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Economic Growth Is Dead: Welcome To The Circular Economy
Everything on this planet is part of a vicious circle. Because we do this, that could happen, or the other way around. The economy is not about growth. The world we live in, the things we use are getting smaller. So, is economic growth dead? Where did it go wrong? The foundation of economics is wrong; it was built on the concept of profit, not because of social importance. We have to go way back, even before money became an issue, to find out where it went wrong. We used to focus only on: eat eat eat, destroy destroy destroy, eat more, destroy more. Even economics admit that capitalism has failed. We all like the idea of sustained economic growth, but in reality, we are to blame for the way nature reacts. We are predators, looking for more, wanting more, but in the end, humankind has become a problem for humanity. Nature can regenerate itself No matter how much fish we ate, fish stocks would almost replenish automatically, and they would come from other places in the ocean. Forests would regenerate within weeks if there is enough rain falling out of the sky and sunlight to let the trees grow. And it is true; this beautiful planet can regenerate itself, it is kind of magical. But because of our interfering, abusing the earth, we are destroying its magical, natural power to restore. Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation Circular economy The circular economy is what works on this planet, is what we know. Residues are completely are entirely reused in the system. The only problem is, humanity uses a lot of plastic. Mother Earth cannot reuse plastic. There is an area in the Pacific Ocean where nature has started to gather much of our plastic. Maybe, in the future, scientists will discover plastic-eating bacteria that can turn plastic into reusable natural chemicals. But that will take forever, long after we all extinct. We, humans, are going too fast. We are cutting down trees too fast, we are polluting the earth too fast, and we are creating more plastic than fish too fast. We all do it too fast. That is why Mother Earth cannot keep up. We have earth that can regenerate, can recycle, but we are still managing to destroy it all. Recommended:  Combing Plastic Waste Out Oceans: Competition For Boyan Slat A credit card per week that is what we eat At this moment, we consume everything, more than we can bear, until there is nothing left to eat each other. A recent study has shown that the amount of plastic we consume every week is as much as one credit card. How? Well, first of all, it is a plastic wrapper, that accidentally ends up in your stomach, but also the fish we eat, ate the plastic that ends up in the ocean. The air we breathe is partly plastic, the dust we walk on. This is the new world, the world we created, a world full of toxic plastic parts. It is a bitter irony that the credit card, symbol of buying, of capitalism, makes us toxic. {youtube}                        Economic Growth Is Dead: Welcome To The Circular Economy.  How Much Plastic Do You Eat? Waste nothing, recycle everything Waste is a myth, that is how the circular economy works. It is very easy, actually. The concept of the circular economy is a process where nothing is wasted. Everything that we produce, even our waste, eventually is turned back into food and products. If you like it or not, this is how our planet works. Everything is recycled, millions of times until the end of time. Recommended:  Circular Architecture 'The GreenHouse': Utrecht, Netherlands Consuming from the heart As mentioned above, we consume a lot, and we consume until we cannot consume anymore. We consume from a state of fear and insecurity and eat our way through the "buffet" of nature. You cannot only understand the circular economy by using a calculator; it must be understood from the heart. The circular economy means being happy with what you have. Consuming to sustain yourself, not to stuff yourself. Consuming because you need things, not because you compete with your neighbour who is the first to go to the moon, or something like that. We are made to consume, and that is fine. But we put the all-you-can-eat Buffet out of action. We need to understand the painful truth that destroying the planet is actually part of our destiny as a species, written in our biology and also a simple function of our population that increases exponentially until it becomes unsustainable. But we are incredibly smart and powerful. We can overcome our biology and change our destiny. We can put uncertainty and competition aside and work on it from the heart. Just like the heart, which takes up the blood and then pumps it out, we have to learn to give and take. We have to embrace the circular economy. Recommended:  Blue Planet Earth: The Amount Of Water You Use
Everything on this planet is part of a vicious circle. Because we do this, that could happen, or the other way around. The economy is not about growth. The world we live in, the things we use are getting smaller. So, is economic growth dead? Where did it go wrong? The foundation of economics is wrong; it was built on the concept of profit, not because of social importance. We have to go way back, even before money became an issue, to find out where it went wrong. We used to focus only on: eat eat eat, destroy destroy destroy, eat more, destroy more. Even economics admit that capitalism has failed. We all like the idea of sustained economic growth, but in reality, we are to blame for the way nature reacts. We are predators, looking for more, wanting more, but in the end, humankind has become a problem for humanity. Nature can regenerate itself No matter how much fish we ate, fish stocks would almost replenish automatically, and they would come from other places in the ocean. Forests would regenerate within weeks if there is enough rain falling out of the sky and sunlight to let the trees grow. And it is true; this beautiful planet can regenerate itself, it is kind of magical. But because of our interfering, abusing the earth, we are destroying its magical, natural power to restore. Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation Circular economy The circular economy is what works on this planet, is what we know. Residues are completely are entirely reused in the system. The only problem is, humanity uses a lot of plastic. Mother Earth cannot reuse plastic. There is an area in the Pacific Ocean where nature has started to gather much of our plastic. Maybe, in the future, scientists will discover plastic-eating bacteria that can turn plastic into reusable natural chemicals. But that will take forever, long after we all extinct. We, humans, are going too fast. We are cutting down trees too fast, we are polluting the earth too fast, and we are creating more plastic than fish too fast. We all do it too fast. That is why Mother Earth cannot keep up. We have earth that can regenerate, can recycle, but we are still managing to destroy it all. Recommended:  Combing Plastic Waste Out Oceans: Competition For Boyan Slat A credit card per week that is what we eat At this moment, we consume everything, more than we can bear, until there is nothing left to eat each other. A recent study has shown that the amount of plastic we consume every week is as much as one credit card. How? Well, first of all, it is a plastic wrapper, that accidentally ends up in your stomach, but also the fish we eat, ate the plastic that ends up in the ocean. The air we breathe is partly plastic, the dust we walk on. This is the new world, the world we created, a world full of toxic plastic parts. It is a bitter irony that the credit card, symbol of buying, of capitalism, makes us toxic. {youtube}                        Economic Growth Is Dead: Welcome To The Circular Economy.  How Much Plastic Do You Eat? Waste nothing, recycle everything Waste is a myth, that is how the circular economy works. It is very easy, actually. The concept of the circular economy is a process where nothing is wasted. Everything that we produce, even our waste, eventually is turned back into food and products. If you like it or not, this is how our planet works. Everything is recycled, millions of times until the end of time. Recommended:  Circular Architecture 'The GreenHouse': Utrecht, Netherlands Consuming from the heart As mentioned above, we consume a lot, and we consume until we cannot consume anymore. We consume from a state of fear and insecurity and eat our way through the "buffet" of nature. You cannot only understand the circular economy by using a calculator; it must be understood from the heart. The circular economy means being happy with what you have. Consuming to sustain yourself, not to stuff yourself. Consuming because you need things, not because you compete with your neighbour who is the first to go to the moon, or something like that. We are made to consume, and that is fine. But we put the all-you-can-eat Buffet out of action. We need to understand the painful truth that destroying the planet is actually part of our destiny as a species, written in our biology and also a simple function of our population that increases exponentially until it becomes unsustainable. But we are incredibly smart and powerful. We can overcome our biology and change our destiny. We can put uncertainty and competition aside and work on it from the heart. Just like the heart, which takes up the blood and then pumps it out, we have to learn to give and take. We have to embrace the circular economy. Recommended:  Blue Planet Earth: The Amount Of Water You Use
Economic Growth Is Dead: Welcome To The Circular Economy
Economic Growth Is Dead: Welcome To The Circular Economy
Brazil Is Burning For Your Beef: Amazon’s Nature, Our Luxury
For those wondering how they could help save the rainforest, known as "the planet's lungs" for producing about 20% of the world's oxygen, the answer may be simple. Eat less meat. Brazil's beef farmers The vast majority of the fires have been set by loggers and ranchers to clear land for cattle. The practice is on the rise, encouraged by Jair Bolsonaro, Brazil's populist pro-business president, who is backed by the country's so-called "beef caucus." While this may be business as usual for Brazil's beef farmers, the rest of the world is looking on in horror. Meat! Eat less So, for those wondering how they could help save the rainforest, known as "the planet's lungs" for producing about 20% of the world's oxygen, the answer may be simple. Eat less meat. It's an idea that Finland has already floated. On Friday, the Nordic country's finance minister called for the European Union to "urgently review the possibility of banning Brazilian beef imports" over the Amazon fires. Brazil is the world's largest exporter of beef, providing close to 20% of the total global exports, according the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), a figure that could rise in the coming years. Last year the country shipped 1.64 million tonnes of beef, the highest volume in history,  generating $6.57 billion in revenue, according to the Brazilian Beef Exporters Association (Abiec), an association of more than 30 Brazilian meat-packing companies. Brasil's export: Amazon’s Nature, Our Luxury The growth of Brazil's beef industry has been driven in part by strong demand from Asia -- mostly China and Hong Kong. These two markets alone accounted for nearly 44% of all beef exports from Brazil in 2018, according to the USDA. And a trade deal struck in June between South America's Mercosur bloc of countries and the European Union could open up even more markets for Brazil's beef-packing industry. Recommended:  Food Future: Serving Lab-Meat In Restaurants Reality? Brazil Is Burning For Your Beef Speaking after the agreement as announced, the head of Abiec, Antônio Camardelli, said the pact could help Brazil gain access to prospective new markets, like Indonesia and Thailand, while boosting sales with existing partners, like the EU. "A deal of this magnitude is like an invitation card for speaking with other countries and trade blocs," Camardelli told Reuters in July. Once implemented, the deal will lift a 20% levy on beef imports into the EU. But, on Friday, Ireland said it was ready to block the deal unless Brazil took action on the Amazon. In a statement Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar described as "Orewellian" Bolsonaro's attempt to blame the fires on environmental groups. Varadkar said that Ireland will monitor Brazil's environmental actions to determine whether to block the Mercosur deal, which is two years away. Environment & Trade He added Irish and European farmers could not be told to use fewer pesticides and respect biodiversity when trade deals were being made with countries not subjected to "decent environmental, labor and product standards." In June, before the furor over the rainforest began, the Irish Farmers Association called on Ireland not to ratify the deal, arguing its terms would disadvantage European beef farmers. Deal or no deal, Brazil's beef industry is projected to continue expanding, buoyed by natural resources, grassland availability and global demand, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). And, with that growth, comes steep environmental costs. Brazil's space research center (INPE) said this week that the number of fires in Brazil is 80% higher than last year. More than half are in the Amazon region, spelling disaster for the local environment and ecology. Amazone on fire Alberto Setzer, a senior scientist at INPE, told CNN that the burning can range from a small-scale agricultural practice, to new deforestation for mechanized and modern agribusiness projects. Farmers wait until the dry season to start burning and clearing areas so their cattle can graze, but this year's destruction has been described as unprecedented. Environmental campaigners blame this uptick on Bolsonaro, who they say has encouraged ranchers, farmers, and loggers to exploit and burn the rainforest like never before with a sense of impunity. Bolsonaro has dismissed accusations of responsibility for the fires, but a clear shift seems to be underway. And if saving the rainforest isn't enough to convince carnivores to stop eating Brazilian beef,  the greenhouse gas emissions the cattle create may be. {youtube}                                        Brazil Is Burning For Your Beef: Amazon’s Nature, Our Luxury Greenhouse gas Beef is responsible for 41% of livestock greenhouse gas emissions, and that livestock accounts for 14.5% of total global emissions. And methane -- the greenhouse gas cattle produce from both ends -- is 25 times more potent that carbon dioxide. An alarming report released last year by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, said changing our diets could contribute 20% of the effort needed to keep global temperatures from rising 2°C above pre-industrial levels. Namely, eating less meat. Still, global consumption of beef and veal is set to rise in the next decade according to projections from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO). A joint report predicted global production would increase 16% between 2017 and 2027 to meet demand. The majority of that expansion will be in developing countries, like Brazil. By: original Eliza Mackintosh Recommended:  Bio-industry: Cognitive Dissonance Makes Us Eat Corrupt Meat
For those wondering how they could help save the rainforest, known as "the planet's lungs" for producing about 20% of the world's oxygen, the answer may be simple. Eat less meat. Brazil's beef farmers The vast majority of the fires have been set by loggers and ranchers to clear land for cattle. The practice is on the rise, encouraged by Jair Bolsonaro, Brazil's populist pro-business president, who is backed by the country's so-called "beef caucus." While this may be business as usual for Brazil's beef farmers, the rest of the world is looking on in horror. Meat! Eat less So, for those wondering how they could help save the rainforest, known as "the planet's lungs" for producing about 20% of the world's oxygen, the answer may be simple. Eat less meat. It's an idea that Finland has already floated. On Friday, the Nordic country's finance minister called for the European Union to "urgently review the possibility of banning Brazilian beef imports" over the Amazon fires. Brazil is the world's largest exporter of beef, providing close to 20% of the total global exports, according the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), a figure that could rise in the coming years. Last year the country shipped 1.64 million tonnes of beef, the highest volume in history,  generating $6.57 billion in revenue, according to the Brazilian Beef Exporters Association (Abiec), an association of more than 30 Brazilian meat-packing companies. Brasil's export: Amazon’s Nature, Our Luxury The growth of Brazil's beef industry has been driven in part by strong demand from Asia -- mostly China and Hong Kong. These two markets alone accounted for nearly 44% of all beef exports from Brazil in 2018, according to the USDA. And a trade deal struck in June between South America's Mercosur bloc of countries and the European Union could open up even more markets for Brazil's beef-packing industry. Recommended:  Food Future: Serving Lab-Meat In Restaurants Reality? Brazil Is Burning For Your Beef Speaking after the agreement as announced, the head of Abiec, Antônio Camardelli, said the pact could help Brazil gain access to prospective new markets, like Indonesia and Thailand, while boosting sales with existing partners, like the EU. "A deal of this magnitude is like an invitation card for speaking with other countries and trade blocs," Camardelli told Reuters in July. Once implemented, the deal will lift a 20% levy on beef imports into the EU. But, on Friday, Ireland said it was ready to block the deal unless Brazil took action on the Amazon. In a statement Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar described as "Orewellian" Bolsonaro's attempt to blame the fires on environmental groups. Varadkar said that Ireland will monitor Brazil's environmental actions to determine whether to block the Mercosur deal, which is two years away. Environment & Trade He added Irish and European farmers could not be told to use fewer pesticides and respect biodiversity when trade deals were being made with countries not subjected to "decent environmental, labor and product standards." In June, before the furor over the rainforest began, the Irish Farmers Association called on Ireland not to ratify the deal, arguing its terms would disadvantage European beef farmers. Deal or no deal, Brazil's beef industry is projected to continue expanding, buoyed by natural resources, grassland availability and global demand, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). And, with that growth, comes steep environmental costs. Brazil's space research center (INPE) said this week that the number of fires in Brazil is 80% higher than last year. More than half are in the Amazon region, spelling disaster for the local environment and ecology. Amazone on fire Alberto Setzer, a senior scientist at INPE, told CNN that the burning can range from a small-scale agricultural practice, to new deforestation for mechanized and modern agribusiness projects. Farmers wait until the dry season to start burning and clearing areas so their cattle can graze, but this year's destruction has been described as unprecedented. Environmental campaigners blame this uptick on Bolsonaro, who they say has encouraged ranchers, farmers, and loggers to exploit and burn the rainforest like never before with a sense of impunity. Bolsonaro has dismissed accusations of responsibility for the fires, but a clear shift seems to be underway. And if saving the rainforest isn't enough to convince carnivores to stop eating Brazilian beef,  the greenhouse gas emissions the cattle create may be. {youtube}                                        Brazil Is Burning For Your Beef: Amazon’s Nature, Our Luxury Greenhouse gas Beef is responsible for 41% of livestock greenhouse gas emissions, and that livestock accounts for 14.5% of total global emissions. And methane -- the greenhouse gas cattle produce from both ends -- is 25 times more potent that carbon dioxide. An alarming report released last year by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, said changing our diets could contribute 20% of the effort needed to keep global temperatures from rising 2°C above pre-industrial levels. Namely, eating less meat. Still, global consumption of beef and veal is set to rise in the next decade according to projections from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO). A joint report predicted global production would increase 16% between 2017 and 2027 to meet demand. The majority of that expansion will be in developing countries, like Brazil. By: original Eliza Mackintosh Recommended:  Bio-industry: Cognitive Dissonance Makes Us Eat Corrupt Meat
Brazil Is Burning For Your Beef: Amazon’s Nature, Our Luxury
Brazil Is Burning For Your Beef: Amazon’s Nature, Our Luxury
Renewable Energy Breakthrough: Hydrogen Extract From Oil
Renewable green energy is a step closer after scientists developed an economical method to extract hydrogen (H2) from oil sands. This method could be used to power hydrogen-powered vehicles, in addition to generating electricity. Hydrogen is regarded as an efficient transport fuel, similar to traditonal fuels such as petrol and diesel, without the associated pollution problems. The process can extract hydrogen from existing oil sands reservoirs, with large supplies found in Canada and Venezuela. This revolutionary process can be applied to mainstream oil fields, causing them to produce hydrogen instead of oil. We anticipate we will be able to use the existing infrastructure and distribution chains to produce H2 for between 10 and 50 cents per kilo. Although hydrogen-powered vehicles are known to be efficient, the high price of extracting hydrogen from oil reserves means the technology has not been economically viable. Hydrogen Extract From Oil However, engineers have now developed an economical method of extracting hydrogen from oil sands. Dr Ian Gates, of the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Calgary, said: “There are vast oil sand reservoirs in several countries, with huge fields in Alberta in Canada, but also in Venezuela and other countries.” Oil fields, even abandoned ones, still contain significant amounts of oil. The researchers found that injecting oxygen into the fields raises the temperature and liberates hydrogen, which can then be separated from other gases via specialist filters. Recommended:  Breaking News! Hydrogen Cheaply Produced By Solar In Belgium Hydrogen up, carbon down Hydrogen is not pre-existing in the reservoirs, but the addition of oxygen means the reaction to form hydrogen can occur. Grant Strem, CEO of Proton Technologies which is commercialising the process, said: “This technique can draw up huge quantities of hydrogen while leaving the carbon in the ground. “When working at production level, we anticipate we will be able to use the existing infrastructure and distribution chains to produce H2 for between 10 and 50 cents per kilo. {youtube}               Renewable Energy Breakthrough: Hydrogen Extract From Oil. Proton Technologies Hydrogen Wellsite Tour Recommended:  Hydrogen Powered Car That Emits Water No CO2: The Rasa “This means it potentially costs a fraction of gasoline for equivalent output”. This compares with current H2 production costs of around $2/kg. Around five percent of the hydrogen produced then powers the oxygen production plant, so the system more than pays for itself. Mr Strem stress the economics of the process is favourable. He said: ”What comes out of the ground is hydrogen gas, so we don’t have the huge above-ground purification costs associated with oil refining: we use the ground as our reaction vessel. Hydrogen: effectively pollution and emission free “Just taking Alberta as an example, we have the potential to supply Canada’s entire electricity requirement for 330 years.” Canada uses approximately 2.5 percent of the world’s electricity – approximately the same amount as Germany. Mr Strem added: “Our initial aim is to scale up the production from Canadian oil sands, but in fact, we anticipate that most of the interest in this process will come from outside Canada, as the economics and the environmental implications make people look very hard at whether they want to continue conventional oil production. “The only product of this process is hydrogen, meaning that it the technology is effectively pollution and emission free. “All the other gases remain in the ground because they cannot go through the hydrogen filter and up to the surface”. Breakthrough, innovative, exciting Professor Brian Horsfield, of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences said: “The research is highly innovative and exciting. “It’s an adaptation of some 1970’s fire-flood production concepts, but tuned to a modern day perspective. “Declining oil field production infrastructures now stand to get a new lease of life. “Extensive field testing will be crucial in assessing how the system works on industrial scales and over time” Recommended:  Hydrogen Energy Storage Revolution In The Netherlands
Renewable green energy is a step closer after scientists developed an economical method to extract hydrogen (H2) from oil sands. This method could be used to power hydrogen-powered vehicles, in addition to generating electricity. Hydrogen is regarded as an efficient transport fuel, similar to traditonal fuels such as petrol and diesel, without the associated pollution problems. The process can extract hydrogen from existing oil sands reservoirs, with large supplies found in Canada and Venezuela. This revolutionary process can be applied to mainstream oil fields, causing them to produce hydrogen instead of oil. We anticipate we will be able to use the existing infrastructure and distribution chains to produce H2 for between 10 and 50 cents per kilo. Although hydrogen-powered vehicles are known to be efficient, the high price of extracting hydrogen from oil reserves means the technology has not been economically viable. Hydrogen Extract From Oil However, engineers have now developed an economical method of extracting hydrogen from oil sands. Dr Ian Gates, of the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Calgary, said: “There are vast oil sand reservoirs in several countries, with huge fields in Alberta in Canada, but also in Venezuela and other countries.” Oil fields, even abandoned ones, still contain significant amounts of oil. The researchers found that injecting oxygen into the fields raises the temperature and liberates hydrogen, which can then be separated from other gases via specialist filters. Recommended:  Breaking News! Hydrogen Cheaply Produced By Solar In Belgium Hydrogen up, carbon down Hydrogen is not pre-existing in the reservoirs, but the addition of oxygen means the reaction to form hydrogen can occur. Grant Strem, CEO of Proton Technologies which is commercialising the process, said: “This technique can draw up huge quantities of hydrogen while leaving the carbon in the ground. “When working at production level, we anticipate we will be able to use the existing infrastructure and distribution chains to produce H2 for between 10 and 50 cents per kilo. {youtube}               Renewable Energy Breakthrough: Hydrogen Extract From Oil. Proton Technologies Hydrogen Wellsite Tour Recommended:  Hydrogen Powered Car That Emits Water No CO2: The Rasa “This means it potentially costs a fraction of gasoline for equivalent output”. This compares with current H2 production costs of around $2/kg. Around five percent of the hydrogen produced then powers the oxygen production plant, so the system more than pays for itself. Mr Strem stress the economics of the process is favourable. He said: ”What comes out of the ground is hydrogen gas, so we don’t have the huge above-ground purification costs associated with oil refining: we use the ground as our reaction vessel. Hydrogen: effectively pollution and emission free “Just taking Alberta as an example, we have the potential to supply Canada’s entire electricity requirement for 330 years.” Canada uses approximately 2.5 percent of the world’s electricity – approximately the same amount as Germany. Mr Strem added: “Our initial aim is to scale up the production from Canadian oil sands, but in fact, we anticipate that most of the interest in this process will come from outside Canada, as the economics and the environmental implications make people look very hard at whether they want to continue conventional oil production. “The only product of this process is hydrogen, meaning that it the technology is effectively pollution and emission free. “All the other gases remain in the ground because they cannot go through the hydrogen filter and up to the surface”. Breakthrough, innovative, exciting Professor Brian Horsfield, of the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences said: “The research is highly innovative and exciting. “It’s an adaptation of some 1970’s fire-flood production concepts, but tuned to a modern day perspective. “Declining oil field production infrastructures now stand to get a new lease of life. “Extensive field testing will be crucial in assessing how the system works on industrial scales and over time” Recommended:  Hydrogen Energy Storage Revolution In The Netherlands
Renewable Energy Breakthrough: Hydrogen Extract From Oil
Spider-Woman: Tarantula Staple Food Gets A Snack: Cambodia
One of the most common fears in mankind? Arachnophobia, or an intense and rather unreasonable fear of spiders and spider-like creatures. We get it, these eight-legged creatures are not as cuddly as a run-of-the-mill rabbit or baby goat, with their itch-inciting appearance and fast and unpredictable way of moving around. But the amount of tension that some people experience when faced with this member of the Araneae family is excessive, to say the least. Recent research has found that some of those suffering from arachnophobia would even prefer diving with great white sharks or jumping out of an airplane to being locked up in a room with one of those critters for ten whole minutes. Cultural fears Speaking on an evolutionary level, there is absolutely no way in which we can rationalise this fear, or attribute it to our survival instincts. Instead, evidence points to it being a so-called institutionalised fear, a phobia that develops by exposure to the extreme reaction of others suffering from it.   This makes it a fear that is largely cultural, rather than genetic. Those of us living in the western world are more prone to it, despite us not having any real poisonous types living in our area that we should actually legitimately be afraid of. Other cultures, living together with much more dangerous and sizeable members of the spider family, observe them with mild trepidation at best.   And other cultures simply eat them.   Spiders as a delicacy In countries like Papua New Guinea and Cambodia, spiders are a real delicacy. (Coincidentally, these are also countries that rank very low on the worldwide arachnophobia index - yes, this actually is a thing.) Tourists that visit Asian hotspot-on-the-rise Phnom Penh, capital of the Kingdom of Cambodia, are often amazed at the sight of street vendors selling fried tarantula and similar snacks.   {youtube}                                              Spider-Woman: Tarantula Staple Food Gets A Snack: Cambodia Cooking shows all around the world have already zeroed in on the phenomenon, with world-famous chefs like Gordon Ramsay having sampled it. And although reactions are mixed, most would agree that it is a unique part of Cambodian culture that should be treasured. A part of their national heritage, if you wish. ( Also interesting:  Insects As Food The New Agriculture Is Good For Our Climate ) Deep fried spiders are surely not for everyone, but for those who have grown up with the phenomenon, it is hard to consider the crawly creatures to be anything but absolutely delicious. Scary? Not in their minds. Tasty, that’s more like it. Especially the female tarantulas are treasured, for the tasty, caviar-like eggs that their bellies contain.   Tarantulas as daily source of protein In order to preserve this unique flavour, spiders are not gutted or cut up. Rather, after getting a quick wash in water, they are thrown in the pot and fried with some delicious spices. Alternative preparation methods include grilling them and serving them with a variety of dip sauces. Its taste is best described as crab, although the consistency is strikingly different.   A-Ping, as the locals call it, have been eaten as just your regular source of protein for generations and generations. The dish originates from the farmland that Cambodia is well-known for, with farmers taking home any tarantulas that they find on their land for dinner. Especially during the reign of the Khmer Rouge, the communist party of Cambodia, food was tight - and therefore all possible food sources more than welcome. Even after the communist regime, people still enjoyed their tarantula snack, some even attributing health benefits to it: from aiding lung and heart diseases all the way up to enhancing sexual desire. The wealthiest of this small Asian country enjoy its uniqueness and rarity, while the people on the street just enjoy its flavour - making it a sought-after delicacy.   Threatened by over-hunting and deforestation Unfortunately it is one that is becoming increasingly harder to find. The rising demand has led to over-hunting, while the deforestation of the Cambodian land is drastically reducing the tarantula’s territory. In the last two decades alone, Cambodia has lost more than 2 million hectares of forest - an alarming 23 percent decline. This land has been re-allocated for agricultural purposes, giving way to enormous cashew and rubber plantations.   ( Also interesting:  Deforestation: No! Celebrate National Tree Day With WhatsOrb ) As the tarantulas enjoy the woods, they are finding themselves struggling to stay in their preferred ecosystem. Furthermore, their declining number makes them much harder to find, which means that fewer people are still attempting to. It will be much more profitable to get a job on one of the plantations, instead of hunting for the tarantulas.   Steep decline in population This leaves the job of hunting spiders to the poorest of the poor, who are often ruthless in their methods: over-hunting is commonplace, as is the use of dangerous chemicals, with no regulations whatsoever in place to protect the treasured species in her survival.   All of this has led to a steep decline in the tarantula population, which may soon find itself at risk of extinction. It may mean the end of not just another animal species, but also the end of a treasured piece of local cuisine - as well as threaten the livelihood of those who have turned it into a business. As long as the government remains hesitant to take action to prevent this from happening, the A-Ping might literally find himself in the frying pan. All about Lifestyle
One of the most common fears in mankind? Arachnophobia, or an intense and rather unreasonable fear of spiders and spider-like creatures. We get it, these eight-legged creatures are not as cuddly as a run-of-the-mill rabbit or baby goat, with their itch-inciting appearance and fast and unpredictable way of moving around. But the amount of tension that some people experience when faced with this member of the Araneae family is excessive, to say the least. Recent research has found that some of those suffering from arachnophobia would even prefer diving with great white sharks or jumping out of an airplane to being locked up in a room with one of those critters for ten whole minutes. Cultural fears Speaking on an evolutionary level, there is absolutely no way in which we can rationalise this fear, or attribute it to our survival instincts. Instead, evidence points to it being a so-called institutionalised fear, a phobia that develops by exposure to the extreme reaction of others suffering from it.   This makes it a fear that is largely cultural, rather than genetic. Those of us living in the western world are more prone to it, despite us not having any real poisonous types living in our area that we should actually legitimately be afraid of. Other cultures, living together with much more dangerous and sizeable members of the spider family, observe them with mild trepidation at best.   And other cultures simply eat them.   Spiders as a delicacy In countries like Papua New Guinea and Cambodia, spiders are a real delicacy. (Coincidentally, these are also countries that rank very low on the worldwide arachnophobia index - yes, this actually is a thing.) Tourists that visit Asian hotspot-on-the-rise Phnom Penh, capital of the Kingdom of Cambodia, are often amazed at the sight of street vendors selling fried tarantula and similar snacks.   {youtube}                                              Spider-Woman: Tarantula Staple Food Gets A Snack: Cambodia Cooking shows all around the world have already zeroed in on the phenomenon, with world-famous chefs like Gordon Ramsay having sampled it. And although reactions are mixed, most would agree that it is a unique part of Cambodian culture that should be treasured. A part of their national heritage, if you wish. ( Also interesting:  Insects As Food The New Agriculture Is Good For Our Climate ) Deep fried spiders are surely not for everyone, but for those who have grown up with the phenomenon, it is hard to consider the crawly creatures to be anything but absolutely delicious. Scary? Not in their minds. Tasty, that’s more like it. Especially the female tarantulas are treasured, for the tasty, caviar-like eggs that their bellies contain.   Tarantulas as daily source of protein In order to preserve this unique flavour, spiders are not gutted or cut up. Rather, after getting a quick wash in water, they are thrown in the pot and fried with some delicious spices. Alternative preparation methods include grilling them and serving them with a variety of dip sauces. Its taste is best described as crab, although the consistency is strikingly different.   A-Ping, as the locals call it, have been eaten as just your regular source of protein for generations and generations. The dish originates from the farmland that Cambodia is well-known for, with farmers taking home any tarantulas that they find on their land for dinner. Especially during the reign of the Khmer Rouge, the communist party of Cambodia, food was tight - and therefore all possible food sources more than welcome. Even after the communist regime, people still enjoyed their tarantula snack, some even attributing health benefits to it: from aiding lung and heart diseases all the way up to enhancing sexual desire. The wealthiest of this small Asian country enjoy its uniqueness and rarity, while the people on the street just enjoy its flavour - making it a sought-after delicacy.   Threatened by over-hunting and deforestation Unfortunately it is one that is becoming increasingly harder to find. The rising demand has led to over-hunting, while the deforestation of the Cambodian land is drastically reducing the tarantula’s territory. In the last two decades alone, Cambodia has lost more than 2 million hectares of forest - an alarming 23 percent decline. This land has been re-allocated for agricultural purposes, giving way to enormous cashew and rubber plantations.   ( Also interesting:  Deforestation: No! Celebrate National Tree Day With WhatsOrb ) As the tarantulas enjoy the woods, they are finding themselves struggling to stay in their preferred ecosystem. Furthermore, their declining number makes them much harder to find, which means that fewer people are still attempting to. It will be much more profitable to get a job on one of the plantations, instead of hunting for the tarantulas.   Steep decline in population This leaves the job of hunting spiders to the poorest of the poor, who are often ruthless in their methods: over-hunting is commonplace, as is the use of dangerous chemicals, with no regulations whatsoever in place to protect the treasured species in her survival.   All of this has led to a steep decline in the tarantula population, which may soon find itself at risk of extinction. It may mean the end of not just another animal species, but also the end of a treasured piece of local cuisine - as well as threaten the livelihood of those who have turned it into a business. As long as the government remains hesitant to take action to prevent this from happening, the A-Ping might literally find himself in the frying pan. All about Lifestyle
Spider-Woman: Tarantula Staple Food Gets A Snack: Cambodia
Spider-Woman: Tarantula Staple Food Gets A Snack: Cambodia
Floating Cities: A Sustainable Concept For Future Communities
At the current pace, it seems almost unfathomable that we will be able to call a halt to sea levels rising, the result of climate change spinning out of control. As our climate system is shrouded in so many uncertainties and complexities, it is hard to predict to what extent it will occur, but one thing seems to be a certainty - those of us living in coastal regions are in for wet feet. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), one of the leading authorities on climate change, has made projections that would see our seas rising for up to 90 centimeters before the end of this century. However, many feel that this is a very conservative number, with other research placing the potential rise anywhere between 200 to 270 centimeters this century alone, describing those numbers as ‘potentially plausible’.   Finding higher grounds:  floating cities A general consensus seems to have been found in the expectation that for each Celsius degree of temperature rise, an irreversible 230 centimeters rise in sea levels will be triggered. Does this mean that you should be panicking if you happen to live near the shore with less than this to spare between the current sea level and your home? Well, not necessarily, as sea levels will not rise uniformly around the world. Due to tectonic activity and subsidence of land, tides, currents and storms, it might even drop in some areas.   Once again though, it is very hard to predict which regions will be hit the hardest. Mother Nature has been giving us a preview of potential consequences, as illustrated by storms in the New York and Houston areas causing excessive flooding. Yet it is hard to pinpoint exactly where you might be ‘safe’. All the more reason to start preparing, which can be done in one of the following three ways: retreating (moving inland), protecting (by erecting sea walls) - or accommodating (adapting to the new status quo). Floating city: Oceanix A great example of accommodating to rising sea levels caused by climate change is the initiative launched by the architecture firm BIG, titled Oceanix City. Their startup Oceanix has secured partnerships with the United Nations and MIT as they aim to launch their first prototype of a floating city by 2030. Gorgeous 3D-rendered images show floating platforms of about five acres each, that are securely fixed to the sea floor. On these platforms, communities are built up using sustainable means, with platforms interconnected using walkways.   {youtube}      Climate Change: Floating Cities Are A Concept To Survive.  Oceanix City: New York's Future Floating City   As such, it really forms a ‘city’ made out of connected artificial islands. Buildings will still give off a distinct urban feel, while being fully green - for example by using timber from sustainably grown forests. Furthermore, there will be plenty of space allocated to vertical farms, underwater gardens and greenhouses to provide a steady food supply for those living on it. Similarly, power is mostly generated from renewable sources like wind and solar. Drinking water is derived straight from the sea and run through desalination plants, and a highly effective sewage and waste-recycling system will be in place. While it can be used as an extension of a coastal city - adding a new neighbourhood on the water -, it could theoretically also function as a thriving, self-sustaining metropolis. Oceanix: p hilosophy of floating cities  The idea surely is not new, with architects and city developers having touted similar thoughts in the past. One notable example is the American inventor Buckminster Fuller, who already envisioned a town of 5,000 inhabitants near Tokyo back in the 1960s. While ambitious, it had done little but fuel the fantasy of science-fiction writers around the world.   Yet the refined way in which Oceanix has presented her vision has drawn the attention of many and serves as inspiration for more creative thinking and developing in this area. After all, the concept may have to grow up a lot faster than we would want it to. Another start-up, Singaporean company Blue Frontiers, has accepted this challenge as well - and is well underway to building the first actual floating village. ( Recommended:  Floating City: A Sci-Fi Trope Or A Salvation For Many Nations? ) Floating village in Tahiti Recently, they signed a memorandum of understanding with the government of French Polynesia, that would allow them to build a floating village in a Tahitian lagoon - with construction slated to begin next year. It will be the ideal testing ground for technologies aiding floating cities and set in motion a - hopefully steep - learning curve when it comes to letting communities live on the water. At the same time, there will be some 300 people actually working and living in this floating village, measuring roughly 7,500 square meters. They will occupy themselves with the construction and operation of bungalows, apartments, research institutions, underwater restaurants, and facilities for new aquatic industries like wave power generation and seaweed farming. This will all undoubtedly make it both a hotspot for eco-tourism and a testing ground for sustainable initiatives, a combination that has ultimately convinced the French Polynesian government to give it a shot. The project’s architect has described his vision as perfectly blending in with its surroundings, making it closely resemble a natural island. Roofs will be made up of gardens and walls cladded with local products like coconut wood.   The goal is not to come up with something revolutionary and futuristic looking, but rather honour the ecosystem in which the community will have to live. Ultimately, it will even serve as a means of restoring natural ecosystems, including animal and plant species.   ( Recommended:  Smart Sustainable Lifestyle Changing Tips & Tricks For 2019 ) Accommodating rising sea levels This last part really hits it out of the park and is the perfect representation of what we mean when we talk about ‘accommodating’ rising sea levels. No fancy installations, walls or communities that look as if they have been removed from the set of a sci-fi movie. No war-like efforts to combat our climate and the sea, as if they are the enemies that should be kept out of our lives at all costs. No, just plain and simple ways of ‘returning to our roots’, in a way, and finding sustainable ways of surviving by using our natural environment - not by fighting it.   All about Climate Change
At the current pace, it seems almost unfathomable that we will be able to call a halt to sea levels rising, the result of climate change spinning out of control. As our climate system is shrouded in so many uncertainties and complexities, it is hard to predict to what extent it will occur, but one thing seems to be a certainty - those of us living in coastal regions are in for wet feet. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), one of the leading authorities on climate change, has made projections that would see our seas rising for up to 90 centimeters before the end of this century. However, many feel that this is a very conservative number, with other research placing the potential rise anywhere between 200 to 270 centimeters this century alone, describing those numbers as ‘potentially plausible’.   Finding higher grounds:  floating cities A general consensus seems to have been found in the expectation that for each Celsius degree of temperature rise, an irreversible 230 centimeters rise in sea levels will be triggered. Does this mean that you should be panicking if you happen to live near the shore with less than this to spare between the current sea level and your home? Well, not necessarily, as sea levels will not rise uniformly around the world. Due to tectonic activity and subsidence of land, tides, currents and storms, it might even drop in some areas.   Once again though, it is very hard to predict which regions will be hit the hardest. Mother Nature has been giving us a preview of potential consequences, as illustrated by storms in the New York and Houston areas causing excessive flooding. Yet it is hard to pinpoint exactly where you might be ‘safe’. All the more reason to start preparing, which can be done in one of the following three ways: retreating (moving inland), protecting (by erecting sea walls) - or accommodating (adapting to the new status quo). Floating city: Oceanix A great example of accommodating to rising sea levels caused by climate change is the initiative launched by the architecture firm BIG, titled Oceanix City. Their startup Oceanix has secured partnerships with the United Nations and MIT as they aim to launch their first prototype of a floating city by 2030. Gorgeous 3D-rendered images show floating platforms of about five acres each, that are securely fixed to the sea floor. On these platforms, communities are built up using sustainable means, with platforms interconnected using walkways.   {youtube}      Climate Change: Floating Cities Are A Concept To Survive.  Oceanix City: New York's Future Floating City   As such, it really forms a ‘city’ made out of connected artificial islands. Buildings will still give off a distinct urban feel, while being fully green - for example by using timber from sustainably grown forests. Furthermore, there will be plenty of space allocated to vertical farms, underwater gardens and greenhouses to provide a steady food supply for those living on it. Similarly, power is mostly generated from renewable sources like wind and solar. Drinking water is derived straight from the sea and run through desalination plants, and a highly effective sewage and waste-recycling system will be in place. While it can be used as an extension of a coastal city - adding a new neighbourhood on the water -, it could theoretically also function as a thriving, self-sustaining metropolis. Oceanix: p hilosophy of floating cities  The idea surely is not new, with architects and city developers having touted similar thoughts in the past. One notable example is the American inventor Buckminster Fuller, who already envisioned a town of 5,000 inhabitants near Tokyo back in the 1960s. While ambitious, it had done little but fuel the fantasy of science-fiction writers around the world.   Yet the refined way in which Oceanix has presented her vision has drawn the attention of many and serves as inspiration for more creative thinking and developing in this area. After all, the concept may have to grow up a lot faster than we would want it to. Another start-up, Singaporean company Blue Frontiers, has accepted this challenge as well - and is well underway to building the first actual floating village. ( Recommended:  Floating City: A Sci-Fi Trope Or A Salvation For Many Nations? ) Floating village in Tahiti Recently, they signed a memorandum of understanding with the government of French Polynesia, that would allow them to build a floating village in a Tahitian lagoon - with construction slated to begin next year. It will be the ideal testing ground for technologies aiding floating cities and set in motion a - hopefully steep - learning curve when it comes to letting communities live on the water. At the same time, there will be some 300 people actually working and living in this floating village, measuring roughly 7,500 square meters. They will occupy themselves with the construction and operation of bungalows, apartments, research institutions, underwater restaurants, and facilities for new aquatic industries like wave power generation and seaweed farming. This will all undoubtedly make it both a hotspot for eco-tourism and a testing ground for sustainable initiatives, a combination that has ultimately convinced the French Polynesian government to give it a shot. The project’s architect has described his vision as perfectly blending in with its surroundings, making it closely resemble a natural island. Roofs will be made up of gardens and walls cladded with local products like coconut wood.   The goal is not to come up with something revolutionary and futuristic looking, but rather honour the ecosystem in which the community will have to live. Ultimately, it will even serve as a means of restoring natural ecosystems, including animal and plant species.   ( Recommended:  Smart Sustainable Lifestyle Changing Tips & Tricks For 2019 ) Accommodating rising sea levels This last part really hits it out of the park and is the perfect representation of what we mean when we talk about ‘accommodating’ rising sea levels. No fancy installations, walls or communities that look as if they have been removed from the set of a sci-fi movie. No war-like efforts to combat our climate and the sea, as if they are the enemies that should be kept out of our lives at all costs. No, just plain and simple ways of ‘returning to our roots’, in a way, and finding sustainable ways of surviving by using our natural environment - not by fighting it.   All about Climate Change
Floating Cities: A Sustainable Concept For Future Communities
Floating Cities: A Sustainable Concept For Future Communities
Environmental Costs Of Lithium Battery Addiction: Worldwide
Lithium batteries. Most of us will be familiar with the term, if only for the way in which airlines nowadays expressly tell you to not put them in your checked luggage. They could explode mid-flight, release toxic fumes and incite electrical fires.   Those who have done a bit more research will know that these commonly house in our personal electronics, including smartphones, tablets and laptops. This makes them a crucial element of today’s world and therefore susceptible to a steady production flow. Yet lithium batteries can also be found in e-bikes and electric cars, which are definitely on the rise.   In short? Lithium batteries power a significant part of our lives and will continue to do so even more in years to come. Environmental costs lithium battery production Unfortunately, they are not exactly helping us in our struggle to replace fossil fuels with cleaner alternatives. The environmental costs of lithium battery production are huge, with entire communities polluted by the toxic metals that make up its core components. Lithium mines are located in some of the world’s poorest regions, making it a particularly harrowing dilemma. Just a couple of years ago, back in 2016, the Ganzizhou Rongda lithium mine, located in China, experienced a toxic chemical leak. As a result, the Liqi river was polluted and ecosystems all the way up to the Tibetan plateau were destroyed. Dead animals floated in the water, both fish and livestock depending on this river for their water supply. Reliance on lithium It was not an isolated incident. In the past few years, there have been numerous instances of lithium mining causing irreversible damage to the environment and those living in it. Ironic, considering how many people are looking at it for its ability to help ‘green up’ the world. Electric cars rely on it, with Tesla averaging 12 kilograms of lithium in their batteries, as do grid storage solutions for renewable energy sources, requiring many times this number for their operations. ( Recommended:  Electric Cars: Truly Green Or A New Kind Of Liability? ) So, it is hardly surprising that demand numbers for lithium have grown pretty much exponentially and will continue to do so in the future. Recent forecasts predict an industry growth of 800% in the next decade, from 100 gigawatt hours in 2017 to 800 gigawatt hours in 2027. All a result of the increasing number of products containing lithium - and their successes. Lithium is a reactive alkali metal known for its durability and power, that can be obtained through hard-rock mining and brine water mining. The latter is responsible for 87% of the world’s lithium supply, mostly found in the salars or brine lakes in South America. The so-called Lithium Triangle, an otherworldly landscape of salt flats, covers Argentina, Bolivia and Chile and is home to over half of the world’s supply of this metal. People filling a truck with salt from the saltflacs in Chile Water issues The main issue here? Water. These lands are notoriously dry, yet significant amounts of water are needed to extract the lithium. It requires up to 500,000 gallons of water for each ton of lithium, a pretty hefty water bill. Chile has dedicated about 65% of its total water supply to the mining activities in the region, effectively robbing their quinoa farmers and llama herders of much sought after water.   In the example of China, on the other hand, the problem is not so much the lack of water, but more the abundance thereof. In order to extract lithium, holes are drilled and filled with water and toxic chemicals, including hydrochloric acid. When these pools leak or overflow, these chemicals infiltrate rivers and other water sources in the region. This also affects regions that use hard-rock mining to obtain lithium, including large areas in Australia and North America. Traditional methods are used to extract the lithium, but even these methods still require the use of damaging chemicals. In Nevada, for instance, lithium mining has led to rivers and streams being polluted and fish inhabiting those bodies of water being impacted - for up to 150 miles downstream.   ( Recommended:  Asia’s Water War: China, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam ) Environmental costs Even experts admit that it is far from green. It leaves behind devastating marks in the landscape, while draining water supplies and polluting wells, streams, ground water and rivers. This is a well-known fact that has led to many furious protests in countries currently engaging in lithium mining activities. As bad as this sounds, it does not even make lithium the most dangerous component of modern batteries. At least the material itself is relatively harmless, when compared to some of its counterparts. Just look at cobalt, for instance, a naturally occurring mineral in central Africa. It is very toxic when pulled from the ground and requires careful handling.   Unsafe and unethical practices As luck would have it, it can mostly be found in one country - one that is not exactly well known for its far-reaching environmental policies and favourable working conditions, the Democratic Republic of Congo. With prices quadrupling in recent years, it is understandable why there has been such a rush to mine the material - the country is relatively poor and could really use this ‘cash cow’.   This has resulted in largely unethical and unsafe mining practices, often involving child workers handling the dangerous material with their bare hands. All to make a quick buck. {youtube} Environmental Costs Of Lithium Battery Addiction: Worldwide. Inside the Congo cobalt mines that exploit children And honestly? We cannot really blame governments and industry leaders in China, Chile and The Congo. They have found a way of lifting some of the burden of poverty that they have historically been suffering from, having quite literally found themselves sitting on a goldmine. As long as the demand is there, they will keep on delivering.   ( Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation ) Search for greener alternatives As such, we need a green alternative to these batteries. Some kind of rechargeable, durable energy source that uses environmentally friendly materials instead. Researchers are already looking at ways of maintaining battery performance while cutting out lithium and cobalt. They key phrase here is ‘maintaining battery performance’: if these ‘greener’ batteries are in any way less effective or durable, chances are that they could eventually be just as bad for the environment. Simply because an electric car with a less effective battery will have a higher environmental footprint. Another solution is the recycling of lithium, through the re-use of unwanted tablets, phones and laptops. This could be a win-win, requiring less mining and reducing pollution from lithium leaking in landfills when lithium-containing products are haphazardly dumped. Yet it has been an uphill struggle so far, due to the lithium’s characteristic of degrading over time and not being able to clearly pinpoint its life stage; as well as the secrecy surrounding the exact contents of each producer’s battery, making it harder to recycle as well. The issue of ‘greening up’ the batteries to power our smart devices, electric cars, and other ‘sustainable’ inventions will hopefully receive plenty of attention over the coming years. Finding ways of saving the world will, after all, require a steady energy source that is already green in its own right.   All about Solar Energy
Lithium batteries. Most of us will be familiar with the term, if only for the way in which airlines nowadays expressly tell you to not put them in your checked luggage. They could explode mid-flight, release toxic fumes and incite electrical fires.   Those who have done a bit more research will know that these commonly house in our personal electronics, including smartphones, tablets and laptops. This makes them a crucial element of today’s world and therefore susceptible to a steady production flow. Yet lithium batteries can also be found in e-bikes and electric cars, which are definitely on the rise.   In short? Lithium batteries power a significant part of our lives and will continue to do so even more in years to come. Environmental costs lithium battery production Unfortunately, they are not exactly helping us in our struggle to replace fossil fuels with cleaner alternatives. The environmental costs of lithium battery production are huge, with entire communities polluted by the toxic metals that make up its core components. Lithium mines are located in some of the world’s poorest regions, making it a particularly harrowing dilemma. Just a couple of years ago, back in 2016, the Ganzizhou Rongda lithium mine, located in China, experienced a toxic chemical leak. As a result, the Liqi river was polluted and ecosystems all the way up to the Tibetan plateau were destroyed. Dead animals floated in the water, both fish and livestock depending on this river for their water supply. Reliance on lithium It was not an isolated incident. In the past few years, there have been numerous instances of lithium mining causing irreversible damage to the environment and those living in it. Ironic, considering how many people are looking at it for its ability to help ‘green up’ the world. Electric cars rely on it, with Tesla averaging 12 kilograms of lithium in their batteries, as do grid storage solutions for renewable energy sources, requiring many times this number for their operations. ( Recommended:  Electric Cars: Truly Green Or A New Kind Of Liability? ) So, it is hardly surprising that demand numbers for lithium have grown pretty much exponentially and will continue to do so in the future. Recent forecasts predict an industry growth of 800% in the next decade, from 100 gigawatt hours in 2017 to 800 gigawatt hours in 2027. All a result of the increasing number of products containing lithium - and their successes. Lithium is a reactive alkali metal known for its durability and power, that can be obtained through hard-rock mining and brine water mining. The latter is responsible for 87% of the world’s lithium supply, mostly found in the salars or brine lakes in South America. The so-called Lithium Triangle, an otherworldly landscape of salt flats, covers Argentina, Bolivia and Chile and is home to over half of the world’s supply of this metal. People filling a truck with salt from the saltflacs in Chile Water issues The main issue here? Water. These lands are notoriously dry, yet significant amounts of water are needed to extract the lithium. It requires up to 500,000 gallons of water for each ton of lithium, a pretty hefty water bill. Chile has dedicated about 65% of its total water supply to the mining activities in the region, effectively robbing their quinoa farmers and llama herders of much sought after water.   In the example of China, on the other hand, the problem is not so much the lack of water, but more the abundance thereof. In order to extract lithium, holes are drilled and filled with water and toxic chemicals, including hydrochloric acid. When these pools leak or overflow, these chemicals infiltrate rivers and other water sources in the region. This also affects regions that use hard-rock mining to obtain lithium, including large areas in Australia and North America. Traditional methods are used to extract the lithium, but even these methods still require the use of damaging chemicals. In Nevada, for instance, lithium mining has led to rivers and streams being polluted and fish inhabiting those bodies of water being impacted - for up to 150 miles downstream.   ( Recommended:  Asia’s Water War: China, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam ) Environmental costs Even experts admit that it is far from green. It leaves behind devastating marks in the landscape, while draining water supplies and polluting wells, streams, ground water and rivers. This is a well-known fact that has led to many furious protests in countries currently engaging in lithium mining activities. As bad as this sounds, it does not even make lithium the most dangerous component of modern batteries. At least the material itself is relatively harmless, when compared to some of its counterparts. Just look at cobalt, for instance, a naturally occurring mineral in central Africa. It is very toxic when pulled from the ground and requires careful handling.   Unsafe and unethical practices As luck would have it, it can mostly be found in one country - one that is not exactly well known for its far-reaching environmental policies and favourable working conditions, the Democratic Republic of Congo. With prices quadrupling in recent years, it is understandable why there has been such a rush to mine the material - the country is relatively poor and could really use this ‘cash cow’.   This has resulted in largely unethical and unsafe mining practices, often involving child workers handling the dangerous material with their bare hands. All to make a quick buck. {youtube} Environmental Costs Of Lithium Battery Addiction: Worldwide. Inside the Congo cobalt mines that exploit children And honestly? We cannot really blame governments and industry leaders in China, Chile and The Congo. They have found a way of lifting some of the burden of poverty that they have historically been suffering from, having quite literally found themselves sitting on a goldmine. As long as the demand is there, they will keep on delivering.   ( Recommended:  Consumerism In ‘The West’: A Society Built On Exploitation ) Search for greener alternatives As such, we need a green alternative to these batteries. Some kind of rechargeable, durable energy source that uses environmentally friendly materials instead. Researchers are already looking at ways of maintaining battery performance while cutting out lithium and cobalt. They key phrase here is ‘maintaining battery performance’: if these ‘greener’ batteries are in any way less effective or durable, chances are that they could eventually be just as bad for the environment. Simply because an electric car with a less effective battery will have a higher environmental footprint. Another solution is the recycling of lithium, through the re-use of unwanted tablets, phones and laptops. This could be a win-win, requiring less mining and reducing pollution from lithium leaking in landfills when lithium-containing products are haphazardly dumped. Yet it has been an uphill struggle so far, due to the lithium’s characteristic of degrading over time and not being able to clearly pinpoint its life stage; as well as the secrecy surrounding the exact contents of each producer’s battery, making it harder to recycle as well. The issue of ‘greening up’ the batteries to power our smart devices, electric cars, and other ‘sustainable’ inventions will hopefully receive plenty of attention over the coming years. Finding ways of saving the world will, after all, require a steady energy source that is already green in its own right.   All about Solar Energy
Environmental Costs Of Lithium Battery Addiction: Worldwide
Environmental Costs Of Lithium Battery Addiction: Worldwide
Green Villa With Living Facade Of Plant Pots The Netherlands
Architecture practice MVRDV has unveiled designs for a residential development in Sint-Michielsgestel, the Netherlands, with green walls formed of shelves of plants. Together with their co-architect Van Boven Architecten, the Dutch practice has developed Green Villa for property developer Stein to sit in a corner site on the southern edge of the town. The three-storey housing block will follow the mansard roof shape of the neighbouring building, but its entire frontage will be covered in giant rows of shelves covered in greenery. Potted plants, bushes and trees will sit upon shelves of varying sizes and depths. Species planned for the living facade include forsythia bushes and jasmine plants, as well as pine and birch trees. Further pots are to be installed on the roof. Green Villa, green dip "This design is a continuation of our research into facade-less buildings and radical greening," said Winy Maas, founding partner of MVRDV. "The idea from the 1990s of city parks as an oasis in the city is too limited. We need a radical 'green dip'," he added, referencing an upcoming book of the same title from think-tank The Why Factory. The Green Dip reports on the project developed by The Why Factory, the University of Technology Sydney and Delft University of Technology examining how nature can be better integrated into the urban fabric of cities. "We should also cover roofs and high-rise facades with greenery," continued Maas, who leads The Why Factory. "Plants and trees can help us to offset CO2 emissions, cool our cities, and promote biodiversity." ( Recommended:  Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It? ) Green Villa's grid of plants will double as a 'three-dimensional arboretum' and 'tree library', with each plant labelled with a nameplate and accompanying information. Stored rainwater will be used to water the plants via a sensor-controlled irrigation system built into their planters to keep them green all year round. ( Recommended:  Solar Canopies Supply Shade Electricity And Filter Rainwater ) "The Green Villa is also a personal project, because I went to school in Sint-Michielsgestel," added Maas. "Just like I did before with the Glass Farm, in my native village of Schijndel, I am returning to the region of my youth." Completed in 2013, Glass Farm is a shop and office complex made of glass but disguised to look like a tradition farmhouse. ( See photo below ) MVRDV has also designed a skyscraper in Shenzhen, China, with rooftop gardens and outdoor parks at various levels. ( See photo below ) Project credits: Architect: MVRDV Founding partner in charge: Winy Maas Partner/director: Gideon Maasland Design team: Gijs Rikken, Karolina Szóstkiewicz, Daan Zandbergen Co-architect: Van Boven Architecten All Visualisations by: Antonio Luca Coco and Pavlos Ventouris All about Green Architecture
Architecture practice MVRDV has unveiled designs for a residential development in Sint-Michielsgestel, the Netherlands, with green walls formed of shelves of plants. Together with their co-architect Van Boven Architecten, the Dutch practice has developed Green Villa for property developer Stein to sit in a corner site on the southern edge of the town. The three-storey housing block will follow the mansard roof shape of the neighbouring building, but its entire frontage will be covered in giant rows of shelves covered in greenery. Potted plants, bushes and trees will sit upon shelves of varying sizes and depths. Species planned for the living facade include forsythia bushes and jasmine plants, as well as pine and birch trees. Further pots are to be installed on the roof. Green Villa, green dip "This design is a continuation of our research into facade-less buildings and radical greening," said Winy Maas, founding partner of MVRDV. "The idea from the 1990s of city parks as an oasis in the city is too limited. We need a radical 'green dip'," he added, referencing an upcoming book of the same title from think-tank The Why Factory. The Green Dip reports on the project developed by The Why Factory, the University of Technology Sydney and Delft University of Technology examining how nature can be better integrated into the urban fabric of cities. "We should also cover roofs and high-rise facades with greenery," continued Maas, who leads The Why Factory. "Plants and trees can help us to offset CO2 emissions, cool our cities, and promote biodiversity." ( Recommended:  Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It? ) Green Villa's grid of plants will double as a 'three-dimensional arboretum' and 'tree library', with each plant labelled with a nameplate and accompanying information. Stored rainwater will be used to water the plants via a sensor-controlled irrigation system built into their planters to keep them green all year round. ( Recommended:  Solar Canopies Supply Shade Electricity And Filter Rainwater ) "The Green Villa is also a personal project, because I went to school in Sint-Michielsgestel," added Maas. "Just like I did before with the Glass Farm, in my native village of Schijndel, I am returning to the region of my youth." Completed in 2013, Glass Farm is a shop and office complex made of glass but disguised to look like a tradition farmhouse. ( See photo below ) MVRDV has also designed a skyscraper in Shenzhen, China, with rooftop gardens and outdoor parks at various levels. ( See photo below ) Project credits: Architect: MVRDV Founding partner in charge: Winy Maas Partner/director: Gideon Maasland Design team: Gijs Rikken, Karolina Szóstkiewicz, Daan Zandbergen Co-architect: Van Boven Architecten All Visualisations by: Antonio Luca Coco and Pavlos Ventouris All about Green Architecture
Green Villa With Living Facade Of Plant Pots The Netherlands
Hydrogen Powered Car That Emits Water No CO2: The Rasa
It’s been a long road for fuel cell cars to get to where they are now, a possible option. It all started back in the 1980s when fuel-cells themselves had to be physically shrunk to fit into a normal car, not the back of a van. Then they had to make them affordable and the fuel able to be widely available. All of these obstacles have been overcome yet fuel cell cars still have not been mass adopted. That is because they were not found to be very efficient. To produce the gas, compress it, and transport it is costly. However, there is a special little fuel cell car called Rasa that is drastically more economical and its creator has come up with a more efficient hydrogen distribution system too. The car and the system around are both part of a grand plan by the company Riversimple, founded by Hugo Spowers, former motor racer and mechanical engineer of race cars. Photo by: Simon Thompson Hydrogen powered vehicles: the Rasa 15 years ago Spowers stopped working with internal combustion engines when he had the idea of building a hydrogen-powered vehicle. He was determined to find a fundamental solution to the problems associated with carbon emissions and so he hand-built an aerodynamic car which weighs only 580 kilos, 40 kilos more than the battery of a Tesla Model S car. ( Also interesting:  Tesla Model S Got Hesla By Adding A Hydrogen Installation ) The Rasa is novel and sophisticated in engineering terms. A fuel cell provides electrical energy when hydrogen is combined with oxygen. That electrical energy powers the motors while emitting only water. The Rasa has a motor in each of its four wheels which provide drive and braking. Ultra-capacitors are used to store recovered energy from braking. A carbon tub keeps weight down, while a honed design cuts drag. The Rasa's reach It can drive about 482 km (300 miles) on a tank of just 1.5kg of hydrogen. The best part is, the hydrogen is compressed to 350bar, not the 700bar the industry majors use. This uses less energy and makes for much cheaper filling stations, hence a more economical system. If that’s not good enough, the Rasa is so green that its well-to-wheel CO2 emissions (even if the hydrogen is synthesized from natural gas) are about 40g/km. That CO2 figure is a lot better than any electric car that uses the UK’s mix of electricity generation. ( Also interesting:  Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It? ) {youtube}                                         Hydrogen Powered Car That Emits Water No CoO2: The Rasa   Pollution & Resources Spowers gave up being a motor racer because he wants to save the world and started developing the Rasa. Everything in the Riversimple’s business plan aligns to that aim. Spowers has to change everything about the traditional system and an incremental change wouldn’t do. Each of the changes demands that other things be changed. The whole system must change, in one leap. 'You can’t cross a canyon in two jumps'. Photo by: Riversimple Rasa rentals So what does this mean? The company will never sell a Rasa. Riversimple’s drivers will pay a monthly rental fee, to include depreciation, maintenance and, crucially, fuel. Done this way, said Spowers, everything points to a car that pollutes less and depletes fewer resources. Photo by: Simon Tompson The next step is to build charging stations for users and therefore make the product more attractive to consumers. Hydrogen cars can work alongside battery-powered electric vehicles in the future – a sustainable, greener world to come – to reduce CO2 emissions worldwide. By: RiversimpleCredit: Riversimple All about Hydrogen Transport
It’s been a long road for fuel cell cars to get to where they are now, a possible option. It all started back in the 1980s when fuel-cells themselves had to be physically shrunk to fit into a normal car, not the back of a van. Then they had to make them affordable and the fuel able to be widely available. All of these obstacles have been overcome yet fuel cell cars still have not been mass adopted. That is because they were not found to be very efficient. To produce the gas, compress it, and transport it is costly. However, there is a special little fuel cell car called Rasa that is drastically more economical and its creator has come up with a more efficient hydrogen distribution system too. The car and the system around are both part of a grand plan by the company Riversimple, founded by Hugo Spowers, former motor racer and mechanical engineer of race cars. Photo by: Simon Thompson Hydrogen powered vehicles: the Rasa 15 years ago Spowers stopped working with internal combustion engines when he had the idea of building a hydrogen-powered vehicle. He was determined to find a fundamental solution to the problems associated with carbon emissions and so he hand-built an aerodynamic car which weighs only 580 kilos, 40 kilos more than the battery of a Tesla Model S car. ( Also interesting:  Tesla Model S Got Hesla By Adding A Hydrogen Installation ) The Rasa is novel and sophisticated in engineering terms. A fuel cell provides electrical energy when hydrogen is combined with oxygen. That electrical energy powers the motors while emitting only water. The Rasa has a motor in each of its four wheels which provide drive and braking. Ultra-capacitors are used to store recovered energy from braking. A carbon tub keeps weight down, while a honed design cuts drag. The Rasa's reach It can drive about 482 km (300 miles) on a tank of just 1.5kg of hydrogen. The best part is, the hydrogen is compressed to 350bar, not the 700bar the industry majors use. This uses less energy and makes for much cheaper filling stations, hence a more economical system. If that’s not good enough, the Rasa is so green that its well-to-wheel CO2 emissions (even if the hydrogen is synthesized from natural gas) are about 40g/km. That CO2 figure is a lot better than any electric car that uses the UK’s mix of electricity generation. ( Also interesting:  Climate Change Efforts On Reducing CO2 Why Not Recycle It? ) {youtube}                                         Hydrogen Powered Car That Emits Water No CoO2: The Rasa   Pollution & Resources Spowers gave up being a motor racer because he wants to save the world and started developing the Rasa. Everything in the Riversimple’s business plan aligns to that aim. Spowers has to change everything about the traditional system and an incremental change wouldn’t do. Each of the changes demands that other things be changed. The whole system must change, in one leap. 'You can’t cross a canyon in two jumps'. Photo by: Riversimple Rasa rentals So what does this mean? The company will never sell a Rasa. Riversimple’s drivers will pay a monthly rental fee, to include depreciation, maintenance and, crucially, fuel. Done this way, said Spowers, everything points to a car that pollutes less and depletes fewer resources. Photo by: Simon Tompson The next step is to build charging stations for users and therefore make the product more attractive to consumers. Hydrogen cars can work alongside battery-powered electric vehicles in the future – a sustainable, greener world to come – to reduce CO2 emissions worldwide. By: RiversimpleCredit: Riversimple All about Hydrogen Transport
Hydrogen Powered Car That Emits Water No CO2: The Rasa
Hydrogen Powered Car That Emits Water No CO2: The Rasa
Nuclear Floating Power Plants: A Floating Chernobyl: Russia
The only nuclear floating power plant in the world has gone up the sea for the first time. The Russian Akademik Lomonosov left St. Petersburg, where it was built. It is towed through the Baltic Sea, around the northern tip of Norway to Murmansk, where the reactors are filled with nuclear fuel. The Akademik Lomonosov was built in nine years and will be operational this year 2019 off the coast of Chukotka in the far east of Russia. There, the power plant must provide energy to remote factories, port cities and oil platforms. It will replace two nuclear reactors which, according to the Russian nuclear power company Rosatom, are technologically outdated. Russian nuclear floating power plant makes its maiden voyage Shocking The project is heavily criticized by environmentalists. Greenpeace calls it a floating Chernobyl. "Nuclear reactors that float in the Arctic Ocean are a shockingly obvious threat to a fragile environment that is already under enormous pressure from climate change," says Jan Haverkamp, ​​nuclear expert at the environmental club. Nuclear floating power plant is not safe at all The atomic lobby deliberately omits the enormous risks of nuclear power plants, says Els de Groen, writer, journalist and former MEP for the Greens / European Free Alliance. Now that coal, oil and gas consumption is warming up or shaking the earth, the call for nuclear energy is getting louder. Complete with the old mantra: major accidents, small opportunities. Hydropower, particulate matter and natural gas production are all much more dangerous than nuclear energy ... Chernobyl was the fault of the Russians and Fukushima was hit by a tsunami, and the numbers of victims are based on speculation. It is time to put an end to the demagoguery of nuclear lobbyists as emeritus professor Jan Goudriaan. The expertise they carry out does not sink in anything that they conceal. Never do they mention the waste problem and the long-term consequences. During uranium extraction, during reprocessing and decommissioning, large quantities of waste occur that remain highly radioactive for hundreds of years (cesium) to tens of thousands of years (plutonium) and even billions of years (uranium). On that scale we are one-day flies, although it is with a footprint that no dinosaur can match. ( Recommended:  Nuclear Power: Will It Destroy Or Save The World? ) Experts never tell us that the calculation of 'safe' doses is always based on an average person. The four to ten times greater radiation sensitivity of women, children and unborn babies is not taken into account. For the Netherlands this means that three-fifths of the population may be exposed to unacceptable radiation levels. The annual dose of 1 millisievert experiences a fetus as 10 millisievert or half the annual dose of a radiological worker! Moreover, the sensitivity of tissues and organs, expressed as a percentage, is cast into a system that does not allow any correction. If we discover tomorrow that our lungs are more sensitive than has always been assumed, then we must lower the sensitivity of another organ, because the sensitivity of all organs must remain 100%. However, this inadequate system is used to calculate the permissible burden on, for example, the bladder and then to decide whether or not to send workers an infected space or to evacuate members of the population or not. Last year, all Dutch people received a iodine tablet in a radius of 100 km. If saturated in time, the thyroid gland, causing the radioactive iodine-131 is no longer absorbed. What experts do not tell you is that there is more to it: strontium, for example, that accumulates in our bones, or plutonium that seeks out the red bone marrow. There are no pills against that. The sensitivity of the thyroid is only a fraction of the total sensitivity. Nuclear energy stations are in 30 years gone. In Doel, Tihange and Borssele there are power stations of forty years old. There are thousands of cracks in various reactor vessels, so-called hydrogen flakes. This leads to a dilemma: the fuel rods have to be cooled permanently, but the cracks force us to drastically increase the temperature of the emergency cooling water. Nevertheless, the power stations remain open. There is no budget for demolition, no premium was paid for accident insurance or the costs of evacuations. There is not one insurance company that dares to run the risks. If a nuclear power plant had four wheels, it would be taken directly from the road. ( Recommended:  Nuclear Waste Storage An Example For The World: Finland ) Why does not that happen? I would like to quote Einstein: "The unchained atomic force has changed everything, except our way of thinking ... The solution of that problem lies in the heart of the people. Had I known that, then I would have become a watchmaker. Not everything we discover is good, but apparently it takes courage to admit mistakes". By: Els de Groen. Cover photo Фото: greenpeace.org/russia All about Energy
The only nuclear floating power plant in the world has gone up the sea for the first time. The Russian Akademik Lomonosov left St. Petersburg, where it was built. It is towed through the Baltic Sea, around the northern tip of Norway to Murmansk, where the reactors are filled with nuclear fuel. The Akademik Lomonosov was built in nine years and will be operational this year 2019 off the coast of Chukotka in the far east of Russia. There, the power plant must provide energy to remote factories, port cities and oil platforms. It will replace two nuclear reactors which, according to the Russian nuclear power company Rosatom, are technologically outdated. Russian nuclear floating power plant makes its maiden voyage Shocking The project is heavily criticized by environmentalists. Greenpeace calls it a floating Chernobyl. "Nuclear reactors that float in the Arctic Ocean are a shockingly obvious threat to a fragile environment that is already under enormous pressure from climate change," says Jan Haverkamp, ​​nuclear expert at the environmental club. Nuclear floating power plant is not safe at all The atomic lobby deliberately omits the enormous risks of nuclear power plants, says Els de Groen, writer, journalist and former MEP for the Greens / European Free Alliance. Now that coal, oil and gas consumption is warming up or shaking the earth, the call for nuclear energy is getting louder. Complete with the old mantra: major accidents, small opportunities. Hydropower, particulate matter and natural gas production are all much more dangerous than nuclear energy ... Chernobyl was the fault of the Russians and Fukushima was hit by a tsunami, and the numbers of victims are based on speculation. It is time to put an end to the demagoguery of nuclear lobbyists as emeritus professor Jan Goudriaan. The expertise they carry out does not sink in anything that they conceal. Never do they mention the waste problem and the long-term consequences. During uranium extraction, during reprocessing and decommissioning, large quantities of waste occur that remain highly radioactive for hundreds of years (cesium) to tens of thousands of years (plutonium) and even billions of years (uranium). On that scale we are one-day flies, although it is with a footprint that no dinosaur can match. ( Recommended:  Nuclear Power: Will It Destroy Or Save The World? ) Experts never tell us that the calculation of 'safe' doses is always based on an average person. The four to ten times greater radiation sensitivity of women, children and unborn babies is not taken into account. For the Netherlands this means that three-fifths of the population may be exposed to unacceptable radiation levels. The annual dose of 1 millisievert experiences a fetus as 10 millisievert or half the annual dose of a radiological worker! Moreover, the sensitivity of tissues and organs, expressed as a percentage, is cast into a system that does not allow any correction. If we discover tomorrow that our lungs are more sensitive than has always been assumed, then we must lower the sensitivity of another organ, because the sensitivity of all organs must remain 100%. However, this inadequate system is used to calculate the permissible burden on, for example, the bladder and then to decide whether or not to send workers an infected space or to evacuate members of the population or not. Last year, all Dutch people received a iodine tablet in a radius of 100 km. If saturated in time, the thyroid gland, causing the radioactive iodine-131 is no longer absorbed. What experts do not tell you is that there is more to it: strontium, for example, that accumulates in our bones, or plutonium that seeks out the red bone marrow. There are no pills against that. The sensitivity of the thyroid is only a fraction of the total sensitivity. Nuclear energy stations are in 30 years gone. In Doel, Tihange and Borssele there are power stations of forty years old. There are thousands of cracks in various reactor vessels, so-called hydrogen flakes. This leads to a dilemma: the fuel rods have to be cooled permanently, but the cracks force us to drastically increase the temperature of the emergency cooling water. Nevertheless, the power stations remain open. There is no budget for demolition, no premium was paid for accident insurance or the costs of evacuations. There is not one insurance company that dares to run the risks. If a nuclear power plant had four wheels, it would be taken directly from the road. ( Recommended:  Nuclear Waste Storage An Example For The World: Finland ) Why does not that happen? I would like to quote Einstein: "The unchained atomic force has changed everything, except our way of thinking ... The solution of that problem lies in the heart of the people. Had I known that, then I would have become a watchmaker. Not everything we discover is good, but apparently it takes courage to admit mistakes". By: Els de Groen. Cover photo Фото: greenpeace.org/russia All about Energy
Nuclear Floating Power Plants: A Floating Chernobyl: Russia
Nuclear Floating Power Plants: A Floating Chernobyl: Russia
Delay Climate Change With Submarines Which Produce Icebergs
This ice-making submarine would pop out bergs to help fight climate change. A team of designers led by Faris Rajak Kotahatuhaha proposes re-freezing sea water in the Arctic to create miniature modular icebergs using a submarine-like vessel, in a bid to combat climate change. The Indonesian designer worked on the prototype with collaborators Denny Lesmana Budi and Fiera Alifa for an international competition organised by the Association of Siamese Architects. The team was awarded second prize in the contest for its geoengineering proposal to re-freeze the Arctic and transform sea water into new ice fields.  T he designers propose to delay climate change with submarines which produce icebergs Artic ecosystem need to be restored Kotahatuhaha's team set out to create a prototype for the 're-iceberg-isation' of parts of the Arctic by freezing seawater into hexagonal blocks of ice that nest together to form new ice floes. Delay Climate Change With Submarines Which Produce Icebergs The main goal of this idea is to restore the polar ecosystem, which has a direct effect on the balance of the global climate. The concept is a proactive response to issues related to the melting of the earth's polar ice. The designers felt that too much emphasis is currently being placed on protecting cities from rising sea-levels rather than tackling the problem at its source and delay climate change with submarines which produce icebergs.  The artificial icebergs wil increase the Albedo effect. ( Also interesting:  China Will Make It Rain In Tibet: Space Technology ) Albedo Effect Albedo is a measure of the reflectivity of a surface. The albedo effect when applied to the Earth is a measure of how much of the Sun's energy is reflected back into space. Overall, the Earth's albedo has a cooling effect. (The term ‘albedo’ is derived from the Latin for ‘whiteness’). The basic principle is analogous to strategies employed by people who live in hot places. Building are finished with white exteriors to keep them cool, because white surfaces reflect the sun’s energy. Black surfaces reflect much less. People wear light colours in summer rather than dark ones for the same reason. The Earth’s surface is a vast patchwork of colours, ranging from the dazzling white of ice and snow, to the dark surfaces of oceans and forests. Each surface has a specific effect on the Earth’s temperature. Snow and ice reflect a lot of the sun’s energy back into space. The darker oceans absorb energy, which warms the water. Oceans help keep the Earth warm because they absorb a lot of heat (approximately 90%). This warming increases water vapour, which acts as a greenhouse gas and helps to keep temperatures within ranges humans have largely taken for granted for millennia. ( Recommended for you:  Manmade Antarctic Snowstorm: Save Cities From Rising Seas ) Submarines Which Produce Icebergs {youtube}                                   Iceberg-making submarine aims to tackle global warming by re-freezing the Arctic The submarine-like vessel would submerge to collect sea water in a central hexagonal tank. Turbines would then be used to blast the tank with cold air and accelerate the freezing process. During this process, the vessel would return to the surface of the sea and the tank would be covered to protect it from sunlight. A system of reverse osmosis would be used to filter some of the salt from the water in order to speed up the process. Once the water is frozen, the vessel would submerge again, leaving behind an "ice baby" with a volume of 2,027 cubic-metres. These miniature icebergs would then cluster together in a honeycomb pattern to form a larger ice floe. All about climate change
This ice-making submarine would pop out bergs to help fight climate change. A team of designers led by Faris Rajak Kotahatuhaha proposes re-freezing sea water in the Arctic to create miniature modular icebergs using a submarine-like vessel, in a bid to combat climate change. The Indonesian designer worked on the prototype with collaborators Denny Lesmana Budi and Fiera Alifa for an international competition organised by the Association of Siamese Architects. The team was awarded second prize in the contest for its geoengineering proposal to re-freeze the Arctic and transform sea water into new ice fields.  T he designers propose to delay climate change with submarines which produce icebergs Artic ecosystem need to be restored Kotahatuhaha's team set out to create a prototype for the 're-iceberg-isation' of parts of the Arctic by freezing seawater into hexagonal blocks of ice that nest together to form new ice floes. Delay Climate Change With Submarines Which Produce Icebergs The main goal of this idea is to restore the polar ecosystem, which has a direct effect on the balance of the global climate. The concept is a proactive response to issues related to the melting of the earth's polar ice. The designers felt that too much emphasis is currently being placed on protecting cities from rising sea-levels rather than tackling the problem at its source and delay climate change with submarines which produce icebergs.  The artificial icebergs wil increase the Albedo effect. ( Also interesting:  China Will Make It Rain In Tibet: Space Technology ) Albedo Effect Albedo is a measure of the reflectivity of a surface. The albedo effect when applied to the Earth is a measure of how much of the Sun's energy is reflected back into space. Overall, the Earth's albedo has a cooling effect. (The term ‘albedo’ is derived from the Latin for ‘whiteness’). The basic principle is analogous to strategies employed by people who live in hot places. Building are finished with white exteriors to keep them cool, because white surfaces reflect the sun’s energy. Black surfaces reflect much less. People wear light colours in summer rather than dark ones for the same reason. The Earth’s surface is a vast patchwork of colours, ranging from the dazzling white of ice and snow, to the dark surfaces of oceans and forests. Each surface has a specific effect on the Earth’s temperature. Snow and ice reflect a lot of the sun’s energy back into space. The darker oceans absorb energy, which warms the water. Oceans help keep the Earth warm because they absorb a lot of heat (approximately 90%). This warming increases water vapour, which acts as a greenhouse gas and helps to keep temperatures within ranges humans have largely taken for granted for millennia. ( Recommended for you:  Manmade Antarctic Snowstorm: Save Cities From Rising Seas ) Submarines Which Produce Icebergs {youtube}                                   Iceberg-making submarine aims to tackle global warming by re-freezing the Arctic The submarine-like vessel would submerge to collect sea water in a central hexagonal tank. Turbines would then be used to blast the tank with cold air and accelerate the freezing process. During this process, the vessel would return to the surface of the sea and the tank would be covered to protect it from sunlight. A system of reverse osmosis would be used to filter some of the salt from the water in order to speed up the process. Once the water is frozen, the vessel would submerge again, leaving behind an "ice baby" with a volume of 2,027 cubic-metres. These miniature icebergs would then cluster together in a honeycomb pattern to form a larger ice floe. All about climate change
Delay Climate Change With Submarines Which Produce Icebergs
Farmers Using Flowers Instead Of Chemicals To Tackle Pests
Flowers are colorful. They smell nice and brighten up many homes and gardens. But flowers have another crucial advantage: they attract insects. Pesticides are causing major problems: they are polluting drinking water, for example, and killing bees. That is why more and more farmers are now using flowers instead of these chemicals to tackle pests on their land. To ensure more beneficial bugs visit their fields to feed on pests, some farmers are planting ‘flower strips’ in and around their crops. This kind of biological pest control seems to be an excellent way of contributing to the ecological intensification of agriculture. ( Recommended:  Vegetables, Fruit, Edible Flowers, But Also Bees In Cities Urban Farming ) Flowers instead of chemicals to tackle pests With mounting evidence about the problems caused by pesticides, many of the insect-killers have been taken off the market in the UK and Europe. However, others are still frequently used; and that frequent use makes them less effective, as pests become resistant to the chemicals. Fortunately, there is a biological way to combat pests on land. The so-called flower strips can encourage natural opponents of agricultural pests. As a result, the damage to agricultural crops is less, and there is hardly any need to use polluting plant protection products. The natural enemies of pests in arable crops will do the job. Experimenting with farmers using flowers, ‘a highway for bugs’ This kind of biological pest control is nothing new. Cultivating an environment where natural pest predators can live by growing flowers between other crops is already a common practice for promoting biodiversity. For example, farmers already know that aphids (a common pest for multiple crops) don't stand a chance if they must share their home with parasitic wasps. They will eat the lice in their larval state. But now, agriculturalists are experimenting with strips of flowers within their crops, creating a highway for bugs to travel farther and cover more ground for pest control. It may be a strange sight: strips of land that generally should have one color, but now have all kinds of vividly colored flowers in the middle. Due to a new study, fourteen sites will look like this. The study tests how well the wildflowers attract pest-eating bugs, and how well they can help replace commercial – and polluting - pesticides. ( Recommended :  Regenerative Agriculture: Its Full Potential (Part 3) ) Pesticides will be the last line of defense on farms The study includes borders of wildflowers around each field - something that some farmers have used over the past two decades in the area to promote general biodiversity, not specifically for pest control. Also, there are strips of flowers placed in the middle of fields. Small insects cannot travel far, but with these flower strips, they can enter the entire land. A similar study was done in Switzerland, where one of the results was that the leaf damage was reduced by 61%. The researchers estimated that choosing the right mix of flowers could increase yield 10%, making it economically self-sustaining or even profitable to keep planting flowers. The research shows that the use of aggressive pesticides can probably not be eliminated entirely, but that this natural method will make a big difference in the necessary quantity. If this biological approach is combined with other techniques, such as using technology to diagnose vermin, pesticide use could be dramatically reduced, and serve as a last line of defense on farms, rather than the first thing farmers reach for. {youtube}                                                       7 Simple Strategies to Prevent Garden Pests Biological method: farmers using flowers and herbs You can also apply this organic method of pest control at home. By strategically placing insect repellent plants in your house or garden, you can keep annoying pests at bay. Curious about which flowers, plants, and herbs you should purchase as a natural bug repellent? According to the American company Aerex Pest Control, these are the best ways to keep those fleas, mosquitoes, and flies out. Please note that these plants, herbs, and flowers will not exterminate complete pests. This way of biological pest control can be beneficial when combined with other forms of proactive pest control in and around your home. Basil: repels mosquitoes and flies (and tastes great) Aerex Pest Control says that basil is a ‘great solution for repelling mosquitoes and flies’. These annoying insects don’t like the smell of this herb. Basil grows best with lots of sun and water. You can buy basil in a container in almost every supermarket and plant it in your garden. Easy does it! An additional advantage: basil tastes excellent with some mozzarella and tomato. Citronella: keeps the mosquitos away Citronella is known for its mosquito repelling odor: it had essential oils in it that these insects hate. You can buy citronella candles or a spray, but you can also strategically place this plant with strongly lemon-scented leaves in your home or garden. “It does well in a pot, or in the ground in a sunny and well-drained location,” according to Aerex Pest Control. Lavender: great for pest control The sweet smell of lavender is great for a good night’s sleep, but also to help repel flies, fleas, and mosquitoes. Thereby, it is a fantastic plant for pest control. The beautiful purple flowers will not look out of place in a colorful garden. “This plant is easy to maintain since it can basically survive all weather conditions.” Marigolds: repels and provide pops of color Marigolds will repel mosquitoes and aphids since they dislike the scent of this beautiful plant. “Plant them in sunny areas of your garden. If you have a vegetable garden, you can plant these throughout your garden to provide pops of color. Chrysanthemum: the greatest insect repeller among flowers Chrysanthemum helps to repel a lot of pests, including spider mites, ticks, roaches, lice, and fleas aphids, according to Aerex. The special ingredient: pyrethrum. You can find this in numerous insect-repelling sprays, as well as pet shampoos. This beautiful flower will look great both indoors and outdoors. ( Recommended:  New Foodscape Alternatives Gets Attention In The Netherlands )
Flowers are colorful. They smell nice and brighten up many homes and gardens. But flowers have another crucial advantage: they attract insects. Pesticides are causing major problems: they are polluting drinking water, for example, and killing bees. That is why more and more farmers are now using flowers instead of these chemicals to tackle pests on their land. To ensure more beneficial bugs visit their fields to feed on pests, some farmers are planting ‘flower strips’ in and around their crops. This kind of biological pest control seems to be an excellent way of contributing to the ecological intensification of agriculture. ( Recommended:  Vegetables, Fruit, Edible Flowers, But Also Bees In Cities Urban Farming ) Flowers instead of chemicals to tackle pests With mounting evidence about the problems caused by pesticides, many of the insect-killers have been taken off the market in the UK and Europe. However, others are still frequently used; and that frequent use makes them less effective, as pests become resistant to the chemicals. Fortunately, there is a biological way to combat pests on land. The so-called flower strips can encourage natural opponents of agricultural pests. As a result, the damage to agricultural crops is less, and there is hardly any need to use polluting plant protection products. The natural enemies of pests in arable crops will do the job. Experimenting with farmers using flowers, ‘a highway for bugs’ This kind of biological pest control is nothing new. Cultivating an environment where natural pest predators can live by growing flowers between other crops is already a common practice for promoting biodiversity. For example, farmers already know that aphids (a common pest for multiple crops) don't stand a chance if they must share their home with parasitic wasps. They will eat the lice in their larval state. But now, agriculturalists are experimenting with strips of flowers within their crops, creating a highway for bugs to travel farther and cover more ground for pest control. It may be a strange sight: strips of land that generally should have one color, but now have all kinds of vividly colored flowers in the middle. Due to a new study, fourteen sites will look like this. The study tests how well the wildflowers attract pest-eating bugs, and how well they can help replace commercial – and polluting - pesticides. ( Recommended :  Regenerative Agriculture: Its Full Potential (Part 3) ) Pesticides will be the last line of defense on farms The study includes borders of wildflowers around each field - something that some farmers have used over the past two decades in the area to promote general biodiversity, not specifically for pest control. Also, there are strips of flowers placed in the middle of fields. Small insects cannot travel far, but with these flower strips, they can enter the entire land. A similar study was done in Switzerland, where one of the results was that the leaf damage was reduced by 61%. The researchers estimated that choosing the right mix of flowers could increase yield 10%, making it economically self-sustaining or even profitable to keep planting flowers. The research shows that the use of aggressive pesticides can probably not be eliminated entirely, but that this natural method will make a big difference in the necessary quantity. If this biological approach is combined with other techniques, such as using technology to diagnose vermin, pesticide use could be dramatically reduced, and serve as a last line of defense on farms, rather than the first thing farmers reach for. {youtube}                                                       7 Simple Strategies to Prevent Garden Pests Biological method: farmers using flowers and herbs You can also apply this organic method of pest control at home. By strategically placing insect repellent plants in your house or garden, you can keep annoying pests at bay. Curious about which flowers, plants, and herbs you should purchase as a natural bug repellent? According to the American company Aerex Pest Control, these are the best ways to keep those fleas, mosquitoes, and flies out. Please note that these plants, herbs, and flowers will not exterminate complete pests. This way of biological pest control can be beneficial when combined with other forms of proactive pest control in and around your home. Basil: repels mosquitoes and flies (and tastes great) Aerex Pest Control says that basil is a ‘great solution for repelling mosquitoes and flies’. These annoying insects don’t like the smell of this herb. Basil grows best with lots of sun and water. You can buy basil in a container in almost every supermarket and plant it in your garden. Easy does it! An additional advantage: basil tastes excellent with some mozzarella and tomato. Citronella: keeps the mosquitos away Citronella is known for its mosquito repelling odor: it had essential oils in it that these insects hate. You can buy citronella candles or a spray, but you can also strategically place this plant with strongly lemon-scented leaves in your home or garden. “It does well in a pot, or in the ground in a sunny and well-drained location,” according to Aerex Pest Control. Lavender: great for pest control The sweet smell of lavender is great for a good night’s sleep, but also to help repel flies, fleas, and mosquitoes. Thereby, it is a fantastic plant for pest control. The beautiful purple flowers will not look out of place in a colorful garden. “This plant is easy to maintain since it can basically survive all weather conditions.” Marigolds: repels and provide pops of color Marigolds will repel mosquitoes and aphids since they dislike the scent of this beautiful plant. “Plant them in sunny areas of your garden. If you have a vegetable garden, you can plant these throughout your garden to provide pops of color. Chrysanthemum: the greatest insect repeller among flowers Chrysanthemum helps to repel a lot of pests, including spider mites, ticks, roaches, lice, and fleas aphids, according to Aerex. The special ingredient: pyrethrum. You can find this in numerous insect-repelling sprays, as well as pet shampoos. This beautiful flower will look great both indoors and outdoors. ( Recommended:  New Foodscape Alternatives Gets Attention In The Netherlands )
Farmers Using Flowers Instead Of Chemicals To Tackle Pests
Farmers Using Flowers Instead Of Chemicals To Tackle Pests
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