fact, most of the models at the show are powered by some form of electrification. It's where the future of the auto industry is unquestionably heading. (Accept it, petrol heads.) Before you go! Recommended:  Solar And Hydrogen Boats Win The Future: France, Monaco Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Futuristic Cars Tokyo Show 2019: Will You Ever Drive them?
Are Bio Based Bottles Good For The Environment?
The Paper Bottle Project and brewer Carlsberg think both that it is a great idea. Prototypes were produced from virgin pulp derived from the Scandinavian forests and are ‘fully recyclable’. Shaping a path towards a sustainable bio-based paper bottle solution. Challenge innovators and designers, they understand that packaging plays as much a role in the consumer experience as it does in creating waste. Today, we also know that we have the power to answer to both consumer and environmental demands by challenging conventional packaging and developing alternatives that will one day become the norm. Replacing materials that threaten our planet and minimise waste, ultimately, lending a hand to shape a path towards a more sustainable future. Are Paper Bottles A Sustainable Possibility? The Paper Bottle Project does and created a collaborative platform between BillerudKorsnäs, Grow, multi-disciplinary experts in tech and leading Brand Partners of various categories. Together we embark on an explorative journey with a mission to create a bio-based paper bottle solution that leaves a minimal to neutral environmental footprint for global benefit. For the design of this new bottle solution, it was important that the structural and graphic language not only mirror our collaborative process but also embody the natural harmony between material, design and manufacturing. The result became an interplay of form and identity that could appeal to a broad range of potential brand owners, and yet represent a unique visual language with characteristics that stay true to the origins of the material. What makes packaging sustainable? Sustainable Packaging Reduces Use Of Resources The use of sustainable packaging can also play a role in the amount of energy it takes to package a product or make the actual packaging itself. It can reduce solid waste, water usage, electricity and emissions. Made of virgin pulp derived from the Scandinavian forests, the visual direction for the concept’s design as we like to say, was born from the woods. Does Brewer Carlsberg Also Wants To Produce A ‘Paper Bottle’ For Its Beer? Carlsberg has released details of two new ‘paper bottle’ research prototypes it’s working on. In an announcement made during the C40 World Mayors Summit in Copenhagen, the Danish brewing giant said the; ‘Green Fibre Bottle’ prototypes were produced from sustainably sourced wood fibres and ‘fully recyclable’. The business has been developing the idea since 2015, working with packaging experts and academics on the project. An ‘inner barrier’ is used to ensure the bottles can carry beer. One prototype uses a recycled polyethylene terephthalate polymer film barrier, which acts as a thin internal lining. The other uses what Carlsberg described as a ‘100% bio-based’ polyethylene furanoate polymer film barrier. The prototypes will now be tested, with Carlsberg stating that its eventual aim was to produce a ‘100% bio-based bottle without polymers’. Carlsberg is ‘pleased with the progress on the Green Fibre Bottle so far’. {youtube}                                                      Are Bio Based Bottles Good For The Environment?                           Carlsberg Unveils PAPER Beer Bottles Made from Sustainably Sourced Recyclable Wood While we are not completely there yet, the two prototypes are an important step towards realizing our ultimate ambition of bringing this breakthrough to market. The company would continue to work with experts to ‘overcome remaining technical challenges’. Carlsberg is one of many major international firms looking to change the way it packages products. Is Eco-friendly Packaging, The Next Thing In Craft Beer? For a research team in Scotland designing an environmentally friendly packaging for craft beer made with an unusual material is this the case! Cuantec - a bio-tech firm backed by the University of Strathclyde alongside three investors including the Scottish Investment Bank - says it is using the remains of shellfish to manufacture bio-degradable six-pack rings, potentially saving millions of animals each year which are killed by entanglement. Recommended:  Sustainability Single-Use Care Products: Glorified Garbage The scientists in Motherwell, North Lanarkshire, were originally working towards a degradable alternative to food packaging, but believe they are just months away from a breakthrough which could see beer firms adopting the new ‘plastic rings’ later this year. Cuantec partnered with local brewery Jaw Brew to create the new can connectors, and says success would turn the business ‘from a research company into a production company’. If they get the science right in the next six months, they could be available by the end of the year. Tests are done in the lab and resulted in strong ideas for the formulation. The firm’s chief operating officer Dr Ryan Taylor, an analytical chemist and alumnus of Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, began working on the project in Spring 2017. He received support in establishing the company from his alma mater through the Strathclyde Entrepreneurs Fund, which invests in business ventures by the University community. Around 100 million marine mammals are affected each year by plastic waste, according to a study by the University of Plymouth, while hundreds of thousands of animals die as a result of being caught in plastic rings. Recommended:  Plastic Waste And Turtles: A Worldwide Fatal Attraction The firm intends to launch the bio degradable rings in the drinks market by 2020, and recently launched a crowdfunding campaign to secure € 173,000 worth of investment to hire more staff and expand its facilities. Murray-Green said the firm already has customers lined up. Plastic pollution has hit the headlines and people are starting to realise that everything they do has an impact. We bring home more plastic than we do food, it’s ridiculous. Everything is packaged and wrapped in some form of it. We can’t change the food industry overnight, but at least we can make a contribution to stopping the damage that these choices have done. What packaging is the most environmentally friendly? Recycled cardboard environmental packaging. For bulk packaging and items of all shapes and sizes, cardboard may still be the answer. However, cardboard can still be environmentally friendly, providing you choose cardboard from sustainable sources. Are there Wine Producers Who Are Interested In Eco Friendly Packaging? In the world of wine, it can be difficult to stand out from the crowd. But as this collection proves, it is still possible to reinvent the wheel (or bottle) and push the boundaries of design in innovative and eco-friendly inventive ways. While most producers will tell you that the liquid is the most important part of the production process (and it ultimately is), packaging plays a vital role in the marketing of a brand, even more so considering today’s tech-savvy, choice-rich, brand-hopping consumer base. Making wine more accessible, interesting and appealing should be a priority for any brand, with the label and packaging one of the most effective tools in a producer’s arsenal. Rather than being a short-lived novelty or gimmick, the most successful and original designs are executed with a specific need in mind, whether its accessibility, education, convenience, fighting for an eco-minded cause, or even fulfilling the needs of the admittedly niche space travelling wine lover. Extravagant design for design’s sake of course has its place, as does tradition. But the most memorable products are those that push the boundaries of expectation with a clear purpose, resulting in a truly unique, striking or practical design – either fabulously flamboyant or so simple you wonder why no-one thought of it sooner. Omdesign 2016 Acorn Port Planter This clever, eco-friendly packaging comes from Portuguese design agency Omdesign.  In keeping with its ethos of wanting to give back to nature, its latest design comprises a bottle of 2012 LBV Port inside a cork gift tube. Inside the tube is a real acorn, covered with soil, encouraging consumers to take part in. Portugal’s Cork Oak Forest Preservation Efforts. Once the tree begins to grow, the recipient can replant it to a permanent position in the ground and mark the area with the wooden ring from the centre of the package, creating a lasting monument to its design. The base can later be reused to collect more acorns and renew the cycle. Omdesign has won the award for Best Sustainable Packaging at the Drinks Business Awards. Blossom Cava Bouquet Sustainable Package Turning design on its head, quite literally, this wine bottle design from Norway’s PackLab for Sweden’s Stella Wines, part of the Solera Beverage Group, is intended to be upended and carried by the neck, mimicking a bunch of flowers. Why bother to take a bunch of flowers and a bottle of wine to a dinner party when you gift both in one handy package? Garcon Wines Flattened Wine Bottle Garcon Wines is a start-up company, launched by entrepreneur Joe Revell, which claims to be the first wine home delivery service that is able to post wine through a customers’ letterbox thanks to its flattened wine bottle design. The bottles, which are 100% recyclable, have the same 750ml volume of a conventional glass wine bottle but have been flattened and made longer so they can fit through a letterbox. The bottle itself is 34 centimetre in length, about 5 centimetre taller than a regular wine bottle but around half as thick. The bottles are packed in cardboard boxes. Earlier this year, the company officially  launched its flat ‘letterbox-friendly’ wine bottle in the UK, having partnered with online florist, Bloom & Wild. Customers can purchase a flattened bottle of Merlot or Sauvignon Blanc, both from Chile, along with a bunch of flowers, if they wish. Wasem Double Insulated Wine Bottle  A German design company unveiled what is claims is the ‘world’s first double-layer wine bottle’ which keeps wine cold without the need to put it back in the cooler. Called ‘Cooleo’, the bottle has already been adopted by German winery Wasem, which has ordered 6,000 bottles to house its Pinot Noir rosé and dry Riesling. The double-walled bottle provides an insulating layer which helps to keep drinks cold, removing the need to put the bottle back in the fridge, the brand claims. It is made from hand-blown Borosilicate glass, which ‘has outstanding clarity and scratch-resistant durability’ flattened wine bottle. It is sealed with a glass Vinolok closure meaning that the bottle can be up-cycled and reused. Kim Soohee, founder and CEO of the design company Our Wonderful World, which has launched the product, hopes that people will also customise the bottle using different designs, graphics, artwork and wines. Recommended:  Hydrogen Powered Gin: Sustainable Gin Could Become Reality Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
The Paper Bottle Project and brewer Carlsberg think both that it is a great idea. Prototypes were produced from virgin pulp derived from the Scandinavian forests and are ‘fully recyclable’. Shaping a path towards a sustainable bio-based paper bottle solution. Challenge innovators and designers, they understand that packaging plays as much a role in the consumer experience as it does in creating waste. Today, we also know that we have the power to answer to both consumer and environmental demands by challenging conventional packaging and developing alternatives that will one day become the norm. Replacing materials that threaten our planet and minimise waste, ultimately, lending a hand to shape a path towards a more sustainable future. Are Paper Bottles A Sustainable Possibility? The Paper Bottle Project does and created a collaborative platform between BillerudKorsnäs, Grow, multi-disciplinary experts in tech and leading Brand Partners of various categories. Together we embark on an explorative journey with a mission to create a bio-based paper bottle solution that leaves a minimal to neutral environmental footprint for global benefit. For the design of this new bottle solution, it was important that the structural and graphic language not only mirror our collaborative process but also embody the natural harmony between material, design and manufacturing. The result became an interplay of form and identity that could appeal to a broad range of potential brand owners, and yet represent a unique visual language with characteristics that stay true to the origins of the material. What makes packaging sustainable? Sustainable Packaging Reduces Use Of Resources The use of sustainable packaging can also play a role in the amount of energy it takes to package a product or make the actual packaging itself. It can reduce solid waste, water usage, electricity and emissions. Made of virgin pulp derived from the Scandinavian forests, the visual direction for the concept’s design as we like to say, was born from the woods. Does Brewer Carlsberg Also Wants To Produce A ‘Paper Bottle’ For Its Beer? Carlsberg has released details of two new ‘paper bottle’ research prototypes it’s working on. In an announcement made during the C40 World Mayors Summit in Copenhagen, the Danish brewing giant said the; ‘Green Fibre Bottle’ prototypes were produced from sustainably sourced wood fibres and ‘fully recyclable’. The business has been developing the idea since 2015, working with packaging experts and academics on the project. An ‘inner barrier’ is used to ensure the bottles can carry beer. One prototype uses a recycled polyethylene terephthalate polymer film barrier, which acts as a thin internal lining. The other uses what Carlsberg described as a ‘100% bio-based’ polyethylene furanoate polymer film barrier. The prototypes will now be tested, with Carlsberg stating that its eventual aim was to produce a ‘100% bio-based bottle without polymers’. Carlsberg is ‘pleased with the progress on the Green Fibre Bottle so far’. {youtube}                                                      Are Bio Based Bottles Good For The Environment?                           Carlsberg Unveils PAPER Beer Bottles Made from Sustainably Sourced Recyclable Wood While we are not completely there yet, the two prototypes are an important step towards realizing our ultimate ambition of bringing this breakthrough to market. The company would continue to work with experts to ‘overcome remaining technical challenges’. Carlsberg is one of many major international firms looking to change the way it packages products. Is Eco-friendly Packaging, The Next Thing In Craft Beer? For a research team in Scotland designing an environmentally friendly packaging for craft beer made with an unusual material is this the case! Cuantec - a bio-tech firm backed by the University of Strathclyde alongside three investors including the Scottish Investment Bank - says it is using the remains of shellfish to manufacture bio-degradable six-pack rings, potentially saving millions of animals each year which are killed by entanglement. Recommended:  Sustainability Single-Use Care Products: Glorified Garbage The scientists in Motherwell, North Lanarkshire, were originally working towards a degradable alternative to food packaging, but believe they are just months away from a breakthrough which could see beer firms adopting the new ‘plastic rings’ later this year. Cuantec partnered with local brewery Jaw Brew to create the new can connectors, and says success would turn the business ‘from a research company into a production company’. If they get the science right in the next six months, they could be available by the end of the year. Tests are done in the lab and resulted in strong ideas for the formulation. The firm’s chief operating officer Dr Ryan Taylor, an analytical chemist and alumnus of Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, began working on the project in Spring 2017. He received support in establishing the company from his alma mater through the Strathclyde Entrepreneurs Fund, which invests in business ventures by the University community. Around 100 million marine mammals are affected each year by plastic waste, according to a study by the University of Plymouth, while hundreds of thousands of animals die as a result of being caught in plastic rings. Recommended:  Plastic Waste And Turtles: A Worldwide Fatal Attraction The firm intends to launch the bio degradable rings in the drinks market by 2020, and recently launched a crowdfunding campaign to secure € 173,000 worth of investment to hire more staff and expand its facilities. Murray-Green said the firm already has customers lined up. Plastic pollution has hit the headlines and people are starting to realise that everything they do has an impact. We bring home more plastic than we do food, it’s ridiculous. Everything is packaged and wrapped in some form of it. We can’t change the food industry overnight, but at least we can make a contribution to stopping the damage that these choices have done. What packaging is the most environmentally friendly? Recycled cardboard environmental packaging. For bulk packaging and items of all shapes and sizes, cardboard may still be the answer. However, cardboard can still be environmentally friendly, providing you choose cardboard from sustainable sources. Are there Wine Producers Who Are Interested In Eco Friendly Packaging? In the world of wine, it can be difficult to stand out from the crowd. But as this collection proves, it is still possible to reinvent the wheel (or bottle) and push the boundaries of design in innovative and eco-friendly inventive ways. While most producers will tell you that the liquid is the most important part of the production process (and it ultimately is), packaging plays a vital role in the marketing of a brand, even more so considering today’s tech-savvy, choice-rich, brand-hopping consumer base. Making wine more accessible, interesting and appealing should be a priority for any brand, with the label and packaging one of the most effective tools in a producer’s arsenal. Rather than being a short-lived novelty or gimmick, the most successful and original designs are executed with a specific need in mind, whether its accessibility, education, convenience, fighting for an eco-minded cause, or even fulfilling the needs of the admittedly niche space travelling wine lover. Extravagant design for design’s sake of course has its place, as does tradition. But the most memorable products are those that push the boundaries of expectation with a clear purpose, resulting in a truly unique, striking or practical design – either fabulously flamboyant or so simple you wonder why no-one thought of it sooner. Omdesign 2016 Acorn Port Planter This clever, eco-friendly packaging comes from Portuguese design agency Omdesign.  In keeping with its ethos of wanting to give back to nature, its latest design comprises a bottle of 2012 LBV Port inside a cork gift tube. Inside the tube is a real acorn, covered with soil, encouraging consumers to take part in. Portugal’s Cork Oak Forest Preservation Efforts. Once the tree begins to grow, the recipient can replant it to a permanent position in the ground and mark the area with the wooden ring from the centre of the package, creating a lasting monument to its design. The base can later be reused to collect more acorns and renew the cycle. Omdesign has won the award for Best Sustainable Packaging at the Drinks Business Awards. Blossom Cava Bouquet Sustainable Package Turning design on its head, quite literally, this wine bottle design from Norway’s PackLab for Sweden’s Stella Wines, part of the Solera Beverage Group, is intended to be upended and carried by the neck, mimicking a bunch of flowers. Why bother to take a bunch of flowers and a bottle of wine to a dinner party when you gift both in one handy package? Garcon Wines Flattened Wine Bottle Garcon Wines is a start-up company, launched by entrepreneur Joe Revell, which claims to be the first wine home delivery service that is able to post wine through a customers’ letterbox thanks to its flattened wine bottle design. The bottles, which are 100% recyclable, have the same 750ml volume of a conventional glass wine bottle but have been flattened and made longer so they can fit through a letterbox. The bottle itself is 34 centimetre in length, about 5 centimetre taller than a regular wine bottle but around half as thick. The bottles are packed in cardboard boxes. Earlier this year, the company officially  launched its flat ‘letterbox-friendly’ wine bottle in the UK, having partnered with online florist, Bloom & Wild. Customers can purchase a flattened bottle of Merlot or Sauvignon Blanc, both from Chile, along with a bunch of flowers, if they wish. Wasem Double Insulated Wine Bottle  A German design company unveiled what is claims is the ‘world’s first double-layer wine bottle’ which keeps wine cold without the need to put it back in the cooler. Called ‘Cooleo’, the bottle has already been adopted by German winery Wasem, which has ordered 6,000 bottles to house its Pinot Noir rosé and dry Riesling. The double-walled bottle provides an insulating layer which helps to keep drinks cold, removing the need to put the bottle back in the fridge, the brand claims. It is made from hand-blown Borosilicate glass, which ‘has outstanding clarity and scratch-resistant durability’ flattened wine bottle. It is sealed with a glass Vinolok closure meaning that the bottle can be up-cycled and reused. Kim Soohee, founder and CEO of the design company Our Wonderful World, which has launched the product, hopes that people will also customise the bottle using different designs, graphics, artwork and wines. Recommended:  Hydrogen Powered Gin: Sustainable Gin Could Become Reality Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Are Bio Based Bottles Good For The Environment?
Are Bio Based Bottles Good For The Environment?
Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage
There is a new sustainable raw material available, taken from the excess granular sludge released during the treatment of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Epe, the Netherlands. This new sustainable raw material is made possible by the Dutch Water Authority Vallei en Veluwe. Construction Of The Installation The board of Vallei en Veluwe has given the green light for the development of an installation who can carry out this process. In the spring of 2020, it has to be finished and working. Material From Sewage Has Unique Features {youtube}                                                            This video is only available in the Dutch language                                                    Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage                                                     Kaumera Nereda Gum - samenwerkende partners in beeld   The sustainable and biological raw material, Kaumera Nereda Gum, has a few exceptional qualities. It can retain water, but also repel it. This offers various possibilities for its use in the agriculture and horticulture, the paper industry and the construction sector.  For example, if you add Kaumera to the soil, fertilisers can be retained much longer. But you can add Kaumera as well to concrete floors, for a better coating. It last longer and its hardening better. Recommended:  Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK Circular Economy What is a circular economy? A circular economy (often referred to simply as ‘circularity’) is an economic system aimed at eliminating waste and the continual use of resources. Circular systems employ reuse, sharing, repair, remanufacturing and recycling to create a close-loop system, minimising the use of resource inputs and the creation of waste, pollution and carbon emissions The goal of the national government is to have a completely circular economy by 2050 in the country. To achieve that goal, Kaumera could play an important role as raw material. Tanja Klip-Martin, chair of the Water Authority, says: "together with our partners, we are fully committed to the research, production and application of Kaumera to achieve this goal". Sewage Purification Technology What are the different types of wastewater? Types of wastewater: Wastewater comes in three main types namely Blackwater, Graywater and Yellow water. This is wastewater that originates from toilet fixtures, dishwashers, and food preparation sinks. It is made up of all the things that you can imagine going down the toilets, bath and sink drains. The raw material is obtained from the sewage sludge generated by Nereda's sewage technology. In 2012, the Vallei en Veluwe Water Board was the world' s first to start utilising this technology in Epe. There is way less energy needed to purify the sewage water. This innovative and organic method of wastewater treatment is now used in more and more installations all over the world. Recommended:  Agriculture, Using Wastewater As Natural Fertilizer: Mexico Creating New Material From Sewage In Two factories Within a year, the Vallei en Veluwe Water Authority and the Rijn en IJssel Water Authority work together to build two factories. A factory will open in Zutphen in the autumn of 2019. This factory will take Kaumera from wastewater from the dairy industry. Next to the factory in Zutphen, there will be an operational factory in Epe in the spring of 2020. They also extract Kaumera, but then from municipal sewage water. A lot of people are happy with this innovation; the extraction of Kaumera from wastewater is widely supported in this sector. Next to Rijn en IJssel, Vallei en Veluwe, the water authorities of Noorderzijlvest, Vechtstromen, Waterbedrijf Limburg and Hoogheemraadschap de Stichtse Rijnlanden are also involved. Working Together A lot of companies worked together to make it possible to extract Kaumera. They all have their knowledge and expertise to recover, process and market this new raw material. At this way, they are all working together to create a sustainable, circular economy. This all can be created and developed, thanks to the financial contributions of the Province of Gelderland, the European Union (LIFE), and the Ministry of Economic Affairs (DEI). Collaboration and innovation are essential to make things happen. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
There is a new sustainable raw material available, taken from the excess granular sludge released during the treatment of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Epe, the Netherlands. This new sustainable raw material is made possible by the Dutch Water Authority Vallei en Veluwe. Construction Of The Installation The board of Vallei en Veluwe has given the green light for the development of an installation who can carry out this process. In the spring of 2020, it has to be finished and working. Material From Sewage Has Unique Features {youtube}                                                            This video is only available in the Dutch language                                                    Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage                                                     Kaumera Nereda Gum - samenwerkende partners in beeld   The sustainable and biological raw material, Kaumera Nereda Gum, has a few exceptional qualities. It can retain water, but also repel it. This offers various possibilities for its use in the agriculture and horticulture, the paper industry and the construction sector.  For example, if you add Kaumera to the soil, fertilisers can be retained much longer. But you can add Kaumera as well to concrete floors, for a better coating. It last longer and its hardening better. Recommended:  Bioplastic From Fish Scale And Skin Composts Quickly: UK Circular Economy What is a circular economy? A circular economy (often referred to simply as ‘circularity’) is an economic system aimed at eliminating waste and the continual use of resources. Circular systems employ reuse, sharing, repair, remanufacturing and recycling to create a close-loop system, minimising the use of resource inputs and the creation of waste, pollution and carbon emissions The goal of the national government is to have a completely circular economy by 2050 in the country. To achieve that goal, Kaumera could play an important role as raw material. Tanja Klip-Martin, chair of the Water Authority, says: "together with our partners, we are fully committed to the research, production and application of Kaumera to achieve this goal". Sewage Purification Technology What are the different types of wastewater? Types of wastewater: Wastewater comes in three main types namely Blackwater, Graywater and Yellow water. This is wastewater that originates from toilet fixtures, dishwashers, and food preparation sinks. It is made up of all the things that you can imagine going down the toilets, bath and sink drains. The raw material is obtained from the sewage sludge generated by Nereda's sewage technology. In 2012, the Vallei en Veluwe Water Board was the world' s first to start utilising this technology in Epe. There is way less energy needed to purify the sewage water. This innovative and organic method of wastewater treatment is now used in more and more installations all over the world. Recommended:  Agriculture, Using Wastewater As Natural Fertilizer: Mexico Creating New Material From Sewage In Two factories Within a year, the Vallei en Veluwe Water Authority and the Rijn en IJssel Water Authority work together to build two factories. A factory will open in Zutphen in the autumn of 2019. This factory will take Kaumera from wastewater from the dairy industry. Next to the factory in Zutphen, there will be an operational factory in Epe in the spring of 2020. They also extract Kaumera, but then from municipal sewage water. A lot of people are happy with this innovation; the extraction of Kaumera from wastewater is widely supported in this sector. Next to Rijn en IJssel, Vallei en Veluwe, the water authorities of Noorderzijlvest, Vechtstromen, Waterbedrijf Limburg and Hoogheemraadschap de Stichtse Rijnlanden are also involved. Working Together A lot of companies worked together to make it possible to extract Kaumera. They all have their knowledge and expertise to recover, process and market this new raw material. At this way, they are all working together to create a sustainable, circular economy. This all can be created and developed, thanks to the financial contributions of the Province of Gelderland, the European Union (LIFE), and the Ministry of Economic Affairs (DEI). Collaboration and innovation are essential to make things happen. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage
Waste: The Netherlands Creates New Material From Sewage
Sustainability Single-Use Care Products: Glorified Garbage
Sheet masks are trash. Unnecessary, they’re superfluous! They come wrapped in plastic. Sheet masks are, quite literally, pre-packaged piles of glorified garbage. Harsh, maybe but as the news cycles through stories on climate change and carbon emissions and what to do about the planet’s compounding pollution problem, it is understandable where it’s coming from. Entire cities have banned plastic straws and plastic bags. Extinction Rebellion protested at London Fashion Week while Greta Thunberg petitioned for political involvement at the United Nations  Climate Action Summit. Fashion houses are pledging carbon-neutrality. And beauty? While clean beauty is a growing category, and many brands are implementing sustainable practices, single-use items are a special cause for concern. Recommended:  Sustainable Fashion: Fungi, Roots From MycoWorks, Inspidere Sustainability Single-Use Care Products Beauty products made to use once and throw out, like makeup wipes and sheet masks, create a lot of unnecessary refuse. In the case of sheet masks, there’s a pouch, the mask, and sometimes the mask is wrapped in a plastic sheet. Usually, none of the components are recyclable and all of them end up in the trash post sheet-masking session, making it one of the more wasteful things one can do in 20 minutes or less.                                                          How to make a DIY non wasteful clay face mask Single-Use Care Products: Glorified Garbage The pouches that hold sheet masks are often a combination of aluminum and plastic, which cannot be recycled. The stiff, inner plastic sheets likely can’t be processed in recycling plants either (as is the case with a surprising amount of plastics). At best, these materials end up in a landfill; at worst, they end up in the ocean. Do facial masks work? Although there is no independent evidence that mud masks, clay masks, cream masks, or sheet masks provide any long lasting benefit to the skin, they can be hydrating, soothing and provide some keratolytic/exfoliant effect. Plastic can take hundreds of years to decompose, breaking down over time into harmful microplastics—pieces of plastic less than five millimeters long that are manufactured using different toxic and carcinogenic chemicals. Research has proven that microplastics are abundant in water, air, and the food we eat. Besides the potential health hazards of consuming microplastics, the particles release methane as they break down. Methane emissions contribute to global warming, and global warming affects our climate, creating more severe and unpredictable weather patterns that impact entire ecosystems. Single-Use Care Products: The Mask Then, of course, there’s the mask itself. Most are made with a blend of synthetic materials (nylon, plastic microfibers, polyester), which equates to laying saturated molten plastic over your face. As appealing as that sounds, there’s a downside: These “cannot be composted and must go in the garbage bin. Recent hydrogel versions are either made of synthetic polymers essentially, plastic—or eco-friendly biocellulose, but biodegradable sheet masks aren’t always better. Some come soaked in serums thick with silicones, a class of ingredients that leaves a thin, plastic-y film on the skin’s surface to create the illusion of ‘a glow’. This film is bioaccumulative, and prevents the ‘biodegradable’ biocellulose or bamboo base from fully breaking down. Instead, silicone-coated sheet masks join their synthetic counterparts in ‘leaking toxins into the soil’ for years. The same goes for under-eye masks, makeup wipes, and daily toning and exfoliating pads. Organic Cotton Masks Not Sustainable At All When you zoom out to consider the effort and emissions that go into producing the product in the first place (one organic cotton mask could require thousands of gallons of water) and the shipping materials associated with online orders, that’s a massive mountain of waste for a momentary thrill. Yet, the single-use sector continues to thrive. 'The usage of wet wipes is increasing by 15% each year and the face mask market is expected to grow to over $50 billion by 2025. Ongoing production of non-recyclable, non-compostable, and non-biodegradable products will have a considerable impact on the environment. (On a superficial note: Pollution particles will  also  have a considerable impact on your skin, hence the popularity of antioxidant beauty products. So technically, cutting down on waste isn’t only better for the earth, it’s better for your face. Is this to say that skin-care is single-handedly polluting the planet? Not at all. Rather, tracing a sheet mask’s face-to-waste-bin journey should highlight just how easy it is to reduce your environmental footprint. What is the best organic face mask? The Best Natural Face Masks For Every Skin Type: Andalou Naturals Instant Brighten & Tighten Hydro Serum Facial Mask Naturopathica Aloe Replenishing Gel Mask One Love Organics Love + Charcoal Masque Eminence Organic Skin Care Yam and Pumpkin Enzyme Peel Arcona Tea Tree Mask Inlight Beauty Chocolate Mask Sheet Masks, Choose Compostable Ones ‘Beauty Heroes’, started a zero-waste beauty section on their website because we know that customers are conscious consumers and genuinely wants to do better for the planet, they just need the tools. One of those tools is the Orgaid Organic Sheet Mask, which is 100% biodegradable and compostable, made with organic ingredients, and packaged in recyclable cardboard. When you’re done with the mask, you can place it right in your compost bin, where it leaves no evidence of its existence behind (besides your dewy, hydrated skin). Refuse, Reduce, Reuse It’s great if it’s in cardboard, and recyclable packing is awesome but it’s still an unnecessary single-use product.  Recycle , after all, enters into the equation after  reduce  and  reuse  for a reason. Refuse is even better! It’s not even having the product in the first place. Does this make you feel beautiful? Does this make you feel happy? Is the trash that this is going to create worth the moments of joy that you feel from it? Usually, the answer is no!                                                                   I Tried to Go Zero Waste for 7 Days Beauty Habits, Balance Them If you absolutely cannot bear the thought of a self-care Sunday or cross-country flight  sans  sheet mask, there’s no need to shame-spiral. If sheet masks are that one thing in life that make you super happy, more than anything else, then don’t try to get rid of your sheet mask—look for other ways to reduce your waste first. The Package Free Shop (which just closed a $4.5 million seed round led by Primary Venture Partners) is a great place to start. Bioaccumulative Ingredients, Eliminate them Cross-check your products with the Environmental Working Group’s Skin Deep database. It rates ingredients in terms of ecotoxicology and personal health, making it pretty easy to eliminate bioaccumulative substances - like silicones, triclosan, and triclocarban - from your routine. Recycling Most products’ caps, pumps, droppers, and plastic bottles - especially those of the squeeze-y variety - aren’t recyclable on a local level. However, TerraCycle, Credo, and Ayond have programs in place to collect and properly recycle these items for you. Single-Use Products, Swap Them Ahead, discover 10 sustainable (and super-luxe) skin-care products to replace your single-use sheet masks, makeup wipes, and more. You don’t ever want to have reducing your waste feel like giving something up—it’s always a positive thing. Before you go! Recommended:  Getting Healthier By Eating Sustainable Food And Taking Exercise Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Sheet masks are trash. Unnecessary, they’re superfluous! They come wrapped in plastic. Sheet masks are, quite literally, pre-packaged piles of glorified garbage. Harsh, maybe but as the news cycles through stories on climate change and carbon emissions and what to do about the planet’s compounding pollution problem, it is understandable where it’s coming from. Entire cities have banned plastic straws and plastic bags. Extinction Rebellion protested at London Fashion Week while Greta Thunberg petitioned for political involvement at the United Nations  Climate Action Summit. Fashion houses are pledging carbon-neutrality. And beauty? While clean beauty is a growing category, and many brands are implementing sustainable practices, single-use items are a special cause for concern. Recommended:  Sustainable Fashion: Fungi, Roots From MycoWorks, Inspidere Sustainability Single-Use Care Products Beauty products made to use once and throw out, like makeup wipes and sheet masks, create a lot of unnecessary refuse. In the case of sheet masks, there’s a pouch, the mask, and sometimes the mask is wrapped in a plastic sheet. Usually, none of the components are recyclable and all of them end up in the trash post sheet-masking session, making it one of the more wasteful things one can do in 20 minutes or less.                                                          How to make a DIY non wasteful clay face mask Single-Use Care Products: Glorified Garbage The pouches that hold sheet masks are often a combination of aluminum and plastic, which cannot be recycled. The stiff, inner plastic sheets likely can’t be processed in recycling plants either (as is the case with a surprising amount of plastics). At best, these materials end up in a landfill; at worst, they end up in the ocean. Do facial masks work? Although there is no independent evidence that mud masks, clay masks, cream masks, or sheet masks provide any long lasting benefit to the skin, they can be hydrating, soothing and provide some keratolytic/exfoliant effect. Plastic can take hundreds of years to decompose, breaking down over time into harmful microplastics—pieces of plastic less than five millimeters long that are manufactured using different toxic and carcinogenic chemicals. Research has proven that microplastics are abundant in water, air, and the food we eat. Besides the potential health hazards of consuming microplastics, the particles release methane as they break down. Methane emissions contribute to global warming, and global warming affects our climate, creating more severe and unpredictable weather patterns that impact entire ecosystems. Single-Use Care Products: The Mask Then, of course, there’s the mask itself. Most are made with a blend of synthetic materials (nylon, plastic microfibers, polyester), which equates to laying saturated molten plastic over your face. As appealing as that sounds, there’s a downside: These “cannot be composted and must go in the garbage bin. Recent hydrogel versions are either made of synthetic polymers essentially, plastic—or eco-friendly biocellulose, but biodegradable sheet masks aren’t always better. Some come soaked in serums thick with silicones, a class of ingredients that leaves a thin, plastic-y film on the skin’s surface to create the illusion of ‘a glow’. This film is bioaccumulative, and prevents the ‘biodegradable’ biocellulose or bamboo base from fully breaking down. Instead, silicone-coated sheet masks join their synthetic counterparts in ‘leaking toxins into the soil’ for years. The same goes for under-eye masks, makeup wipes, and daily toning and exfoliating pads. Organic Cotton Masks Not Sustainable At All When you zoom out to consider the effort and emissions that go into producing the product in the first place (one organic cotton mask could require thousands of gallons of water) and the shipping materials associated with online orders, that’s a massive mountain of waste for a momentary thrill. Yet, the single-use sector continues to thrive. 'The usage of wet wipes is increasing by 15% each year and the face mask market is expected to grow to over $50 billion by 2025. Ongoing production of non-recyclable, non-compostable, and non-biodegradable products will have a considerable impact on the environment. (On a superficial note: Pollution particles will  also  have a considerable impact on your skin, hence the popularity of antioxidant beauty products. So technically, cutting down on waste isn’t only better for the earth, it’s better for your face. Is this to say that skin-care is single-handedly polluting the planet? Not at all. Rather, tracing a sheet mask’s face-to-waste-bin journey should highlight just how easy it is to reduce your environmental footprint. What is the best organic face mask? The Best Natural Face Masks For Every Skin Type: Andalou Naturals Instant Brighten & Tighten Hydro Serum Facial Mask Naturopathica Aloe Replenishing Gel Mask One Love Organics Love + Charcoal Masque Eminence Organic Skin Care Yam and Pumpkin Enzyme Peel Arcona Tea Tree Mask Inlight Beauty Chocolate Mask Sheet Masks, Choose Compostable Ones ‘Beauty Heroes’, started a zero-waste beauty section on their website because we know that customers are conscious consumers and genuinely wants to do better for the planet, they just need the tools. One of those tools is the Orgaid Organic Sheet Mask, which is 100% biodegradable and compostable, made with organic ingredients, and packaged in recyclable cardboard. When you’re done with the mask, you can place it right in your compost bin, where it leaves no evidence of its existence behind (besides your dewy, hydrated skin). Refuse, Reduce, Reuse It’s great if it’s in cardboard, and recyclable packing is awesome but it’s still an unnecessary single-use product.  Recycle , after all, enters into the equation after  reduce  and  reuse  for a reason. Refuse is even better! It’s not even having the product in the first place. Does this make you feel beautiful? Does this make you feel happy? Is the trash that this is going to create worth the moments of joy that you feel from it? Usually, the answer is no!                                                                   I Tried to Go Zero Waste for 7 Days Beauty Habits, Balance Them If you absolutely cannot bear the thought of a self-care Sunday or cross-country flight  sans  sheet mask, there’s no need to shame-spiral. If sheet masks are that one thing in life that make you super happy, more than anything else, then don’t try to get rid of your sheet mask—look for other ways to reduce your waste first. The Package Free Shop (which just closed a $4.5 million seed round led by Primary Venture Partners) is a great place to start. Bioaccumulative Ingredients, Eliminate them Cross-check your products with the Environmental Working Group’s Skin Deep database. It rates ingredients in terms of ecotoxicology and personal health, making it pretty easy to eliminate bioaccumulative substances - like silicones, triclosan, and triclocarban - from your routine. Recycling Most products’ caps, pumps, droppers, and plastic bottles - especially those of the squeeze-y variety - aren’t recyclable on a local level. However, TerraCycle, Credo, and Ayond have programs in place to collect and properly recycle these items for you. Single-Use Products, Swap Them Ahead, discover 10 sustainable (and super-luxe) skin-care products to replace your single-use sheet masks, makeup wipes, and more. You don’t ever want to have reducing your waste feel like giving something up—it’s always a positive thing. Before you go! Recommended:  Getting Healthier By Eating Sustainable Food And Taking Exercise Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Sustainability Single-Use Care Products: Glorified Garbage
Sustainability Single-Use Care Products: Glorified Garbage
Casa Lokomotif Mobile Tiny House / Caravan House / Mobile House
For the environment friendly. Casa Locomotive does not deal with local permits. It takes care of the real owners of the land. It settles in your olive grove without damaging any trees and displacing any living creatures. Casa Lokomotif Mobile Tiny House Casa Locomotive generates its own energy while traveling, it does not stop producing. Stingy about water. Gray waste water in the field using flowers, tomatoes water. Casa Locomotive is produced in accordance with international highways standards and drives with 4x4 vehicles. It stops at any time in the landscape you want. I do not have a car like that or I don't even have a driver's license, but if you want to have a Casa Locomotive, he offers his solution. Picks up and leaves where you want. As long as you want to be intertwined with nature. We have the rest. Contact us for any questions you may have. We are excited to tell you more about the Casa Locomotive. How much does it cost generally to buy a tiny house? They can cost anywhere from $10,000 or $180,000 (€9,000 or €163,000). What's cool about tiny houses is that they can be built to match anyone's lifestyle and budget. The average falls somewhere in the range of $30,000 to $40,000 (€27,000 or €36,000). Pdesgn – 02. Tiny house that offers comfort with its elegant appearance and 2,50m x 6,00m dimensions Casa Lokomotif Mobile Tiny House Founder He was born in 1985 in Istanbul. After graduating from Besiktas High School, he graduated from Yildiz Technical University, Department of Architecture and then completed his MA degree in Architectural Design at the same university. For many years he worked as an architect in light steel, steel and prefabricated buildings. He has gained experience in many domestic and international projects. He was the Breeam coordinator of 35 Street Project and achieved success in his field. Projects in Turkey in 2011 and the first BREEAM design certificate in European space projects has been very key issue. Does Netflix have tiny houses? The 'Tiny House Nation'. Series is Now Available on Netflix. Netflix has published a new show on its streaming service on the subject of tiny houses. 'Tiny House Nation' follows renovation experts John Weisbarth and Zack Giffin across America, as they help design and construct tiny homes in spaces under 500 square feet or 46 M2. Casa Locomotive Mobile Home Systems Brands After this adventure; In 2015, Commodore Steel LLC. He took part in the hospital project as a guest architect in Abu Dhabi based company. As of 2015, he worked as an Projects Director in an architecture office. He gained serious experience on behalf of the zoning legislation and took part in consultancy, project and municipal project services to the leading companies of the construction sector. Since November 2018, Pdesgn Architecture Services has established Casa Prefabricated House Systems and Casa Locomotive Mobile Home Systems brands. Pdesign-01. 2.50m x 6.00m dimensions, including the trailer. Highest point 3.80m. It is made of aluminium composite material supported by a steel construction with outer walls and roof Casa Locomotive Contact Information Show in panorama view Sinanpasa Mh. Süleyman Seba Cd. Row Houses F1 Block No: 14/5 Besiktas / Istanbul 34353 T: 02129823869 M: 05353105133 info@casalokomotif.com http://casalokomotif.com Recommended: All About Tiny Houses
For the environment friendly. Casa Locomotive does not deal with local permits. It takes care of the real owners of the land. It settles in your olive grove without damaging any trees and displacing any living creatures. Casa Lokomotif Mobile Tiny House Casa Locomotive generates its own energy while traveling, it does not stop producing. Stingy about water. Gray waste water in the field using flowers, tomatoes water. Casa Locomotive is produced in accordance with international highways standards and drives with 4x4 vehicles. It stops at any time in the landscape you want. I do not have a car like that or I don't even have a driver's license, but if you want to have a Casa Locomotive, he offers his solution. Picks up and leaves where you want. As long as you want to be intertwined with nature. We have the rest. Contact us for any questions you may have. We are excited to tell you more about the Casa Locomotive. How much does it cost generally to buy a tiny house? They can cost anywhere from $10,000 or $180,000 (€9,000 or €163,000). What's cool about tiny houses is that they can be built to match anyone's lifestyle and budget. The average falls somewhere in the range of $30,000 to $40,000 (€27,000 or €36,000). Pdesgn – 02. Tiny house that offers comfort with its elegant appearance and 2,50m x 6,00m dimensions Casa Lokomotif Mobile Tiny House Founder He was born in 1985 in Istanbul. After graduating from Besiktas High School, he graduated from Yildiz Technical University, Department of Architecture and then completed his MA degree in Architectural Design at the same university. For many years he worked as an architect in light steel, steel and prefabricated buildings. He has gained experience in many domestic and international projects. He was the Breeam coordinator of 35 Street Project and achieved success in his field. Projects in Turkey in 2011 and the first BREEAM design certificate in European space projects has been very key issue. Does Netflix have tiny houses? The 'Tiny House Nation'. Series is Now Available on Netflix. Netflix has published a new show on its streaming service on the subject of tiny houses. 'Tiny House Nation' follows renovation experts John Weisbarth and Zack Giffin across America, as they help design and construct tiny homes in spaces under 500 square feet or 46 M2. Casa Locomotive Mobile Home Systems Brands After this adventure; In 2015, Commodore Steel LLC. He took part in the hospital project as a guest architect in Abu Dhabi based company. As of 2015, he worked as an Projects Director in an architecture office. He gained serious experience on behalf of the zoning legislation and took part in consultancy, project and municipal project services to the leading companies of the construction sector. Since November 2018, Pdesgn Architecture Services has established Casa Prefabricated House Systems and Casa Locomotive Mobile Home Systems brands. Pdesign-01. 2.50m x 6.00m dimensions, including the trailer. Highest point 3.80m. It is made of aluminium composite material supported by a steel construction with outer walls and roof Casa Locomotive Contact Information Show in panorama view Sinanpasa Mh. Süleyman Seba Cd. Row Houses F1 Block No: 14/5 Besiktas / Istanbul 34353 T: 02129823869 M: 05353105133 info@casalokomotif.com http://casalokomotif.com Recommended: All About Tiny Houses
Casa Lokomotif Mobile Tiny House / Caravan House / Mobile House
Casa Lokomotif Mobile Tiny House / Caravan House / Mobile House
Sustainable Fashion: Fungi, Roots From MycoWorks, Inspidere
Environmental action group Extinction Rebellion disrupted London Fashion Week to highlight the harms of throwaway culture and the concurrent climate emergency that the clothing market contributes to.  Calling for the cancellation of future fashion weeks in acknowledgement of the crisis, it plans to target show venues and hold a funeral procession called 'London Fashion Week: Rest in Peace'. These may be new tactics but the problems with the industry have long been known. Very high water usage, pollution, a high carbon footprint and bad working conditions mean that the fashion industry, and in particular cheap cotton garments such as denim jeans, are known to be extremely environmentally and socially damaging. This is before we even consider the impact of fast fashion, inexpensive clothing produced rapidly in response to the latest trends. Such items inevitably end up in an overfull landfill site before they are even near 'worn out'. Sustainable Fashion: Slow Fashion Currently in Vogue is the concept of 'slow fashion', an approach which considers the processes and resources required to make clothing and recommends that we buy quality garments that will last for longer. Another often touted option is the recommendation that we simply buy less, something encouraged by the protest groups involved in ‘Buy Nothing Day’ and initiatives such as Oxfam’s. Attempting to reduce the demand for new clothes is certainly going to be an important part of a more sustainable future. But what this ignores is the fact that the fashion industry is not a system that is about need. Rather, it is driven by desire, aspiration, gender politics and celebrity culture. Changing behaviour – by encouraging consumers to stop buying new things at all – would, to us, seem more immediately difficult and multifaceted than creating an alternative, aesthetically viable material solution. What is mushroom fabric? A new organic textile has been developed that is grown from mushroom spores and plant fibres. The material is called MYX, from the mycelium: the vegetable part of a mushroom. MYX is grown during a 3-4 week period, using the oyster mushroom, a common edible fungus. ... It is grown on a matrix of strands of plant fibre But this does not seem to be reflected in most design attempts so far to create sustainable, circular fashion. Take the rise of ‘fair trade fashion’ and organic cotton, for example. In our view, most of these purportedly sustainable alternatives do not seem to be able to tackle the complexity of the fashion system or the different components of it adequately. Organic cotton is still environmentally harmful and the price of “fair trade” fashion is often prohibitively expensive for many consumers. Another recent design trend is the use of electronics and 'smart materials' to make garments interactive and more engaging, supposedly giving them longevity. But there is little research into how such textiles may be disposed of – and they are not likely to be cheap, either. As such, we feel that materials that are already abundant in nature offer the best alternatives. Think of polylactic acid (PLA), a substance made from vegetable starch and already used to make biodegradable carrier bags but have the potential to be developed into textiles. Or Tencel and Lyocell, materials that are made from sustainable wood pulp and are already on the market. Then there’s anything made from collagen, “animal protein” and a natural polymer, which although not so popular with vegans, has been developed into ‘Zoa’, a luxury leather alternative by Modern Meadow, and our own experiments working with waste materials. Sustainable materials of this kind are what we should be focusing on. Mushroom Materials Create Sustainable Fashion Particularly exciting are the growing number of companies producing mushroom alternatives to packaging, building materials and leather. Stella McCartney, for example, is collaborating with Bolt Threads on a ‘Mylo’ mushroom leather range of accessories. Shoes made from mushrooms by Stella McCartney There are several projects and companies working in this area and their outputs are diverse and inventive. Of particular note are MycoWorks, who have created 'a new kind of leather grown rapidly from mycelium and agricultural by-products in a carbon-negative process'. They say that the material is sustainable, versatile, and animal–free. MuSkin, another leather alternative, is made out of Phellinus ellipsoideus, a fungus that rots wood in subtropical forests. Meanwhile, Ecovative Design, who started out making an alternative to plastic packaging but have branched out into creating leather and foam from mycelium. Package material made from mushrooms And in a similar area – not using fungi but microbes – is leather made from the cellulosic scoby bacteria that is used in the making of kombucha tea. There are lots of companies experimenting with this technique, such as Biocouture. This material, when dried out, looks like a clear, pale brown leather with a flexible plastic texture. How do you make mushroom bricks? The mushroom brick is "grown" by mixing together chopped-up corn husks with mycelium. The mixture is then put into a brick mould and left to grow for five days. The result is a brick that is solid, but lightweight. The 'mushroom tower' is then assembled using a custom algorithm to lay the bricks layer by layer. We have our own experience in this field: a couple of years ago we collaborated on an attempt to make a material out of mushrooms. We grew our material from the vegetable waste from a tuber-derived cellulose powder product made by a company in Scotland. We wanted to create a location-specific fungal material, differing from the other current projects mentioned. Our initial samples looked and had the texture and appearance of furry burnt crisps: it was clear we weren’t going to grow jeans or undermine the denim industry in the short space of time we had. But this objective and passion for the possibilities of mycelium in this context has stayed with us, and we are not the only ones. The benefits of growing a textile-like material from fungi or bacteria as opposed to cotton, man-made fabrics or worse still, blends such as ‘poly-cotton’ are many. Fungi are naturally abundant in nature, quick to grow (on a range of waste materials) and their growth uses a lot less water than traditional textile manufacture. In theory, a fungal product is also completely biodegradable, can be strong, can be colourful, water repellent, can be edible, and can have medicinal properties. And the list goes on. Bio 'Bomber Jack' made from mushrooms As a way to disrupt the fashion system as a whole, fungi or bacteria based textile alternatives might still be some way off. But while the over consumption and toxic wastefulness of the fashion and traditional textile industry continues, design in this area can also be seen as an act of environmental protest. One of the greatest challenges faced by the textiles and fashion industry is to make itself more sustainable, not just in terms of economic and labour force issues but in the face of ecological necessity. The production of textiles involves a long chain of complex processes to convert raw materials such as fibres or petroleum into finished fabrics or fashion products. These processes are typically resource intensive, requiring high concentrations of chemicals, large amounts of water and involving high temperatures and long processing times. This commonly results in high energy consumption and waste. Recommended:  Sustainable Fabric By IKEA and NIKE Textile Without Pollution A transition towards a more sustainable textiles and fashion sector requires approaches that can minimise its environmental and social impacts, therefore opting for cleaner manufacturing processes which can dramatically reduce carbon emissions and water use and eliminate the use of harmful chemicals. Here are five ways nature is being explored by individuals, research teams and industry to help make fashion more sustainable. Scientists are uncovering and exploiting underlying mechanisms and models found in nature to design new materials, processes and products as well as systems of production for the future. These range from traditional to contemporary processes that use low or high-tech methods, practised by artists in their studios to scientists in labs or artists and scientists working together collaboratively. Design Tools: Enzymes Enzymes are highly specific biocatalysts found within the cells of all living organisms. They offer the possibility of manufacturing textiles using simpler and less severe processing conditions which can reduce the consumption of chemicals, energy and water and the generation of waste. As a result, enzymes have successfully replaced a range of industrial textile processes, since they started being used in the early part of the 20th century. Cellulases and another group of enzymes called laccases are used in the production of stonewashed denim fabrics and garments. Stonewashed effects on indigo dyed cotton denim used to be created by pumice stones – but the use of pumice stones caused damage to both fibres and machines. Working with colleagues from De Montfort University, I have been investigating the possibilities of using laccase and protease as creative design tools to make industrial textile processes more sustainable. In our research we used enzymes to synthesise textile dyes and pattern fabrics using ambient processing conditions, such as temperatures as low as 50°C at atmospheric pressure. We now have ways to create many different colours with just a slight alteration of processing conditions, reacting enzymes and compounds together in various different conditions in a technique that eliminates the need to use pre-manufactured dyes. Leather: Zoa From collagen: The area of synthetic biology is growing at a rapid rate, and as a result many companies such as New York-based Modern Meadow are exploring the possibilities this area of modern science offers. The company has successfully bio-fabricated a leather alternative called Zoa. The advanced material is constructed from collagen (a protein) – the main component of natural leather – but Zoa is designed and grown in a lab from animal-free collagen derived from yeast. The material is capable of replicating the qualities of leather and offers new design aesthetics and performance properties not previously possible – while also eliminating the high environmental impact of raising cows and tanning their hides (which is often a toxic process). From fungi: Similarly, San Francisco-based MycoWorks – among others – has been exploring the possibilities of creating sustainable materials using fungi. Mycelium, (a mushroom root material) which is grown from fungi and agricultural by-products is custom engineered in a lab using a carbon negative process. It is easy to cultivate, fast growing and can be easily manipulated to adopt the properties similar to leather and many other mainstream materials such as wood and polystyrene. Sustainable Fashion: Roots, Inspidere Grass roots: An interesting project by the artist Diana Scherer called Interwoven explores the fabrication of materials using living plant networks which could be used to construct garments of the future. She has developed a process which manipulates oat and wheat plant roots to grow intricate lace-like textile materials. {youtube}                                            Sustainable Fashion: Fungi, Roots From MycoWorks, Inspidere                                                              The future of fashion: Diana Scherer She buries templates in the soil that act as moulds, which manipulates and channels the plants root systems to reveal woven structures constructed from geometrics and delicate motifs once the fabric is excavated. Cow manure: In a circular economy model, nothing is considered waste. In the Netherlands, a company called Inspidere has developed a method it has called Mestic that uses cow manure to produce new textiles. The processing method enables cellulose to be extracted from manure to produce two materials, viscose and cellulose acetate. The manure is separated and processed in a lab to extract pure cellulose, which is further processed to create viscose (regenerated cellulose) and cellulose acetate (bio-plastic), both of which can be turned into textiles. The group have achieved lab-scale success, the challenge remains to scale this process up commercially. These are just a few of the ways in which nature is being harnessed to provide the textile and fashion industry with realistic and viable options to move towards sustainability. Before you go! Recommended:  Israeli 3D Printed Fashion As Sustainable Works Of Art Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Environmental action group Extinction Rebellion disrupted London Fashion Week to highlight the harms of throwaway culture and the concurrent climate emergency that the clothing market contributes to.  Calling for the cancellation of future fashion weeks in acknowledgement of the crisis, it plans to target show venues and hold a funeral procession called 'London Fashion Week: Rest in Peace'. These may be new tactics but the problems with the industry have long been known. Very high water usage, pollution, a high carbon footprint and bad working conditions mean that the fashion industry, and in particular cheap cotton garments such as denim jeans, are known to be extremely environmentally and socially damaging. This is before we even consider the impact of fast fashion, inexpensive clothing produced rapidly in response to the latest trends. Such items inevitably end up in an overfull landfill site before they are even near 'worn out'. Sustainable Fashion: Slow Fashion Currently in Vogue is the concept of 'slow fashion', an approach which considers the processes and resources required to make clothing and recommends that we buy quality garments that will last for longer. Another often touted option is the recommendation that we simply buy less, something encouraged by the protest groups involved in ‘Buy Nothing Day’ and initiatives such as Oxfam’s. Attempting to reduce the demand for new clothes is certainly going to be an important part of a more sustainable future. But what this ignores is the fact that the fashion industry is not a system that is about need. Rather, it is driven by desire, aspiration, gender politics and celebrity culture. Changing behaviour – by encouraging consumers to stop buying new things at all – would, to us, seem more immediately difficult and multifaceted than creating an alternative, aesthetically viable material solution. What is mushroom fabric? A new organic textile has been developed that is grown from mushroom spores and plant fibres. The material is called MYX, from the mycelium: the vegetable part of a mushroom. MYX is grown during a 3-4 week period, using the oyster mushroom, a common edible fungus. ... It is grown on a matrix of strands of plant fibre But this does not seem to be reflected in most design attempts so far to create sustainable, circular fashion. Take the rise of ‘fair trade fashion’ and organic cotton, for example. In our view, most of these purportedly sustainable alternatives do not seem to be able to tackle the complexity of the fashion system or the different components of it adequately. Organic cotton is still environmentally harmful and the price of “fair trade” fashion is often prohibitively expensive for many consumers. Another recent design trend is the use of electronics and 'smart materials' to make garments interactive and more engaging, supposedly giving them longevity. But there is little research into how such textiles may be disposed of – and they are not likely to be cheap, either. As such, we feel that materials that are already abundant in nature offer the best alternatives. Think of polylactic acid (PLA), a substance made from vegetable starch and already used to make biodegradable carrier bags but have the potential to be developed into textiles. Or Tencel and Lyocell, materials that are made from sustainable wood pulp and are already on the market. Then there’s anything made from collagen, “animal protein” and a natural polymer, which although not so popular with vegans, has been developed into ‘Zoa’, a luxury leather alternative by Modern Meadow, and our own experiments working with waste materials. Sustainable materials of this kind are what we should be focusing on. Mushroom Materials Create Sustainable Fashion Particularly exciting are the growing number of companies producing mushroom alternatives to packaging, building materials and leather. Stella McCartney, for example, is collaborating with Bolt Threads on a ‘Mylo’ mushroom leather range of accessories. Shoes made from mushrooms by Stella McCartney There are several projects and companies working in this area and their outputs are diverse and inventive. Of particular note are MycoWorks, who have created 'a new kind of leather grown rapidly from mycelium and agricultural by-products in a carbon-negative process'. They say that the material is sustainable, versatile, and animal–free. MuSkin, another leather alternative, is made out of Phellinus ellipsoideus, a fungus that rots wood in subtropical forests. Meanwhile, Ecovative Design, who started out making an alternative to plastic packaging but have branched out into creating leather and foam from mycelium. Package material made from mushrooms And in a similar area – not using fungi but microbes – is leather made from the cellulosic scoby bacteria that is used in the making of kombucha tea. There are lots of companies experimenting with this technique, such as Biocouture. This material, when dried out, looks like a clear, pale brown leather with a flexible plastic texture. How do you make mushroom bricks? The mushroom brick is "grown" by mixing together chopped-up corn husks with mycelium. The mixture is then put into a brick mould and left to grow for five days. The result is a brick that is solid, but lightweight. The 'mushroom tower' is then assembled using a custom algorithm to lay the bricks layer by layer. We have our own experience in this field: a couple of years ago we collaborated on an attempt to make a material out of mushrooms. We grew our material from the vegetable waste from a tuber-derived cellulose powder product made by a company in Scotland. We wanted to create a location-specific fungal material, differing from the other current projects mentioned. Our initial samples looked and had the texture and appearance of furry burnt crisps: it was clear we weren’t going to grow jeans or undermine the denim industry in the short space of time we had. But this objective and passion for the possibilities of mycelium in this context has stayed with us, and we are not the only ones. The benefits of growing a textile-like material from fungi or bacteria as opposed to cotton, man-made fabrics or worse still, blends such as ‘poly-cotton’ are many. Fungi are naturally abundant in nature, quick to grow (on a range of waste materials) and their growth uses a lot less water than traditional textile manufacture. In theory, a fungal product is also completely biodegradable, can be strong, can be colourful, water repellent, can be edible, and can have medicinal properties. And the list goes on. Bio 'Bomber Jack' made from mushrooms As a way to disrupt the fashion system as a whole, fungi or bacteria based textile alternatives might still be some way off. But while the over consumption and toxic wastefulness of the fashion and traditional textile industry continues, design in this area can also be seen as an act of environmental protest. One of the greatest challenges faced by the textiles and fashion industry is to make itself more sustainable, not just in terms of economic and labour force issues but in the face of ecological necessity. The production of textiles involves a long chain of complex processes to convert raw materials such as fibres or petroleum into finished fabrics or fashion products. These processes are typically resource intensive, requiring high concentrations of chemicals, large amounts of water and involving high temperatures and long processing times. This commonly results in high energy consumption and waste. Recommended:  Sustainable Fabric By IKEA and NIKE Textile Without Pollution A transition towards a more sustainable textiles and fashion sector requires approaches that can minimise its environmental and social impacts, therefore opting for cleaner manufacturing processes which can dramatically reduce carbon emissions and water use and eliminate the use of harmful chemicals. Here are five ways nature is being explored by individuals, research teams and industry to help make fashion more sustainable. Scientists are uncovering and exploiting underlying mechanisms and models found in nature to design new materials, processes and products as well as systems of production for the future. These range from traditional to contemporary processes that use low or high-tech methods, practised by artists in their studios to scientists in labs or artists and scientists working together collaboratively. Design Tools: Enzymes Enzymes are highly specific biocatalysts found within the cells of all living organisms. They offer the possibility of manufacturing textiles using simpler and less severe processing conditions which can reduce the consumption of chemicals, energy and water and the generation of waste. As a result, enzymes have successfully replaced a range of industrial textile processes, since they started being used in the early part of the 20th century. Cellulases and another group of enzymes called laccases are used in the production of stonewashed denim fabrics and garments. Stonewashed effects on indigo dyed cotton denim used to be created by pumice stones – but the use of pumice stones caused damage to both fibres and machines. Working with colleagues from De Montfort University, I have been investigating the possibilities of using laccase and protease as creative design tools to make industrial textile processes more sustainable. In our research we used enzymes to synthesise textile dyes and pattern fabrics using ambient processing conditions, such as temperatures as low as 50°C at atmospheric pressure. We now have ways to create many different colours with just a slight alteration of processing conditions, reacting enzymes and compounds together in various different conditions in a technique that eliminates the need to use pre-manufactured dyes. Leather: Zoa From collagen: The area of synthetic biology is growing at a rapid rate, and as a result many companies such as New York-based Modern Meadow are exploring the possibilities this area of modern science offers. The company has successfully bio-fabricated a leather alternative called Zoa. The advanced material is constructed from collagen (a protein) – the main component of natural leather – but Zoa is designed and grown in a lab from animal-free collagen derived from yeast. The material is capable of replicating the qualities of leather and offers new design aesthetics and performance properties not previously possible – while also eliminating the high environmental impact of raising cows and tanning their hides (which is often a toxic process). From fungi: Similarly, San Francisco-based MycoWorks – among others – has been exploring the possibilities of creating sustainable materials using fungi. Mycelium, (a mushroom root material) which is grown from fungi and agricultural by-products is custom engineered in a lab using a carbon negative process. It is easy to cultivate, fast growing and can be easily manipulated to adopt the properties similar to leather and many other mainstream materials such as wood and polystyrene. Sustainable Fashion: Roots, Inspidere Grass roots: An interesting project by the artist Diana Scherer called Interwoven explores the fabrication of materials using living plant networks which could be used to construct garments of the future. She has developed a process which manipulates oat and wheat plant roots to grow intricate lace-like textile materials. {youtube}                                            Sustainable Fashion: Fungi, Roots From MycoWorks, Inspidere                                                              The future of fashion: Diana Scherer She buries templates in the soil that act as moulds, which manipulates and channels the plants root systems to reveal woven structures constructed from geometrics and delicate motifs once the fabric is excavated. Cow manure: In a circular economy model, nothing is considered waste. In the Netherlands, a company called Inspidere has developed a method it has called Mestic that uses cow manure to produce new textiles. The processing method enables cellulose to be extracted from manure to produce two materials, viscose and cellulose acetate. The manure is separated and processed in a lab to extract pure cellulose, which is further processed to create viscose (regenerated cellulose) and cellulose acetate (bio-plastic), both of which can be turned into textiles. The group have achieved lab-scale success, the challenge remains to scale this process up commercially. These are just a few of the ways in which nature is being harnessed to provide the textile and fashion industry with realistic and viable options to move towards sustainability. Before you go! Recommended:  Israeli 3D Printed Fashion As Sustainable Works Of Art Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Sustainable Fashion: Fungi, Roots From MycoWorks, Inspidere
Sustainable Fashion: Fungi, Roots From MycoWorks, Inspidere
Asteroid Mining: The Advocates Of Space Exploration
Earlier instalments of this four-part series of articles on asteroid mining dealt with the concept and its feasibility. As we are looking to space for obtaining minerals and heavy metals that are growing scarce on Earth, we are running into the technical difficulties of mining on asteroids - which host a wide variety of resources.   The previous article highlighted the infrastructure needs and the advanced robotics required to make asteroid mining a reality - and looked at the techniques that could be used to actually mine some of those 150 million + asteroids in our inner solar system. Now, we will shift gears and look at the advocates of this concept, who are ready and willing to invest heavily in this costly expedition. To kick off with the most obvious sentiment people experience when finding out more about the concept of asteroid mining: yes, please. There is a large group of people eager to get started and grab their piece of this potentially enormous pie, from billionaires like Elon Musk to presidents like Donald Trump - whose Space Force will be happy to get in the ‘business’ of space colonisation. (part 3 of 4) Reducing Industry On Earth Scientists are eager to get a move on as well, especially now that climate change is becoming an urgent, pressing issue. After all, moving our heavy industry abroad would mean that Earth could become a designated ‘residential zone’, so to speak. And that is what we are looking at: getting the majority of industry off the surface of our planet.   With asteroid mining, we will be able to handle the raw materials directly at their source, in space. The supply chain could become virtually self-sufficient and self-replicating, meaning that operations will grow exponentially while not requiring any input from us, down on Earth. Hence, all kinds of factories and resource generation activities could quite literally be outsourced to space. As Phil Metzger, a planetary scientist, aptly put it: “ The solar system can support a billion times greater industry than we have on Earth. We would be able to promote healthy societies all over the world at the same time that we would be reducing the environmental burden on the Earth. ”   Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation Solar Panels 'Covering The Earth' What if we install solar panels in the Sahara? Large-scale wind and solar power 'could green the Sahara' Installing huge numbers of solar panels and wind turbines in the Sahara desert would have a major impact on rainfall, vegetation and temperatures, researchers say. As a result, vegetation cover fraction increases by about 20%. One thing is undeniable. We will not be able to continue down here, on Earth, at the rate that we are currently at. Our energy sources are limited, that is a fact. Yes, renewable energy is virtually inexhaustible, but if we want to power our lives with this source of energy alone in a ' few hundred years’ time ', we would have to cover the 'entire surface of the Earth with solar panels'. All of our land mass would be covered in solar cells, barely leaving space for anything else. In 2030 we have to cover the total landmass of Spain to supply worlds energy need. Estimated global energy consumption by 2030 is 678 quadrillion Btu = 198,721,800,000,000 kilowatt-hours (simple conversion) divided by 400 kilowatt-hours of solar-energy production per square meter of land (based on 20% efficiency, 70% sunshine days per year and the fact that 1,000 watts of solar energy strikes each square meter of land on Earth) = 496,805 square kilometres of solar panels (191,817 square miles) This is hardly realistic. And especially when looking out into the vast depths of space all around us, it simply begs the question why we are not more eager to move out there, explore, and find ways of expanding without burdening our home planet to the breaking point. Recommended:  Renewables In Danger! Solar And Wind Energy: Start Digging Who’s Up For The Challenge? There is a rather boring answer to this question, as there are a bunch of companies, governments and ventures actively pursuing asteroid mining - with all the corresponding space industries - as a feasible business model. Over the last couple of years, these popped up left, right and center, sponsored by advocates, investors and industrialists alike. Just to get an idea of what they are doing, take a look at the following three startups. Deep Space Industries One of these enterprises is Deep Space Industries, an American company founded in 2013 by a group of ambitious scientists and entrepreneurs. They spent five years researching a large number of technologies that were meant to reduce the costs of travelling to high Earth orbits and deep space. Additionally, they came up with the initial design for a fleet of worthy spacecraft.   After being acquired by Bradford Space, Inc. last year, their focus somewhat shifted to deep space exploration, water-based propulsion and space station facilities. {youtube}                                                     Asteroid Mining: The Advocates Of Space Exploration                                 Mine asteroids for resources, like Deep Space Industries and Planetary Resources Planetary Resources Another American company, aptly named Planetary Resources, used to draw on extensive aerospace experience as well. With high-profile names such as Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin and filmmaker James Cameron backing its activities, they succeeded in launching two test satellites.   Although it was a huge success, the company started experiencing financial difficulties last year and was acquired by tech company ConsenSys.   What are the benefits of asteroid mining? Asteroids are enticing for several reasons. They have small gravity fields, so it makes it easier to place spacecraft and mining equipment on the surface. It's also easier to launch off an asteroid than say the Earth or the Moon. Trans Astronautica Corporation A company that famously claimed that it would ' build the transcontinental railroad of space to open the solar system to humanity' , and received funding from NASA for doing so. Their Mini Bee concept, a 250 kilo weighing robotic mining flight system, is designed to capture asteroids between 10 and 40 meters in diameter. It comes equipped with all kinds of advanced technologies like optical mining, laser mining, solar reflectors and asteroid containment systems.   Trans Astronautica Corporation Mini Bee Even better, it would use resources drawn directly from asteroids - including water ice and other volatile compounds - as a propellant, making it fully self-sufficient and, in theory, allowing it to mine indefinitely. Respecting The ‘Wilderness’   As with any major development, there are voices cautioning against hasty space expansion. This question was posed in a recent paper with the title ‘How much of the Solar System should we leave as Wilderness?’ The recommendation was to exercise restraint and already, before going ‘out there’, start setting limits for expansion activities such as asteroid mining. This will be quite a challenge, as we are desperate to accommodate our growing industry and population. How and why asteroid mining will make a difference in this will be examined in the fourth and final article in this series.   Before you go! Recommended:  The Illusions Of Renewables. Solar And Wind Will Not Save Our Climate Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Earlier instalments of this four-part series of articles on asteroid mining dealt with the concept and its feasibility. As we are looking to space for obtaining minerals and heavy metals that are growing scarce on Earth, we are running into the technical difficulties of mining on asteroids - which host a wide variety of resources.   The previous article highlighted the infrastructure needs and the advanced robotics required to make asteroid mining a reality - and looked at the techniques that could be used to actually mine some of those 150 million + asteroids in our inner solar system. Now, we will shift gears and look at the advocates of this concept, who are ready and willing to invest heavily in this costly expedition. To kick off with the most obvious sentiment people experience when finding out more about the concept of asteroid mining: yes, please. There is a large group of people eager to get started and grab their piece of this potentially enormous pie, from billionaires like Elon Musk to presidents like Donald Trump - whose Space Force will be happy to get in the ‘business’ of space colonisation. (part 3 of 4) Reducing Industry On Earth Scientists are eager to get a move on as well, especially now that climate change is becoming an urgent, pressing issue. After all, moving our heavy industry abroad would mean that Earth could become a designated ‘residential zone’, so to speak. And that is what we are looking at: getting the majority of industry off the surface of our planet.   With asteroid mining, we will be able to handle the raw materials directly at their source, in space. The supply chain could become virtually self-sufficient and self-replicating, meaning that operations will grow exponentially while not requiring any input from us, down on Earth. Hence, all kinds of factories and resource generation activities could quite literally be outsourced to space. As Phil Metzger, a planetary scientist, aptly put it: “ The solar system can support a billion times greater industry than we have on Earth. We would be able to promote healthy societies all over the world at the same time that we would be reducing the environmental burden on the Earth. ”   Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation Solar Panels 'Covering The Earth' What if we install solar panels in the Sahara? Large-scale wind and solar power 'could green the Sahara' Installing huge numbers of solar panels and wind turbines in the Sahara desert would have a major impact on rainfall, vegetation and temperatures, researchers say. As a result, vegetation cover fraction increases by about 20%. One thing is undeniable. We will not be able to continue down here, on Earth, at the rate that we are currently at. Our energy sources are limited, that is a fact. Yes, renewable energy is virtually inexhaustible, but if we want to power our lives with this source of energy alone in a ' few hundred years’ time ', we would have to cover the 'entire surface of the Earth with solar panels'. All of our land mass would be covered in solar cells, barely leaving space for anything else. In 2030 we have to cover the total landmass of Spain to supply worlds energy need. Estimated global energy consumption by 2030 is 678 quadrillion Btu = 198,721,800,000,000 kilowatt-hours (simple conversion) divided by 400 kilowatt-hours of solar-energy production per square meter of land (based on 20% efficiency, 70% sunshine days per year and the fact that 1,000 watts of solar energy strikes each square meter of land on Earth) = 496,805 square kilometres of solar panels (191,817 square miles) This is hardly realistic. And especially when looking out into the vast depths of space all around us, it simply begs the question why we are not more eager to move out there, explore, and find ways of expanding without burdening our home planet to the breaking point. Recommended:  Renewables In Danger! Solar And Wind Energy: Start Digging Who’s Up For The Challenge? There is a rather boring answer to this question, as there are a bunch of companies, governments and ventures actively pursuing asteroid mining - with all the corresponding space industries - as a feasible business model. Over the last couple of years, these popped up left, right and center, sponsored by advocates, investors and industrialists alike. Just to get an idea of what they are doing, take a look at the following three startups. Deep Space Industries One of these enterprises is Deep Space Industries, an American company founded in 2013 by a group of ambitious scientists and entrepreneurs. They spent five years researching a large number of technologies that were meant to reduce the costs of travelling to high Earth orbits and deep space. Additionally, they came up with the initial design for a fleet of worthy spacecraft.   After being acquired by Bradford Space, Inc. last year, their focus somewhat shifted to deep space exploration, water-based propulsion and space station facilities. {youtube}                                                     Asteroid Mining: The Advocates Of Space Exploration                                 Mine asteroids for resources, like Deep Space Industries and Planetary Resources Planetary Resources Another American company, aptly named Planetary Resources, used to draw on extensive aerospace experience as well. With high-profile names such as Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin and filmmaker James Cameron backing its activities, they succeeded in launching two test satellites.   Although it was a huge success, the company started experiencing financial difficulties last year and was acquired by tech company ConsenSys.   What are the benefits of asteroid mining? Asteroids are enticing for several reasons. They have small gravity fields, so it makes it easier to place spacecraft and mining equipment on the surface. It's also easier to launch off an asteroid than say the Earth or the Moon. Trans Astronautica Corporation A company that famously claimed that it would ' build the transcontinental railroad of space to open the solar system to humanity' , and received funding from NASA for doing so. Their Mini Bee concept, a 250 kilo weighing robotic mining flight system, is designed to capture asteroids between 10 and 40 meters in diameter. It comes equipped with all kinds of advanced technologies like optical mining, laser mining, solar reflectors and asteroid containment systems.   Trans Astronautica Corporation Mini Bee Even better, it would use resources drawn directly from asteroids - including water ice and other volatile compounds - as a propellant, making it fully self-sufficient and, in theory, allowing it to mine indefinitely. Respecting The ‘Wilderness’   As with any major development, there are voices cautioning against hasty space expansion. This question was posed in a recent paper with the title ‘How much of the Solar System should we leave as Wilderness?’ The recommendation was to exercise restraint and already, before going ‘out there’, start setting limits for expansion activities such as asteroid mining. This will be quite a challenge, as we are desperate to accommodate our growing industry and population. How and why asteroid mining will make a difference in this will be examined in the fourth and final article in this series.   Before you go! Recommended:  The Illusions Of Renewables. Solar And Wind Will Not Save Our Climate Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Asteroid Mining: The Advocates Of Space Exploration
Asteroid Mining: The Advocates Of Space Exploration
Grimshaw Designs Tiny Houses ‘The Peak’: Australia
Grimshaw, an Australian architectural firm, created a 35-metre-square tiny house. The Peak, the name of the house, is designed to provide young people in affordable homes. The micro-homes could be easily accommodated with IKEA furniture. The tiny house has a double-height ceiling, and there is sufficient space for a queen-sized bed. The housing prices are extremely high in Australia's cities, so this could be a great option. The Price Of The Peak The pre-assembled tiny homes start at A$110,000 (€67,680), the fully equipped version costs A$150,000 (€92,292).  {youtube}                                                     Grimshaw Designs Tiny Houses ‘The Peak’: Australia                                                            Nestd Tiny Homes | Melbourne Home Show About Grimshaw Grimshaw Architects has been watching the tiny house movement for a while now, and they wanted to design something a bit different than the regular micro homes. So, they created the Peak. Usually, tiny houses are very small and look a bit like a developed caravan. Grimshaw wanted something else: he wanted to offer an affordable home, more liveable, and with high-quality design. More than you would expect from a micro home. Grimshaw chose to give the home high ceilings, that offers a greater sense of space. What is the best insulation to use in a tiny house? You do have insulation choices beyond spray foam. Fiberglass batts are most commonly used by tiny house builders and, with sufficient thickness, provide excellent insulation. Made From What? The pre-assembled units are made of high-quality laminated wood, and by using the dimensions of the IKEA components to determine the layout of the interior, owners of The Peak can customise their kitchen, bedroom and bathroom, while keeping the price low. It makes high-quality design achievable; it is not a privilege that people can no longer afford. The Tiny house can use electricity, as it can be connected to the electricity grid. Also, up to 16 solar panels can be placed on the roof, making it more self-sufficient. There is also enough space for water and a compost toilet if required. Grimshaw hopes that these houses could be the solution for young starters who struggle with the housing crisis. Homes in Australian cities are very expensive. With the tiny house movement, there could be a sort of tiny communities. "we could design new neighbourhoods around tiny houses". Tiny Houses Around The World Tiny houses are trendy nowadays. Architects are working to find a solution for the housing shortage. All around the world, there are problems with housing and the micro homes could be an option to reduce this problem. In the Netherlands, you have several companies working on this problem. One of them is Ana Rocha Architecture. They created a tiny micro-home, which has 50-square-metre to live in, divided over three stories. In Slovakia, Nice Architects designed a tiny egg-shaped home. It can operate off-grid and can be used for only € 80,277. Before you go! Recommended:  The Sustainable Wikkelhouse Built In A Day: The Netherlands Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Grimshaw, an Australian architectural firm, created a 35-metre-square tiny house. The Peak, the name of the house, is designed to provide young people in affordable homes. The micro-homes could be easily accommodated with IKEA furniture. The tiny house has a double-height ceiling, and there is sufficient space for a queen-sized bed. The housing prices are extremely high in Australia's cities, so this could be a great option. The Price Of The Peak The pre-assembled tiny homes start at A$110,000 (€67,680), the fully equipped version costs A$150,000 (€92,292).  {youtube}                                                     Grimshaw Designs Tiny Houses ‘The Peak’: Australia                                                            Nestd Tiny Homes | Melbourne Home Show About Grimshaw Grimshaw Architects has been watching the tiny house movement for a while now, and they wanted to design something a bit different than the regular micro homes. So, they created the Peak. Usually, tiny houses are very small and look a bit like a developed caravan. Grimshaw wanted something else: he wanted to offer an affordable home, more liveable, and with high-quality design. More than you would expect from a micro home. Grimshaw chose to give the home high ceilings, that offers a greater sense of space. What is the best insulation to use in a tiny house? You do have insulation choices beyond spray foam. Fiberglass batts are most commonly used by tiny house builders and, with sufficient thickness, provide excellent insulation. Made From What? The pre-assembled units are made of high-quality laminated wood, and by using the dimensions of the IKEA components to determine the layout of the interior, owners of The Peak can customise their kitchen, bedroom and bathroom, while keeping the price low. It makes high-quality design achievable; it is not a privilege that people can no longer afford. The Tiny house can use electricity, as it can be connected to the electricity grid. Also, up to 16 solar panels can be placed on the roof, making it more self-sufficient. There is also enough space for water and a compost toilet if required. Grimshaw hopes that these houses could be the solution for young starters who struggle with the housing crisis. Homes in Australian cities are very expensive. With the tiny house movement, there could be a sort of tiny communities. "we could design new neighbourhoods around tiny houses". Tiny Houses Around The World Tiny houses are trendy nowadays. Architects are working to find a solution for the housing shortage. All around the world, there are problems with housing and the micro homes could be an option to reduce this problem. In the Netherlands, you have several companies working on this problem. One of them is Ana Rocha Architecture. They created a tiny micro-home, which has 50-square-metre to live in, divided over three stories. In Slovakia, Nice Architects designed a tiny egg-shaped home. It can operate off-grid and can be used for only € 80,277. Before you go! Recommended:  The Sustainable Wikkelhouse Built In A Day: The Netherlands Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Grimshaw Designs Tiny Houses ‘The Peak’: Australia
Grimshaw Designs Tiny Houses ‘The Peak’: Australia
Algae Makes Protein From Manure: Nitrogen Problem Solved
The company ‘I’am Algae’ in the Netherlands (Bolsward, province of Friesland) thinks it has a solution for the nitrogen (livestock farming manure) problem. It is possible that small organisms such as algae can solve the nitrogen and ammonia problem in agriculture. The company ' Hi, I'm Algae ' from Bolsward has come up with a formula. The company showed a test set-up with algae tanks during the 'Weekend of the Weterschap' (Weekend of Science). This arrangement consists of a device that separates manure into a closed system. Algae Makes Protein From Nitrogen Recommended:  Energy Miracle Algae. 10.000 Barrels A Day, Less CO2: 2025   The ammonia does not escape through separation in a closed system. After separation, the largest part is nitrogen-containing, which is suitable for offering to algae in special tanks. They then make it into protein, which in turn is a raw material for food. The algae also absorbs CO2 for this process and they make raw materials for the pharmaceutical industry, for example. Can we grow Algae on land that otherwise go to waste? Algae is remarkable in the way that it grows because it does not need to take away space from traditional plants such as corn, wheat or beans. Algae can be grown almost anywhere as long as the proper conditions are created. Algae uses water that is not suited for regular crops and facilities can be built on any type of land, making it easy for farmers to farm algae in areas where traditional crops would not do well.  For example, according to Henk Jan Hulshoff of the Hi, I'm Algae company, a farmer would recycle completely without nitrogen or ammonia emissions. And so there is no more manure on the land. Because of the production of protein, the farmer no longer needs to use concentrates. "That means that many soybeans from South America no longer have to be imported," says Hulshoff. "And then no extra jungle has to be cut down." Dairy, Chicken And Pig Farmers The system is not only suitable for dairy farmers, but also for farmers with chickens and pigs. In half a year the company wants to further investigate the market with two demonstration systems of different sizes. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change Causes Nature To Change: The World Affected Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
The company ‘I’am Algae’ in the Netherlands (Bolsward, province of Friesland) thinks it has a solution for the nitrogen (livestock farming manure) problem. It is possible that small organisms such as algae can solve the nitrogen and ammonia problem in agriculture. The company ' Hi, I'm Algae ' from Bolsward has come up with a formula. The company showed a test set-up with algae tanks during the 'Weekend of the Weterschap' (Weekend of Science). This arrangement consists of a device that separates manure into a closed system. Algae Makes Protein From Nitrogen Recommended:  Energy Miracle Algae. 10.000 Barrels A Day, Less CO2: 2025   The ammonia does not escape through separation in a closed system. After separation, the largest part is nitrogen-containing, which is suitable for offering to algae in special tanks. They then make it into protein, which in turn is a raw material for food. The algae also absorbs CO2 for this process and they make raw materials for the pharmaceutical industry, for example. Can we grow Algae on land that otherwise go to waste? Algae is remarkable in the way that it grows because it does not need to take away space from traditional plants such as corn, wheat or beans. Algae can be grown almost anywhere as long as the proper conditions are created. Algae uses water that is not suited for regular crops and facilities can be built on any type of land, making it easy for farmers to farm algae in areas where traditional crops would not do well.  For example, according to Henk Jan Hulshoff of the Hi, I'm Algae company, a farmer would recycle completely without nitrogen or ammonia emissions. And so there is no more manure on the land. Because of the production of protein, the farmer no longer needs to use concentrates. "That means that many soybeans from South America no longer have to be imported," says Hulshoff. "And then no extra jungle has to be cut down." Dairy, Chicken And Pig Farmers The system is not only suitable for dairy farmers, but also for farmers with chickens and pigs. In half a year the company wants to further investigate the market with two demonstration systems of different sizes. Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change Causes Nature To Change: The World Affected Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Algae Makes Protein From Manure: Nitrogen Problem Solved
Hydrogen-Powered Energy Observer Reaches London: The Future
The world’s first hydrogen-powered boat to tour the world, Energy Observer, has sailed into London. With no CO2 emissions, no fine particles and no noise that could disturb underwater fauna, the ship is the first of its kind and potentially a model for the future. Pollution Free A sleek racing boat, carpeted by solar panels, prominent for its two tall, rectangular sails, will be docked beneath Tower Bridge. Christened Energy Observer, the ship sailed into town marking the end of its north European tour. Since leaving Saint-Malo in 2017, the team has travelled 18,000 nautical miles, visited 25 countries and made 47 stopovers, including a particularly challenging mission to Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago – all without producing any greenhouse gas emissions or particulate pollution. Renewable Technologies: Hydrogen-Powered Energy Observer How does hydrogen renewable energy work? A fuel cell combines hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, heat, and water. Fuel cells are often compared to batteries. Both convert the energy produced by a chemical reaction into usable electric power.  Renewable energy sources, like the sun and wind, can't produce energy all the time. This tour marks just one part of a wider world mission, due to take place over six years with 50 countries visited and 101 stopovers made. But this expedition isn’t just an exercise in perseverance. The Energy Observer team is on a mission to test a variety of renewable technologies across difficult conditions, while carrying and spreading a political message – that a cleaner maritime world, utilising hydrogen as a primary fuel source, is entirely possible. Crew from the 'Energy Observer' Marine Ecosystem Speaking at a press conference to mark the beginning of the London stopover, ex-merchant navy officer Victorien Erussard, now president, founder and captain of Energy Observer explained his motivations for launching the project: ‘I have travelled 10,000 miles at sea and have suffered and witnessed the significant pollution of maritime transport and the degradation of the marine ecosystem,’ he said. ‘I decided that I had to find a solution. I imagined a clean and intelligent ship capable of optimising the energy mix available to us. A ship with the same comfort as a hotel boat, with the freedom of sailing equipped with an innovative energy system.’ Solar, battery Storage, Hydrogen Erussard, and film-maker Jérôme Delafosse, were joined at the conference by the on-board crew of 12 sailors, engineers and creatives. Having now spent many months at sea, the team look completely at home on the boat, jumping naturally across its solar-panelled flooring and posing on the roof. Inside the boat, conditions are certainly cosy. Snug bunks and a fully operational kitchen (complete with Smeg accessories) mirror the sleek exterior. Recommended:  Solar Powered Silent 55 Yacht Allows You To Cruise The World The most exciting thing about the vessel however is hidden from view. In order to power each voyage, the crew makes use of a range of renewable energy technologies, battery storage and hydrogen, with the latter stored in tanks beneath the surface. This makes it very different from the vast majority of ocean-going ships, which still rely on heavy and toxic bunker fuel – so toxic that the industry is one of the world’s biggest polluters, producing nearly one billion tons of CO 2  emissions every year, approximately two to three per cent of total man-made emissions. It has been estimated that the emissions from just 15 cargo ships equal that produced from all the cars in the world. {youtube}                                                                Energy Observer 2019 innovations                                         Hydrogen-Powered Energy Observer Reaches London: The Future The timing of this mission is therefore prescient. In April 2018, the International Maritime Organization put in place a target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping by 50 per cent by 2050, and it is likely that some of the technologies being trialled on-board Energy Observer will prove essential if this goal is to be reached. Many experts agree that in the long-term, exploiting hydrogen will make the difference. Hydrogen Fuel From Seawater How Can sea water be used for fuel? Scientists from the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have demonstrated significant progress in their novel gas-to-liquid process, which simultaneously recovers carbon dioxide and hydrogen from seawater, and report that it can produce a fuel-like hydrocarbon liquid which may eventually offer a renewable replacement. Energy Observer is currently unique because it is capable of producing hydrogen fuel on-board from seawater electrolysis – in which water molecules are separated into hydrogen and oxygen. This process is powered using renewable solar and wind energy. The latter is crucial because, while hydrogen is an efficient energy carrier and can be cleanly converted into electricity, its production is rarely so clean. The Energy Observer passing London Bridge Green Hydrogen “Hydrogen is inexhaustible, it is the most abundant element in the universe,’ said Erussard. ‘But it is not found in its natural state on land. We need energy to produce it.’ In fact, 95 per cent of hydrogen is separated from other elements using the power of fossil fuels, though Erussard adds that the ‘recent competitiveness of renewable energies and technological progresses, including electrolysis, could allow massive production of green hydrogen in the coming years.’ Recommended:  Hydrogen Energy Storage Revolution In The Netherlands Photovoltaic Panels On-board Energy Observer, production is largely powered by the 141 square metres of photovoltaic solar panels that cover the surface. These panels are vital because they charge the boat’s set of Li-ion batteries during stopovers, which in turn power the electric motor. Once the batteries are full, the excess energy is used to produce hydrogen which is then stored in tanks for later use. Generally, the batteries provide short-term immediate power, with the hydrogen used later when conditions deteriorate. During the north Europe tour, a typical voyage saw hydrogen supply up to 60 per cent of the ship’s energy with the remaining 40 per cent attributed to solar power using a fuel cell. Ocean Wings A more recent addition to the boat has seen two wind-capturing devices attached. Though abundant, wind is tricky to harness for larger ships and over the course of the expedition the team tested a number of technologies, with several proving unsatisfactory. The new sails, called Ocean Wings, are more useful. The sails act as a rigging system, allowing the crew to control speed and relieve the electric motors (tests have indicated that 18 to 42 per cent less energy is required with the sails in use). They also increase energy production during navigation through the production of hydroelectric power and, most importantly of all, they can produce hydrogen during navigation. While the crew was previously limited to producing hydrogen on stopovers, the sails mean it can do so while on the move, a world first. Hydrogen Use The key question now is whether Energy Observer can really become the ship of tomorrow. The crew believe that its technology is ready to be scaled-up and is currently working on a number of shuttle boats and other service boat projects. But there are undoubtedly several obstacles that stand in the way of much larger cargo ships cleaning up their act. A key barrier to expanding hydrogen-use is currently the cost of production. It is not feasible for most larger boats to produce hydrogen on-board and so land-based facilities will need to be significantly scaled-up. Until this is done on a wide scale, hydrogen will remain expensive and large companies will have little incentive to move away from traditional, cheap and dirty fuels. ‘What we need today is to coincide political will with favourable legislation and financial investments, in order to allow the deployment of green and economic hydrogen in our maritime world,’ said Erussard. ‘To get there, it is necessary to adopt regulations that will make maritime hydrogen an obvious option for many applications.’ Hydrogen Storage Another challenge of utilising hydrogen comes from storing it. Though hydrogen has a very high energy content – up to three times more energy than diesel and 2.5 times more than natural gas – it is extremely light and therefore has to be stored at high pressure to stop it taking up too much room. Energy Observer has been trialling different storage methods to overcome this issue and currently has eight tanks on-board with a capacity of 332 litres, capable of storing 62kg of hydrogen. Despite these challenges, hydrogen still looks likely to be a key player in the future. Global Shipping During the last Energy Observer voyage the team found that for equal weight, hydrogen storage contained 7.35 times more power than the batteries. But, utilising the gas efficiently will require more research. How do you store hydrogen safely? Hydrogen can be stored in three ways: As a compressed gas in high-pressure tanks As a liquid in dewars or tanks (stored at -253°C) As a solid by either absorbing or reacting with metals or chemical compounds or storing in an alternative chemical form Speaking at the press conference, the IMO’s secretary general, Kitack Lim, highlighted this fact: ‘One of the fundamental IMO (International Maritime Organisation) targets is that by 2050 we reduce at least 50 per cent of GHG emissions (Greenhouse Gas) from international shipping,’ he said. ‘If you consider the increase of the global shipping fleet around 2050, in terms of the individual ship, that target means at least 80 to 85 per cent reduction per ship. This is a very high ambition. ‘One of the key sources is hydrogen. In this sense I’m very pleased to see the development effort by the Energy Observer project. There should be more research work and effort to apply this to the bigger ships so we can eventually achieve our target by 2050. The Team Victorien Erussard, offshore racer and merchant naval officer, will lead the expedition, along with Jérôme Delafosse, professional diver and producer of wildlife documentaries. Victorien Erussard, offshore racer and merchant naval officer By their side, a team of over 30 people, architects, designers, and engineers, spreading from Saint-Malo to Paris to Grenoble, have been working since 2015 on refurbishing the catamaran. Energy Observer is a former race boat that has been reconditioned: Built in Canada in 1983 by naval architect Nigel Irens. Naval architect Nigel Irens The boat is built under the supervision of sailor Mike Birch, the maxi-multihull marked the evolution of its successors. Baptised Formule TAG, it was the first racing sailboat to break the symbolic 500 miles limit in 24 hours in 1984. The boat has since been lengthened four times and now displays the following dimensions: Length 30,5 metres Width 12,80 metres Weight 28 metric tons Speed 8-10 knots According to Victorien Erussard "Energy Observer is a conversion that has a double meaning: to recycle a reliable and lightweight catamaran which is an around the world record holder and to invest in research and development, instead of in composites". Technologies Used Designed in partnership with a naval architect team and the CEA-LITEN (fr) of Grenoble, this experimental vessel is going to be the first with autonomous means of producing hydrogen on board and without emitting greenhouse gas emissions using renewable energies. The boat will produce and store hydrogen using seawater thanks to an energy mix involving: 3 types of solar panels spreading over a surface of 130 square meters (21 kW peak), 2 vertical axis wind turbines (2 x 1 kW), 1 traction kite and 2 reversible electric motors (2x41 kW) of hydrogenation, 1 lithium battery (106 kWh), 1 desalinisator, 1 electrolyser, 1 compressor, 1 fuel cell (22 kW), and 62 kg of hydrogen. The complete hydrogen system weighs 2100 kilos. A new, lighter battery will be implemented in 2019. Before you go! Recommended:  Tesla Model S Got Hesla By Adding A Hydrogen Installation Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
The world’s first hydrogen-powered boat to tour the world, Energy Observer, has sailed into London. With no CO2 emissions, no fine particles and no noise that could disturb underwater fauna, the ship is the first of its kind and potentially a model for the future. Pollution Free A sleek racing boat, carpeted by solar panels, prominent for its two tall, rectangular sails, will be docked beneath Tower Bridge. Christened Energy Observer, the ship sailed into town marking the end of its north European tour. Since leaving Saint-Malo in 2017, the team has travelled 18,000 nautical miles, visited 25 countries and made 47 stopovers, including a particularly challenging mission to Spitsbergen in the Svalbard Archipelago – all without producing any greenhouse gas emissions or particulate pollution. Renewable Technologies: Hydrogen-Powered Energy Observer How does hydrogen renewable energy work? A fuel cell combines hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, heat, and water. Fuel cells are often compared to batteries. Both convert the energy produced by a chemical reaction into usable electric power.  Renewable energy sources, like the sun and wind, can't produce energy all the time. This tour marks just one part of a wider world mission, due to take place over six years with 50 countries visited and 101 stopovers made. But this expedition isn’t just an exercise in perseverance. The Energy Observer team is on a mission to test a variety of renewable technologies across difficult conditions, while carrying and spreading a political message – that a cleaner maritime world, utilising hydrogen as a primary fuel source, is entirely possible. Crew from the 'Energy Observer' Marine Ecosystem Speaking at a press conference to mark the beginning of the London stopover, ex-merchant navy officer Victorien Erussard, now president, founder and captain of Energy Observer explained his motivations for launching the project: ‘I have travelled 10,000 miles at sea and have suffered and witnessed the significant pollution of maritime transport and the degradation of the marine ecosystem,’ he said. ‘I decided that I had to find a solution. I imagined a clean and intelligent ship capable of optimising the energy mix available to us. A ship with the same comfort as a hotel boat, with the freedom of sailing equipped with an innovative energy system.’ Solar, battery Storage, Hydrogen Erussard, and film-maker Jérôme Delafosse, were joined at the conference by the on-board crew of 12 sailors, engineers and creatives. Having now spent many months at sea, the team look completely at home on the boat, jumping naturally across its solar-panelled flooring and posing on the roof. Inside the boat, conditions are certainly cosy. Snug bunks and a fully operational kitchen (complete with Smeg accessories) mirror the sleek exterior. Recommended:  Solar Powered Silent 55 Yacht Allows You To Cruise The World The most exciting thing about the vessel however is hidden from view. In order to power each voyage, the crew makes use of a range of renewable energy technologies, battery storage and hydrogen, with the latter stored in tanks beneath the surface. This makes it very different from the vast majority of ocean-going ships, which still rely on heavy and toxic bunker fuel – so toxic that the industry is one of the world’s biggest polluters, producing nearly one billion tons of CO 2  emissions every year, approximately two to three per cent of total man-made emissions. It has been estimated that the emissions from just 15 cargo ships equal that produced from all the cars in the world. {youtube}                                                                Energy Observer 2019 innovations                                         Hydrogen-Powered Energy Observer Reaches London: The Future The timing of this mission is therefore prescient. In April 2018, the International Maritime Organization put in place a target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping by 50 per cent by 2050, and it is likely that some of the technologies being trialled on-board Energy Observer will prove essential if this goal is to be reached. Many experts agree that in the long-term, exploiting hydrogen will make the difference. Hydrogen Fuel From Seawater How Can sea water be used for fuel? Scientists from the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have demonstrated significant progress in their novel gas-to-liquid process, which simultaneously recovers carbon dioxide and hydrogen from seawater, and report that it can produce a fuel-like hydrocarbon liquid which may eventually offer a renewable replacement. Energy Observer is currently unique because it is capable of producing hydrogen fuel on-board from seawater electrolysis – in which water molecules are separated into hydrogen and oxygen. This process is powered using renewable solar and wind energy. The latter is crucial because, while hydrogen is an efficient energy carrier and can be cleanly converted into electricity, its production is rarely so clean. The Energy Observer passing London Bridge Green Hydrogen “Hydrogen is inexhaustible, it is the most abundant element in the universe,’ said Erussard. ‘But it is not found in its natural state on land. We need energy to produce it.’ In fact, 95 per cent of hydrogen is separated from other elements using the power of fossil fuels, though Erussard adds that the ‘recent competitiveness of renewable energies and technological progresses, including electrolysis, could allow massive production of green hydrogen in the coming years.’ Recommended:  Hydrogen Energy Storage Revolution In The Netherlands Photovoltaic Panels On-board Energy Observer, production is largely powered by the 141 square metres of photovoltaic solar panels that cover the surface. These panels are vital because they charge the boat’s set of Li-ion batteries during stopovers, which in turn power the electric motor. Once the batteries are full, the excess energy is used to produce hydrogen which is then stored in tanks for later use. Generally, the batteries provide short-term immediate power, with the hydrogen used later when conditions deteriorate. During the north Europe tour, a typical voyage saw hydrogen supply up to 60 per cent of the ship’s energy with the remaining 40 per cent attributed to solar power using a fuel cell. Ocean Wings A more recent addition to the boat has seen two wind-capturing devices attached. Though abundant, wind is tricky to harness for larger ships and over the course of the expedition the team tested a number of technologies, with several proving unsatisfactory. The new sails, called Ocean Wings, are more useful. The sails act as a rigging system, allowing the crew to control speed and relieve the electric motors (tests have indicated that 18 to 42 per cent less energy is required with the sails in use). They also increase energy production during navigation through the production of hydroelectric power and, most importantly of all, they can produce hydrogen during navigation. While the crew was previously limited to producing hydrogen on stopovers, the sails mean it can do so while on the move, a world first. Hydrogen Use The key question now is whether Energy Observer can really become the ship of tomorrow. The crew believe that its technology is ready to be scaled-up and is currently working on a number of shuttle boats and other service boat projects. But there are undoubtedly several obstacles that stand in the way of much larger cargo ships cleaning up their act. A key barrier to expanding hydrogen-use is currently the cost of production. It is not feasible for most larger boats to produce hydrogen on-board and so land-based facilities will need to be significantly scaled-up. Until this is done on a wide scale, hydrogen will remain expensive and large companies will have little incentive to move away from traditional, cheap and dirty fuels. ‘What we need today is to coincide political will with favourable legislation and financial investments, in order to allow the deployment of green and economic hydrogen in our maritime world,’ said Erussard. ‘To get there, it is necessary to adopt regulations that will make maritime hydrogen an obvious option for many applications.’ Hydrogen Storage Another challenge of utilising hydrogen comes from storing it. Though hydrogen has a very high energy content – up to three times more energy than diesel and 2.5 times more than natural gas – it is extremely light and therefore has to be stored at high pressure to stop it taking up too much room. Energy Observer has been trialling different storage methods to overcome this issue and currently has eight tanks on-board with a capacity of 332 litres, capable of storing 62kg of hydrogen. Despite these challenges, hydrogen still looks likely to be a key player in the future. Global Shipping During the last Energy Observer voyage the team found that for equal weight, hydrogen storage contained 7.35 times more power than the batteries. But, utilising the gas efficiently will require more research. How do you store hydrogen safely? Hydrogen can be stored in three ways: As a compressed gas in high-pressure tanks As a liquid in dewars or tanks (stored at -253°C) As a solid by either absorbing or reacting with metals or chemical compounds or storing in an alternative chemical form Speaking at the press conference, the IMO’s secretary general, Kitack Lim, highlighted this fact: ‘One of the fundamental IMO (International Maritime Organisation) targets is that by 2050 we reduce at least 50 per cent of GHG emissions (Greenhouse Gas) from international shipping,’ he said. ‘If you consider the increase of the global shipping fleet around 2050, in terms of the individual ship, that target means at least 80 to 85 per cent reduction per ship. This is a very high ambition. ‘One of the key sources is hydrogen. In this sense I’m very pleased to see the development effort by the Energy Observer project. There should be more research work and effort to apply this to the bigger ships so we can eventually achieve our target by 2050. The Team Victorien Erussard, offshore racer and merchant naval officer, will lead the expedition, along with Jérôme Delafosse, professional diver and producer of wildlife documentaries. Victorien Erussard, offshore racer and merchant naval officer By their side, a team of over 30 people, architects, designers, and engineers, spreading from Saint-Malo to Paris to Grenoble, have been working since 2015 on refurbishing the catamaran. Energy Observer is a former race boat that has been reconditioned: Built in Canada in 1983 by naval architect Nigel Irens. Naval architect Nigel Irens The boat is built under the supervision of sailor Mike Birch, the maxi-multihull marked the evolution of its successors. Baptised Formule TAG, it was the first racing sailboat to break the symbolic 500 miles limit in 24 hours in 1984. The boat has since been lengthened four times and now displays the following dimensions: Length 30,5 metres Width 12,80 metres Weight 28 metric tons Speed 8-10 knots According to Victorien Erussard "Energy Observer is a conversion that has a double meaning: to recycle a reliable and lightweight catamaran which is an around the world record holder and to invest in research and development, instead of in composites". Technologies Used Designed in partnership with a naval architect team and the CEA-LITEN (fr) of Grenoble, this experimental vessel is going to be the first with autonomous means of producing hydrogen on board and without emitting greenhouse gas emissions using renewable energies. The boat will produce and store hydrogen using seawater thanks to an energy mix involving: 3 types of solar panels spreading over a surface of 130 square meters (21 kW peak), 2 vertical axis wind turbines (2 x 1 kW), 1 traction kite and 2 reversible electric motors (2x41 kW) of hydrogenation, 1 lithium battery (106 kWh), 1 desalinisator, 1 electrolyser, 1 compressor, 1 fuel cell (22 kW), and 62 kg of hydrogen. The complete hydrogen system weighs 2100 kilos. A new, lighter battery will be implemented in 2019. Before you go! Recommended:  Tesla Model S Got Hesla By Adding A Hydrogen Installation Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Hydrogen-Powered Energy Observer Reaches London: The Future
Hydrogen-Powered Energy Observer Reaches London: The Future
Carbon Emissions Reduced To 35 Percent: TORQAMP, Netherlands
A dirty diesel engine will be able to drive much more sustainably thanks to the TORQAMP, an electric compressor. “It almost sounds too good to be true,” admits the co-founder of TORQAMP, Jelke Hoekstra. “Yet we can reduce carbon emissions by up to 35 percent. Which makes a car significantly cleaner.” Four years ago, together with Daniel Hilgersom, he started TORQAMP, a spin-off from Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e). What started out as an electric turbo for motorsport, has gradually progressed more towards making a variety of vehicles more sustainable. TORQAMP, How Does It Work? Hoekstra: “There are various devices available that can boost the performance of a car, such as superchargers and turbos. A turbo injects more air into the engine so that it has more power in combination with extra fuel. For example, the car is able to accelerate faster or drive faster. We have created an electric turbocharger. It uses less fuel and is much easier to install. In fact, it is comparable to a compressor or an air pump. It can be used on all combustion engines whether they use petrol, LPG, diesel or kerosene. This makes the TORQAMP suitable for all kinds of applications, such as road vehicles, motorsport and in the shipping industry.” {youtube}                                      Dyno Testing Electric Supercharger on Honda Prelude TorqAmp                                   Carbon Emissions Reduced To 35 Percent: TORQAMP, Netherlands Sustainable Mobility What does sustainable mobility mean? Sustainable mobility means ‘Satisfying the needs of the current generation without compromising the ability to satisfy the needs of future generations’, Brundtland report: Sustainable mobility is therefore the mobility model that enables movement with minimal environmental and territorial impact. Unlike a normal turbo, the TORQAMP does not rely initially on exhaust fumes in order to blast out air. Soot (Soot is a mass of impure carbon particles resulting from the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons) is reduced, since air can be blown into the engine proactively. Soot is a result of too much fuel and not enough oxygen when fuel is burnt. We want to prevent a diesel engine from emitting any soot at all in the future. That would be ideal. We already have a few solutions in mind for this, but that also calls for a lot of research. We are currently investigating the options for lorries and ships as well. Electric propulsion is not possible for these vehicles in the short term, but our device could very well be a solution. Ways are being thought up that aim to make new cars cleaner. For example, by making the engine smaller so that it uses less fuel. The government even encourages us to buy new cars. But with our device, we are also able to make existing diesel cars cleaner relatively inexpensively. We have even designed it so that most people are able to install it themselves. Moreover, the TORQAMP is suitable for all cars. The unit is made in such a way that every engine can cope with the extra air pressure. Hydrogen How does a hydrogen cell work? A fuel cell works by passing hydrogen through the anode of a fuel cell and oxygen through the cathode. At the cathode, the protons, electrons, and oxygen combine to produce water molecules. Due to their high efficiency, fuel cells are very clean, with their only by-products being electricity, excess heat, and water.   As well as making diesel engines cleaner, the TORQAMP is able to contribute to the development of hydrogen cells. A hydrogen cell needs a compressor to pump air into its system. The oxygen is needed as part of the chemical process for generating energy. Combustion engines suck in air themselves by the way they operate, but a hydrogen cell doesn’t. That’s why they have a separate compressor. Otherwise it won’t work. The hydrogen cell’s efficiency is also increased this way. Recommended:  Hydrogen Powered Car That Emits Water No CO2: The Rasa There are several compressors on the market, but they are comparatively expensive. Most compressors which are suitable for the hydrogen market cost around 25 thousand euros. Our compressor is €2,500. Therefore, the TORQAMP could significantly reduce the price of a hydrogen cell. We are working towards further development in this area with various parties. For example, TU/e-start-up DENS, which is working on hydrogen cells, has already asked us to supply a compressor. We have also submitted a plan together with TNO (TNO, the Netherlands Organisation for applied scientific research TNO, was founded by law in 1932 to enable business and government to apply knowledge) so we can take this application to a higher level. In addition to that, we are testing with yet another party a prototype of an electric aircraft. In this project, our compressor regulates the air pressure in a cabin. That’s how we are able to contribute in a number of ways to cleaner means of transportation.” TORQAMP, how did the idea came about? “During my final year I was working on high speed electric motors. That’s how the idea came about,” says Hilgersom. He graduated from the TU/e in automotive sciences. Hoekstra: “Daniel and I were introduced to each other via via. That clicked right away, so we started a company together in order to develop this even further. He is the engineer and I do the sales side as the business manager. We originally thought we could have developed the whole product within a year. In the end, it turned out to be four.” Funding To Roll This Out Further? “We hope to be able to sell a number of TORQAMPS fairly easily in the motorsport sector. Selling to large car manufacturers is more difficult because they have set far too many conditions. In motorsport there are plenty of car enthusiasts with a lot of technical knowledge. That’s a better fit for us,” says Hoekstra. “We have to test our product on various cars in order to gain the confidence of these car enthusiasts. We do some of this ourselves, but we also have small-scale tuning companies do this for us. They convert cars too. We approach them to test a car and ask them if they are interested in selling the product. When they realize the value of the product, they start talking about it to everyone. And word of mouth is still the best way to go. We have also set up a Kickstarter campaign through which we are aiming to sell fifty TORQAMPS. “With the money that we are making in the motorsport world, we also want to expand the development of compressors for hydrogen cells and create cleaner diesel engines. We are currently applying for European subsidies for this. Our greatest passion lies in these applications. That’s why we are focusing the company’s long-term vision on this.” Hilgersom: “This is how we want to make a positive contribution to the environment by making it possible to drive in a more environmentally friendly way.” TORQAMPS, In A Year’s Time? “We hope that within a year we will have enough financial resources to hire two extra engineers and a marketing professional. With several engineers, we will be able to speed up development. This will make it easier for us to place products on the hydrogen market and to do more research in the diesel market. Good marketing is a must”, says Hoekstra. “People and companies are expressing more and more interest in the product. They regularly ask us if we can make something for them. Now we are so busy with day-to-day issues that we can’ t do everything. That’s a pity. Extra engineers would certainly help with this.” Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
A dirty diesel engine will be able to drive much more sustainably thanks to the TORQAMP, an electric compressor. “It almost sounds too good to be true,” admits the co-founder of TORQAMP, Jelke Hoekstra. “Yet we can reduce carbon emissions by up to 35 percent. Which makes a car significantly cleaner.” Four years ago, together with Daniel Hilgersom, he started TORQAMP, a spin-off from Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e). What started out as an electric turbo for motorsport, has gradually progressed more towards making a variety of vehicles more sustainable. TORQAMP, How Does It Work? Hoekstra: “There are various devices available that can boost the performance of a car, such as superchargers and turbos. A turbo injects more air into the engine so that it has more power in combination with extra fuel. For example, the car is able to accelerate faster or drive faster. We have created an electric turbocharger. It uses less fuel and is much easier to install. In fact, it is comparable to a compressor or an air pump. It can be used on all combustion engines whether they use petrol, LPG, diesel or kerosene. This makes the TORQAMP suitable for all kinds of applications, such as road vehicles, motorsport and in the shipping industry.” {youtube}                                      Dyno Testing Electric Supercharger on Honda Prelude TorqAmp                                   Carbon Emissions Reduced To 35 Percent: TORQAMP, Netherlands Sustainable Mobility What does sustainable mobility mean? Sustainable mobility means ‘Satisfying the needs of the current generation without compromising the ability to satisfy the needs of future generations’, Brundtland report: Sustainable mobility is therefore the mobility model that enables movement with minimal environmental and territorial impact. Unlike a normal turbo, the TORQAMP does not rely initially on exhaust fumes in order to blast out air. Soot (Soot is a mass of impure carbon particles resulting from the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons) is reduced, since air can be blown into the engine proactively. Soot is a result of too much fuel and not enough oxygen when fuel is burnt. We want to prevent a diesel engine from emitting any soot at all in the future. That would be ideal. We already have a few solutions in mind for this, but that also calls for a lot of research. We are currently investigating the options for lorries and ships as well. Electric propulsion is not possible for these vehicles in the short term, but our device could very well be a solution. Ways are being thought up that aim to make new cars cleaner. For example, by making the engine smaller so that it uses less fuel. The government even encourages us to buy new cars. But with our device, we are also able to make existing diesel cars cleaner relatively inexpensively. We have even designed it so that most people are able to install it themselves. Moreover, the TORQAMP is suitable for all cars. The unit is made in such a way that every engine can cope with the extra air pressure. Hydrogen How does a hydrogen cell work? A fuel cell works by passing hydrogen through the anode of a fuel cell and oxygen through the cathode. At the cathode, the protons, electrons, and oxygen combine to produce water molecules. Due to their high efficiency, fuel cells are very clean, with their only by-products being electricity, excess heat, and water.   As well as making diesel engines cleaner, the TORQAMP is able to contribute to the development of hydrogen cells. A hydrogen cell needs a compressor to pump air into its system. The oxygen is needed as part of the chemical process for generating energy. Combustion engines suck in air themselves by the way they operate, but a hydrogen cell doesn’t. That’s why they have a separate compressor. Otherwise it won’t work. The hydrogen cell’s efficiency is also increased this way. Recommended:  Hydrogen Powered Car That Emits Water No CO2: The Rasa There are several compressors on the market, but they are comparatively expensive. Most compressors which are suitable for the hydrogen market cost around 25 thousand euros. Our compressor is €2,500. Therefore, the TORQAMP could significantly reduce the price of a hydrogen cell. We are working towards further development in this area with various parties. For example, TU/e-start-up DENS, which is working on hydrogen cells, has already asked us to supply a compressor. We have also submitted a plan together with TNO (TNO, the Netherlands Organisation for applied scientific research TNO, was founded by law in 1932 to enable business and government to apply knowledge) so we can take this application to a higher level. In addition to that, we are testing with yet another party a prototype of an electric aircraft. In this project, our compressor regulates the air pressure in a cabin. That’s how we are able to contribute in a number of ways to cleaner means of transportation.” TORQAMP, how did the idea came about? “During my final year I was working on high speed electric motors. That’s how the idea came about,” says Hilgersom. He graduated from the TU/e in automotive sciences. Hoekstra: “Daniel and I were introduced to each other via via. That clicked right away, so we started a company together in order to develop this even further. He is the engineer and I do the sales side as the business manager. We originally thought we could have developed the whole product within a year. In the end, it turned out to be four.” Funding To Roll This Out Further? “We hope to be able to sell a number of TORQAMPS fairly easily in the motorsport sector. Selling to large car manufacturers is more difficult because they have set far too many conditions. In motorsport there are plenty of car enthusiasts with a lot of technical knowledge. That’s a better fit for us,” says Hoekstra. “We have to test our product on various cars in order to gain the confidence of these car enthusiasts. We do some of this ourselves, but we also have small-scale tuning companies do this for us. They convert cars too. We approach them to test a car and ask them if they are interested in selling the product. When they realize the value of the product, they start talking about it to everyone. And word of mouth is still the best way to go. We have also set up a Kickstarter campaign through which we are aiming to sell fifty TORQAMPS. “With the money that we are making in the motorsport world, we also want to expand the development of compressors for hydrogen cells and create cleaner diesel engines. We are currently applying for European subsidies for this. Our greatest passion lies in these applications. That’s why we are focusing the company’s long-term vision on this.” Hilgersom: “This is how we want to make a positive contribution to the environment by making it possible to drive in a more environmentally friendly way.” TORQAMPS, In A Year’s Time? “We hope that within a year we will have enough financial resources to hire two extra engineers and a marketing professional. With several engineers, we will be able to speed up development. This will make it easier for us to place products on the hydrogen market and to do more research in the diesel market. Good marketing is a must”, says Hoekstra. “People and companies are expressing more and more interest in the product. They regularly ask us if we can make something for them. Now we are so busy with day-to-day issues that we can’ t do everything. That’s a pity. Extra engineers would certainly help with this.” Before you go! Recommended:  Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It? Did you find this an interesting article or do you have a question or remark? Leave a comment below. We try to respond the same day. Like to write your own article about sustainability? Click on  'Register'  or push the button 'Write An Article' on the  'HomePage'
Carbon Emissions Reduced To 35 Percent: TORQAMP, Netherlands
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